Eddie Waldo

Eddie Waldo

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Following 36
UK
Both mid-range handsets are on the way, but which one is the best one?
US
(Tohoku University) The electron is an elementary particle, a building block on which other systems evolve. With specific properties such as spin, or angular momentum, that can be manipulated to carry information, electrons are primed to advance modern information technology. An international collaboration of researchers has now developed a way to extend and stabilize the lifetime of the electron's spin to more effectively carry information.
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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos gave his first-ever Congressional testimony on Wednesday, alongside CEOs of Facebook, Apple, and Alphabet. Bezos dodged most of the sensitive questions, instead saying that he'd get back with a more detailed answer at a later date. The careful approach is understandable given Bezos is speaking under oath, according to legal experts. But some experts believe he could have been more direct in addressing the key issues, like allegations of accessing seller data. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Americans got a rare chance to take the measure of the world's richest person on Wednesday, when Jeff Bezos, the press-shy CEO of Amazon, testified before Congress for the first time. But far from making an indelible impression, Bezos stood out mainly for what he didn't do, sidestepping sensitive questions about Amazon's market power and business practices, and behaving with the calculated caution of someone hoping not to be noticed in a crowd. During the House Antitrust Subcommittee hearing that also featured the top execs of Facebook, Apple, and Google, Bezos mostly stuck to party-line comments, rarely giving definitive answers, and instead offering to get back with more details at a later date. By one count, tracked by the Markup news site, Bezos had the most "I'll-get-back-to-you-on-that" comments of the four CEOs at the hearing.  At one point, Bezos struggled to answer a basic question about requiring seller names and addresses when opening an account on its marketplace, saying he'd get back because he'd "rather give the accurate answer." Amazon does verify seller name, address, and phone numbers, a company spokesperson later told Business Insider. The cautious demeanor underscores the heavy scrutiny Bezos, the world's richest person, is facing as lawmakers debate whether Amazon, along with other tech giants including Apple, Alphabet, and Facebook, need to be broken up in an effort to foster fair competition. While it may make Bezos look evasive, and almost detached from the company, it's the right approach when you're testifying under oath, according to Bill Kovacic, former chairman of the Federal Trade Commission who now teaches antitrust law at George Washington University. "He was trying to be very careful — it's a natural consequence of being sworn in," Kovacic told Business Insider. "Rule number one is never guess or speculate." 'Can't guarantee it's never been violated' Bezos, one of the most feared competitors in the business world, has earned a reputation as someone with the courage to fight for their beliefs — as was the case in 2019, when he publicly declared that he would not cooperate with a tabloid that had obtained sensitive selfies and text messages about his extra-marital relationship.  But the Bezos that appeared before lawmakers on Wednesday showed no signs of spoiling for a fight. When Florida Republican Matt Gaetz attacked Amazon for working with the Southern Poverty Law Center — a renowned, 50-year old nonprofit that monitors extremist and hate groups — because in Gaetz's word the group is hostile to "Christian doctrine" and "out of step," Bezos demurred.  "I'm going to acknowledge this is an imperfect system," Bezos said, of Amazon's program allowing consumers to donate to charities that include the SPLC. And when it came to important questions about the company, some legal experts said Bezos should have been a lot more forthcoming. That includes his response to a question about Amazon looking into individual seller data to clone best-selling products. The question follows a Wall Street Journal report alleging that Amazon employees accessed proprietary data about third-party merchant on its platform in order to come up with its own competing product that eventually stole market share from the original seller.  Bezos said it's against company policy to access proprietary seller data, and the company has additional safeguards to prevent it from happening. But he said he couldn't guarantee that policy "has never been violated," adding that the company is still investigating the case. "I do not want to go beyond what I know right now," Bezos said. John Kirkwood, a law professor at Seattle University, told Business Insider that it was "disappointing" to see Bezos dodge the question because it was the issue of greatest importance during the hearing. Given tbat the story came out in late April, Amazon had plenty of time to come up with a better answer, he said.  Instead, Bezos could have used it as an opportunity to tackle the antitrust issue more directly, explaining why it's pro-competitive to use publicly available information to copy or improve others' products. He could have also explained in more detail about Amazon's policy of prohibiting the use of confidential data about individual sellers, he said. "You'd think on such a key issue they could move faster," Kirkwood said. 'Amazon Heroin' Part of the reason why Bezos failed to appear more engaged may have had to do with the format of the hearing. Due to COVID-19, the testimony took place virtually, with each of the CEOs speaking through online video conferencing software. Because each speaker was given a five minute limit to ask questions, some of the conversations seemed rushed and disorganized, according to Juozas Kaziukenas, CEO of Marketplace Pulse. He said it would have been more effective if the committee had questioned each CEO on separate days, as the questioning seemed to lack depth. "It didn't seem to present any new angles or uncovered evidence," he said. On less sensitive issues, Bezos didn't appear to hold back.  