Eric Grunau

Eric Grunau

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Following 47
Coronavirus mutations can sound scary, but they're actually nothing to worry about. Some can even be beneficial for tracking and containing the virus.
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Posted by MiriamEllisThe Internet can be a great connector, but sometimes, it acts as a barrier. Your local business receives a negative review, and the slate-colored words on the bland white screen can seem so cold, remote. You respond, but the whole interaction feels stilted, formal, devoid of face-to-face human feelings, like this: At least when a complaint occurs via phone, the tone of a customer’s voice tells you a bit more and you can strive to respond with an appropriate vocal pitch, further questions, soothing, helping, maybe resolving. Still, if you’re working off a formal script, the human connection can be missed: Image credit: News Oresund, Elvert Barnes It’s a win when a customer complains in person to your staff, but only if those employees have been empowered to use their own initiative to solve problems. Employees who’ve been tasked with face-to-face interactions but lack permission to act fully human when customers complain will miss opportunity after opportunity to earn the loyalty your brand would give almost anything to amass. Two people can be looking one another in the eye, but if one has to act corporate instead of human, too much formality ensures forgettable experiences: Image credit: Jan-Willem Boot, Amancay Blank What you really want as a local business owner is to have the power to turn those chilly black-and-white words on a review profile into a living color interaction. You want to turn one-way messaging into front porch conversation, with the potential for further details, vital learnings, resolution, and deeply informal human connection with a neighbor, like this: Image Credit: Christian Gries The great barrier: reviews Seventeen years into my journey as a local SEO, I’ve come to realize that my favorite businesses — the ones I’ve come to patronize with devotion — are the ones with owners and staff who treat me with the least formality. They’ve creatively established an environment in which I felt liked, heard, regarded, trusted, and appreciated, and I’ve responded with loyalty. It’s really a beautiful thing, when you step back and think about it. For me, it’s small local farmers who epitomize informal neighborliness in business. They: Do their best to grow high quality foodKnow me by nameKnow my dietary preferencesLet me roam around their properties for enjoyment’s sakeTrust me to pay via an honor systemAsk me if there’s additional produce I’d like them to growWant to know how I’m cooking their produceTell me other ways I might prepare their produceHave nice conversations with me about a variety of topics Am I describing a business here, or a friend? The line is blurry. I’ve hugged some farmers. Prayed for a few when they’ve had hard times. I may have first met them for monetary transactions, but we’ve built human relationships, and the entire way I relate to this sector is defined by how the farmers go about their business. With a few exceptions, most local brands can work at building less formality and more neighborliness into their in-person customer service. Think about it. In most settings, your customers would enjoy being treated with the respectful interest and kindness that invites camaraderie. But we hit a strange barrier when the medium is online reviews. If we learned to read and write in a formal school setting, we may unconsciously ascribe a certain stiffness to textual exchanges. We’re worried about getting lower marks for making a mistake, and we’re aware of being in front of a public audience in writing review responses. We’re missing vital communicative cues, like the facial expression of the customer, their tone of voice, and their body language. On our side of the equation, we can’t shake hands, or physically demonstrate our willingness to help, or even signal our approachability with a smile. To tell the truth, reviews aren’t a great substitute for in-person communication, but they are here to stay, and there’s a certain amount of fear on both sides of many transactions that builds up the layers of the barrier, like this: What can be done to bring the two parties closer together, so that they are at least leaning over the same fence to talk? Create a workflow for spotting single and aggregate review cues The easiest way I know of to get started with a workflow surrounding reviews is via a very intuitive product like Moz Local. Basic components are built into the dashboard, offering a simple jumping off point into the complex world of reputation management. The screenshot above shows a portion of the functions Moz Local offers for review management. The organization of the various data widgets create a bridge for getting closer to customers and engaging in real, meaningful dialogue with them in an atmosphere of goodwill, rather than fear. Let’s break it down by tasks. 