Frank Wilkerson

Frank Wilkerson

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Following 54
US
Facebook-owned WhatsApp appears to be working on new multiple device support with synchronized chat history. WABetaInfo reports that WhatsApp is testing the ability to use an account on multiple devices, including a separate iPad app. WhatsApp currently supports multiple devices through WhatsApp Web, which connects back to a phone account. WhatsApp Web requires a phone to be powered on and connected to the web, but this new multiple device support won’t need to constantly connect back to a phone and will allow people to use WhatsApp on multiple devices simultaneously. Yes, it's the ability to use your WhatsApp account from 4 devices at the same time.Under development, but it's great! pic.twitter.com/JYvtMahrag— WABetaInfo... Continue reading…
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Boffins find atmospheric oddities that make the planet blink in Spring and Autumn Mars pulses with ultraviolet light three times a night during spring and autumn, according to boffins from the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP).…
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Image: Google Backing up your Android phone is always smart — and backing it up to the cloud makes it easy to reload your data even if your phone is lost, stolen, or broken. And now you can back up some of that data to Google’s cloud storage service, Google One, even if you aren’t on one of the company’s paid plans, which start at $1.99 for 100GB of storage. If you’ve got a personal Google account (not a G Suite account), you can get up to 15GB of storage for backing up your mobile data (although that can vary somewhat, depending on what other services / accounts you have). Back up data with Android Of course, you don’t need Google One to back up your app data, call history, contacts, settings, or SMS messages. You could already do that easily using... Continue reading…
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I drove the glorious 2020 Porsche 718 Spyder, a high-performance convertible two-seater that goes for a well-optioned $105,780. The Spyder has a new 414-horsepower flat-six engine that's devoid of turbochargers and, in my car, mated to a crisp six-speed manual transmission. The Spyder traces it lineage to the open-air racers of the 1950s. It isn't a practical car, but it is the best Porsche money can buy — and, for me, a ticket to happiness. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. "The colors tremble and vibrate." That's a line from the title poem in Frederick Seidel's 1998 collection "Going Fast," a work crammed with references to the motorcycles Seidel loves. Speed is a combination of reality and perception — we understand it as it's happening — and on a motorbike, you'd better be processing what's going on and doing it with all available gray matter and muscle memory. The colors don't tremble or vibrate quite as much in a car. In many cars, they're positively immobile. But as I'm not riding these days, I take what I can get from four-wheelers. A few weeks ago, Porsche lent me a 718 Spyder, model year 2020. Over a week's time, I didn't just reacquaint myself with the trembling and the vibrating. I found some new colors.FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! I'm not going to show you what the Spyder looks like top up. Some folks might think the roadster looks cool with its sleek semi-automatic cloth roof, complete with winglets that evoke the flimsy covering of the roadster's heritage. But I don't. The Spyder needs to live a largely top-down life, like its legendary antecedent. You know the car I'm talking about: "Little Bastard." James Dean's deathmobile, No. 130, a 1955 Porsche 550 that lost a tragic open-road encounter with 1950 Ford. Dean was 24. He'd barely had the car a week. You can't not think about the rebel without a cause — his white V-neck T-shirt, the driving gloves, the cigarette, and that '55 Porsche at a California filling station in the iconic photo, Dean's last known living image — when you slip into the snug cockpit of the 2020 Spyder. Sixty-five years have changed nothing. (Well, airbags.) You're in a topless two-seater with a Porsche badge on the hood, engine behind your head, road beneath your 20-inch alloy wheels. What you don't have is a flat-four engine making just over 100 horsepower. In fact, you have a flat-six, sans turbos of any sort, a 4.0-liter mill producing 414 horsepower with 309 pound-feet of torque and — get this, get it good — a redline at 8,000 rpm. (The 2021 911 Carrera S, by contrast, tops out a 7,500, with its 3.0-liter six.) Yessir! Beneath my left foot was a crisply responsive clutch pedal. Beneath my right hand, a six-speed stick. But I really