Everett Toliver

Everett Toliver

Followers 51
Following 40
UK
Visible has just launched a fantastic iPhone deals promotion, giving new customers a free pair of Bose headphones with every purchase.
UK
The first major of the year is under way and Tiger is on the prowl - watch a PGA live stream and catch all the 1st round Championship action today.
US
The Pixel 5 could see a jump in refresh rate and screen size.
China
The fact that Samsung Unpacked will take place on Wednesday, August 5th is well known to many tech fans. The event itself is held, first ... The post Note 20 will arrive with UWP technology – a high-speed alternative to NFC appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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If ecosystems are the next battleground, Google needs to start properly arming itself for the war.
UK
This is exciting news as the orcas are down to only 73 individuals as of the end of last year.
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The FCC has greenlit Amazon’s plans to deploy a constellation of 3,236 broadband satellites into the night sky. Amazon is calling its project Kuiper (named after the belt in the outer solar system which extends from the orbit of Neptune at 30 AU, to approximately 50 AU from the Sun.) “We have heard so many... Read more » The post FCC greenlights Amazon’s Kuiper 3,236 satellite broadband constellation appeared first on Telecoms Tech News.
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While many new parents would like to sleep right next to their newborn, experts discourage sharing a bed with your infant. A baby movement monitor is the best alternative to being by your baby’s side while they sleep. Placing your infant to sleep on their back, avoiding soft surfaces, and refraining from placing blankets, pillows, […] The post The best baby movement monitor so you can rest easy while your baby sleeps appeared first on New Folks.
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From Covid conspiracies to election scams, automated advertising software plays a large—and largely unseen—role.
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Xbox One support was removed from Avowed and Everwild's official sites
UK
We refuse to accept the demise of Android dessert names, and apparently so does Google.
US
The new layout aims to make it easier for users to see how many people follow specific Pages set up by businesses and celebs.
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Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says customers are starting to view so-called digital transformation as key to their ability to survive disruptions like the pandemic, rather than as optional projects. "No one can take away from the fact that GDP is going to be negative," he said. Microsoft released fourth-quarter and 2020 fiscal year earnings on Wednesday, beating analyst estimates in many ways, but falling short in key areas. Are you a current or former Microsoft employee? Contact this reporter via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-425-344-8242) or email ([email protected]). Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. One of the lessons Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella learned from the pandemic is companies are no longer viewing the modernization of their IT as optional projects, but key to their ability to survive disruptions to their businesses. "The thing that we have learned I would say in the last five months is that digital technology is…becoming perhaps the most key to business resilience," Nadella said on a call with investors following the company's fourth-quarter and fiscal year 2020 earnings release. Microsoft's sales pitch in recent years has used phrases like "digital transformation" and "tech intensity," telling customers (and potential customers) that no matter the industry they're in, they should adopt new technologies to help take their businesses to the next level. Nadella's comments suggest Microsoft's pitch and the way customers view making so-called digital transformations has evolved from a means to elevate a business to a means to keep it afloat, especially during the economic crisis created by the pandemic.  When Nadella thinks of digital transformation now, he said, he thinks about how Microsoft can help make companies more resilient to external factors — like a pandemic — by making business processes remote or automated in what he said is going to be an "ecommerce, contactless, reimagined world." That kind of rethinking is going to prove necessary across industries and sectors, he indicated, because while individual companies like Microsoft itself are doing reasonably well under current circumstances, looking at the bigger picture shows that in aggregate, the entire economy is reeling from the pandemic, touching the lives of everybody. "No one can take away from the fact that GDP is going to be negative," he said. Microsoft released fourth-quarter and 2020 fiscal year earnings on Wednesday, beating analyst estimates in many ways by reporting $11.2 billion in profit on revenue of $38 billion for the quarter and $44.3 billion in profile on revenue of $143 billion for the year. Microsoft's cloud business once again appeared strong, reaching $50 billion in annual revenue for the first time, but Azure revenue growth slowed to 47% from 59% last quarter and Microsoft missed expectations for the key business unit that includes Office 365 and its Teams chat app.  Got a tip? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message her on Twitter @ashannstew, or send her a secure message through Signal at 425-344-8242.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
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The social network and its photo service Instagram are creating new teams to tackle this issue.
