Donny Stiteler

Donny Stiteler

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You can also expect easier one-handed use and time-sensitive live wallpaper.
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Shooting a magnificient video is a breeze these days, because the quality of smartphone cameras is just through the roof. But the real challenge comes ... The post Do you want a free easy-to-use 1-click video editor ? appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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New service offers daily classes on mindfulness, meditation and movement for no monthly fee, breaking down barriers to wellness.
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"Certain media reports claiming that the affected device count has increased from 7,000 to 62,000 since October 2019 are inaccurate" The post Taiwan’s QNAP Denies Storage Equipment Infections Are Rising appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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If you're thinking a 2020 mid-ranger will be better than a 2019 flagship, you might want to watch this.
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The new network could deliver higher speeds, better range, and lower lag.
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Business teams around the world have shifted to remote work. A recent webinar by the adult-education school General Assembly explains why listening is a critical skill for identifying the needs and wants of remote employees. The presentation, which we've reproduced in full below, outlines how managers can develop and maintain company culture. Click here for more BI Prime content. People around the world are practicing social distancing to help slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, which means that many employees are working fully remotely for the first time. Remote work has mixed effects on companies' internal cultures. Colleagues in different divisions have a chance to forge unlikely relationships and managers are recognizing the importance of candid communication. But some leaders struggle to keep their teams engaged during meetings and some employees have been struggling with feelings of isolation. But there are ways to make the transition to distributed work a little easier. In a recent webinar (you can watch the recording here) by the adult-education school General Assembly, lead global data science instructor Matt Brems told viewers that listening is a critical skill for maintaining company culture among remote employees. "Understand what it is that they need and how you can best satisfy those needs and work with them," Brems told nearly 5,000 viewers. "Even though we're remote," he added, "we can still develop that personal connection."  General Assembly trains individuals and employees at companies including Google and Deloitte on skills like software engineering and data science. The company is headquartered in New York City, but has campuses in Singapore, Paris, and all over the world. Below you'll find a version of the presentation deck, which we've shared with General Assembly's permission.SEE ALSO: 3 steps every manager should take right now to help employees feel less lonely and isolated when working from home
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Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes top the grid at Silverstone this Sunday/ Follow our guide to get an F1 live stream and watch the British Grand Prix 2020 online.
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For years, potential competitors kept an eye on Tesla as it absorbed all the risk of creating a viable market for electric vehicles. While the electric-vehicle market hovers in the single digits, the conventional wisdom was that Tesla would exhaust itself proving that consumers actually wanted to go electric. But with the EV market now poised to rapidly grow, Tesla finds itself with the most powerful brand, nurtured for more than a decade by charismatic, controversial CEO Elon Musk. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. In the car business, it's often said that brands are grand, but products pay the bills. In other words, you can capture or retain customers with what your company stands for, but long-term, if you don't have great vehicles, you're going to have a problem. For almost its entire history, more than 15 years, Tesla has inverted that wisdom. A few years ago, the carmaker was barely selling any vehicles relative to its global competitors. Last year, Tesla delivered only about 250,000 vehicles, while General Motors sold almost 8 million. Investors have decided that this means Tesla should be worth $300 billion in market capitalization, more valuable than GM, Ford, and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles combined — and topping Volkswagen and Toyota, the two biggest automakers on Earth. Vehicle sales obviously don't add up to $300 billion in value; Tesla's quarterly revenue remains far below a Detroit Big Three car company. It's a bet on the future, and a prediction that Tesla should be able to expand its near-monopoly of the EV market as that market grows from a currently tiny basis, merely 1-2% of worldwide sales. Investor optimism is that Tesla will maintain a dominant share, increase it scale, and notch enviable profit margins, perhaps more than 10% (high-volume luxury carmakers operate at that level, while mass-market companies run in the single-digit range).  