Eric Grunau

Eric Grunau

Followers 60
Following 46
UK
There’s a new Facebook app coming today, pushing groups to the fore, introducing a new icon, and even getting rid of the blue.Announced by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg today at the opening keynote of the F8 2019 developer conference, it’s the fifth generation of Facebook as we know it.Internally, the update is known as FB5.As Zuckerberg describes it, it’s actually the biggest change for Facebook in the past five years.First up will be a new app, with a new version of Facebook in the browser to follow.Most striking from the outset is going to be the color change.
UK
The roller-coaster nature of semiconductor demand caught Samsung napping in calendar Q1 (PDF) resulting in a 60 per cent dive in profits, the lowest haul since the fiery Galaxy Note 7 debacle of 2017."First quarter earnings were weighed down by the weakness in memory chips and displays, although the newly launched Galaxy S10 smartphone logged solid sales," said Sammy in a glass-half-full statement.For the quarter ended 31 March, sales crossed the line at 52.39trn KRW (£34.5bn/ $44.9bn), down 14 per cent year-on-year, due to declines across the major divisions.Device Solutions – memory, mobile system-on-chip and Foundry biz – was hit the hardest, falling 27 per cent to KRW 20.62trn (£13.5bn, $17.6bn): semiconductor was down 30 per cent to KRW 14.47trn (£9.5bn, $12.4bn), of which KRW 11.47trn pertained to memory, itself down 34 per cent.Display Panels fell to 6.12trn KRW (£4.02bn, $5.2bn) from 7.54trn KRW (£4.9bn, $6.4bn) a year earlier.Demand for memory chips collapsed and this has forced all manufacturers to pull down production forecasts, leading to a drop in prices amid inventory adjustments from those behind the world's largest data centres.
US
Bill Gates likes to read and recommend books.This year, ahead of choosing MIT Technology Review's breakthrough innovations, Gates read 10 books on tech that helped inform his choices.Here are Bill Gates's 10 best books on tech.Like most successful people, Bill Gates is an avid reader.Read more: Something interesting happened when Bill Gates started driving his daughter to schoolThis year, Gates took a special interest in books about technology to help him curate MIT Technology Review's 10 breakthrough technologies of 2019.
US
Spotify surpassed 100 million subscribers at the end of March, the music streaming service said Monday in its first-quarter report.That keeps Spotify above its closest competitor, Apple Music; Apple CEO Tim Cook said in January that Apple Music hit 50 million subscribers at the end of last year.As society worldwide has shifted to streaming as the most common way people listen to tunes, Spotify and Apple Music have broken away as the two leaders in a race to dominate subscription music.Spotify is the biggest streaming service by both subscribers and those who listen for free in the world, but Apple Music reportedly has been outstripping Spotify's growth in the US, which is the world's biggest market for recorded music.Spotify's growth in the latest quarter hit the top end of the range that it had predicted in February.Looking ahead to the middle of this year, the company predicted it would gain another 7 million to 10 million paying members.
UK
Facebook has officially banned personality quizzes and other apps it considers to be of ‘minimal utility.’ The move comes a year after the Cambridge Analytica scandal, which involved the data firm acquiring information on millions of Facebook users via one of these quiz apps.In addition, Facebook says it is removing access to multiple older APIs starting this summer.Facebook announced the changes on its developers blog late Thursday, stating that developers will need to review the list of APIs it plans to remove and see whether their apps depend on any of them.The company warns that starting on July 30, apps that utilize the APIs on that list will no longer have access to them.New apps will not have access to those APIs starting on April 30, according to the company, which says that starting today, it will also remove access to expired user permissions approved for developers’ apps.In this case, ‘expired’ refers to permissions that were approved but that the app has not used or accessed in at least 90 days.
