Donald Herrera

Donald Herrera

Followers 58
Following 33
US
Two presentations at the Defcon security conference find that government apps consume an unhealthy amount of data.
UK
We look at the purpose, features and benefits of fleet management, and how software can help fleet managers overcome their key challenges.
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Social media platforms have enacted bans on disinformation related to COVID-19 and other issues, but researchers say that banning content after it's already gone viral can do more harm than good.   For example, the platforms recently banned a viral video of doctors urging COVID-19 treatment with hydroxychloroquine, which federal agencies have called ineffective and dangerous.  That ban prompted news coverage and charges by conspiracy theorists that the video contained truth being suppressed by authorities.  Social media platforms say they are addressing disinformation as quickly as they can.   Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Disinformation campaigns can rocket to virality by capitalizing on the very bans that social media companies have enacted to address them, researchers and analysts say.  A key case in point is the "America's Frontline Doctors" video posted on July 27 in which a white-coated group urged treatment of COVID-19 with hydroxychloroquine, which federal agencies have called ineffective and potentially dangerous. The video went viral after President Trump tweeted it, and the platforms removed it that day. But posts about it spiked July 28, the day after Twitter banned it, researchers say. Why? Viral posts about a video that was suddenly unavailable piqued interest even more, they say.  The social media companies' bans are "stopping viral disinformation at a very high rate of engagement — once they have already been established," says Annie Klomhaus, cofounder and chief operating officer of the Austin internet and social media research firm Yonder. By cutting off the content after it's already gained so much steam, the bans end up putting the disinformation in a media spotlight. In the case of the "Frontline Doctors" video and the controversial drug, its proponents can then claim the ban is part of a suppression campaign connected to the government, furthering their conspiracy theory.  In the case of the video, it spread through a formula that's proven incredibly effective for disseminating other messages (or disinformation), too. The groups pass around videos and other disinformation in private groups, which Facebook doesn't closely monitor. Once the content has momentum, users post it to Twitter and seek to engage large influential accounts that share the same ideology. At that point, it is difficult for social media companies to take any action that doesn't exacerbate the issue, in part because of intense coverage by traditional media, which will write up both the fact that disinformation has gone viral and its removal. "The companies are in a really hard place," Klomhaus says. "They're trying to do the right thing,  but addressing something that is already viral is a really hard problem."  Paul Barrett, deputy director of the NYU Stern Center for Business and Human Rights, who has authored recent widely-cited research on social media disinformation, agrees.  "By the time platforms even notice the existence of such a video, it's often gone viral, and millions of people have seen it, possibly being misled on important issues such as the effectiveness of supposed medical cures," he said. "What's more, the very act of taking down such content can feed into conspiracy theories that the material is being suppressed by malign interests." Twitter has said its moderators take action swiftly when disinformation is discovered. In the case of the "Frontline Doctors" video, a Twitter spokesperson says, "Tweets with the video were in violation of our COVID-19 misinformation policy. We are taking action in line with our policy." A Facebook spokesperson said, "It took us several hours to enforce against the video and we're doing a review to understand why this took longer than it should have." The company said it has removed more than 7 million pieces of content on Facebook and Instagram for violating its policy against sharing COVID-19 misinformation. Some familiar social media influencers helped to make the "Frontline Doctors" video go viral. The video picked up momentum in private Facebook groups, then made the jump to Twitter, where the right-wing youth group Turning Point USA amplified it. (That group has opposed masks and social distancing despite its cofounder's death from COVID-19.)  The far-right blog Breitbart News picked the story up, as did several programs on a favorite news source of the president, Fox News. The video reached millions when it was tweeted by President Trump and his son, Don Jr. This led to bans by Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. Those bans were widely covered by news agencies, and the disinformation campaign reached its peak of 120,000 social media posts about the drug the day after Twitter banned the video. In the week before, there were 18,000 posts about the drug, according to researchers at Yonder.  This may have been exactly what the groups promoting the video wanted. One of the main promoters of the video appears to confirm that view.  A doctor thrust into the spotlight by the video, Stella Immanuel, posted on Twitter that her religious ministry – which says some health issues are caused by people having sex dreams about "demons" – benefited from the TV coverage brought about by the social media ban.  "CNN, MSNBC etc are doing free commercials on our deliverance ministry," she said in a tweet on July 28, the day after Twitter banned the video.  