Felton Woodall

Felton Woodall

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Following 42
US
Google reportedly trains new employees to avoid using certain words that may jeopardize the company in antitrust backlash down the line, per a report from The Markup. The off-limits words include "unique," "dominant," "the leader," and "unmatched," among others. Google also reminds employees to avoid sending a message that the firm is out to 'crush,' 'kill,' 'hurt,' 'block,' or do anything else that might be perceived as evil or unfair." A company spokesperson told The Markup that it has had these training guides in place for employees for "well over a decade." The report comes as Google remains embroiled in multiple antitrust investigations both in the US and in Europe. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Alphabet, Google's parent company, reportedly trains new employees to not use certain words that may come back to haunt the firm in antitrust backlash. According to a report from The Markup, the company's list of words and phrases that are off-limits includes "the leader" and "market share." Instead of saying "unique," employees could say "new" or "alternative." And in place of "dominant," employees could use "successful," according to one of the documents, which the outlet uploaded to a cloud file. Employees across various departments, from engineering to sales, receive the training according to the report. "Alphabet gets sued a lot, and we have our fair share of regulatory investigations," one internal document reads, according to the outlet. "Assume every document will become public." Lawmakers that are currently probing Google and other firms over antitrust concerns are tasked with identifying a number of factors before being able to take legal action against the companies, one of which is establishing that they do in fact have dominance in the market. Search is Google's most profitable business product, and the company operating 90% of all search queries. But according to documents, the company instructs employees to discuss market dominance carefully.  "We use the term 'User Preference for Google Search' and never the term market share," reads the document. Another factor lawmakers have to prove is that companies are harming consumers and small business owners. In another internal file, the company reminds employees to "always include at least one" example of how business decisions are designed to benefit the public. "We are not out to 'crush,' 'kill,' 'hurt,' 'block,' or do anything else that might be perceived as evil or unfair," one of the documents reads according to The Markup. "Microsoft famously got into trouble when one of their employees threatened to 'cut off Netscape's air supply.'" Company spokesperson Julie Tarallo McAlister told Business Insider: "These are completely standard competition law compliance trainings that most large companies provide to their employees. We instruct employees to compete fairly and build great products, rather than focus or opine on competitors. We've had these trainings in place for well over a decade." The report surfaces as Google remains tied up in multiple antitrust investigations in the US and in Europe, including a congressional probe into the firm as well as into Amazon, Apple, and Facebook over concerns regarding anti-competitive business practices. Read the full report on The Markup here.SEE ALSO: Big Tech's CEOs testified in a historic antitrust hearing. Now what? Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
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Attacks that worked 10 years ago have only gotten worse despite growing use.
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HBO Go disappears tomorrow, with HBO Max meant to replace it. But HBO Max is in a standoff with Roku and Amazon Fire TV, and you're caught in the middle.