US
Intel slightly beat Wall Street’s expectations for the first quarter as the company reported earnings of 17 cents a share on revenue of $16.1 billion.For the period ending March 31, analysts had expected Intel to report non-GAAP earnings of 89 cents a share on revenues of $16.03 billion.But Intel continues to focus on the “data-centric” strategy, with chips for PCs and datacenter processing as demand grows for everything from internet of things devices to self-driving cars.That is down from January guidance.“Results for the first quarter were slightly higher than our January expectations.We shipped a strong mix of high performance products and continued spending discipline while ramping 10nm and managing a challenging NAND pricing environment.
US
After the spacecraft Beresheet crashed into the moon this month, details are emerging about what may have gone wrong.SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) are performing a preliminary investigation of the causes of the failed landing.“According to preliminary investigation of the Israeli spacecraft Beresheet’s landing maneuver, it appears that a manual command was entered into the spacecraft’s computer,” SpaceIL said in a statement.“This led to a chain reaction in the spacecraft, during which the main engine switched off, which prevented it from activating further.”The investigation into the causes of the issue is ongoing, and the final results of the investigation are expected in the coming weeks.As the investigation continues, NASA scientists will be making an investigation of their own.
US
German camera maker Leica is facing heat from Chinese censors and nationalistic internet users who are leaving angry comments after it launched an ad dramatizing the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests.Leica has been censored on the social media platform Weibo, as independently verified by The Verge and reported by the South China Morning Post.The nearly five-minute video titled “The Hunt” depicts a photojournalist resisting interrogation from Chinese police and managing to stay in his hotel room so that he can snap a photo of a lone protester standing in front of police tanks, blocking their path.His scenes are interspersed with clips of other life-threatening situations around the world.The end of the video says: “This film is dedicated to those who lend their eyes to make us see.” The image of the Tank Man has become iconic, and no one knows what happened to that man.It’s also a heavily pro-democracy message that strikes a nerve with China whose censors are gearing up for the upcoming 30th anniversary of the protests on June 4th.
UK
Ofcom is amenable to technical tweaks that mobile operators have requested to 5G rules, launching a consultation yesterday.The Big Four – Telefónica UK, Vodafone, BT's EE and Hutchison's Three – as well as fifth 5G licensee UK Broadband want to increase the power limits permitted in the 3.4Ghz, 3.5Ghz and 3.6Ghz spectrum licences from 25dBM to 28dBM, and move the guard band requirement above 3605MHz."Ofcom is minded to grant the all of the licence variations," the regulator said in the consultation document (PDF, p2).The licensees say that 5G's directional antennas (Active Antennae Base Stations, or AAS) – which use beam-forming technology – would benefit from tweaks to the technical conditions that are part of the licence.Sorry, rural folks: that means ultrafast 5G for city dwellers – once enough of the compatible 5G kit is floating around.Only mugs will be using 5G hardware this year, noted one expert wag The Reg spoke to.
US
As I write this, I’m at TED 2019 in Vancouver, which is a weeklong marathon of talks and workshops and coffee meetings and experiences and demos and late-night trivia contests and networking, networking, networking.Meanwhile, I’m sick as a dog with a virus I caught from my 3-year-old, I’m on deadline for what feels like a bazillion stories, and I’m pregnant, which means I need coffee but can’t have too much, and need sleep but can only lay on my left side, and can’t breathe without sitting propped up with a pillow anyway, since I can’t safely take any cold medication.“The decimation of sleep throughout industrialized nations is having a catastrophic impact on our health, our wellness, even the safety and education of our children.It’s fast becoming one of the greatest challenges we face in the 21st century,” Walker, an expert in sleep at UC Berkeley and author of the best-selling book “Why We Sleep,” told a rapt TED audience on Thursday.(A comparison Walker might hate.He ran down all the ways in which sleep deprivation hurts people: it makes you dumber, more forgetful, unable to learn new things, more vulnerable to dementia, more likely to die of a heart attack, less able to fend off sickness with a strong immune system, more likely to get cancer, and it makes our bodies literally hurt more.
