Eddie Cox

Eddie Cox

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Hyundai is bringing its new fuel-cell powered SUV to CES 2018, the first test model for its Level 4 autonomous car plans.The EV – the official name of which will be confirmed in Las Vegas next week – will form the basis for a partnership between Hyundai and driverless tech firm Aurora, which together aim to have an autonomous vehicle on the market by 2021.The hydrogen powered car will be a test-bed for numerous new technologies the automaker has in the pipeline.In addition to the fuel-cell drivetrain – which will emit only water as a waste product, rather than carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases – it will preview the so-called Intelligent Personal Cockpit.That’s Hyundai’s vision of how artificial intelligence (AI), voice recognition, and an ability to track the driver’s vital signs could make for a more rewarding car.Of all the tech, though, it’s probably the attempt to oust the driver from their spot behind the steering wheel that’s most intriguing.
Experts believe partnership is the way forward for the public sectors development.Over three quarters of company directors worry about the public sector’s ability to take advantage of developing technology, according to a new survey.The Institute of Directors (IoD), supported by Atos, carried out a survey across almost 1,000 business leaders looking at the productivity of the public sector.Findings revealed that 77% of respondents do not think the public sector is effectively equipped to take as much advantage of changes due to advances in technology such as automation, in the next year in comparison to private sector companies.Compared to digital services across the private sector, 61% of respondents believe the public sector provide a worse service with 60% worrying the public sector does not make use of expertise from the private sector as just over half of respondents (51%) believe a new model is needed for organisations.Stephen Martin, Director General of the Institute of Directors: “While there has been some improvement in recent years, business leaders still feel the public sector is lagging well behind when compared against the innovation we’ve seen from companies.
Well, let me speak for myself.So it’s no wonder why on this week’s episode of CTRL+T, I was drawn to some news items that touched on home assistants and personal assistants for when you’re out in the wild.Amazon’s Echo Dot was the top-selling product on all of Amazon this holiday season and startup Fin recently launched its human/AI personal assistant.Henry Pickavet, TC editorial director and CTRL+T co-host, and I also explored the HQ Trivia craze.This past week, HQ Trivia launched its Android app in Canada and opened up pre-registration for U.S.-based Android users.HQ plans to launch its Android app in the U.S. on January 1.
Almost every R user knows about popular packages like dplyr and ggplot2.One of the best way to find cool, new-to-you R code is to see what other useRs have discovered.Create character vectors without quotation marks.Note the lack of a space in Internet Explorer -- spaces will trip up the Cs function.You can run it from that Addins menu, but selecting text and then leaving your coding window to go to the Tools > Addins menu to select Bare Combine doesn't necessarily feel less cumbersome than typing a few quotation marks.Finally, you can copy a string like Firefox, Chrome, Edge, Safari, Internet Explorer, Opera into your clipboard and then run the datapasta package's vector_paste() function.
Now, it’s a serious engineering proposition.Companies in Belgium and the UK are testing crawlers and rovers to suck up potato-sized nodules on the seabed.And companies backed by Chinese, Japanese, and Korean governments are investigating the idea of drilling into the sides of underwater volcanoes or breaking off chunks of inactive hydrothermal vents—both places where minerals are deposited over time.And a group of scientists are trying to get ahead of the problem, working with the would-be miners to build dredging technology that will minimize environmental destruction.The effects of seabed mining are a lot like trawling by fishing boats, Koschinsky says.“We will not know for sure the complete effects on the deep sea ecosystem, should we decide to do deep sea mining,” Koschinsky says.
A retired U.S. Navy pilot revealed the time in 2004 when he encountered a strange object he claimed was “not from this world.”David Fravor, a Navy pilot for 18 years before retiring, said he has come across strange things during his tenure but recalled one encounter on Nov. 14, 2004, that left him puzzled, ABC News reported.It was — after 18 years of flying, I've seen pretty much about everything that I can see in that realm, and this was nothing close."Fravor said he was on a routine training mission off the coast of California when he witnessed a 40-foot “wingless object” that he described as a Tic Tac, flying at incredibly high speeds in strange patterns.The pilot said controllers on a Navy ship reported “objects dropping out of the sky from 80,000 feet and going straight back up.”"So we're thinking, OK, this is going to be interesting," Fravor said.
Uber has nabbed a notable new partner in its quest to target the lucrative Indonesian market: BBM Messenger.BlackBerry’s once globally popular messaging service, BBM has pretty much died out in most markets around the world.However, it is still a major force in Indonesia, which is why Uber is now looking to make its ride-hailing service easier to access for millions of people across the country by allowing them to hail a car without leaving the BBM app.Just as BlackBerry has been inking licensing deals to keep its hardware brand alive through Android and third-party manufacturers, the company has also made similar moves with its BBM messaging software.Last June, BlackBerry announced a partnership with PT Elang Mahkota Teknologi Tbk, a subsidiary of one of Indonesia’s largest media groups, Emtek.In essence, BlackBerry decided to license BBM out to Emtek, which would take charge of maintaining and developing the BBM service.