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The new content also bring the ability to dream and fireworks to the island
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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is testifying before Congress about antitrust on Wednesday. Facebook has released the full text of Zuckerberg's planned prepared remarks, and you can read it below. Facing scrutiny over his company's power and dominance, the technology exec will argue that heavy-handed regulation will only benefit China. Zuckerberg is to argue that Facebook still faces considerable competition. The CEOs of Apple, Amazon, and Google will also testify at the unprecedented hearing. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will warn Congress that attempts to regulate his company's power under antitrust law risks helping China. On Wednesday, the 36-year-old billionaire chief executive is due to testify before the House Judiciary Committee in an unprecedented hearing that will also feature the CEOs of Apple, Amazon, and Google. All four American companies are facing intensifying scrutiny over their outsize market power and their impacts on the competition, and face an array of antitrust probes both domestically and abroad. Ahead of the hearing, Facebook has released a copy of Zuckerberg's prepared remarks — offering a preview of how the technology executive plans to defend his company against charges of unfair dominance. The thrust of the argument: That Facebook is a force for good, that it still faces plentiful competition, and that any heavy-handed regulation would hand a victory to authoritarian China and reshape the balance of power online for the worse. "Although people around the world use our products, Facebook is a proudly American company. We believe in values — democracy, competition, inclusion and free expression — that the American economy was built on," Zuckerberg is to say. "Many other tech companies share these values, but there's no guarantee our values will win out. For example, China is building its own version of the internet focused on very different ideas, and they are exporting their vision to other countries. As Congress and other stakeholders consider how antitrust laws support competition in the U.S., I believe it's important to maintain the core values of openness and fairness that have made America's digital economy a force for empowerment and opportunity here and around the world." Read Mark Zuckerberg's full prepared remarks below. I. Introduction Chairman Cicilline, Ranking Member Sensenbrenner, and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to be here today. I'd also like to thank your staff for their professionalism and courtesy in working with our team over the course of your investigation. Facebook is part of an industry that has changed the world. We face intense competition globally and we only succeed when we build things people find valuable. I'm proud that we stand for American values like giving every person a voice and expanding access to opportunity. As a platform for ideas we'll always be at the center of important debates about society and technology, which is why I've called for new rules for the internet. II. Facebook's value and the role of competition Every day, millions of Americans use our services to stay in touch with friends and family and talk about issues that matter to them. People use our apps to share videos, photos, livestreams, posts and private messages; to join communities, set up fundraisers for good causes, and even register to give blood. These services create a lot of value in people's lives, and our business model means we can offer them for free. We also help millions of businesses connect with customers. Facebook gives small businesses and individual entrepreneurs access to sophisticated tools that previously only the largest players had. Now any business can use our services to establish an online presence, reach potential customers and grow. We're constantly building new ways to empower people to connect and share. Since Covid-19 emerged, we've seen how important this can be. People use our services to stay in touch with friends and family they can't be with in person; they use our tools to keep their businesses running since the internet stays open even when physical stores cannot. Facebook supports its mission of connecting people around the world by selling ads, and we face significant competition. We compete against the companies appearing at this hearing, plus many others that sell advertising and connect people. We also compete globally, including against companies that have access to markets that we aren't in. Our story would not have been possible without U.S. laws that encourage competition and innovation. I believe that strong and consistent competition policy is vital because it ensures that the playing field is level for all. At Facebook, we compete hard, because we're up against other smart and innovative companies that are determined to win. We know that our future success is not guaranteed, especially in a global tech industry defined by rapid innovation. The history of technology is often the history of failure, and even industry leading tech companies fail if they don't stay competitive. This is why we're focused on delivering better services for people and businesses, and competing as vigorously as we can within the rules. Although people around the world use our products, Facebook is a proudly American company. We believe in values -- democracy, competition, inclusion and free expression -- that the American economy was built on. Many other tech companies share these values, but there's no guarantee our values will win out. For example, China is building its own version of the internet focused on very different ideas, and they are exporting their vision to other countries. As Congress and other stakeholders consider how antitrust laws support competition in the U.S., I believe it's important to maintain the core values of openness and fairness that have made America's digital economy a force for empowerment and opportunity here and around the world. III. Facebook's History of Innovation In a competitive economy, innovation leads to improvements that benefit consumers. I understand this is one of the key goals of antitrust law, and it is what Facebook has been focused on since day one. We've consistently added new products for people that enhance their ability to connect and share what matters most to them. Our service began as a text-based website. Today on Facebook you can share almost any type of digital content; read news; broadcast or watch live video; play games; connect with businesses; buy or sell products; send