Sweden
Trafikverket planerar för att byta betong mot asfalt som beläggning i Förbifartens tunnlar.Men materialen tillåts inte konkurrera på lika villkor.Arbetet med motorvägsleden Förbifarten väster om Stockholm pågår för fullt.Förbifarten sträcker sig från Kungens kurva i söder till Häggvik i norr.Men betongen har flera andra fördelar; den är starkare, den slits långsammare och den är ljusare.Att betongen är ljusare gör att vi behöver litet mindre energi för tunnelns belysning som ju behövs 24 timmar om dygnet året runt.
US
If you have tips or feedback, email me at [email protected] $221 billion US ad industry is being upended by the rise of digital ad giants, fragmented consumer attention, and marketers' pressure for results, while media industry is undergoing a grand convergence with tech giants, telecoms, startups and legacy companies competing to set the cultural agenda.These visionaries range from P's Marc Pritchard, who's pushing to clean up digital advertising; to showrunner Shonda Rhimes, who's changing the balance of power in the TV industry.The deadline for nominations for the most innovative chief marketing officers is April 29.Elsewhere, Lauren Johnson dug into Publicis' $4.4 billion deal for data company Epsilon.The pending deal with give Publicis' agencies access to Epsilon's database of 250 million US consumers.
UK
“Purchase and return history from one retailer alone is not nearly rich enough”Earlier this month, in a move which could well be a watershed moment, ASOS modified its returns policy in a bid to take action against ‘serial returners’, writes Oliver Guy, Global Industry Director, Retail, Software AG.The answer is quite simple – ecommerce has revolutionised consumer behaviour, particularly in the fashion world where customers have more choice than ever.Whilst others often order one item of clothing in several sizes to try them on at home – and return the rest.This has facilitated the rise of the ‘serial returner’.The impact of ‘serial returners’
US
The U.S. healthcare system spends roughly $190 billion every year on physical therapies prescribed to treat muscular and skeletal disorders, and Sword Health has raised $8 million in a new round of financing to slash those costs.The New York-based company was founded in Europe four years ago and recently relocated to the U.S. where spending on musculoskeletal disorders has skyrocketed to become the second most costly ailment in America, the company said.Sword Health focuses on five key pathologies — lower back pain, shoulder pain, neck pain and physical therapy in the wake of knee and hip replacement surgeries.“Lower back pain is the most important one in terms of chronic pain, then knee and shoulder pain” says Sword Health founder and chief executive Virgilio Bento.Khosla Ventures led the round with undisclosed angel investors.It’s the first funding for Sword since it raised a $4.6 million seed round last April.
US
AT has sold its 10 percent stake in Hulu back to the streaming service today for $1.43 billion dollars, in a move that will now give Disney (which already had gained a controlling interest in Hulu through its Fox purchase) even more control going forward.Post-purchase, that puts Disney’s stake in Hulu as owning 66 percent of the service, with Comcast owning the remaining 33 percent.As a sign of how quickly this has progressed, just last year, Hulu was still divided evenly between Disney, Fox, and Comcast — each owning a 30 percent cut of the company — alongside AT’s 10 percent stake.Disney gaining even more control over Hulu could also mean a radical shift in what Hulu even is.Right now, the site offers streaming content from a huge range of providers, including Comcast-owned NBC and Universal, and AT networks like TBS and TNT.But with AT no longer in the game and the balance of power firmly shifted in Disney’s favor, it’s easy to imagine a future where Comcast and AT pull out their shows entirely in favor of their own streaming efforts, leaving Hulu as an exclusively Disney service that compliments the upcoming Disney+.