UK
And only "a small subset" of those 130 accounts were actually taken over, according to Twitter.
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Apps secretly monitor a victim’s communications, location, photos, password keystrokes, and more.
UK
Princess Beatrice has married Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi in an unannounced ceremony in front of her grandmother the Queen, and a small number of guests, Buckingham Palace has confirmed.The palace said in a statement: “The private wedding ceremony of Princess Beatrice and Mr Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi took place at 11am on Friday 17th July at The Royal Chapel of All Saints at Royal Lodge, Windsor.“The small ceremony was attended by The Queen, The Duke of Edinburgh and close family.“The wedding took place in accordance with all relevant government guidelines.”Related... 'Magic Turns To Anxiety': The Couples Cancelling Their Weddings Amid Coronavirus Prince Andrew Has 'Provided Zero Cooperation' To The Jeffrey Epstein Inquiry, Says US Prosecutor What Will Prince Harry And Meghan Markle Do Now?
UK
With a high-res display, a backlight, and no ads on the lock screen, the Kobo Nia is a strong alternative to Amazon's e-reader.
UK
We're rounding up all the best cheap laptop deals in the US right here so you can grab your perfect computer for less.
China
Electronic gadgets and overally all the accessories and more or less everything are in huge supply on Aliexpress. It’s probably actually harder to find something ... The post Non-contact IR thermometer and more on sale from Aliexpress appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Chicago-based software review company G2 raised $100 million in venture capital and had big growth ambitions. It spent like a well-funded company, undergoing a $6 million office renovation and purchasing a domain name reportedly once valued at $1 million. But its ambitions surpassed its revenue growth, and in December 2019 the company laid off 10% of its workforce. The company applied for a Paycheck Protection Program loan to cover its payroll expenses during the coronavirus shutdown.  The company received a loan between $5 million and $10 million, according to the US. Treasury. In June, the company said, it returned the loan. On June 30, it laid off another 5% of its employees. Business Insider spoke with 11 current and former employees who said the company appeared to be spending like it would double or triple its revenue in 2019. Instead, its revenue grew just 50%, putting the tech startup in a financial squeeze which continues to this day. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Connecting the fifth and sixth floors of G2's new office, situated in the Chicago Loop, is a giant wooden staircase with stadium-esque platforms designed to seat the quickly-growing company during its increasingly populated all-hands meetings. Bright red cushions and safety tape accent the large structure, matching the color scheme of the company's new logo, reimagined and truncated from its clunkier, original name, G2 Crowd. The stairwell, elegant but formidable, was built in 2019 and signaled that G2's scrappier early days were past. It cost $1 million of a $6 million renovation budget to build. The structure had only been in use for a few months in December, when G2 staffers climbed to the second floor and learned that 10% of the 400-person company would be laid off and disinvited from the annual holiday party the next evening.  "Optically, looking back, it does not look good," one former employee told Business Insider. The company would later dispute the amount paid for the stairway from its own pockets. G2, a software review website and one of the most successful startups on the Chicago tech scene, made another decision not long afterwards whose optics also looked questionable in hindsight.  As the coronavirus was tanking the US economy, the company applied for and received a small business loan as part of the federal Paycheck Protection Program to cover some of its payroll costs. The PPP money was earmarked to help cash-strapped businesses keep their workers on staff; and if they could avoid layoffs, the loans would be forgiven. G2 is one of roughly 10,000 companies backed by venture capital and public-equity firms that participated in the government's emergency loan program. The startups that received money are at the center of a debate about whether venture-backed businesses, which are partially owned by their VC investors and which are designed to pursue inherently risky business models, have taken away money intended to help mom-and-pop employers, like restaurants and dental offices, stay afloat during the coronavirus pandemic. As the case of G2 shows, the answer is not always black and white. G2, which has raised more than $100 million from top-tier venture capital firms like IVP, Accel, and Pritzker Group, was already struggling by the time the coronavirus began to spread across the US. With its free-spending history and missed growth targets, G2 had all the signs of a company that leaned on the PPP program to support an unsustainable growth model. As it turns out, G2 returned the government money — which totaled