1. Seek cues in single reviews with ongoing alerts To enter into a conversation, you have to know when it starts. The right-side column of the Moz Local dashboard keeps a running feed of your incoming reviews on a variety of platforms, as well as incoming Google Q&A questions. On a daily basis, you can see who is starting a conversation about your business, and you can tell whether customers most recent customers were having a good or bad experience by looking at the star rating. Make it your practice to click first on any review in this feed if it’s received a 3-star rating or less, and see how much information a customer has shared about the reason for their less-than-perfect rating, as in this fictitious example:. Because the reviews are timestamped, you may have the ability to connect a customer’s poor experience with something that happened at your place of business on a specific day, like being understaffed, having an equipment failure, or another problem. In fact, a second view in the dashboard makes it immediately obvious if the reviews you received on a particular day had lower star ratings than you’d like to see: If you know a customer’s complaints can be tied to an issue, this gives you something more and better to say than just “I’m sorry,” when you respond. For example, broken equipment leading to a cold meal is something you can explain in asking the customer to let you make it up to them. 2. Seek cues in aggregated sentiment Knowing whether you have just one customer with a single complaint or multiple customers with the same complaint is vital quality control intelligence. Very often, Google reviews are particularly brief in comparison to reviews on other platforms, and you need to be able to take a large body of them to see if there are shared topical themes. The Review Analysis widget in the Moz Local dashboard does exactly this for you: In this view, you can see up to 100 of the most common words your customers are using when they review you, the percentage of the reviews containing each word, and the star rating associated with reviews using each word. You can toggle the data for each column. In our fictitious example, the business owner could see that when food is served cold, it’s yielding very poor review ratings, but that, fortunately, this is a complaint contained in only 1.7% of total reviews. Meanwhile, the business owner could notice that 2% of reviews with a 3.8 star rating (only a moderately good experience) are revolving around the phrase “service”. The owner can click on each word to be shown a list of the reviews containing that term to help them identify what it is about the service that’s diminishing customer satisfaction. The figures in the above screenshot are all pretty low, and likely represent only mild concerns for the business. If, however, the business owner saw something like this, that would change the narrative: Here, 12.2% of the reviews mentioning the restaurant’s veggie burgers are associated with a very poor 2.0 rating. The owner would need to dive into this list of reviews and see just what it is customers don’t like about this dish. For example, if many of these reviews mentioned that the burgers lacked flavor, had bland condiments, or buns that fell apart, these would be cues that could lead to changing a recipe. Again, this would give the owner something genuine to say in response to dissatisfied customers. Ideally, it would lead to the customer being invited to come again for something like a free taste test of the new recipe. Whatever details the review sentiment analysis function yields for your business, use it with the intention of having a two sided conversation with your customers. They complain, in aggregate, about X, you research and implement a solution, and finally, you invite them to experience the solution in hopes of retaining that customer, which is typically far less costly than replacing them. 3. Grade your business at a glance These two views in the Moz Local dashboard allow you to analyze two key, related aspects of your business at a glance. The Average Rating view is the fastest way to grade yourself on aggregate customer satisfaction. This example shows a business with little to fear, with 96% of customers rating the business at 4-or-more stars and only 4% having a three-stars-or-less experience. In terms of having happy customers, this fictitious company is doing a great job. However, the Reviews Reply rate needs some work. They’re only replying to 1% of their overall reviews, 0% of their 2-to-5-star reviews, and only 21% of their 1-star reviews. The business is doing an excellent job offline, but unless they improve their online responsiveness, their average review rating could begin to decrease over time. In sum, a workflow which investigates reviews singly and in aggregate tells the story or customer satisfaction across time, and gives the business owner a clearer narrative to tap into and write from in responding. Make optimal response rates and two-way conversation your goal As a local business owner, you have many demands on your time. That being said, my pro tip for you is to respond to every review you possibly can. There’s no scenario in which it’s smart to ignore a conversation any customer starts, whether positive or negative. Just as you wouldn’t ignore a percentage of your incoming calls or customers walking around your business, you shouldn’t ignore them online. If thinking of reviews as a two-way conversation is a bit of new concept to you, consider that most review platforms