and receive payments; organize groups and events; and raise money for important causes. WhatsApp provides secure and reliable communication, including voice and video calls. Instagram offers photo sharing with tools to connect and create. And the Facebook family goes beyond software, with hardware products like Oculus and Portal. We built these new products and services because the intense competitive pressures we face push us to experiment with new ideas. We are always working to develop technologies that will change how people connect and communicate in the future, and we invest around $10 billion per year in research and development. We know that if we don't constantly keep improving, we will fall behind. Many of our products were new concepts when we introduced them, and they have served as models for other companies and apps that have used and iterated on our ideas -- including features like News Feed ranking and the Like button that have become foundational to many competitive services. We have also helped advance nascent technologies like artificial intelligence (AI), augmented reality (AR), and virtual reality (VR). We actively contribute to the open-source community. For example, we developed the PyTorch open- source project, which has become one of the most successful AI development tools and is now used worldwide to create new AI technology and applications. We also released Detectron2, our computer vision technology which we use for integrity work; FAISS, a state-of-the-art search tool for finding similar multimedia documents; and DensePose, for 3D interpretation of 2D images. We offer hundreds of projects like these on Facebook Open Source and GitHub, where our projects have hundreds of thousands of followers. We also share the results of our hardware research: for example, we developed the world's most efficient servers and published the plans so everyone could use them as part of our Open Compute Project. I believe sharing our intellectual property this way helps the entire ecosystem move forward and develop new products. We create technology to enable social good. For example, our Crisis Response tools allow people to let family and friends know they are safe, share information during a crisis, and help communities recover. Our Safety Check tool has been activated in more than 1,400 crises. In 2018 alone, our community used Crisis Response tools for over 300 crises in more than 80 countries. We've also developed charitable giving tools that make it easy for our community to raise money for causes they care about on Facebook. People, nonprofits and verified Pages can collect donations from their friends and supporters on Facebook, and so far our community has raised more than $3 billion. To take just one example, the nonprofit No Kid Hungry has raised over $5 million from more than 200,000 donors to help feed children across the United States. We also invest in our communities, and have committed to making over $1 billion in investments in Black and diverse suppliers and communities in the US. Like many companies, we've both built our own products from the ground up, and we've moved others forward through mergers and acquisitions. Our acquisitions have helped drive innovation for people who use our own products and services and for the broader startup community. Acquisitions bring together different companies' complementary strengths. When you acquire a company, you can benefit from their technology and talent, and when you are acquired you get access to resources and people you otherwise might never have been able to tap into. Facebook has made Instagram and WhatsApp successful as part of our family of apps. Instagram and WhatsApp have been able to grow and operate their services using Facebook's bespoke, lower-cost infrastructure and tackle spam and harmful content with Facebook's integrity teams and technology. Following its acquisition, Instagram was able to get help stabilizing infrastructure and controlling runaway spam. It also benefited from the ability to plug into Facebook's self-serve ads system, sales team and existing advertiser relationships to drive monetization, and was able to build products including IG Direct and IG Video that used Facebook's technology and infrastructure. Before it was acquired, WhatsApp was a paid app with a reputation for secure communications; together we built on that by introducing end-to-end encryption and making it free to use. Since its acquisition, WhatsApp has also been able to develop products such as voice and video calling that were built on Facebook's technology stack. These benefits came about as a result of our acquisition of those companies, and would not have happened had we not made those acquisitions. We have developed new products for Instagram and WhatsApp, and we have learned from those companies to bring new ideas to Facebook. The end result is better services that provide more value to people and advertisers, which is a core goal of Facebook's acquisition strategy. IV. Facebook Platform In 2007, we launched the Facebook Platform, a set of tools for developers and businesses to build complementary services on Facebook. Our vision for Platform has always been to foster an ecosystem of apps that build on top of Facebook and create a richer and more interesting experience for people. At the same time, we have developed rules to make Platform work better for everyone and to protect the significant investments we made in capital and talent to develop it. We've made changes to those policies over time to deal with issues as they arose, and to protect user privacy and give people more control over their data. We stand by those changes and will continue to evaluate our policies to address any new issues that arise. V. The Benefits of Scale I understand that people have concerns about the size and perceived power that tech companies have. Ultimately, I believe companies shouldn't be making so many judgments about important issues like harmful content, privacy, and election integrity on their own. That's why I've called for a more active role for governments and regulators and updated rules for the internet. If we do this right, we can preserve what's best about this technology — the freedom for people to connect and express themselves and for entrepreneurs to build new things — while also protecting society from broader harms. In the meantime, Facebook is working to address problems at scale. From election security to building more privacy-protective products, we are bringing significant technical and financial resources to bear on the challenges we face. For example, we now have more than 35,000 people working on safety and security — three times as many as