between $5 million and $10 million according to the government's database — in June, following Business Insider inquiries into the loan. Later that month, G2 laid off another 5% of its staff, even as it said its business was showing signs of resilience and better-than-expected performance amid the pandemic. Business Insider spoke with 11 current and former G2 employees to get a first-hand look at the financial decisions made at the company leading up to the coronavirus crisis. Their comments, shared on condition of anonymity because they feared retribution, reveal a pattern of high-risk, low-payoff spending and leadership missteps that left the company ill-prepared for the coronavirus curveball — a situation that describes many other venture-funded startups whose workers are increasingly adding to the country's unemployment rolls. A photoshopped image of the CEO ringing the NYSE bell  G2 was founded in 2013, but its hyper-growth drive began in May 2018 when cofounder Godard Abel took over as CEO with a mission to take the company public. The IPO goal was emphasized to G2's staff at every all-hands meeting, where Abel would display a photoshopped image of himself ringing the bell at the New York Stock Exchange. During Abel's first year in the CEO job, G2 made two acquisitions followed by bumpy integrations. It also opened two international offices. It was all in line with the growth-first obsession that defined many startups at the time. "Everything was based on vanity metrics: over-hiring to hit milestones, getting to five cities," one former employee said. "They really pushed and bragged that we had 400 employees in multiple countries." G2 is a review site for enterprise software products, where chief technology officers choose expensive software based on customer-generated feedback, like a restaurant gets on Yelp. Revenue comes from customers like IBM and Salesforce, who pay for click-throughs to their websites. G2 also sells research reports similar to those of industry data firms. IBM, G2's largest client, pays millions of dollars a year for the startup's various services. But G2's big dream is to become a proper digital marketplace for business software, as Amazon did for books. To get there, the company invested heavily in hiring and marketing in 2018 and 2019 before hitting a financial squeeze.  A new URL with a 7-figure price tag sunk G2's traffic When G2 outgrew its long-time home at Chicago's Civic Opera House, it signed an 8-year lease on a 66,000 square-foot space down the street. Crain's Chicago described the move as a "drastic expansion" in response to a "hiring binge." That was when the million dollar staircase began.  G2' new marketing chief, Ryan Bonnici, who joined the company in December 2017, pushed for the construction of the voguish staircase, touting it as a draw for Chicago tech talent, several sources said.   With its showpiece steps, G2 had something to match other buzzy Silicon Valley firms like Square and Asana, and the company could lay claim to young Chicago tech workers who might otherwise be drawn to jobs at out-of-town tech companies with big local offices, like Google or LinkedIn. A G2 spokesperson, who declined to give their name, said part of a renovation allowance from the new landlord paid for the staircase, which also helped G2 avoid additional construction to integrate its two floors. One of the marketing team's other big purchases was a new domain name. Having changed its name from G2 Crowd to G2, the company wanted a URL to match,  and purchased the G2.com domain name. The URL was originally priced at seven-figures, two former employees said, though it may have been lowered during the negotiation process.  But, as is common when you switch domain names, the company's visitor numbers temporarily tanked when it launched the new url in April 2019. The company lost 35% of its traffic overnight, one former marketer said, although it eventually returned. Lauren Decker, Vice President of Brand and Product Marketing at G2, defends the purchase.  "It was a pretty critical investment for us to have a domain that's easy to search and to find, and having a 2-digit domain makes it easier to remember," she said, describing the cost of the G2 domain name as "below market price." Revenue declined with employee morale The exuberant spending might have gone unremarked, but revenue growth slipped in 2019 following what insiders described as a leadership change that sank the sales team's morale and sent some of its leaders packing. In the four years before 2019, the sales team had doubled or tripled its revenues from the year before, according to former team members. But in 2019, G2's revenue grew just 50%. Former members of the sales team pointed fingers at cofounder Matt Gorniak, who rejoined G2 as chief revenue officer in May 2018 and served until May 2020. As with the marketing team, leadership set ambitious hiring and performance goals that many team members found untenable.  The company admits some missteps. "While we won't discuss our sales targets or achievements externally, we will say that while the percent growth rate did not meet our stated goals, we are incredibly proud of our team's performance," the G2 spokesperson said.  "Things are going great at G2. Stoked that the momentum is strong and now accelerating with Mike Weir joining as my successor CRO," Gorniak said in an email to Business Insider when asked to discuss his tenure at the company.  Venture capital changed its tune on PPP Without the setbacks of 2019, G2 might have been well-fixed financially to continue on a strong growth path with no need for government help. The company raised $55 million in a Series C led by IVP in October 2018, bringing its total funding to $100 million. That round valued G2 at nearly $500 million, according to TechCrunch. But by March 2020, with its last fundraising more than 15 months in the rear-view mirror, the coronavirus pandemic came barreling down to test G2's resiliency — and put its recent management moves under scrutiny. When G2's PPP loan was approved, Abel told staffers it would keep everyone's jobs safe for around six weeks, two recent employees told Business Insider. "We were pretty uncertain and fearful of how that was going to affect our business," Decker said on June 10, about the decision to apply for the loan.  Despite its initial relief, G2 returned the loan in early June. The business performed better than it had expected, Decker said, and new government guidance led it to reconsider its eligibility for the funds.  In its further cost-cutting in response to the virus, it pared vice president and senior leadership's pay by 15% to 20%, Decker said. Senior leaders will also forgo their bonuses, the G2 spokesperson said.   Then on June 30, the company laid off 17 people, or 5% of its remaining staff. "The largest firms in venture were very scared that the optics would look bad for them" Had G2 kept its PPP loan, it could have potentially averted the layoffs for some weeks. But would that only have delayed an inevitable need to cut staff going forward? In that case, G2 may have had to repay the loan. The very nature of a PPP loan, with its restrictions on layoffs, is in some ways contrary to the belt-tightening that many VCs have advised their portfolio companies to undertake in order to conserve cash and survive the downturn caused by the pandemic. G2 investors Jules Maltz from IVP, Arun Matthew from Accel, Tim Kopp from Hyde Park Venture Partners and Adam Koopersmith from Pritzker Group did not respond to requests for comment about G2's PPP loan filing or return.  Krishna Gupta, founding partner at venture firm Romulus Capital, said all of the companies in his portfolio applied for the program initially, and believes the program did save jobs, but some of the companies gave the money back once they realized they could get more capital from their late stage investors.  "The largest firms in venture were very scared that the optics would look bad for them in taking a loan — that it was, in the public discourse, for Main Street and not for tech or Wall Street," Gupta said. As of June 30, the PPP program has distributed around $522 billion to more than 4.9 million businesses, the Treasury said. Many venture-backed companies received a portion of those funds, but many also gave the money back. Like many businesses, venture-backed companies faced a lack of clarity on whether they qualified. Companies like G2,with fewer than 500 employees, technically qualified as a small business, but new guidance issued by the US Treasury in late April stipulated that companies with access to outside capital, such as deep-pocketed investors, should not take the loan. "Every startup we heard of sent it back," said Jarrett Streebin, CEO at EasyPost, which received and returned its loan. "It would have helped, but the guidance on it was so weak, we were opening ourselves up to a lot of liability in the future, and liability that would be tough to measure because of how loosely some of the stuff was written." Meanwhile G2, now seasoned in the art of making do with less money than expected, has a new strategy for weathering the coronavirus: taking things slow.  "Right now in this particular climate, especially with the recession and the pandemic still leaving a lot of uncertainty, we have slowed our hiring," Decker said. "Going into 2020, our focus has been on smart growth and how we ensure we get the most return on investment out of every program we run."SEE ALSO: $3 billion Carta slashed its revenue goal but kept hiring anyway, leading to massive layoffs in April. Insiders describe whiplash and organizational chaos as the company attempts an ambitious new pivot. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
UK
We've rounded up all seven of the upcoming Star Trek series we know about.
UK
You’re wearing PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) kit, someone walks up to you to monitor your temperature and you’re then asked to walk across the aisle to be seated distant from a co-passenger. Welcome to the future of air travel. Traveling by air is not going to be as it was probably a few months back. The onset of COVID-19 – … Continue reading
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All the major US carriers have options that let you stream as much as you want. We've laid out how they work, and which will give you the most bang for your buck.