enable people to edit their reviews for a reason: many of your customers think of the reviews they write as living documents, and are willing to update them to journal subsequent interactions that made a scenario better or worse. My own research has shown this to be true, and multiple studies have reached the conclusion that the majority of customers will continue doing business with brands that resolve their complaints. This means that local businesses can manage a customer journey that follow this pattern for negative reviews, much of the time: In black-and-white review land, this might look like this: Or, when a customer is happy to begin with, offering extra incentives to come again while thanking the customer for taking the time to write their review could look like this: Here, a conversation starter about salsa has been turned into a two-way dialog guaranteed to make the customer feel heard and valued. They’ve been invited back, their opinion has been solicited, and both the existing customer and all potential future customers reading Mary’s response can see that this is a restaurant with a lively, on-going relationship with its diners. Takeaway: don’t just say “thanks” to every customer who positively reviews your business. Seek cues in their words that show what they care about and tie it to what you care about. Find common ground to further engage them and bring them back again. How big of a priority are reviews, really? I’ve consulted with so many local business owners over the years — everybody from beekeepers to bookkeepers. It’s a plain fact that all small business owners are extremely busy, and not all of them instantly take a shine to the idea of having a lot of little two-way conversations going on with their customers in their review profiles. Statistics can change minds on this, when it comes to figuring out how much of a priority review analysis and management should be. Consider these findings from the Moz State of the Local SEO Industry survey of over 1,400 people involved in the marketing of local businesses: Respondents placed aspects of Google reviews (count, sentiment, owner responses, etc.) as having the second greatest impact on Google’s local rankings. 90% of respondents agree that the impact of reviews on local pack rankings is real. Nearly 14% of those marketing the largest local enterprises realize that more resources need to be devoted to review management. Yet, in another section of the survey, agency workers placed review management in a lowly 11th place in terms of something they are requested to help their clients with. Learn more about these trends by downloading the free State of the Local SEO Industry Report for 2020. Statistics like these indicate that there is a maturing awareness of the vital role reviews play in running a successful local business. Management of all aspects of reviews deserves priority time. Make a habit of reading reviews between the lines Moz Local software will ensure you know whenever single reviews come in, and help you slice and dice review data in ways that tell customer service narratives in aggregate. If you’re already using this software, your first steps of reputation management are just waiting to be taken with ease and simplicity. But to get the most of any review management product, you’ll need to bring a human talent to the dashboard: your ability to read between the lines of review text that can be brief, vague, sharp, and sometimes unfair. With the exception of spam, there’s a real person on the other side of each text snippet, and for the most part, their shared desire is to be treated well by your business. Even if a review stems from a customer you can’t identify or one who communicates disappointment rudely, you can take the high road by making a mental image of yourself standing face-to-face with someone you highly value who is voicing a problem. Respond from that good place, with the conscious intention of improved neighborly communication and you may be pleasantly surprised by your ability to transform even the most dissatisfied person into a happier, more loyal customer. I’ll close today with an excerpt of a very long real-world review which I’ve truncated. I’ve underlined the cues and the rewards I’m hoping you’ll spot and see as you strengthen your commitment to review management as a key component of your customer service strategy. The new Moz Local plans — Lite, Preferred, and Elite — are designed to offer more features and flexibility to better meet the needs of local businesses and their marketers. Customers on any of the new plans can now monitor reviews via alerts, and depending on the plan, respond to reviews and take advantage of social posting. It’s never been more important to actively engage and listen to the needs and concerns of your current customers — and potential customers will take notice.Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!
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Murmurs have circulated in recent weeks that several ad tech companies are preparing initial public offerings, contributing to the most robust IPO market in five years. Adweek spoke with several analysts in the space to gauge if the recent reports indicate a repeat of past investment crash-and-burn bubbles, or whether the industry is entering a...