didn't need anything past three. I'm not sure what anybody is going to do with the forthcoming dual-clutch transmission and its seven. Perhaps shave a few tenths off the Porsche-claimed zero to 60 mph time of 4.2 seconds. (But why? I got to 60 mph in what I thought was about 3.5 seconds, and I was barely into third gear.) The open air, the open road, the power and the power and the power, and I haven't even gotten to the exhaust note yet. The ever-present sense that the exquisite neutrality of the Spyder's balance could send one off into new adventures in either over- or understeer. The unsettling dynamics of this ... well, this little bastard. Heck, I'm a 911 fella through and through. Never have I fallen in line for the Boxsters and Caymans, although I've had my fun with the midmounted turbo fours. I usually like less weight and power, to max out the feathery nature of a proper two-seater. But the 2020 718 Spyder rearranged my consciousness, like something quick and compelling moving through space and time. This is a car that you dream about after the driving is done, then dream anew when the driving resumes, and before you know it, the driving and dreaming are the same thing. The 718 Spyder has a stablemate: the GT4, hard-topped and inarguably more the genuine mid-engine race car in the Porsche paddock. For the hardcore competitor, a worthy set of wheels. For me, an extra $3,000, base, on the Spyder and for what? A stiffer architecture? I'd rather channel the late Sir Stirling Moss and have the wind in a grinning swirl around my head. Let's say I spent the $105,780 to make this Spyder my own. I don't think I'd bother putting the top up once I took it down. The process is borderline maddening. First, you flick a switch in the cabin, between the seats. The windows lower, and three latches disengage from the windshield. The rear hatch pops open. You then exit the car and reconfigure the winglet on either side, raising the hatch before folding, not without some effort, the top in a compartment behind the seats. Thump the hatch closed and the alfresco driving can commence. Compared to this undertaking, which for me entailed some planning every time, with a Miata's sequence: drop windows, twist latch, throw soft-top back. The whole deal could be accomplished at a stoplight. I didn't look forward to wrestling with the Spyder's roof, but with rain in the forecast, I had to grapple several times. (Putting it back up is even harder than dropping it.) But I do own a garage, which at the moment is crammed with suburban summertime gear. If it were up to me, I'd remove the top entirely and knock the weight down to 3,500 pounds. A gossamer car cover would be my new protection from the elements, and the Spyder would never even witness winter. Are Porsches beautiful? Well, no. They're actually sort of, um, ugly. Homely. The bug eyes, the awkward haunches, the endless aesthetic problem of the front end ... and the rear end ... and the sides ... But Porsche sports cars are so magnificently engineered by the geniuses in Stuttgart that the visual offenses are forgiven as soon as the tires grab the tarmac. This is a tool. Who cares how it looks? I do, but if I want an object of beauty, there's always the Aston Martin DB9. If I want to drive for my life, I'd take a 911. Or would I? The issue with the 911 is that because the rear-engine design is so profoundly flawed, Porsche designers have been innovating since the mid-1960s to solve the problem. They've succeeded so thoroughly that the 911 has lost some edge. One can push the machine harder than ever without fear of catastrophe, as I did when I recently tested the new Carrera 4S and Turbo S in rapid succession. The 911 shows you how to drive it. The car plots a course into the future and guides you to it; no vehicle fills me with more confidence. The Spyder, on the other hand, undermines my confidence, oh-so subtly. I could feel the grip ebbing whenever I got frisky. In my heart, I want this and want it badly from a rear-drive sports car, and I got it not too long ago from an Aston V8 Vantage. That was 503 hp with tail-happy slip, however, and it was sort of scary. (This is comparative; the 800 hp in a Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye Widebody was flatly terrifying.) The Spyder's 414 was easier to work with, the limit of what I can handle when it comes to throttle versus tire adhesion. In a word, exhilarating. In another, alive. In yet another, I'll admit, beautiful. I drove the Spyder a lot, both because it's addictive to drive and because during the Northeaster summer you want top-down motoring into the night. New Jersey's legendary Garden State Parkway is a few minutes from my house, and I made for it with a certain native son's song lyrics in my head and a sense of