UK
“Harder to get consent for data use than it is to get consent for medical treatment”The Open Data Institute (ODI) has published a report on three pilot “data trusts” – legal structures designed to provide independent stewardship of data – it set up under a government-funded trial that may have far-reaching impact.A key metric: whether they could “increase access to data while retaining trust.”The report by the non-profit ODI comes as the government looks to find ways to unlock and monetise vast public data sets (e.g.A key benefit for data users – like the AI and machine learning companies that need huge data sets to train and deploy their algorithms on – would be the ability to tap public data sets that have already been collated in one place, with a single legal agreement governing their use, streamlining current access agreements.The ODI found that there is “huge demand” from private, public and third sector organisations in countries around the world to explore data trusts; a somewhat inchoate term for a legal vehicle that can facilitate the sharing of data from several sources while respecting varying legal interests.
US
With a new chief executive officer and $4 million in fresh funding from investors including the Los Angeles-based investment firm, Upfront Ventures, Territory Foods is poised for growth.The company recently hired powerhouse executive Abby Coleman, the former vice president of marketing and strategy at Quidsi and head of e-commerce at Diapers.com as its new chief executive and is now looking to expand its footprint and unique approach to meal delivery beyond its current geographies.The company uses a proprietary food recommendation engine to determine its subscribers’ personal preferences to deliver them meals that are more tailored to their individual tastes.Territory also employs a unique business model, leveraging local chefs to prepare meals according to menus designed by the company.The distributed workforce of gig chefs allows the company greater flexibility in planning, preparing, and distributing its meals, according to Coleman.A lifelong vegetarian and mother of two vegetarian daughters, the 39-year-old Coleman actually began her business in the food services industry as a caterer before moving on to leadership positions at Kraft Foods and Mondelez International before taking on the vice presidential role at Quidsi.
US
In another example of how fiat and digital currencies are converging in the financial services industry, Visa on Thursday unveiled a debit card that lets users buy things with fiat money converted from cryptocurrency stored in online wallets.The new Coinbase Card is directly tied to a person's cryptocurrency balance in digital wallets managed by the eponymous digital currency exchange.The cryptocurrency will initially be converted into British pounds, Euros or U.S. dollars.A Coinbase Card mobile app will allow consumers to see spending summaries, transaction receipts and get instant notifications.Blockchain, the electronic ledger technology on which cryptocurrency relies, requires each transaction be verified through a consensus of those using it before it is finalized.To artificially speed up the transaction, the payment processor (Visa) will likely give instant approval and take on the liability if something goes wrong with the transaction.
US
Verma was a contentious figure at Apttus, where current and former employees accused him of creating a culture of bullying and fear.His departure comes just six months after Apttus was bought by private equity firm Thoma Bravo and nearly a year after founding CEO Kirk Krappe left the company following allegations of sexual misconduct.The head of revenue at Apttus, an enterprise tech company that has been rocked by a series of controversies and executive turnover, has left the company without an immediate replacement, according to a memo obtained by Business Insider.Raj Verma, the Chief Revenue Officer at Apttus, along with Gordon Thompson, senior vice president of sales, engineering and solutions, are no longer at the company, according to the memo sent to staff on Thursday by Apttus' recently-appointed CEO Frank Holland.It's unclear under what circumstances Verma departed, or whether he qualified for any of the $26 million parachute package that rankled some employees when its existence was disclosed in an email to shareholders ahead of the company's sale to Thoma Bravo in fall.Several current and former insiders described a culture of bullying and fear that permeated the company and attributed it to Verma, Business Insider previously reported.
UK
AT continues to roll out its 5G network, announcing today that it has launched service in seven different cities around the US.AT’s 5G network got its start in 12 different cities at the tail end of last year, so after this latest expansion, the number of cities with 5G service from the carrier is now up to 19.There’s a long way to go before AT 5G covers the nation, but this is certainly a good start.The cities AT is launching in today include Austin, Los Angeles, Nashville, Orlando, San Diego, San Francisco, and San Jose.Those are all massive metropolitan areas, but unfortunately, service is only live in portions of the 19 cities AT claims for its 5G coverage area.Coverage will spread to other parts of those cities in the future, but AT didn’t give a timeline for when the roll out would be complete.