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Welcome to the 3rd episode of Inside Influence: What’s working and what’s not inside the world of B2B Influencer Marketing. Each week we feature an interview with a B2B marketing insider on all things influence and a deeper dive into the insights found in the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report. In this 3rd episode of Inside Influence you are in for a treat: A discussion with the force of nature and client of TopRank Marketing that is Ursula Ringham, Head of Global Influencer Marketing at SAP. Ursula leads the Global Influencer Marketing team at SAP in collaboration with the entire SAP product portfolio to create innovative content with trusted external voices to build brand awareness and create pipeline. She is also an accomplished storyteller, author, creator, influencer marketer, digital innovator, social media maven, champion of girls education, and self described "outdoor sports freak". Our Inside Influence conversation covered a variety of influencer marketing topics including: The key components of influencer marketing operations The importance and application of influencer marketing software An influencer marketing case study featuring an SAP podcast Advice for marketers that want the benefits of influencer engagement but are hesitant to commit What B2B brands can expect if they hire an outside agency to help with influencer marketing What B2B marketers should watch out for when working with influencers and influencer programs Rising influencer stars in the B2B tech space Here are a few highlights of our discussion with a video of our full interview below. 77% of all the world's revenue transactions go through an SAP ERP system, so we're probably the biggest company in the world that you use every day, but you don't know anything about it. Of course most people in the marketing world know you, but for those that don’t, can you share a bit about the work you do at SAP? Ursula: Sure. I work at SAP and if people don't know what that is, SAP is one of the largest enterprise software companies in the world. 77% of all the world's revenue transactions go through an SAP ERP system, so we're probably the biggest company in the world that you use every day, but you don't know anything about it. What I do is I manage our global influencer marketing program where we collaborate with trusted voices that influence customer decisions. What we like to do is collaborate with them to tell the story of how SAP makes the world run better and improve people's lives. Your contribution to the 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report on influencer marketing operations was really important because I think a lot of people don’t think about all the behind the scenes work that goes into an effective program. What are the key components of influencer marketing operations that marketers should know about?  Ursula:The operations part of influencer marketing is so important. I think when you're just starting with an influencer program, you're just like, okay, where do I begin? You know there are people you need to research with a large social following, but that's the wrong approach. You'd have to start with your strategy. You also need some tools to help you. There are different influencer relationship management tools that you can use such as like Onalytica or Traackr which are more for the enterprise. These are also tools that are going to help you with tasks. For example, when we work with other teams at SAP, the very first thing we do is we have them fill out a form about the audience demographics, what success looks like, and the buyer persona. The key thing is (Influencer Relationship Management) tools save you time and help you manage all your projects in one place. We collect this information so we can find out who's that person that you want to help tell the story with you? And that's really, really important. When you use influencer relationship management tools, you can go in and plug all that data in. The tool will surf the whole web, bring everything back and populate a report for you showing matching influencers. Then you can look at who are these influencers? The key thing is the tools save you time and help you manage all your projects in one place. Great. I suppose along with software, process comes into play and the whole operations thing too, right? As far as like best practices? Ursula: Oh my gosh, there's so many different best practices. But the one thing that I always tell my team is even if the tool brings up all these people, you need to read, watch and listen to every single asset that these influencers has come up with. That's a best practice. You really have to go and see what the influencer's personality is like and how they present themselves. You can't just look and go, wow, this person meets the criteria on paper of what this team wanted. Maybe they wanted them to be located in North America and have a podcast. Or maybe they had 50,000 followers. But you really have to go and see what the influencer's personality is like and how they present themselves. Of course, now our world is all digital and about video. For that you have to see how they perform if you want them to be a host. The biggest practice is the process that I have: you have to watch, read and listen to everything out there. The 