guilt in my gut that I was taking to the thoroughfare in a German roadster, rather than an American muscle car. Parkway journeys aren't the best use of the Spyder's talents, but they can get you to regions where the roads wind and wend, twist and bend. But we're not there just yet. At high speed, the Spyder is perplexing. Thanks to that 8,000 rpm redline, which sits there on the tachometer, beckoning one to, you know, test it. Hammer the accelerator and observe the needle climb until the soulful huff of the flat six becomes, if not a scream, then a sort of throaty yowl. I wanted to throw the shifter into fifth, but the engine only needs second and (barely) third. The torque is so cussedly available after three snicks that you rapidly forget about downshifting for more pop and simply hang out around 4,000 or 5,000 rpm and grab speed whenever you want or need it. The Spyder basically trifles with everything else on the road, save the odd Voodoo V8 Mustang, a flat-crank hellraiser that's actually a fine track-day choice, but that offers none of the Spyder's panache. In a GT350, the redline is 8,250 rpm, which I used to dismember a racetrack in Utah a few years back, without departing from third gear. The 718, therefore, is a steering-and-braking-at-speed experience. With the wheel light and flicky in the hands, the suspension ready for whatever I could throw at it, and the brakes providing the on-command stopping and four Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2's providing the gripping, boredom is vanquished and troubles retreat. The top speed is said to be 187 mph, at which point you might be able to use the retractable spoiler to add some useful downforce to the rear end, and count on the front aerodynamics to slip the airflow up and over the Spyder's smooth form, in the case of my tester wearing a sharp GT Silver Metallic paint job, the soft top cut from cloth the color of drying blood. The interior is premium yet purposeful. A "Bordeaux" red-and-black leather and Alcantara package adds almost $3,000 to the final damage, but in general the insides make few compromises. The Alcantara-clad wheel is intended for steering; it lacks the now typical multifunction array of buttons, switches, knobs, and dials. The seats are snug, and the evidence of discipline around weight — mass is the enemy of speed and handling — is in the webbed pull-handle door releases and lack of storage. The woeful retractable cupholders, flimsy things that no fool would risk with a steaming latte, are pathetic but understandable. They're made of load-lightening plastic. When they inevitably break and you throw them into a rest-stop trash can, subtract another eight ounces from the Spyder's bulk. The infotainment system, running on a modest touchscreen, is good for listening to music and provides GPS navigation, and it also enables the expected Bluetooth device pairing along with USB connectivity. But the real joy of the Spyder is taking the opportunity to ignore the tech. Punch up the exhaust note and switch off the cylinder-deactivation features (which probably helps yield the fuel economy figures of 16 mph city/23 highway/19 combined), and with the top down, come on and feel the noise. Seriously, you don't drop more than $100,000 ($96,300 base) on a ride like this if you want to fiddle with a touchscreen. Kudos to Porsche for installing infotainment. But it's a plus-$2,300 option. And I'd have been happy with a factory AM/FM and a folding roadmap. Apart from the cupholders, I got my usual kicks from stuff like the "smoking package," a micro-lighter and ashtray that I estimated could hold the butts of exactly three Marlboros.  A chronograph occupies prime real estate in the middle of the Spyder's dash and would be helpful if clocking lap times. As it stands, for the Spyder's mainly trackless customers, it's like a nice wristwatch, adding some functional style to the cabin.   As with the 911, it's impossible to gaze upon the Spyder's motor unless you're a qualified mechanic and are ready to dismantle the cowlings and covers. The 718's powerplant is even more concealed than the 911's, tucked away in the compact zone between seats and rear axle. Shockingly, combined with the usual front trunk, the Spyder has a moderately ample cargo hold under the rear hatch. I was able to tote, at one point, a folding camp chair and a shipment of outdoor lights from Home Depot. Versatility! I'm not kidding. I think the Spyder, with its two seats, could haul more stuff than some smaller three-row SUVs, with the third row deployed. It didn't occur to me to investigate towing capacity. Why do we even bother with manuals anymore? They're objectively slower than dual-clutch automatics and once you get over the thrills of blipping the throttle on your own