we had just three years ago. We've built sophisticated systems to find and remove harmful content. We're funding new technologies to tackle emerging threats like deepfakes. And we're building products to connect people to authoritative information, like our recently introduced Covid-19 and voter information centers. We have a responsibility to work constantly to keep people safe on our platform, and to make sure we're investing to fix our issues and get ahead of new risks. Facebook's size is an asset in those efforts. VI. Supporting Our Community Through the COVID-19 Pandemic Our services have supported people and businesses throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. People turn to Facebook to stay connected with their families and friends and get authoritative and up-to-date health information. For many, our services are critical communications tools: group calls in Italy during the early stages of the pandemic jumped by more than 1,000 percent, and in April 700 million people were making video calls every day on Messenger and WhatsApp. Businesses also use our tools to stay connected to customers, shift sales online, and run fundraisers. For many small businesses, being able to operate online is vital and I'm proud that our tools enable this. We built new products to respond to the crisis. We launched Community Help, which lets people find and offer help in their local area -- everything from volunteering to pick up groceries and assisting with errands to sharing goods and checking in on one another. This is the kind of social infrastructure that companies like Facebook are well positioned to provide. We connect people to authoritative health information and we're taking aggressive steps to stop Covid- 19-related misinformation and harmful content from spreading. In January, we started displaying educational pop-ups in Facebook and Instagram connecting people to authoritative Covid-19-related information from organizations including the CDC, regional health authorities, and the WHO. We also launched the Covid-19 information center, which is now featured at the top of News Feed on Facebook and includes real-time updates from national health authorities and global organizations. Through these efforts across Facebook and Instagram, we've directed more than 2 billion people to resources from health authorities, and we're giving millions in ad credits to health authorities so they can reach people. We're also using data in new ways to inform the public health response. We partnered with Carnegie Mellon University to launch a Covid-19 Symptom Survey that can help researchers predict the spread of the disease. With millions of responses, researchers are able to get a much more detailed picture of the pandemic. We also contributed aggregated anonymized location data to the Covid-19 Mobility Data Network, a group of 40 health researchers whose work helps governments determine if and where it's appropriate to roll back social distancing orders. I'm proud that we've been able to support people, businesses and the public health effort during this crisis.VII. Our Responsibility to Our Community This is an incredibly challenging time, and that's why it's more important than ever that people can have conversations on our platforms about the issues that matter to them – whether that's Covid-19, racial and social injustice, family and economic concerns, or the upcoming elections. We recognize that we have a responsibility to stop bad actors from interfering with or undermining these conversations through misinformation, attempted voter suppression, or speech that is hateful or incites violence. I understand the concerns people have in these areas, and we are working to address them. While we are making progress – for example, we have dramatically improved our ability to proactively find and remove harmful content and prevent election interference – I recognize that we have more to do. I know our primary goal at this hearing is to talk about antitrust and competition issues, but with four major tech CEOs appearing before Congress, we also have an opportunity to talk about how technology can better serve society. Each of our companies is doing important work to meet our current responsibilities to our communities, while also planning and investing for a time where we are likely to see significant economic and social disruption. I hope at least some of today's hearing will touch on the future, and how our collective scale and resources could be harnessed to help people and businesses. For instance, many families are worried about schooling and how to balance home and work obligations going forward. How can we leverage our products to lessen this burden for people? What else can we do to support communities if social distancing orders remain in place? How can we better equip our small businesses to compete, including on the world stage? How else can technology companies assist the public health effort? We don't have all the answers yet, but I hope that our industry continues to look for innovative ways to support our communities through this difficult time. VIII. Conclusion Our success rests on our ability to build products that bring value to people's lives -- whether it's finding a supportive Facebook group, starting a business on Instagram, video calling loved ones on Messenger or staying in touch with a friend on WhatsApp. Facebook is a successful company now, but we got there the American way: we started with nothing and provided better products that people find valuable. As I understand our laws, companies aren't bad just because they are big. Many large companies that fail to compete cease to exist. This is why we're focused on building and updating our products to give people the best possible experiences. Provided we continue investing in new ideas and living up to our broader social responsibilities, I'm hopeful that we'll keep making progress and deliver better products and services -- for the people and businesses that use our products, for the wider tech ecosystem, and for the world. Several years ago, Facebook moved our headquarters to the campus where Sun Microsystems used to be. We kept their sign out front, on the back of ours, to remind us that things change fast in tech. I've long believed that the nature of our industry is that someday a product will replace Facebook. I want us to be the ones that build it, because if we don't, someone else will. Thank you, and I look forward to your questions.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why you don't see brilliantly blue fireworks
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Here's a look at our most important stories for the week ending July 25.