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Report includes a case study featuring your work with SAP in the form of a podcast. Creating a single resource to serve as a platform for different internal customers and different external audiences is impressive. What role did influencers play in the Tech Unknown podcast? Ursula: Absolutely. We created this podcast called Tech Unknown. We actually just finished our second season. For the first season, it was basically an influencer talking to other influencers, live. When you look at influencer marketing, you have to think, what is the story you're going to tell? For the second season, we wanted to create something different. And so we took inspiration from This American Life, a great podcast. We have a host that tells a story, which is the most important thing. When you look at influencer marketing, you have to think, what is the story you're going to tell? It's not just like, let's do this campaign. You have to think about what is the overall story? The podcast is a series and what we did was to identify an influencer who would be our host. So decided that would be Tamra McClary. She's a great thought leader and influencer. The reason we chose her is she's energetic, her voice, and how she introduces things is great. The audience can relate to her. For the second season she was the host and our focus was on the topic of data. We looked at all different lines of business and how data affects different businesses out there. Then we would bring in other influencers to give their perspective as like thought leaders on that topic. So if it's talking about HR data, we bring in an HR expert. And then we might have a customer involved in it or an SAP executive who could talk about the customer. The whole thing was around thought leadership and the influencers played a critical role because they validated the story. They are that third party validation about what SAP is talking about as a challenge in the industry. The hope is that people realize, "Oh, SAP has a solution to my challenges. Let me go check that out." That's why it was so important that the podcast included influencers. And I'll have to tell you one thing that is absolutely incredible. We would create a summary blog post about the podcast that we publish on one of our website properties. The gal who manages this thought leadership area of sap.com knows SEO really well. If you typed into Google, "future of data", out of 1.5 billion search results, our blog post came up number one. It's a combination of working with the influencer who has the social media presence on the topic. Also, Tamera the host is out there and she's promoting this blog summary that she wrote. She's promoting the series and we're getting the word out there using the right keywords and it all comes into play. It's all full circle, right? It's a podcast, it's a blog, it's the influencers. It's all working together to create this awareness that people are going to pay attention to and realize that SAP has a solution to their business needs. So who are some B2B tech influencers that really stand out today? And are there any re rising stars you would like to mention also? Ursula: Oh my gosh, there are several. One of the first people that comes to mind is Sally Eaves. She's someone that she's been on the scene for quite some time, but the thing is, Sally is first of all, Sally. I don't know where she gets that energy. She is 24/7 go, go, go. She's doing so many things. She has a background being a CTO, but then she has a side of her that is about education, children and the environment and how technology is influencing society. She's kind of like the whole package and she's really good and knowledgeable and very charismatic. We'd love to do some work with her because she's fantastic. She also has a British accent, which makes that fun for us Americans. She's one of the top ones that I would recommend. I love following her stories, so definitely check her out. To see the full Inside Influence interview with Ursula, check out the video below: To connect with Ursula on all things marketing and influence, you can find her on LinkedIn and Twitter. Don't miss Ursula and I as we present at the virtual Content Marketing World conference this week: Influencer Marketing Unleashed: Top Tactics for Success from Global B2B Brands. This is my 10th year in a row speaking at CMWorld and this presentation highlights the best of the best when it comes to information about B2B influencer marketing including: Key trends based on the latest B2B influencer marketing research study Use cases and case studies from Monday.com, Cherwell Software, LinkedIn, Adobe, Alcatel Lucent Enterprise and of course, SAP. A framework for enterprise B2B influencer content campaigns While the CMWorld conference is happening virtually this week, you can get access to presentations on demand as well. Check out the website. Next up on Inside Influence is a conversation with Janine Wegner, Global Thought Leadership Program and Activation Manager at Dell Technologies. Be sure to check out our previous Inside Influence interviews: Rani Mani, Adobe - The Value of B2B Influencer Marketing Garnor Morantes, LinkedIn - The Power of Always-On Influence The post Inside Influence: Ursula Ringham from SAP on Influencer Marketing Operations appeared first on B2B Marketing Blog - TopRank®.