Woah CNN, MSNBC etc are doing free commercials on our deliverance ministry. Fire Power is main stream. Thank you CNN and let me know when y'all need some of them demons cast out of you. I will gladly oblige. You will feel a lot better. Keep up the good work. #cnn #MSNBC — Stella Immanuel MD (@stella_immanuel) July 29, 2020 Immanuel did not respond to several requests for comment. The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment. When asked about his sharing of the video last week, President Trump said, "[Immanuel] said that she's had tremendous success with hundreds of different patients, and I thought her voice was an important voice, but I know nothing about her." The group is backed by Tea Party Patriots, a conservative group that has supported protests against lockdown measures.  The New York Times reported that the group posted the video to its YouTube channel on July 27 before it went viral.  Klomhaus of Yonder notes that a similar hydroxychloroquine disinformation campaign followed this path in April, and more disinformation campaigns are likely to exploit this process, especially as the pursuit of a coronavirus cure continues, along with the upcoming election. "As a vaccine comes closer to coming out, this narrative will probably continue," Klomhaus said. "If it follows the previous pattern of recurring in a few months, that would put this kind of viral politicalization of the virus squarely right in front of the election."  For example, there are many many conspiracy theories about Microsoft founder Bill Gates and COVID-19 that have no basis in fact that are spreading in similar ways on social media, Klomhaus says.  Barrett of NYU says social media platforms must address the holes in their techniques for addressing disinformation, because there's no way the problem is going away in the leadup to November's election.  "Unfortunately, the platforms have no choice but to improve their technical and human content moderation methods and press ahead with removing content that is dangerous to users," he said. "The platforms cannot just throw up their hands and say the problem has no solution."SEE ALSO: Facebook banned disinformation networks that downplayed the severity of COVID-19 Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What makes 'Parasite' so shocking is the twist that happens in a 10-minute sequence
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WhatsApp has been testing features to let you perform reverse search images and text of the message to control misinformation. Now, the company is rolling out the function to let you search a message on the web to check if a frequently forwarded message has correct information or not. Now, you’ll see a magnifying glass next to frequently forwarded messages. You can tap on that icon to launch a search on the web to see if it’s some kind of myth that’s doing the rounds. Notably, WhatsApp considers messages that have been forwarded more than five times in a chain… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: WhatsApp
UK
Get the latest on coronavirus. Sign up to the Daily Brief for news, explainers, how-tos, opinion and more.Pubs in England could have to be closed in order for schools to reopen next month, a scientist advising the government has warned.Professor Graham Medley, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), said a “trade off” might need to be made to ensure full-time education could resume.Concerns have turned to a rise in infections among young people after the number of Covid-19 cases increased. Speaking on BBC Radio 4′s Today programme on Saturday, he said it was “quite possible” pubs could have to shut for schools to reopen.“I think we’re in a situation whereby most people think that opening schools is a priority for the health and wellbeing of children and that when we do that we are going to reconnect lots of households.“And so actually, closing some of the other networks, some of the other activities may well be required to enable us to open schools.“It might come down to a question of which do you trade off against each other and then that’s a matter of prioritising, do we think pubs are more important than schools?”He added the increase in Covid-19 cases was mainly among young people,  but warned there was a danger it could “spill” over into other sections of the population.“The age distribution of infections has changed, it has moved down into younger age groups and so it is likely we won’t see that increase in hospital admissions related to infection in the same way we did in March,” he told the BBC.“But the big fear is the virus just gets out of control and we end up in a situation where there is so much virus that it inevitably spills out into all sections of the population.”Prof Medley’s comments came as Boris Johnson scrapped some of his plans to further ease lockdown restrictions in England from August 1 “in order to keep the virus under control”.Speaking at a press conference in Downing Street on Friday, the prime minister said lifting these restrictions would be delayed until August 15 at the earliest.It followed a warning by Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer,  that the country had “probably reached the limits of what we can do in terms of opening up as a society”.The growth rate and R value of coronavirus transmission in the UK have changed slightly in the last week, according to figures published by the government.Data released on Friday revealed the growth rate is now between minus 4% to minus 1%, compared with a rate of minus 5% to minus 1% per day, last week.The R value for the UK is between 0.8 to 0.9, a slight change from 0.7 to 0.9.Johnson has previously promised both primary and secondary schools will return in September “with full attendance”.Labour’s shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth said it should be a “national priority to get our children back into school”. Related... Torbay Was Already Struggling. Covid-19 Could Devastate It How Boris Johnson's Confusing New Slogan Capped Off 15 Hours Of Lockdown Chaos Boris Johnson Scraps Plan To Ease Some Lockdown Measures From August 1
UK
Apple’s next flagship phone has been confirmed to be delayed, but when will it actually land?