downshifts, powering through the gears and launching off the clutch, and all that heel-toe tomfoolery if you get very, very motivated, they're hard to live with. We bother with them on cars like the Spyder because there's no point of cars like the Spyder without a movable stick between the seats and a third pedal on the floor. Remember, I'm tearing that annoying cover out and going top-down forever. This is not my daily driver, and a pox on the commute. I'm on a hunt for curves and corners when I drive the 718, and I want to be in control of the show. I could complain about the tricky shift into reverse: over to the left, hard, then up. But I won't. The 718 Spyder is utterly mesmerizing. It's one of those cars that showed me colors I hadn't seen before, by which I mean ushered into my brainpan some new mixtures of the physical, intellectual, emotional, and psychological realms that had previously been concealed. Top down and at speed, the car is a high-speed vision quest. The enlightenment it delivers is sadly ephemeral, but that just gives you excuse to strap in again and aim the nose back toward the open asphalt, with a mind freed to explore its corners thanks to stupendous German design and engineering. The Spyder is the only Porsche I've driven in some time that has added up to far more than its impressive specs. A recent batch of new 911s confirmed for me the genius of that machine and Porsche's commitment to making it ever better. The Cayenne SUV remains as brilliant as it was in the early 2000s, when it stunned the world with its greatness. I've even found some Panameras I could live with. But happiness, for me, is not now a warm puppy. Nor is it a walk on the wild side, nor a ride on a horse with no name. It's a Porsche Spyder. And I know where to find it.
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"With reuse, we can actually drive down costs and we can increase access."
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America was forced to wait for the Honda Civic Type R and now, having blessed us with its official presence here, Honda seems determined to slice away any mechanical reason you might have not to buy one. At under $38k out the door, the 2020 model year may have seen the price climb a little, but the attention to detail … Continue reading
China
The move highlights efforts from Meituan to fend off competition from Alipay, which is moving into the local services sector—Meituan's home turf.
UK
Research showed 'reduced deviation' when it made a 0.5mm x 0.5mm slice Researchers have built a 2.4g robot that could be capable of eye surgery, inspired by the ancient paper-folding art of origami.…
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So, you’ve seen some amazing GPT-3 demos on Twitter (if not, where have you been?). This mega machine learning model, created by OpenAI, can write it’s own op-eds, poems, articles, and even working code: This is mind blowing. With GPT-3, I built a layout generator where you just describe any layout you want, and it generates the JSX code for you. W H A T pic.twitter.com/w8JkrZO4lk — Sharif Shameem (@sharifshameem) July 13, 2020 Here’s #gpt3 writing some SQL for me. pic.twitter.com/JVeyijV2MX — Ayush Patel (@ayushpatel34) July 19, 2020 =GPT3()… the spreadsheet function to rule them all. Impressed with how well it… This story continues at The Next Web
China
Remember the Xiaomi Mi MIX 3 slider smartphone? Well, very few will remember this device because it is barely in the news for any reason. ... The post Xiaomi’s first 5G phone seems abandoned – misses out on major update appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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China launched its first fully homegrown Mars mission on Thursday as it attempts to join the United States in successfully landing a spacecraft on the red planet.
UK
That’s the largest single-day increase in the history of the news agency’s eight-year-old Billionaires Index.
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Nikon is wasting no time expanding its full-frame mirrorless camera series, which it introduced last year with the launch of the Z6 and the Z7. The company has welcomed a new model to its lineup: the Z5, a budget alternative that should appeal to intermediate photographers seeking an upgrade to their crop sensor format. The Z5 uses Nikon’s Z mount and sports a 24.3MP full-frame sensor, which supports a maximum resolution of 6,016 x 4,016 pixels. It also comes with 5-axis in-body stabilization and shoots 4K video — though only at 30 FPS (you will have to drop to 1080p for… This story continues at The Next Web
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The United Arab Emirates is set to launch a historic mission to Mars from an island off the coast of Japan.