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(Portland State University) The new article Evidence from Urban Roads without Bicycle Lanes on the Impact of Bicycle Traffic on Passenger Car Travel Speeds published in Transportation Research Record, the Journal of the Transportation Research Board, demonstrates that bicycles do not significantly reduce passenger car travel speeds on low speed, low volume urban roads without bicycle lanes. The research shows that differences in vehicle speeds with and without cyclists were generally on the order of 1 mph or less - negligible from a practical perspective.
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This summer’s showcase will be packed with new reveals
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Now celebrate with this chicken burger made from the finest reformed Texas factory floor scrapings.
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Power-sipping, phat bandwidth and dope density Great news for anyone who wants to use Slack and Google Chrome simultaneously: The JEDEC Solid State Technology Association has formalised the spec for DDR5 SDRAM, expected to become the standard memory for most computing devices.…
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There was a time in the distant past when PIM (short for “Personal Information Management”) was the name of the enterprise and productivity game and Microsoft Outlook was the king of that hill. Today, Outlook has become mostly an email client like many, with a few add-ons on top. Perhaps that may have been for the best because, for almost … Continue reading
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An unprecedented “security incident” has rocked Twitter—and scammers are making off with huge amounts of bitcoin.
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Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge The Nintendo Switch, like everything else that can lighten the mood during this incredibly tough time, is in short supply. And as soon as retailers like Best Buy, Amazon, and Walmart gets it in stock, it quickly sells out. It can be disheartening to miss out on the opportunity to buy a Switch — but fear not! The purpose of this article is to help you do just that without paying more than it would usually cost at retail. We’re keeping a lookout across the web to find where, when, and how you can buy a Nintendo Switch (the one you can dock to your TV or remove for portable use) or a Switch Lite (the portable-only version of the console) as well as any bundles that seem like good deals. Keep in mind that stock — even Switch consoles that... Continue reading…
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Xiaomi has hiked the price of its budget phone, the Redmi Note 8 in India yet again.
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If you’ve been waiting for Microsoft’s latest Flight Simulator release, the time is close at hand. Today the folks that run the development of Microsoft Flight Simulator revealed that they’d reached an important milestone. Alpha 5 was was released this week, on the 9th of July, 2020, and Closed Beta was moved into final testing! Included in the update notes … Continue reading
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Alphabet’s novel solution to connecting the unconnected has had its first non-emergency deployment in Kenya.
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Instead of smoking cannabis with Joe Rogan – an activity that’s illegal at the federal level, where Musk holds a security clearance – he’s making outlandish claims about the capabilities of a brain chip in development by his neuro-tech startup Neuralink.On Lex Fridman’s “Artificial Intelligence” podcast, Musk recently stated that Neuralink will ‘solve’ certain brain disorders.So Neuralink I think at first will solve a lot of brain-related diseases.Parents can’t remember their kids’ names and that kind of thing.In fact, there’s some ethical debate in the medical community over whether autism, which is considered a disorder, should be treated as part of a person’s identity and not a ‘condition’ to be fixed.So far, Neuralink‘s tech has been described as something closer to a Bluetooth actuator that operates on brain signals.