UK
Artificial intelligence may be the most powerful tool humans have. When applied properly to a problem suited for it, AI allows humans to do amazing things. We can diagnose cancer at a glance or give a voice to those who cannot speak by simply applying the right algorithm in the correct way. But AI isn’t a panacea or cure-all. In fact, when improperly applied, it’s a dangerous snake oil that should be avoided at all costs. To that end, I present six types of AI that I believe ethical developers should avoid. First though, a brief explanation. I’m not passing… This story continues at The Next Web
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Claroty has discovered multiple vulnerabilities in industrial VPNs that could lead to remote code execution if left unpatched.
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Germany-based Electric Brands has unveiled the eBussy, an electric modular bus that can come in 10 different body forms. The eBussy comes in two chassis: "standard" and "offroad". Its modularity allows the vehicle to be used with different bodies, such as a camper, dump truck, bus, or various types of pickup trucks. The eBussy starts at around $18,632 and will be available on the market in 2021. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Electric Brands has unveiled the eBussy, an electric vehicle that can come in various forms — including a bus, camper van, and pickup truck — by using modular attachments. According to the Germany-based company's website, the eBussy's design is centered around the "Lego principle" by using a series of chassis attachments to create a multi-use vehicle. Unlike other makers in, or newcomers to, the electric vehicle market, Electric Brands isn't a veteran automaker or a new car-focused startup. According to the company's website, the idea for the Lego-like vehicle came in late 2018 after the team decided to expand from its original product line of electric scooters, of which it currently has two. Now, the company is set to unveil the eBussy in 2021. The eBussy starts with one of two chassis options: the "standard" and the "offroad". From there, customers can select one of 10 body styles that best fits their needs, whether it be a camper van, dump truck, pickup truck, or bus. The all-wheel-drive eBussy is then powered by two battery compartments. Each vehicle comes with eight removable lithium ion battery packs, providing 10 kilowatt-hours of power. However, the pack can be upgraded to 24 batteries that then provides 30 kilowatt-hours for those who want an extended range.SEE ALSO: A 2020 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter was turned into a $210,000 off-road camper van that can sleep 4 — see inside 'Pearl' The vehicle's solar panels and electric motors with an energy recuperation system gives the eBussy a range of up to 124 miles daily with the pack of eight batteries. The eBussy's range — without a charge but with full batteries and solar panel use — can then be extended to over 373 miles daily with the 24-battery pack … … although the company says the eBussy can achieve a maximum range of 497 miles. Source: Electric Brands However, the range estimate decreases if the vehicle has a heavy load. The eBussy platform can reach up to 56 mph. It also has around 738 foot-pounds of torque ... ... and is about 12 feet long, 5.4 feet wide, and between 6.2 to 6.7 feet tall. There are 10 different variants that the eBussy can transform into, both on the standard and offroad chassis. This includes the "bus", which has the rear cabin and trunk modules, giving it a price of $23,080 with the standard chassis, or $25,436 with the offroad chassis. There's also a dump truck variant with a middle module that can tip back, a platform, and side flaps, all for $26,260 on the standard chassis, or $28,616 as an off-roader. The eBussy can also transform into transporter builds and several pickup truck variations, including one with a convertible roof. However, the build option that differs the most from the other nine modules is the camper, eBussy's entrance into the ever-popular camper van segment. The camper comes with a refrigerator, television, seating area that can convert into a bed, freshwater tank, and sink, similar to many campers currently available in the market. This camper variant is listed at $33,946 on both the standard and offroad chassis options. Depending on the module being used, the vehicle has a loading volume of up to 187-cubic feet. eBussy also has an empty weight between 992 to 1,323 pounds but can support over double of its weight with a load up to 2,204.6 pounds. One of its most unique features is the steering wheel, which can shift locations across the dashboard from left to right by using its drive by wire system, according to a YouTube video posted by Electric Brands about the eBussy. Source: YouTube    The interior seating comes in two styles: stand-alone or bench seating. And according to Electric Brands, the exterior mirrors are digital. Source: Electric Brands The company is also planning to create battery-switching stations that allow eBussy owners to repower the vehicle's battery packs, although the eBussy can also be charged at home.