Rep. David Cicilline, who chaired Wednesday's hearing, shared a story about a seller who compared Amazon to heroin for its addictive nature — because it's so big, it's the only place to sell online and merchants keep coming back, even if Amazon may engage in abusive tactics, like copying their products or undercutting them. Bezos disagreed with the characterization, saying Amazon only opened up its marketplace to third-party sellers to help both the sellers and customers on its marketplace. Although it was a "very controversial" idea internally when Amazon first accepted third-party sellers, the company was eventually convinced by the many benefits, he said. Bezos also disputed the idea of Amazon being the only viable online marketplace for sellers. When asked about its growing market size, including Amazon's roughly 40% share in US e-commerce, Bezos said he doesn't think e-commerce should be considered a separate category from the broader retail market (under that premise, Amazon owns just 4% of total retail).  "I think we're the best one," Bezos said. "But we're not the only option [for small sellers]." On one occasion, Bezos appeared to take a jab at Facebook. When each of the CEOs were asked to share their thoughts on social media, Bezos said he viewed it as a "nuance-destruction machine," without further elaborating. Amazon's biggest critics, however, took Wednesday's hearing as an opportunity to pounce on Bezos. Athena Coalition, a nonprofit organization that previously organized worker walkouts for Amazon employees, said Bezos largely gave "non-answers" during the hearing, often appearing to lack "the will or competence to change Amazon through his own leadership." "During today's hearing, Jeff Bezos seemed to be unaware of the widespread harms that Amazon inflicts, including the company's mistreatment of sellers, raising the question: has Amazon grown too big to be managed?" Dania Rajendra, a director at Athena, said in a statement.SEE ALSO: Amazon wants to put a waist-high robot in your home. The secretive project's facing high staff turnover, doubts over a $1,000 price tag, and visits from Jeff Bezos. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why YETI coolers are so expensive
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"We continue to partner closely with TSMC to ensure that we can satisfy our customer demand" The post AMD Hikes Full Year Guidance – Admits 7nm Capacity is Tight appeared first on Computer Business Review.
UK
Shops and public transport providers could face legal action if people who are exempt from wearing face masks due to their disability are turned away, legal experts have warned. Face masks in shops were made compulsory on Friday, with face coverings on public transport becoming mandatory in mid-June.Multiple health experts have suggested wearing face masks and coverings is key to preventing a second wave in the UK. But while the science indicates that masks could help protect others from contracting the virus, campaigners have warned that the obstructive nature of face coverings could cause serious problems for disabled people. With this in mind thousands of people with disabilities that prevent them from wearing a mask were made exempt, but there are fears that the new rules could lead discrimination against in public places – with incidents of disabled people facing confrontation already being reported. Now legal experts have warned that shops, supermarkets and public transport providers could face legal action if staff turn away disabled people who are exempt from wearing masks. Imogen Jolley from solicitors Simpson Millar said: “The legislation clearly states that some people are exempt from the new rules which require members of the public to wear a face covering when in a shop, confined public space, or on public transport.“However, while it’s relatively easy to see if a child is of a certain age, some disabilities are less apparent and there are worrying reports to suggest that some people are being singled out as a result. That amounts to discrimination.“It’s absolutely essential that supermarket chiefs and shop managers act now to educate their employees over the rights of disabled people specifically with the terms of the new rules in mind to prevent individuals being refused entry, turned away or asked to leave.“If not, they would be in breach of the Regulations introduced in relation to the wearing of face coverings and potentially their Equality Act Duties.”While the introduction of compulsory face masks has been welcomed by many in order to prevent the spread of Covid-19, disability charities have warned that face coverings could cause serious issues – both practical and social – for some. James Taylor, executive director of strategy, impact and social change at disability equality charity Scope, said: “It’s good that action is being taken to prevent the spread of Coronavirus, but making face coverings compulsory could create new difficulties for many disabled people.“In recent weeks, we’ve heard from disabled people who’ve been challenged over not wearing a face covering while using public transport, causing much distress and anxiety.“The government must make it really clear to everyone that disabled people who cannot safely wear face coverings are exempt.”There are also fears that masks, the vast majority of which are opaque and completely obscure the mouth, will make transactions in shops impossible for people who are reliant on lip-reading. Taylor added: “Face coverings also make communicating difficult or impossible for people who rely on lip-reading, so businesses and services need to recognise this, and have other ways of communicating in place so they are not excluding anyone.“Disabled people and their needs have been routinely forgotten throughout this crisis. If disabled people’s needs are ignored, society risks turning the clock back on equality.”Related... Families Of These Covid Victims Want You To Know Who They Were Is Boris Johnson Tiptoeing Towards An Apology Over Coronavirus Deaths? As Gyms Reopen, 7 Worries That May Be On Your Mind