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The Neuromancer author is known for conjuring dark and dystopian sci-fi. But why is technology always evil in movies?
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How fast is your IT? You need speed and adaptability to adjust as big changes in the global economy and our daily lives keep coming. Disruption is the status quo, and the “new normal” is not yet defined. Are you prepared for what’s next? What are IT organizations saying about it all? This spring, 2,200 IT professionals and senior IT leaders participated in a survey and shared: How fast their organizations can respond to change What application development challenges are holding them back What makes them more (or less!) ready for change The most shocking result? Only 21% of people feel like they can beat their peers and competitors at the change game.To read this article in full, please click here
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The White House told hospitals to bypass the CDC with COVID-19 data
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Google recently launched the Open Usage Commons (OUC) foundation to offer open source projects “support specific to trademark protection and management, usage guidelines, and conformance testing,” according to the OUC’s website. Seems sort of bland, right? Well, maybe.Depending on who you are, you either hate OUC or you love it. On the “hate” side seem to be IBM and the Linux Foundation on the record, and others off. On the “love” side seems to be just Google, though a rising chorus of experienced open sourcerors like Shaun Connolly and Adam Jacob have suggested that maybe, just maybe, this isn’t the end of open source as we know it.To read this article in full, please click here
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Microsoft’s X019 event is underway, and one of the biggest attention-getters during a special episode of Inside Xbox was the reveal of Rare’s next game.It’s been a while since we’ve seen one of these Rare game announcements, as the last one was the reveal of Sea of Thieves during E3 2015.Now we know that its next title will be called Everwild, and though the game is still early on in development, the company is giving us an early look today.Rare says that the goal with Everwild is “building an experience that allows for new ways to play in a natural and magical world.” Details are painfully slim at this point as Rare hasn’t given us any specifics about this game, but we did get a reveal trailer for Everwild during this episode of Inside Xbox, which you can check out below.While the trailer doesn’t give us any indication of how we’ll actually play Everwild, it does show a pretty beautiful world packed with interesting animals.The game has an art style that’s vaguely reminiscent of what we saw in Sea of Thieves, though with character and animal models that are a little less exaggerated.
UK
Drones have become more common these days especially in the consumer market.All sorts and sizes of flying robots, controlled by phones or dedicated controllers can be found in any toy store and hobby store.The use of drones extends to business and even military which has naturally raised red flags when it comes to privacy.But while most groups are calling for stricter drone regulations, DJI is offering an alternative that would allow anyone with a smartphone to identify registered drones flying as far as 1 kilometer away.DJI, perhaps the world’s biggest maker of professional and hobby drones, is keenly aware of the privacy violations drones can cause.But rather than lock down the drone market, DJI proposes giving everyone a tool to identify errant drones.
China
Two years ago, we were talking about Firefox Rocket, an especially lightweight version of the Mozilla mobile browser for some regions of Asia and with some exclusive features not available in the normal version.It would later be renamed Firefox Lite and has recently reached version 2.0.It is another name, although the goal is the same: a light version of Firefox that is curiously based on Chromium instead of Mozilla’s own engine and includes several interesting developments such as Turbo mode, ads blocking and a screen capture of full web pages.Firefox in miniature with Chrome engineAmong the novelties of version 2.0, which for some reason is called “Firefox Lite Advanced Edition”.We have the new button to search for purchases directly from the browser in places like Google, Amazon or eBay.
UK
Vodafone's latest internet offer may have just ended your fibre broadband search - you don't have to wait until Black Friday to snatch up one of the best fibre broadband deals in the UK.This broadband deal is bringing you Superfast 2 plan for the price of regular Superfast 1 - meaning that you'll get average speeds of 63Mb, so almost double of the usual 35Mb.This is the cheapest widely available mega fast fibre package (i.e.50Mb+) around at the moment, so if you live in a busy household or you're looking to game or stream seamlessly - especially in 4K - then this is looking like the deal to go for.It costs £23 a month to most people or a frankly incredible £21 a month if you also have your phone contract with Vodafone.Of course, when the deal is this good, we'd expect it to only be available for a limited amount of time.