US
The OpenJDK Community effort to move the source code of standard Java from Mercurial repos to Git repos on GitHub is proceeding, with early-September set as the target date.Current plans have Oracle’s Java Platform Group transitioning the jdk/jdk repo hosted on GitHub, which is currently a read-only mirror, to become the read-write master for Java Development Kit (JDK) 16 sources by that time. This transition would take place a few weeks before the planned general availability of JDK 15 on September 15. [ Also on InfoWorld: JDK 15: The new features in Java 15 ] As per standard Java’s six-month release cycle, JDK 16 is due in March 2021. The repo migration plan has been done through Project Skara, which has involved investigating alternative source code management and code review options for OpenJDK source code, and migrating to GitHub.To read this article in full, please click here
China
Apart from Galaxy Note 20 series, the next much-awaited smartphone from Samsung is the Galaxy Z Fold 2. The device will see its official unveiling ... The post Galaxy Z Fold 2 hands-on image surfaces online, confirms branding and punch-hole selfie camera appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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(American Institute of Biological Sciences) The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscienceaibs.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
UK
Nothing to say, Larry? Makes a change SAP took a gut-punch in the form of an 18 per cent dive in software licensing revenue to €0.77bn for its Q2 ended June 30, but it also chalked up a 20 per cent jump in contractually committed cloud revenue to €6.65bn.…
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Elon Musk's Twitter account was hacked alongside dozens of celebrity accounts earlier in July. The Tesla CEO told The New York Times he became aware of the hack within minutes because friends texted him. He directly rang Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to alert him. "Probably within less than five minutes my account was locked," Musk said. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. When Elon Musk's Twitter account was hacked as part of a coordinated attack on dozens of high-profile accounts on July 15, the Tesla billionaire hotlined it straight to Twitter's CEO. The attack was highly visible as accounts belonging to dozens of celebrities and public figures including Elon Musk, Barack Obama, Joe Biden, and Kim Kardashian started tweeting links to a bitcoin scam, promising followers that if they sent money to a bitcoin wallet the celebrity in question would send back double the amount. In an interview with The New York Times published Saturday, Elon Musk — himself a prolific Twitter user with roughly 37 million followers — described how he learned about the hack and said immediately rang Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey. Musk said he rang Dorsey as soon as his account tweeted out the bitcoin scam. "Within a few minutes of the post coming up, I immediately got texts from a bunch of people I know, then I immediately called Jack [Dorsey] so probably within less than five minutes my account was locked," he said. Musk also told The Times he was unwell when the hack occurred. "I think I had food poisoning or something, so you throw up incredibly violently with food poisoning. So I was kind of ill during a lot of it, the Twitter takeover. But I think it's good anyway to take a few breaks from Twitter and not be on there 24 hours a day. Twitter can mess with your mind," he said. Since the hack occurred Twitter has determined the hackers were able to view the private direct messages of 36 out of the total 130 accounts which were affected during the breach. When asked by the Times whether he was worried whether the hackers could have seen his private Twitter messages, Musk seemed unperturbed. "I'm not that concerned about my DMs being made public. I mean, we can probably cherry-pick some section of my DMs that sound bad out of context but overall my DMs mostly consist of swapping memes," said Musk.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
US
The Earth’s magnetic field, generated 3,000km below our feet in the liquid iron core, is crucially important to life on our planet. It extends out into space, wrapping us in an electromagnetic blanket that shields the atmosphere and satellites from solar radiation. Yet the magnetic field is constantly changing in both its strength and direction and has undergone some dramatic shifts in the past. This includes enigmatic reversals of the magnetic poles, with the south pole becoming the north pole and vice versa. A long-standing question has been how fast the field can change. Our new study, published in Nature… This story continues at The Next Web
US