China
How an insurtech company tripled its revenue and how Covid-19 has affected Asia’s startup scene
US
The US Army, Navy, and Air Force all field their own esports teams. | Image: U.S. Army Esports / Facebook The US Army has paused streaming video games on Twitch as an outreach and recruitment tool after facing criticism for banning viewers who asked its streamers about US war crimes. The pause was first reported by esports consultant Rod “Slasher” Breslau who said the Army team was stopping streaming, social activity, and participation in the upcoming Twitch Rivals competition. Breslau said there was “no official time frame for a return” and that Twitch had not cancelled its official partnerships with US Army and Navy esports teams. “The team has paused streaming to review internal policies and procedures” A spokesperson for the US Army confirmed the news to GameSpot: “The team has paused streaming to review internal policies and procedures,... Continue reading…
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The 3.9L naturally aspirated V12 will go from idle to redline in 0.3 seconds.
UK
Rumors are circulating that after pulling the plug on its EOS 7D DSLRs, Canon is doing the same with the EOS 5D range as well.
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The Apple iPad Mini is $50 off right now at Best Buy, giving you a great discount on an equally great tablet
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Network-connected gear stuck in boot loop needs replacing Analysis  Since the middle of last month, thousands of Samsung customers found their older internet-connected Blu-ray players had stopped working.…
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Photo by Kena Krutsinger/NBAE via Getty Images Fortnite’s newest in-game emote is a collaborative one. Epic Games this evening announced the launch of “The Renegade,” the viral TikTok dance created by Atlanta teenager Jalaiah Harmon. The Twitter account for Fortnite openly cites Harmon, writing, “Go, go, go, go, let’s go and bust out some [fire] moves by @jalaiah.” It’s not clear whether Epic and Harmon struck some type of licensing deal, but it’s a possibility considering the developer’s rocky legal history with dance emotes. Throughout Fortnite’s meteoric rise starting in the fall of 2017, the game has featured a number of real-world dances copied from pop culture. Sometimes the emotes were inspired by dances on old television shows, like the default dance inspired by Scrubs actor... Continue reading…
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Weatherproof home security cameras take on the elements without complaint. Here are our favorites.
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Photo by Chris Welch / The Verge Samsung has announced that its latest Galaxy Book S is now available to purchase. It’s the first device to offer Intel’s new “Core processors with Intel Hybrid Technology.” Previous Galaxy Book S models have run on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon platform. The new Intel processors (referred to as “Lakefield”) are designed to power ultralight devices; we’re also expecting to see them in the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Fold and the dual-screen Surface Neo. They’re essentially Intel’s answer to ARM. The way these things work is that Intel combines one powerful core with four lower-power cores (for a total of five cores and five threads) on a single die. That allows smaller devices to offer a multithread-capable structure without requiring a hefty amount of... Continue reading…
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This week, Recode’s Peter Kafka joins us to talk about Netflix’s dominance over the entertainment industry and how the streaming landscape continues to change.
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Jeep has long held the crown of the best off-road SUV, but Ford's new Bronco is here and ready to fight.
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Details around OnePlus’ upcoming more-affordable Android smartphone continue to emerge, with the latest spilling extra secrets about the OnePlus Nord’s cameras. Expected to make its official debut on July 21st, according to OnePlus, the smartphone will mark the company’s expansion into the midrange, promising a balance of price and specifications along the way. It’s just what sort of compromise on … Continue reading
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In recent years, new smartphones from companies like Apple and Samsung have seemed like iterative improvements rather than game-changing releases.But the rise of foldable phones like the new Motorola Razr and the Samsung Galaxy Fold proves that major smartphone brands are thinking about what's next for the mobile devices we use every day.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.When Steve Jobs unveiled the first iPhone more than 10 years ago, he famously showcased its ability to function as three devices in one: a phone, an iPod, and an internet communicator.But the breakthroughs in the years following the iPhone's debut were almost as impactful: the launch of the App Store in 2008, the emergence of devices with larger screens after Samsung's first Galaxy Note in 2011, the rise of touchless voice controls with the launch of Siri in 2011 and the original Moto X in 2013, and the Touch ID home button on the iPhone 5S that made passcodes feel obsolete in 2013.For example, the biggest differences between the flagship iPhone 11 Pro that Apple launched in September and 2018's iPhone XS are the 11 Pro's new triple-lens camera that's better at taking photos in the dark, its improved water resistance, and its more sophisticated processor — improvements that are appreciated but certainly don't fundamentally change how smartphones are used.