But for now, the Tesla brand is mighty. Here's how that happened:FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! The Tesla brand predates its first vehicle. But it was the original Roadster that announced Tesla's objectives to the world in the mid-2000s. The Roadster combined high-performance with a save-the-planet mission. The previously best-known electric car was the innovative EV1, introduced in the 1990s, but infamously killed by General Motors. The original Tesla Roadster, with its sub-4-second 0-to-60 mph time, proved that an electric car could be more than a glorified golf cart. The mission was clear, but it needed a compelling megaphone in the person of CEO Elon Musk. After selling PayPal to eBay in 2002, Musk sunk hundreds of millions of dollars into Tesla and other futuristic ventures. Musk cultivated the image of a maverick nerd who lived by his own rules. His brand-building wasn't limited to Tesla. With SpaceX, he sought to make humanity "multi-planetary," to "back up the biosphere" by ushering in a new age of private spaceflight, with an ultimate goal of colonizing Mars. He was like a science-fiction film character, at times a hero, at times something of a villain — or at least a controversial antihero. He mingled with celebrities. At times, he did more than mingle. After three marriages (twice to Talulah Riley), he partnered with musician Grimes (real name: Claire Elise Boucher). The two later welcomed a son to the world. A big part of the Tesla brand was Musk's seemingly reflexive, problem-solving entrepreneurship, cultivated in Silicon Valley. After he got stuck in LA traffic en route to SpaceX HQ, he founded the Boring Company to dig tunnels under the freeways. He also served as chairman of his cousin Lyndon Rives' startup, SolarCity. Tesla acquired the company in 2016. Musk's master plan was to power electric vehicles, among other things, by using what he called the giant fusion reactor in the sky — the Sun. Tesla's brand was built using almost zero money spent on advertising. Instead, Musk presided over spectacular product unveilings, such as the New Roadster in 2017. Musk also put himself out there as the leading high-tech business leader with ideas about how to decarbonize the planet and head off a global-warming disaster. In 2015, he gave a speech at the Sorbonne calling for a carbon tax. Musk also moved quickly when Donald Trump was elected president in 2016. The CEO wanted to press the carbon-tax case with the chief executive. Musk also kept Tesla in the news for less virtuous reasons. A failed effort take the company private in 2018 landed him in trouble with the Securities and Exchange Commission. He wound up losing his chairman title and had to pay a multimillion-dollar fine. Musk also routinely taunted prominent Wall Street short sellers, at one point in 2020 creating Tesla-branded short shorts. In fact, the entire Tesla-Wall Street story contributed to the brand. By 2020, after a monumental rally, Tesla had become the most valuable automaker in the world, worth $300 billion. Early investors were sitting on a 6,350% return. Musk also knew how to sense when trends were shifting. As the electric-vehicle market expanded, some tech firms moved into self-driving cars. Musk then amplified Tesla's efforts, taking personal responsibility for the carmaker's Autopilot semi-autonomous tech. Tesla's tech was as a big a part of the brand as anything else. The robots at its California factory became mechanical characters, with names from the "X-Men" movies. They even costarred with Musk in revealing new vehicles, such as the dual-motor Model S in 2014. If it seemed like Musk was channeling Tony Stark from the "Iron Man" movies — well, it was actually the other way around. Robert Downey Jr.'s character was based on Musk. Musk is a genius at crossbranding. When SpaceX launched its Falcon Heavy rocket in 2018, Musk's personal Tesla Roadster was onboard, as the payload. It was the most stunning car commercial in human history. But it wasn't all a big show under a big tent. Tesla was selling cars, from the Model S sedan ... ... to the Model X SUV. The Model 3 was a mass-market sedan ... ... And it had a crossover SUV stablemate, the Model Y. There was also the Tesla Semi ... ... The updated new Roadster ... ... And the completely out-there Cybertruck. Beyond vehicles, Tesla applied its battery expertise to both home and utility grade storage. After the merger with SolarCity, Tesla introduced its Solar Roof product. The panels were the roof tiles, rather than sitting on top of the roof. Even Tesla's factories became part of the branding story. The first plant in California, later joined by a Gigafactory in Nevada. A factory in Shanghai went online in 2020, and two new plants were announced for Berlin and Austin, Texas. It wasn't as if Tesla stood alone in the electric-car market. Competitors included the versatile, affordable Chevy Bolt EV (starting at $37,000) ... ... And the exotic, anything-but-affordable Porsche Taycan (started at $104,000). But even though the EV market globally accounts for just around 1% of total vehicle sales, by 2020 Tesla had achieved a near monopoly level of share: roughly 80%. The power of brand-delighted Musk. He never wanted to go it alone, and the arrival of numerous new EVs from major automakers simply meant that Tesla's mission of accelerating the shift away from fossil fuels was for real. An electric VW bus — I.D. Buzz — was but a single example. General Motors and CEO Mary Barra committed to an electric destiny, with a plan to launch 22 new EVs by 2023 and creating an entire battery technology, called "Ultium." GM also revived the Hummer nameplate — as a GMC-badged all-electric pickup with a claimed 1,000 horsepower and 0-60 mph time of 3 seconds. And Ford created the Mustang Mach-E, the first new Mustang-branded car since the mid-1960s. Even Musk rival Henrik Fisker got back in the game, founding a new company, Fisker Inc., that promised four new EVs by 2025. But nobody has the brand power that Musk has created for Tesla. It's apparent now that the competition is playing catch-up. But that might be impossible. Experian recently said that of Tesla owners it surveyed, more than 80% would own again. It isn't going to be easy to take on Tesla.