The Russia report on Moscow's attempts to interfere in the UK has been published. It reveals that Russia has used the UK as a 'laundromat' to launder its money and influence. Successive governments have allowed the UK to become the destination of choice for Russian money. It also examines attempts to interfere in British democracy. It says there is insufficient evidence to prove that Russia intefered in the 2016 Brexit referendum. However, that's because the UK government has not sought to find out, the committee said. The report was intended for publication prior to last year's general election, but was delayed by Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A long-awaited report into Russian interference in the UK has revealed how Russia has integrated itself into British social, business and political elites, while taking advantage of UK government policy to launder Russian money and influence. Using evidence submitted by spies and intelligence experts, the report by UK parliamentarians on the Intelligence & Security Committee (ISC), found that British government policy had "offered ideal mechanisms by which illicit finance could be recycled through what has been referred to as the London 'laundromat'." It added that "the UK welcomed Russian money, and few questions – if any – were asked about the provenance of this considerable wealth." Senior Russian figures have used their money to fund British political parties and businesses, with the UK "viewed as a particularly favourable destination for Russian oligarchs and their money." Russian influence across the top levels of British society has now become "the new normal," the authors suggest, adding that "there are a lot of Russians with very close links to Putin who are well integrated into the UK business and social scene, and accepted because of their wealth." The report added that "this level of integration – in 'Londongrad' in particular – means that any measures now beingtaken by the Government are not preventative but rather constitute damage limitation." The report says there is insufficient evidence that to prove that Russia interfered in the 2016 Brexit referendum. However, the report says this is because the UK government did not seek to find out, criticising "extreme caution" among UK security officials to look into potential inteference. ISC member Stewart Hosie on Tuesday morning said there had been "no assessment of Russian interference in the EU referendum and that goes back to nobody wanting to touch this issue with a ten-foot pole." He said the ISC found it "astonishing" that the UK government didn't seek to "protect the referendum" by looking into potential Russian interference. "The report reveals that no one in government knew if Russia interfered in or sought to influence the [Brexit] referendum because they did not want to know"Stewart Hosie MP says government "actively avoided looking for evidence that Russia interfered"https://t.co/XqUf6IhKR0 pic.twitter.com/Y6nNw64bG3 — BBC News (UK) (@BBCNews) July 21, 2020 The report calls for a full, retrospective assessment into potential Russian interference in the referendum, point out that the US carried out an intelligence assessment within two months of the 2016 presidential election. The report by the ISC was published on Tuesday after being completed almost 18 months ago. Prime Ministr Boris Johnson refused to publish it prior to the UK's general election in December amid reports of "embarrassing" information it contained about UK-based Russian oligarchs who fund the Conservatives. No donors are named in the report, which has been extensively redacted prior to publication. Downing Street has been under growing pressure to form the new ISC so that the report could be released. Members of Parliament last month said in a letter to Johnson that the delay in releasing the report was an "affront to democracy," and pointed out that never before had it taken a UK government so long to form the committee. Parts of the report published today are redacted and it does not identify individuals with ties to the Kremlin who have links to the Conservative party. Data published last month showed continued financial support for the Conservative party from the wife of a former minister in Putin's Russian government. Lubov Chernukhin, who is married to ex-Russian finance minister Vladimir Chernukhin, donated £325,000 to Johnson's party in the first quarter of 2020, according to the data, which made her the biggest ever female political donor in the UK. In 2014, she paid £160,000 for a game of tennis with Johnson and then-prime minister David Cameron, as well as a further £30,000 for dinner with the UK government's current education secretary, Gavin Williamson. In May last year, Chernukhin dined with ex-prime minister Theresa May and numerous female members of the Cabinet at the time, after donating £135,000 to a Conservative Party fundraising event. More follows...Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
UK
Inform people in case they go Chinese and ignore self-sufficiency drive India’s Department of Consumer Affairs has detailed new rules for e-commerce operators, including a requirement to reveal a product’s place of origin.…
US
Many so-called “quantitative funds” that mine historical data to make trading decisions fared poorly in March, when stocks fell sharply amid coronavirus fears.