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(National Research Council of Science & Technology) The key to promoting the hydrogen economy represented by hydrogen vehicles is to produce hydrogen for electricity generation at an affordable price. Hydrogen production methods include capturing by-product hydrogen, reforming fossil fuel, and electrolyzing water. Water electrolysis in particular is an eco-friendly method of producing hydrogen, in which the use of a catalyst is the most important factor in determining the efficiency and price competitiveness.
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The department suggests the tech giant may be participating in "unlawful discrimination on the basis of race."
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We've been looking forward to Vizio's OLED TVs since the company announced them at CES 2020. Now, the 55- and 65-inch models are finally available at Best Buy.
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Khalid el-Anany, Egypt’s tourism and antiquities minister, announced last weekend that archaeologists had unearthed dozens of ancient sarcophagi and mummies discovered in a large necropolis south of Cairo. The minister said that there were at least 59 sealed sarcophagi with mummies inside most of them. The mummies were buried inside three wells more than 2600 years ago. The minister says … Continue reading
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The Oppo A15 may launch soon in India. The phone was teased by Amazon as a part of its upcoming "Great Indian Festival Sale".
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The Xbox Series X is packed full of exciting new features such as Quick Resume and spatial audio, but did you know about these?
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In What Works For Me – a series of articles considering how we can find balance in our lives – we talk to celebrities about wellbeing and self-care.Stacey Solomon’s house is not a quiet one, with her partner Joe Swash, three sons, a step-son and a dog to contend with. But the Loose Women star says she still claws back moments of me-time, for the sake of her mental health. “Self-care has to be a conscious effort, because I often think there’s a whole family tree of people who come before I do,” she tells HuffPost UK. “Sometimes, I have to make a point of saying to myself: ’You know what Stace, if you don’t have a bath one day this week, it’s not going to do you any favours. If you don’t turn your phone off for the day today and say ‘no’, you’re going to be impacted negatively.”The latter has been particularly hard in the pandemic, she says, because “no one is shutting off anymore” – and people seem to be getting in touch 24/7. “Sometimes you have to force yourself not to reply and say: ‘Sorry, I was asleep – I’m not a vampire!’” she jokes. READ MORE: Michelle Ackerley: Grief Reared Its Head Again In The Pandemic These tactics give Stacey “a moment to be still’ – but they don’t fix everything. “I don’t want to sit here and say it makes a dramatic difference to my life,” she says, “because sometimes I think there are ways you feel in life that you just can’t get out of, no matter what you do.”Stacey has experienced anxiety from early childhood and has tried everything to tackle it, from hypnosis to EMDR therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy. “I don’t know life without it,” she says. “The only thing that has helped me over the years is just embracing that it’s a part of me. I genuinely don’t think at this point it will ever go away, no matter how much therapy I have. I’ve admitted to myself that it’s part of my personality.”Stacey’s anxiety is characterised by a fear of death. Hearing about death on the news, or that a distant acquaintance has died, can be a trigger. At times, it’s caused her to experience anxiety attacks.  “If I feel myself getting an anxiety attack now, I have to sit still and play it out through my mind logically,” she says. “I have to think: ‘This will come and this will be awful, but then it will go.’ The more I focus on the fact it will go and it’s not going to be there forever, the easier it is for me to ride though it.’”She still isn’t sure what caused her to question her mortality so often in childhood. She had some respite from anxiety in her teens, when she went through a stage of feeling “immortal and invincible”. But giving birth to Zach at 17 brought back her old concerns – and they’ve been with her ever since. “When I gave birth it was such a trauma and I realised how fickle life was, because I felt really out of control,” she says. “I thought I was going to die.” READ MORE: Edith Bowman: 'In Your 40s, You Have A 'Don't Give A F**k' Attitude' Part of the problem, says Stacey, is that women weren’t taught about the realities of birth 12 years ago, so everything came as a complete shock.  “When I had Zach, I didn’t even know I’d give birth to a placenta afterwards,” she says. “No one said: ‘You’ll probably shit yourself, your baby might poo inside you, you’re going to tear from your bum to your vagina and you won’t be able to wee for about three days afterwards.’” It’s why she’s so passionate about sharing the realities of pregnancy and birth on her Instagram, such as showing her blood-spattered t-shirt and towel after giving birth to her youngest, Rex. She also regularly posts pictures and captions relating to body image, showing her cellulite or loose skin after pregnancy. “Sometimes I sit there and question whether I should put something up because it doesn’t look like everyone else’s pictures,” she says. “But then I think: ‘Surely everyone looks like this, and what is it doing to people when they don’t see it?’” While Stacey’s posts come across as self-assured, she admits she’s still prone to a “crisis of confidence” over her intelligence – more than a decade after hitting our screens on the X Factor. “I’ve felt like my whole life, I’ve had to prove I’m not an idiot,” she says. “I still worry about if people think I’m dumb because of my accent. I’m not stupid – I’m just not from a privileged background and I’m not serious a lot of the time.”Self-doubt can also creep in when she’s honest about her mental health struggles online, because she feels like she’s “supposed to be the happy one” who’s known for smiling and joking. “You can’t just be one thing all of the time,” she says. “But you feel like you have to portray that, because that’s how people characterise you.”READ MORE: Davina McCall’s Life In Lockdown: ‘It Felt Like The World Was Collapsing’ Her tactic for boosting her self-esteem is to ignore all feedback about her – whether it’s good or bad. It’s something she regularly speaks to her boys about, teaching them to follow their passions, rather than be influenced by others. “For example, if I was going to make a unicorn pumpkin that I thought was the best thing since sliced bread, but 50,000 people thought it was ridiculous, the best thing I can do is just put it out there, make it and not even acknowledge anyone else’s opinion, whether it’s good or bad,” she explains.“Then, my opinion is protected in my brain and I can just walk around thinking I’ve done the best thing ever.” At 30, letting go of others’ judgements has helped Stacey feel free and totally herself, even embracing the parts of her personality she’d rather change. “You can’t win,” she says. “You’re either too perfect or not perfect enough, so you can only be you – and unapologetically you.” Ahead of the International Day of the Girl, Stacey Solomon has joined forces with the Dove Self-Esteem Project and body image expert Professor Phillippa Diedrichs to host a special IG Live about the importance of building positive self-esteem in young people at 9pm on 8th October. Tune in on Stacey’s and Professor Phillippa’s Instagrams and find out more  at Dove.com/selfesteem.More From What Works For Me: Rachel Khoo: 'The Pandemic Has Left Me Without Work' Jordan Stephens On Mental Health And Racism: 'Sometimes I Just Want To Burn Everything Down' Evanna Lynch: 'I Was Addicted To People Who Made Me Feel Bad'
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The folks behind Untitled Goose Game teamed up with iam8bit to create a physical packaged edition of their game that’s just a treasure. It’s also a bit backwards since it’s aiming to be environmentally friendly when… the game can be purchased digitally, without any packaging at all… but still! Today we’re talking about the Untitled Goose Game iam8bit exclusive “Lovely … Continue reading
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If at first you don't succeed, fail again Geeks eager to nab Nvidia’s GeForce RTX 3090 graphics cards were left disappointed after all the stock on the tech giant's online store was snatched up almost instantly when the cards went up for sale on Thursday.…
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Agile development teams aim to develop innovative capabilities, while devops teams strive to release code to production more frequently. But the buck often stops with the IT service desk and customer support teams who must respond to application incidents, issues, and requests.Release too frequently with defects, performance bottlenecks, or security issues, and end-users may inundate service and support teams with incidents. Even when devops teams deploy reliable changes, they still have a responsibility to aid support teams in providing excellent customer service or end-user support.To read this article in full, please click here
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