US
North Carolina State University researchers have developed a technique that reduces training time for deep learning networks by more than 60 percent without sacrificing accuracy, accelerating the development of new artificial intelligence (AI) applications."Deep learning networks are at the heart of AI applications used in everything from self-driving cars to computer vision technologies," says Xipeng Shen, a professor of computer science at NC State and co-author of a paper on the work."One of the biggest challenges facing the development of new AI tools is the amount of time and computing power it takes to train deep learning networks to identify and respond to the data patterns that are relevant to their applications.Training a deep learning network involves breaking a data sample into chunks of consecutive data points.Each chunk of data is run through a set of computational filters.The results are then run through a second set of filters.
UK
Zoomed in aerial footage, overhead shots, and a water-level view all set against detonating cracks show cliffs collapse and shards of jagged white and blue ice breaking apart.Indeed, the vertiginous shots showing 75 million tonnes of ice fall into the ocean have a dream-like quality.The show took four years to shoot, involved 2,000 hours of dives, 400,000 hours of camera trap footage, and visits to 60 countries.We’re treated to intimate scenes of a family of orangutans in Borneo, a shark feeding frenzy in French Polynesia, and a lone Siberian tiger stalking in the snowy forest, as well as vast landscapes from the Serengeti to the boreal forest.Humans appear in just one scene, casting fishing nets in Alaska to capture herring, which Attenborough notes have been “greatly reduced” due to overfishing.Warming oceans have shrunk sea ice, forcing walruses to huddle on shore more often.
UK
Less than a week after it was announced, Google is pulling the plug on its controversial AI ethics advisory board—an about-face attributable to Googlers themselves.The formation of the eight-member Advanced Technology External Advisory Council (ATEAC) was broadly met with apprehension.Wasn’t this just Google policing itself with the blessing of a handful of academics?Ethics is arguably an area where Google has stumbled recently, taking flack from lawmakers, the press, and its own employees over concerns it was involved in a military drone project and engaged in building a government-censored search product for the Chinese market.In other worse, the core premise of ATEAC seemed compromised from the start.Google already maintains internal AI ethics principles—it was just, in the minds of many employees, increasingly unwilling to follow them.
US
PITTSBURGH (April 5, 2019) -- Two professors at the University of Pittsburgh received an NSF Rapid Response Research (RAPID) grant for $175,000 to study the environmental effects of new anti-corrosion treatments currently being used on Pittsburgh's lead pipes.Like many cities across the country, Pittsburgh's water system still uses some lead pipes, and over time, those can corrode, leaching lead into the drinking water system.To combat this, the Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Authority (PWSA) is introducing orthophosphate into Pittsburgh's water system, which will coat the insides of the lead pipes and help prevent the harmful corrosion.PWSA produces approximately 70 million gallons of treated drinking water per day, which meets all EPA Safe Drinking Water Act standards.Orthophosphate is a food-grade additive that has been shown to be more effective than the soda ash and lime previously used for PWSA's corrosion control.Sarah Haig, PhD, assistant professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Swanson School of Engineering with a secondary appointment in Environmental and Occupational Health at the Graduate School of Public Health, and Emily Elliott, PhD, associate professor of Geology and Environmental Science in the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences and Director of the Pittsburgh Water Collaboratory, will evaluate water samples provided by the PWSA.