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Break out your Buster Sword for our deep dive of the quintessential RPG video game franchise from the 90s.
US
On this episode of the I'm So Obsessed podcast, Lanigan talks about the Disney Archives prop warehouse, owning a Jack Skellington puppet and working with action star Dolph Lundgren.
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The Jeep Wrangler Rubicon comes equipped for challenging off-road adventures right off the assembly line.
UK
Australia's top telco is the first to guarantee wall-to-wall Wi-Fi coverage in your home.
UK
Spotify is rolling out a revamped podcast discovery experience. Starting today, users will be able to browse popular shows in two new charts — Top and Trending. The Top chart will feature the 200 most popular podcasts in a region, and will also let users discover new content by category — like tech, true crime, or health. For the time being, browsing by category will be available only in “certain markets,” including Brazil, Australia, Germany, Mexico, Sweden, the UK, and the US. It’s also worth noting the Top chart will be localized to your region. The Trending chart, on the other… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Spotify
US
Grant Imahara, the engineer behind multiple Hollywood projects, has died at the age of 49 according to The Hollywood Reporter. Imahara hosted the popular science show "Mythbusters" that aired on Discovery Channel. He also cohosted Netflix's "White Rabbit Project," a science show that lasted one season. The engineer spent nine years at Lucasfilm, working on animatronics in the production company's THX and Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) sectors. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Grant Imahara, the former host of Discovery Channel's "Mythbusters," has died at the age of 49, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Per the outlet's report, Imahara died after experiencing a brain aneurysm. Imahara hosted the popular science show "Mythbusters" until 2014. The network told THR in a statement: "We are heartbroken to hear this sad news about Grant. He was an important part of our Discovery family and a really wonderful man. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family." His cohosts Kari Byron and Adam Savage posted on Twitter in reaction to his death. I’m at a loss. No words. I’ve been part of two big families with Grant Imahara over the last 22 years. Grant was a truly brilliant engineer, artist and performer, but also just such a generous, easygoing, and gentle PERSON. Working with Grant was so much fun. I’ll miss my friend. — Adam Savage (@donttrythis) July 14, 2020 Imahara worked with Byron and fellow former "Mythbusters" cohost Tory Belleci for almost a decade, according to People. He teamed up with the pair again to cohost Netflix's "White Rabbit Project," a science series that lasted for one season. Heartbroken and in shock tonight. We were just talking on the phone. This isn’t real. pic.twitter.com/8zE2afcwSu — Kari Byron (@KariByron) July 14, 2020   Imahara was an electrical engineer and roboticist and spent nine years at Lucasfilm, the production company founded by George Lucas and acquired by Disney in 2012, according to THR. He specifically worked in the Industrial Light and Magic and THX sectors, working on the filmmaker's "Star Wars" prequels and other films like "The Matrix Reloaded."SEE ALSO: Adam Savage shares his all-time favorite 'MythBusters' result Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What it's like inside North Korea's controversial restaurant chain
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Want to keep your guilty pleasure viewing habits a secret? Here's what to do.