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Hot on the heels of yesterday’s rumor, Apple has actually launched the 16-inch MacBook Pro laptop.Because the company has finally backtracked on its awful butterfly keyboard and has installed a new one with the far more reliable scissor mechanism instead.No, it’s not exactly the “new” keyboard Apple’s marketing would have you believe, but whatever.Thank fuck the butterfly nightmare is over… for the moment.The company refers to the, uh, “new” typing area as the Magic Keyboard, stating that it delivers “1mm of key travel” and a “stable” feel.Interestingly, Apple has also included a physical escape key next to the Touch Bar, which is good news for anyone who has struggled with its absence.
UK
But a new case study in the UK seems to show that in rare circumstances, even legal e-cigarettes can cause life-threatening lung illness in users.According to senior author Jayesh Mahendra Bhatt, a paediatric lung specialist at Nottingham University Hospital, their patient was a 16-year-old boy with no preexisting health issues.An earlier dose of antibiotics and asthma medication had failed to help him, and soon into the boy’s A visit, his lungs “rapidly deteriorated.” He was admitted to hospital and placed on a ventilator, but his condition worsened and he experienced severe respiratory failure.For the next three days, he remained on life support, needing an artificial lung to oxygenate and clean out his blood.“We consider e-cigarettes as ‘much safer than tobacco’ at our peril.”Near as his doctors could tell, the boy hadn’t contracted a serious respiratory infection or suddenly developed asthma, things that could have explained why his lungs so quickly shut down.
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Solar cells, incorporating the mineral perovskite, have been the focus of attention since the material was first shown to work in 2009.Current solar panels capture 15% to 18% of the solar energy on average, while perovskite solar cells have been found to be as much as 28% efficient.But there are major obstacles to using these materials commercially: The materials are not stable, and they contain water-soluble lead, which is a health hazard.Now a team of scientists and engineers led by Letian Dou, assistant professor of chemical engineering at Purdue University, have developed a sandwich-like material incorporating organic and inorganic materials to form a hybrid structure that doesn't use lead and has much improved stability."The sandwich structures are like semiconductor quantum wells that are widely used today in many electronic and optoelectronic devices, but they are much easier to produce and more tolerant to defects,"The research was published Monday (Nov. 11) in the journal Nature Chemistry.
China
It’s no secret that Sony’s Mobile business hasn’t been in the best shape for the last few years as it continues to record declining mobile sales.Its latest attempt with the Xperia 1 didn’t bring about the needed turn around.And while it is no longer the behemoth we used to know, the company will continue to remain crucial in the mobile market as it supplies camera sensors to a number of smartphone makers.To be clear, the Sony IMX586 has found its way into a number of so far released since it was first launched.Now, following the release of Samsung’s latest 108MP sensor, Sony appears to be prepping an update to the IMX586 sensor.In a teaser video via Weibo, Sony teased the imminent arrival of a new Sony IMX686 sensor.
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Popular network FX is bringing its entire catalog of existing content to on-demand and live television streaming service Hulu, the companies have announced.In addition to offering all of its existing shows on the platform, FX will also create original exclusive shows for Hulu.The content will be presented to viewers as ‘FX on Hulu,’ eliminating the need for a pay-TV plan.Though some FX shows have already been available on Hulu, getting access to the network’s full catalog has required users to download the FX app and authenticate it with their eligible pay-TV credentials.Viewers who don’t have a pay-TV plan are unable to authenticate the app, meaning access to that large streaming catalog is unavailable.The decision to bring FX content to Hulu was revealed by Disney CEO Bob Iger during the company’s latest financial call.
US
In today's factories and warehouses, it's not uncommon to see robots whizzing about, shuttling items or tools from one station to another.But they have a much harder time winding through narrow spaces to carry out tasks such as reaching for a product at the back of a cluttered shelf, or snaking around a car's engine parts to unscrew an oil cap.Now MIT engineers have developed a robot designed to extend a chain-like appendage flexible enough to twist and turn in any necessary configuration, yet rigid enough to support heavy loads or apply torque to assemble parts in tight spaces.The appendage design is inspired by the way plants grow, which involves the transport of nutrients, in a fluidized form, up to the plant's tip.Likewise, the robot consists of a "growing point," or gearbox, that pulls a loose chain of interlocking blocks into the box.The researchers presented the plant-inspired "growing robot" this week at the IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) in Macau.