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(University of Luxembourg) The Luxembourg National Research Fund (FNR) is supporting an extensive new research project to advance data networks, led by the University of Luxembourg's Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) in collaboration with SES.
Sweden
the Number of fintechbolag with your own debit card, continue to grow the business.in the Netherlands Adyen announced today that they are jumping on the korttrenden, a service that the company is going to offer in the whole of Europe.”For us, it's not a way to compete,” said Adyens Ceo Tobias Jones.The Dutch betalbolaget Adyen announced the launch of a private payment cards in the eu and, therefore, also in stockholm, Sweden.the Cards, which are now being launched, addressed to the merchants, who, in turn, give the cards to pass on to their consumers.the Idea is to give merchants more control over your operations by eliminating the need to use a third-party kortutgivningen.
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The Digital Video Broadcasting consortium has approved a new specification called DVB-I that is designed to improve the delivery of linear TV over the internet.Traditional linear broadcast TV was created decades before the internet was invented and thus lacks a lot of the features of video content created with the internet in mind.This new specification seems to be an attempt to compensate for that by adding things like metadata, to make linear content searchable, and help with things like aggregation and multi-screen consumption.“In developing an internet-centric solution for linear television services, we are providing the industry with a crucial missing piece that raises internet-based delivery to the same level in the DVB ecosystem as RF-based content delivery,” said DVB Chair Peter MacAvock.“With these building blocks, addressing the discovery of DVB-I services and the delivery of programme metadata, DVB offers broadcasters and operators an exciting new deployment option.”“The DVB-I specification defines DVB-I Service Lists, a means for internet-connected devices to find curated sets of linear television services that may be delivered through broadband or broadcast mechanisms,” said the announcement.
UK
Former BT chief exec Gavin Patterson is a busy boy.On top of his position as part-time chair of Salesforce, the mullet-sporting, '80s businessman throwback will also be gracing two more companies.It was announced today that Patterson (pictured) will be joining Solon Management Consulting as an advisor and Elixirr as chairman.The first appears to be a German consultancy company specialising in telecoms, media and technology (TMT) industries.According to its blurb, Solon sells "clear, rapid and tailor-made solutions, ranging from strategy development to operations implementation."London-based Elixirr, meanwhile, describes itself as "the challenger consultancy".
US
SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–November 12, 2019–Sverica Capital Management (“Sverica”), a private equity investment firm, announced today that it has made a strategic investment in Gryphon Networks Corp. (“Gryphon” or the “Company”), a leading provider of sales performance management and compliance software.Based in Boston, Massachusetts, Gryphon offers an enterprise-grade computer telephony integration platform that automatically screens, collects, and analyzes phone-based sales activity data from any device to transform activity into accurate, actionable sales insight that drives improved sales performance for many of the country’s top consumer-facing companies.Purpose-built for organizations with large, distributed sales teams, Gryphon’s system enables agents to use the platform from any device, managers to leverage robust analytics tying activity to desired outcomes, and executives to rest assured that sales efforts comply with marketing privacy regulations and internal business rules.Sverica’s investment aims to help Gryphon accelerate development of new sales performance management functionality and expand around its strong team to maintain high satisfaction among Gryphon’s loyal customers while meeting increased demand.Jeff Fotta, CEO of Gryphon, said “Gryphon has independently developed into a significant player in the sales performance management industry.
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Spice things up with this small yet sturdy bamboo mortar-and-pestle set.It will eliminate the need for ground grocery store spices, pulverizing whole peppercorns and fennel seeds for fresher flavor and stronger aromatics.That's right, the most expensive spice in the world can be had for less than a Hamilton.It's not just saffron's vibrant color and unmistakable flavor that drive up its price.There are plenty of reusable options to choose from -- but we're particularly fond of this all-encompassing set, which features four bent and four straight options in a variety of fun sizes, ensuring all your drinking needs are covered.It also includes a pair of cleaning brushes and eight silicone tips for really hot or cold beverages.
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