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Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt has run an ultra-secretive summit in Montana for a handful of executives, politicians, and celebrities since at least 2012, Tech Transparency Project reported Monday. The event has been hosted every summer at the Yellowstone Club and has included guests such as Lady Gaga, Sen. Cory Booker, and journalist Ronan Farrow, according to TTP. While private retreats aren't uncommon, the under-the-radar nature of the Yellowstone event raises questions about whether it has been used to quietly curry favor for Google or Schmidt's own projects. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Every summer since at least 2012, former Google CEO Eric Schmidt has invited a handful of executives, politicians, celebrities, and at least one journalist to a secretive summit in rural Montana, the Tech Transparency Project reported Monday. The event is hosted at the Yellowstone Club — a swanky, private club where members, like Schmidt, pay north of $40,000 per year in membership dues — and has included high-profile guests such as Lady Gaga, Senator Cory Booker, and journalist Ronan Farrow, according to TTP. An analysis of flight records, media accounts, and social media posts by TTP showed that Google's private jets have flown attendees including Google staff to the event, where they engaged in recreational activities as well as discussions on a variety of topics around technology. It isn't uncommon for the ultra-wealthy to host similar "ideas summits" — investment bank Allen & Co. holds a famous one in Sun Valley, Idaho, and Sen. Mitt Romney hosts one in Park City, Utah. However, TTP reported that Schmidt's event has kept an extremely low profile, with attendees being told not to disclose details. That secrecy and the likely attendee list raise questions about what influence the event and conversations held there might have had over their relationships with Schmidt or Google — especially for those in positions of power. TTP reported that recent invitees included Austria's chancellor, who was pushing for a new tax on tech companies and eventually abandoned it; Ronan Farrow, who wrote a story following his attendance event that TTP viewed as being too soft on Google; and the founder of a think tank that had been critical of Google's approach to combating extremist content. Since stepping down as Google CEO in 2011, Schmidt has played an active role in trying to grow the tech industry's influence with government. ProPublica reported last year that he has gained unprecedented access within the Pentagon despite whistleblower concerns that he could use it to steer business toward Google (in which he still owns a substantial amount of stock). Earlier this year, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo tapped Schmidt as a tech advisor for the state's post-pandemic reopening. Schmidt, Lady Gaga, Booker, and Farrow did not immediately respond to requests for comment on this story.SEE ALSO: Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi says ride-hailing will make up only 50% of the company's business moving forward as food delivery growth surges Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
UK
With the next season of The Mandalorian still a few months away, it’s nice to hear a bit of that score to remind us of the show we’ve all come to know and love.
US
Apple sold a lot of corporate notebooks as enterprises kitted out newly remote workers with new Macs during the second quarter, new data shows. Indeed, notebook sales across the board raised all the boats in the PC industry as the coronavirus pandemic pushed workers out of the office and into their homes.Notebooks 'singlehandedly' save the PC market “Notebooks have singlehandedly pulled the PC market out of depression,” said Rushabh Doshi, research director at Canalys, in a statement. “They have been crucial in ensuring that the service, government and education sectors can continue to function in the face of unprecedented disruption and uncertainty.”To read this article in full, please click here
Sweden
Den amerikanska konkurrensutredningen gentemot Google utökas till att också omfatta dess sökmotor och Android-verksamhet, detta enligt källor till CNBC.Tidigare har utredningen, som drivs av 50 delstatsåklagare, bara omfattat företagets annonsverksamhet.Utredningen leds av Texas delstatsåklagare Ken Paxton.Utvecklingen har drivits på politiskt plan av både republikaner och demokrater, däribland president Donald Trump och senator Elizabeth Warren, som vill att Silicon Valleys it-jättar ska styckas upp i mindre bolag, skriver CNBC på sin hemsida.Läs mer: Techjättar under lupp – amerikanska myndigheter förbereder granskningMen det är inte bara de amerikanska myndigheterna som granskar techjättarna.
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