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As the coronavirus crisis leads Google to slow its overall hiring, it's still continuing to "aggressively" bring on workers for its cloud unit.  There are a handful of valuable skills that help Google Cloud employees thrive, said Google Cloud's VP of Human Resources, Brigette McInnis-Day.  Empathy, self-reflection, and a willingness to collaborate are all important. Visit Business Insider Premium for more stories. As the coronavirus crisis forces companies to tighten budgets and cut staff, the cloud industry appears to be thriving, including within Google.  While the company saw its first-ever revenue decline in the second quarter as advertisers pulled back because of the pandemic, its Cloud unit was an earnings bright spot.  In fact, executives said that the cloud unit was still "hiring aggressively," despite a company-wide hiring slow-down for the remainder of the year. "What we're doing in Cloud is being very deliberate about which targeted areas we need growth," Brigette McInnis-Day, Google Cloud's vice president of human resources, told Business Insider in late June, adding that the unit is focused on its technology divisions, customer success, and emerging markets teams.  In the nine months since McInnis-Day joined Google Cloud to help grow its team, she's found that there are a set of valuable interpersonal skills that help employees thrive.  Now that Google's hiring process — which includes multiple interviews, often over several days — takes place entirely online, it can actually help those more subtle skills stand out. Talking with potential hires when both parties are at home "provides more confidence and comfort in themselves versus coming into a new environment," McInnis-Day said.  "I think it's beneficial both for the candidate and for the interviewer because you see them in a more of a personal environment," she said, "So you get to see more of what the candidate shares with you." McInnis-Day walked us through what Google is looking for in new hires, so if you want to impress a Google Cloud recruiter, here are the traits you should try to emphasize: Empathy  As the Google Cloud Platform continues to grow, the team actively recruits engineers that it believes can build products based on what customers need, according to McInnis-Day .  "We're in a unique time," she said. "From a technical perspective, it's really asking questions to understand the business issues, to make sure we know what we're solving for." Listening to feedback and following through is a big part of retaining customers and building trust, McInnis-Day said, and the technology team is just as active in Google's relationship-building process as the sales and customer service teams are. The ability to translate customer feedback into concrete product decisions requires empathy.  "It's very important that the solution is mirroring what's needed," she said.  Self-reflection Self-reflection and empathy go hand-in-hand, McInnis-Day said. As the coronavirus pandemic forced workers across the country to stay at home — and with more companies considering permanent remote work— Google Cloud engineers were pushed to think about how it would impact the long-term goals for their products. In some cases, that meant redefining what was important.  "They're very self reflective and they know what they need or want." McInnis-Day said of employees. "They know what questions to ask."  Honest, open reflection is key to building strong, intuitive products at any tech company, she said. Software engineers should always think beyond standard benchmarks and not be too proud to ask questions. McInnis-Day often asks herself, "Are they going to challenge the status quo?" "We're also finding high-humility in the people — the candidates — we're seeing," McInnis-Day said. "They can tolerate ambiguity and also can take risks." Willingness to collaborate Collaboration is encouraged across tech companies and fostered through the open work environments, plentiful places for employees to relax, and mini kitchens littered throughout campuses at Google, Facebook and Microsoft. The need for effective, enthusiastic collaboration has only increased since local stay-at-home orders went into place, McInnis-Day said. Employees leverage in-house tools to work with their teams and bounce ideas off each other.  "I think the piece that's been so amazing to me coming in to work at Google is their collaborative tools," McInnis-Day said.  Online collaboration has been a big part of Google Cloud's growth in the last few months during the pandemic, she said: "And then we look for that in the candidates as well."SEE ALSO:  Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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These cars are only three years old, but only one is a crossover.