US
A newly published research paper suggests that Facebook's ad delivery system discriminates along racial and gender lines, even when advertisers target their content to a wide audience.Researchers spent $8,500 on ads, and found that housing and job ads were shown to different demographics even though they were set to be targeted at identical audiences.This comes on the heels of US housing officials' recent charge that Facebook enables housing discrimination.The paper was put together by six researchers from Boston's Northeastern University, the University of Southern California, and policy group Upturn.The researchers spent $8,500 running dozens of ads on the platform to determine whether Facebook's ad targeting was skewing certain ads towards or away from certain groups.Read more: Facebook is facing new housing discrimination charges from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development
US
The news has already sparked a wave of conversations and speculation, and its effects on the creative discipline may ultimately outweigh its scale.While Droga5 reported more than $200 million in revenue for 2017, Accenture’s marketing division brought in an estimated $7.8 billion last year, making it equivalent to a holding company the size of Interpublic Group.(That total also marked a 20 percent increase from the previous year.)Opinions began to fly fast and furious before the organizations’ respective press teams even hit “send” on their email announcements.But to start, Adweek spoke to the two men behind the deal, Accenture Interactive CEO Brian Whipple and Droga5 founder and creative chairman David Droga, for insights on its origins and their shared future taking on a fragmented industry.And we have a broad set of capabilities that doesn’t value anyone above the others, which includes digital marketing capabilities, digital content and commerce.
UK
The size of a standard iPhone has stayed the same between generations, with the iPhone 8, iPhone X and iPhone XS all boasting a 5.8-inch display – but that might not be the case for much longer.According to a report by Digitimes, the series of iPhones that will release in 2020 (the iPhone 12) will be smaller than current iPhones – the smallest handset have a 5.42-inch display, stepping up to 6.06 inches and then 6.47 inches for larger devices.In comparison the iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max and iPhone XR have screens of 5.8, 6.1 and 6.5 inches respectively.What's coming with iOS 13?Everything we know about the iPhone 11The report is based on sources from Apple’s component supply chain, and they add that the company is still unsure whether to stick to Samsung-provided displays or defect to LG for its touch technology.
US
The move is a slight departure from the FDA's previous messaging on the matter.In the past, the agency suggested that CBD products would be barred because a CBD-based drug called Epidiolex also exists.Dispensed: Your weekly dose of healthcare newsBy clicking Sign Up, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider Inc. and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.That's led to a flurry of expert speculation about how the industry — which some analysts have projected will soon blossom into a $16 billion market— will shake out.In the statement, outgoing US Food and Drug Administration chief Scott Gottlieb hinted at the possibility for legal CBD-based foods and drinks to exist at some point — so long as they meet or are below a level that the agency deems permissible.
US
WASHINGTON, D.C., April 2, 2019 -- The power to align water molecules is usually held by ice, which affects nearby water and encourages it to join the ice layer -- to freeze too.But in the case of organisms living in freezing habitats, a particularly powerful antifreeze protein is able to overpower the grip ice has on water and convince water molecules to behave in ways that benefit the protein instead.Lead author Konrad Meister at Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Germany and his colleagues have traveled to the coldest places on Earth, including the Arctic and Antarctic, to collect antifreeze proteins from different sources.The protein they are examining in this study is the most active antifreeze protein on record, and it comes from a beetle in Northern Europe called Rhagium mordax."The antifreeze proteins have one side that is uniquely structured, the so-called ice-binding site of the protein, which is very flat, slightly hydrophobic and doesn't have any charged residues," Meister said.Now, for the first time, these unique biomolecules have been adsorbed to ice in the laboratory to get a closer look at the mechanisms that guide the interaction when antifreeze proteins are in contact with ice.
UK
Archaeologists working in the Swiss town of Saint-Ursanne have discovered a remarkably well-preserved leather bootie dating back to the Middle Ages.Located in northwest Switzerland near the French border, the picturesque town of Saint-Ursanne has managed to retain its medieval character.In one of the more striking finds, researchers from the Jura Office of Culture uncovered a fragment of a baby bootie dating back to the late 14th century, as reported in the Local.The tiny leather boot would have fit a child around 12 months of age.Soggy deposits allow for the preservation of waterlogged organic materials such as leather and wood.The Jura archaeologists sent the fragments to the the husband-and-wife team of Serge and Marquita Volke at the Lausanne Shoe Museum for treatment and classification.
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