After months of speculation and protests, the FCC has officially passed the Restoring Internet Freedom declaratory ruling on December 14, repealing the 2015 net neutrality regulations.The reaction was immediate, with industry bigwigs and influencers alike taking to the internet to express their views.Nothing may have changed yet, but regardless of which side you took in the battle, it’s likely the repeal is going to force big change in the U.S.-based section of the internet, for good or for ill.But it’s not over yet.Moments after the motion was passed by the FCC, a handful of individual states have risen to challenge the decision, led by noteworthy supporters of the net neutrality bill.These challenge range from legal challenges by state attorneys general, to lawmakers in California and Washington pledging to propose net neutrality-style laws for their own states.
Italy's inland revenue service announced on Friday it has reached an agreement with Amazon to settle outstanding tax claims spanning 2011 to 2015, Reuters reports.Amazon, the world's largest retailer, will pay a total of 100 million euros ($118 million) to resolve the dispute.In April, the Milan tax police stated it believed Amazon had evaded up to 130 million euros in Italian taxes.Amazon did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
People queuing to buy Snapchat Spectacles.Rob Price/BISnap's British arm reported £26 million in revenue and £1.3 million in profit in the 15 months to December 2016, according to its first full-year financial filings in the UK.The filing shows that the firm had 29 employees in the UK at the time, paid a collective £6.9 million, or an average of around £238,000 each.Snapchat makes most of its money from advertising, but the filing's wording suggests its revenue figure for the UK last year doesn't reflect how many ads it sold.Instead, the 2016 revenue figure appears to be booked through other, unspecified Snap subsidiaries.Snap's UK revenue reflects the British entity charging its costs back, plus a markup.
An enormous, 3-mile-wide "potentially hazardous asteroid" is hurtling toward Earth and is slated to zoom past the planet tomorrow, but scientists say there is no need to worry.Known as 3200 Phaethon, the space rock orbits the Sun and is expected to come the closest it has come to Earth since 1974, 6.4-million miles away, according to a statement from NASA.There is no chance the asteroid will hit Earth and won't come this close again until 2093.NASA JUST SHOWED OFF HOW IT WOULD HELP SAVE THE PLANET FROM 'POSSIBLE LIFE-THREATENING ASTEROIDS'3200 Phaethon is thought to cause the annual Geminid meteor shower, which this year reached its peak this past Thursday.Astronomers almost unanimously agree that no asteroid, particularly those of the near-Earth variety, will hit our planet in our lifetime.
Taiwanese digital media startup The News Lens launched only four years ago, but it quickly became one of the country’s most prolific news sources by leveraging social media to reach younger viewers.Today it took another big step by announcing a strategic partnership with Dawin, one of Taiwan’s top video and film production companies, that will help it reach a wider audience.Based in Taipei, with an office in Hong Kong, The News Lens now claims 7 million monthly unique visitors and publishes four online editions: Chinese-language sites for Taiwan, Hong Kong and Southeast Asia and an English-language site aimed at international readers.Its partnership with Dawin gives The News Lens access to resources like video and audio recording studios and personnel to create weekly programs and other content.As part of the agreement, The News Lens will create videos for distribution on TV channels and OTT platforms (deals haven’t been announced yet, but one obvious candidate is iQiyi, which is sometimes called “China’s Netflix” by Western media), as well as its own sites.Co-founder and chief executive Joey Chung tells TechCrunch that The News Lens is one of the first digital media startups in the region in to partner with a major video production company, which not only gives it the ability to create original programming with high production values, but also land distribution deals that will significantly boost its viewership.
But indie studio Out There Entertainment has found humor in one of the many indignities you’ve been forced to endure: Going through airport security.After graduation, they were accepted into the inaugural SCAD+ program, an incubator to help alumni develop all manner of games.“What we’ve had to do is—initially the majority of the lighting was dynamic, meaning that it was casting shadows in real time and doing light bounces in real time, depending on the [non-playable characters] walking into the scene,” said O’Bryan.I went to SCAD and graduated last spring with a BFA in sequential art and a minor in concept art for games.After that, we were already in contact with [Scott Brown, the current creative director of the SCAD+ program], and he was interested in having us be on the trial run for SCAD+.It had all the groundwork to be a game, but there was no real goal.
You know that a trend is the new black when even mid-range phones from the East start sporting it.That definitely seems to be the case with Huawei sub-brand Honor, whose latest smartphones, including the Honor V10 and the most recent Honor 7X.Spotted at TENAA is a new LLD-AL00 model that is believed to be the Honor 9 Lite due for unveiling next week.But that won’t be it’s only defining feature.One is that it gives more space for content, at least on the vertical.Sideways, together with Android’s split screen functionality, it has room for two square windows side by side.
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