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Installing Linux apps on Chromebooks is a bit more complicated than installing Android ones. Here's how to do it.
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Physical workspaces are like rotary phones: Outdated and largely unnecessary
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Looking for some high-tech tools that can help you up your gardening game? These six might come in handy.
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Car and bike insurance will initially launch to Amazon customers in India.
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Will the Galaxy Fold 2 get a Z in its name? Could it be waterproof and get rid of the first model's biggest screen eyesore? Rumors say yes.
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The August smart lock is exactly what busy modern families need to manage their front door and home security.
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It'll apparently cost around $250 and come out Aug. 1.
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With people having more time indoors on their hands, many have resorted to dusting off their gaming collection or even expanding it with new purchases. Recent events have been a boon to the gaming industry but they have also put some companies and individuals under a microscope. It is against that backdrop that Ubisoft is announcing its latest flagship title’s … Continue reading
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Popular time-bending shooter game Superhot is getting a new sequel that will be free for game owners. Called Superhot: Mind Control Delete, the developers are promising longer gameplay with more insight into the unique world, as well as additional storylines. The same basic mechanics remain, however — players will be tasked with shooting opponents in a world where time only … Continue reading
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If you are an Apple lover, you will be glad to know that a new iPhone will be released soon. Every few years Apple introduces a new iPhone incarnation - each one being better than the last - with all the new exciting updates, features and technology ready for you to explore.
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Following the lead of Marriott, Hilton and the InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG), Hyatt has officially joined its corporate peers in kicking single-use plastic toiletries to the curb.The hospitality brand announced Tuesday morning that it would be transitioning from “small bottles of shower gel, shampoo, conditioner and lotion,” to “large-format” containers in the brand’s 896 hotels and 219,308 rooms by June of 2021.“At Hyatt, our purpose … guides all business decisions, including our global sustainability framework, which focuses on using resources responsibly and helping address today’s most pressing environmental issues,” said Hyatt’s CEO and president Mark Hoplamazian in a statement.“Plastic pollution is a global issue, and we hope our efforts will motivate guests, customers and, indeed, ourselves to think more critically about our use of plastic.”IHG is also expecting to evict the toiletries by 2021.Hilton is expecting to make the transition to “full-size” amenity dispensers by 2022, but has already completed the transition in more than half of the brand’s 954,000 rooms.
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Scientists have detected gravitational waves from ten black hole mergers so far.They are trying to explain the origins of those mergers with the largest detected so far, having defied previous models.The scientists say that the largest of the detected mergers have a higher spin and mass that thought possible.Scientist Rochard O’Shaughnessy has created simulations that could explain how the mergers happened.The new research into the mergers suggests that the merger happens just outside the supermassive black holes at the center of active galactic nuclei.The gas, stars, dust, and black holes become caught in a region surrounding the supermassive black holes known as the accretion disk.
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Email scans try to spot brain damage before it kills youMachine-learning algorithms might be able to work out if your brain is turning to mush from end-stage liver disease just by reading your emails, according to preliminary experiments.ESLD, also known as chronic liver failure, slowly progresses over months and years.It’s often caused by cirrhosis, where scar tissue in damaged livers overtakes healthy cells until the organ can no longer function effectively.Patients find it hard to concentrate, have memory issues, and are slower to react and respond to their environment.A paper published this month in npj Digital Medicine describes their experiment, where they compared the emails of 81 patients diagnosed with ESLD, who have undergone liver transplants, against messages sent by another control group of 81 ELSD sufferers, who have yet to get new livers.