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The Daily Crunch is TechCrunch’s roundup of our biggest and most important stories.If you’d like to get this delivered to your inbox every day at around 9am Pacific, you can subscribe here.John Carmack steps down at Oculus to pursue AI passion project ‘before I get too old’Legendary coder John Carmack is leaving Facebook’s Oculus after six years to focus on a personal project — no less than the creation of Artificial General Intelligence, or “Strong AI.” He’ll remain attached to the company in a “Consulting CTO” position, but will be spending all his time working on, perhaps, the AI that finally surpasses humanity.This follows the departure of Oculus’ founders and early executives.His plan is to pursue his research from home, “Victorian Gentleman Scientist” style, and make his kid help.
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Atlassian today announced a set of new templates and workflows for Jira Service Desk that were purpose-built for HR, legal and facilities teams.Service Desk started six years ago as a version of Jira that was mostly meant for IT departments.Atlassian, however, found that other teams inside the companies that adopted it started to use it as well, including various teams at Twitter and Airbnb, for example.With today’s update, it’s now making it easier for these teams, at least in legal, HR and facilities, to get started with Jira Service Desk without having to customize the product themselves.“Over the last six years, one of the observations that we’ve made was that we need to provide really good services — the idea that we can provide great services to employees is really something that is really on the rise,” said Edwin Wong, the head of the company’s IT products.“I think in the past, maybe we were a bit more forgiving in terms of what employees expected from services departments.
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It’s that time of year again to break out the Christmas sweaters—or, as they’re known across the pond, jumpers.ODD London launched a holiday campaign for U.K. retailer Marks & Spencer with an enthusiastic ad honoring everyone’s favorite fuzzy festive garment.In the spot, an office is thoroughly overcome by the holiday spirit as jumper-clad employees can’t resist the urge to dance their hearts out, ignoring those inconvenient phone calls.The ad is a welcome lighthearted and succinct respite from the sentimentality that abounds on the holiday circuit.That’s not to say the campaign is limited to this brief blast of merriment.“From the get-go, we knew wanted to change the way we approached Christmas.
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You may be familiar with quadcopters for shooting video, but the Commercial UAV Expo had an enormously broader range of drones on display to show where the industry is heading.Most are more expensive than mainstream models like the DJI Mavic.This one is Boeing's Cargo Air Vehicle, shown here in a quarter-scale model, and it's designed to carry up to 500 pounds of payload.It's only a prototype for now, but Boeing's Next group is testing the electric-powered aircraft.Unexpected ways Google Home can temper Thanksgiving chaosWin big with our 2019 Halloween costume contest*
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Chinese internet giant Tencent has enabled overseas users of its digital payments service, WeChat Pay, to link their accounts to international bank cards Visa, Mastercard, American Express, Discover Global Network, and JCB.Under the guidance of the People’s Bank of China, the collaboration allows overseas users to use WeChat Pay for shopping, restaurants, transportation, and accommodation expenses.Tencent said it will support more payment scenarios by stages in the future.“Currently, there are more than 950,000 foreigners working in China, and the country has cumulatively issued 336,000 overseas talent work permits in 2018,” Tencent said in a statement.“However, the inconvenience of not being able to use the widely adopted local mobile payments is becoming a major pain point for overseas people living or visiting mainland China.”The move will help WeChat Pay tap into the increasing number of international tourists traveling to the country.
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During a recent re-watch of Brooklyn Nine-Nine I stumbled across the episode where Captain Holt and his husband were fighting over a brain teaser.Known as the Monty Hall Problem, it's quite a well known probability puzzle that involves cars and goats.We called upon the expertise of Dr Stephen Woodcock, Senior Lecturer in Mathematical Sciences at University of Technology Sydney to help with this one.Dr Woodsock is also an Associate Investigator of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers (ACEMS) and frequently writes for The Conversation.You can find one of his articles on probability right here.Named after the host of U.S. game show, Let's Make A Deal, it was kicking around long before it appeared on Brooklyn Nine-Nine.