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Apple just released iOS 13.2 at the end of October, but it's already moving forward with what's next.The company has just launched the public beta build of iOS 13.3, and it's coming with some performance improvements as well as two new settings, 9to5Mac reports.The iOS 13.3 beta appears to fix some of the iOS 13 problems we had when we found RAM management to be killing our background apps, though it remains to be seen to what degree and how widely that fix applies.A previously announced feature is also finally coming.Apple's Communication Limits tool is now in Screen Time.This will allow you set time limits based on contacts in the phone.
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Chrissy Teigen is a woman of many talents: She started her career as a model, and has since added the titles of cookbook author, entrepreneur, social media maven (and unofficial Queen of Twitter) and more to her resume.It’s those accomplishments and accolades that earned her the additional title of Adweek’s 2019 Brand Visionary.Onstage during our annual Brandweek summit, in conversation with Adweek’s editor and senior vice president of programming Lisa Granatstein during her “Chrissy Teigen on Family, Fame and Keeping It Real” panel, Teigen opened up about beginning her career in modeling and now moving into the world of food, where she sees herself in the future, whether or not she thinks about her tweets before hitting send and more.She and John Legend are recording a song togetherTeigen dropped this piece of news onstage—belatedly asking her husband, Legend, who was sitting front row in the audience, if that news was “a secret.” Legend jokingly responded, “Not anymore!” What the song is about and where we will hear it, however, Teigen is staying mum on.She never saw herself as a model
UK
One of the perks of owning a Nexus device back in the days was the pure, unadulterated Android experience straight from Google as well as a regular and steady supply of updates faster than any OEM could muster.That, fortunately, carried over to the Pixel line but not even Google could keep the software updates coming forever.It doesn’t need to be forever but every extension is more than welcome and that is exactly the news that OG Pixel and Pixel XL owners are now reading, courtesy of Google.Google set a two-year period for providing Android updates to its Pixel phones which, considering the annual cycle, translates to two major Android version updates only.On paper, the very first Pixel and Pixel XL reached their end of life last year.Google surprised faithful fans by actually upgrading the now three-year-old phones to Android 10 as well.
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eBay charges fees based on a percentage of the sale price for every item you sell.Many of us are guilty of buying way too much stuff that we never end up using.While it's great to donate unwanted clothes, shoes, and other items to charities when possible, for items that are newer or of higher value, it might be worth making a few extra bucks by listing them for sale on eBay.Listing items for sale on the site is a relatively straightforward process and you have the option of sending your stuff to auction, where it will sell to the highest bidder, or setting a static "Buy It Now" price where buyers must pay that set amount to purchase your item.Here's how to get started so you can start raking in some extra cash.How to sell items on eBay by listing them on the site
Sweden
since Then, about 700 of the boat owners offered their boats for rentals, which generated more than 1,000 uthyrningstillfällen in Stockholm, sweden and Helsinki, finland.”the Service is growing, and we will continue to promote it,” says Kristian Raij, ceo and co-founder of the Skipperi, with offices both in Helsinki and in Stockholm, sweden.at the same time, is the Airbnb model, the penalty for boat owners and, in any case, when it comes to the high demand on renting a small motor boat for the day.more Than 90% of our users would recommend the service to a friend.”In the spring, they launched a service with more than 20 private motor yachts in Helsinki, finland.For less than 200 euros per month, the ordinary city-dwellers have been able to book an aluminium boat for the day, as often as they want.
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Disney’s $71.3 billion purchase of 21st Century Fox’s deep and eclectic catalog is beginning to bear fruit.In a press release, Disney announced that Avatar, James Cameron’s high-tech, sci-fi adventure film, will be available on Disney+ in the United States, Canada, and The Netherlands on November 12, which just happens to be the streaming service’s debut day.Avatar wasn’t one of the 600 or so titles originally unveiled as part of the Disney+ launch lineup, and wasn’t featured in Disney’s three-plus hour preview of (almost) every movie and TV show hitting Disney+ on the 12th.However, it’s clear why Disney would want to reintroduce audiences to the world of Pandora as soon as possible: James Cameron is currently working on not one, not two, not three, but four Avatar sequels, all of which will debut under the Disney brand.The first Avatar sequel is scheduled to arrive in 2021.On its release in 2009, Avatar blew audiences away with its groundbreaking special effects and best-in-class 3D picture.
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