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Twitter has banned political ads, Facebook hasn't — who's in the right?Allowing political ads to be posted with no fact checking was "wrong," he said speaking at a press conference at Web Summit in Lisbon on Wednesday.He suggested a system similar to the one that allows the removal of content for copyright purposes.If a complaint was lodged and upheld by an independent regulatory agency that said an ad was blatantly false, the platform would legally be required to remove it."I think you could have an agency under certain guidelines that requires removal of ads there are blatantly false or that are suppressing the vote, and have that adjudicated in a way that is still consistent with the First Amendment," he said.There's been a growing sense among politicians and even tech executives over the past few years that the US needs to more closely regulate its technology industry.
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The ACCC's latest ‘measuring broadband’ report – which is conducted every few months by the Australian consumer protection agency – has discovered an increasing difference in the download speeds provided by competing retail service providers (RSPs).The report features a number of rigorous comparisons, but probably the most pertinent of them measures the average download speed provided by an RSP as a percentage of the maximum speed that a plan can reach.This measurement is taken during busy hours (defined as between 7pm-11pm) as well as at the ‘busiest hour’, and is often advertised by RSPs as the ‘typical evening speed’.For example, TPG was found to reach (on average) 86.3% of its maximum plan speeds, which would equate to 86.3Mbps for an NBN100 plan.While TPG has taken out top position for the last three reports, this time around it’s been overtaken by a significantly improved Optus, which has risen 2.1% to offer 87.6% of its advertised download speeds during the busy hours.Telstra and Exetel have both increased as well, with a respective climb of 9.7% and 2.0%, reaching 83.8% and 84.8% respectively.
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Xiaomi has gone back to its roots as a purveyor of shameless Apple ripoffs, and hot off the photocopier is the Xiaomi Mi Watch, a new wearable that is decidedly Cupertino-inspired.The Mi Watch is an Apple Watch clone, but the design is pretty much the only thing that's cloned here.You won't get a good SoC, a good operating system, good battery life, good haptics, or a good app ecosystem.From a distance, though, some people might mistake the Mi Watch for an Apple Watch, and maybe that's enough.The Mi Watch is a Wear OS device powered by Qualcomm's Snapdragon Wear 3100, a combination that makes any wearable device pretty much dead on arrival.Qualcomm has been neglecting the smartwatch market since basically its inception and has never produced a serious competitor to the chips Samsung and Apple regularly put out.
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Primates’ retinal ganglion cells receive visual info from photoreceptors that they then transmit from the eye to the brain.But not all cells are created equal — an estimated 80% operate at low frequency and recognize fine details, while about 20% respond to swift changes.This biological dichotomy inspired scientists at Facebook AI Research to pursue what they call SlowFast.An implementation in Facebook’s PyTorch framework — PySlowFast — is available on GitHub, along with trained models.As the research team points out in a preprint paper, slow motions occur statistically more often than fast motions, and the recognition of semantics like colors, textures, and lighting can be refreshed slowly without compromising accuracy.On the other hand, it’s beneficial to analyze performed motions — like clapping, waving, shaking, walking, or jumping — at a high temporal resolution (i.e., using a greater number of frames), because they evolve faster than their subject identities.
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Rumors of a wrap-around iPhone screen have been floating around for years, but a newly updated patent shows Apple is still very much interested in the technology – even if it isn't going to be ready in time for the iPhone 12.As reported by Patently Apple, Apple has registered a continuation patent on the wrap-around display filing that we've seen before.Essentially, it's appending some new information on an existing patent, or tweaking the details that have already been logged.So while this patent isn't completely new, the fact that it's been updated shows that Apple is still seriously considering this technology.Whether it actually makes it into a finished product remains to be seen.Nintendo wants more 3DS games on the Switch
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