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Some questions don’t ever get settled.That’s what’s exciting, and frustrating, about art and philosophy: you ponder the same sorts of things over and over again.Here’s a tough one: what social responsibility, if any, does art have?What sort of art can you appropriately make about reprehensible things?I don’t remember that debate ever reaching the public mind quite as much as it has lately with Joker.Arthur’s actions in the film bear a resemblance to real, awful acts of violence, and it’s understandably made some people uncomfortable, and people have argued that Joker represents those actions in an irresponsible, even glorifying way.
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Google Maps is making it easier for users to find landmarks in the cities they’re visiting via the addition of small bubbles featuring structure icons.The new landmark bubbles can be found for major destinations in cities around the world, such as for the Eiffel Tower in Paris.Users are seeing the new icons on both iOS and Android versions of the Google Maps app.Google Maps has traditionally marked stores, parks, libraries, and other destinations with small points of interest markers that make them easy to pick out on the maps.These markers are relatively small, though, and blend in with each other, making it easy to overlook the one you’re looking for.That has changed for landmarks.
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Efter viss försening och en kompromiss har Kina lanserat sina första kommersiella 5g-nät.Utrullningen kommer efter att USA och Sydkorea redan hunnit sjösätta nästa generations mobilnätsteknik i ett antal städer.Enligt sajten Fierce Wireless är Kinas lansering något försenad.Ursprungligen var den planerad till kommunistpartiets 70-årsfirande 1 oktober.– Operatörerna gjorde allt som stod i deras makt för att vara klara till 1 oktober, men blev en månad sena.Det visar hur svårt det är med 5g, säger analytikern Roger Entner, till Fierce Wireless.
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What we call the internet today, with its power to move elections, economies and Hyundai Elantras to our designated Uber pickup location, can be traced back to a tiny network with just four nodes: at the University of California, Los Angeles; the Stanford Research Institute; UC Santa Barbara; and the University of Utah.The first message sent over that network, on Oct. 29, 1969, was just two letters: LO.I'd like to tell you that message was written to build suspense before following it up seconds later with a dramatic "...AND BEHOLD, THE INTERNET IS HERE AND THE WORLD IS FOREVER CHANGED!"That's certainly the sort of introduction the birth of the internet deserves.But what really happened is that UCLA student programmer Charley Kline sat down at an SDS Sigma 7 host computer and attempted to log in to the Stanford Research Institute SDS 940 host system via the brand new internetwork sponsored by the Advanced Research Projects Agency, also known as the Arpanet.Kline was attempting to type the LOGIN command, but the system crashed after just the first two letters.
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Orphan Black, BBC America's TV show about a woman who (spoiler) sees a clone of herself on a subway platform, is making bold new tracks in a very different medium.The series seemed to end for good in 2017, but its star Tatiana Maslany is back with Orphan Black: The Next Chapter, an audiobook that picks up eight years from when the show left off.You can download the audiobook from Serial Box, an audiobook and ebook app that released the first Orphan Black episode earlier in September.The episodes are over an hour long, with six out of the 11 available so far -- a new episode is released each Thursday.The fifth and final series ended with Cosima (played by Maslany) and Delphine (Evelyn Brochu), two scientists in love, committing to a globe-trotting journey inoculating 274 clones slowly dying from genetic illness.That's largely thanks to Maslany, a 10-year improv veteran who won the Canadian Improv Games in 2002 during high school.
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I've opened and closed foldable phones hundreds of times by now.But even after reviewing the Galaxy Fold (twice), playing with Huawei's Mate X and bending slim concept designs, nothing has prepared me for TCL's prototype dual-hinged phone, which folds in three parts and opens into a huge, 10-inch tablet.The most remarkable thing about TCL's phone is that the hinges themselves move in different directions.The DragonHinge fold in, like a book, or like the Galaxy Fold, while the Butterfly Hinge folds the opposite way.It looks like an accordion.Completely folded up into a triple-stacked sandwich so that the exposed panel becomes the TCL phone's "outer" screen.
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