China
The renowned research firm IDC has just released its Q3 report for the smartphone market in India.The report covers smartphone sales between July and September and it shows around 46.6 million smartphone shipments.That’s 4 million more smartphones than the 42.6 million shipments achieved in the same period last year.All top five companies have felt the growth in the market, except for Samsung which actually saw a decline in its market share.Interestingly enough, Realme is Oppo’s subsidiary so it’s safe to assume that the Chinese company grabbed the fourth and five spots on IDC’s ranking.Things are even more interesting when we know that along with Vivo, these two brands are part of the Chinese BBK conglomerate.
US
The industry is deep in the throes of the fall release season, with a dizzying array of new titles coming weekly, but news is happening, too.It might feel hard to keep up, but that's why we're here.If you play Fortnite, Epic Games has a message for you: don't frickin' cheat.As Kotaku reports, he posted a video in which he used an aimbot, which is a form of cheating.Especially for someone who makes their living by streaming games like Fortnite.And, yeah, showing yourself using an aimbot in a YouTube video probably wasn't a smart idea, but a lifetime ban is still a pretty extreme punishment.
UK
New rig will be powered by AMD EPYC 7542 processorsThe UK’s Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), which looks after warheads for the UK’s nuclear deterrent Trident, is buying a new seven petaflop Cray Shasta supercomputer, the HPE-owned company said late Tuesday.The AWE has selected a supercomputer built on second-generation AMD EPYC (7542) processors, HPE said, chosing it for its “ability to run mixed workloads and applications at the best total cost of ownership.” Terms were not disclosed.The Atomic Weapons Establishment performs modelling on warhead behaviour “from the quantum scale, through microscale phenomena, to large-scale properties of materials”.It is also the UK’s centre of expertise for rendering improvised nuclear devices (INDs) safe, modelling radioactive plume dispersal and hazard prediction.The new supercomputer, named Vulcan, is expected to have a performance of seven petaflops and include the Cray Slingshot interconnect, AMD EPYC 7542 processors and Cray ClusterStor Lustre storage, offering approximately 100 gigabytes per second of I/O performance, HPE said in another large-scale contract for the company.
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Firefox users are gettin' scammed and Uber is gettin' slammed—but first, a cartoon about not liking what you see in the mirror.Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less.Want to receive this two-minute roundup as an email every weekday?Uber's self-driving car didn't know pedestrians could jaywalkNew documents released as part of a federal investigation reveal that the self-driving car that killed an Arizona woman last year was not designed to detect pedestrians outside of a crosswalk.It is the most damning of a set of details that show Uber's failures to consider how humans actually do things.
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My Purple Royal seat cushion ($79) has made sitting through the workday a much more pleasant exercise, and thanks to its effect on my posture, it's also improved my time spent standing up.Prices start at $39 for the portable and lumbar-support cushions and go up to $129.I'm constantly slouching while I work, and it seems like as soon as I correct my posture, I find myself nearing a 45-degree angle again.Constant posture vigilance is impractical when I'm focused on my job (or just scrolling through Twitter), so I continually let myself fall back into slouching.I go to yoga classes, I try to keep it so both of my shoulder blades are touching my chair back at all times, and I write reminders to sit up straight on Post-it notes on my desk.So far, none of those strategies have had a lasting effect (though I'm sure the yoga classes could if I went more consistently).
China
Chinese manufacturing giant, Huawei, is getting set to release its first 5G smartphone in the nova series.the Huawei nova 6 5G version will have a red colour option.Not only that, it appears that this smartphone will come with a new “nova” brand logo at the glass rear.The usual “Huawei” logo is placed on the right side of the camera.The Huawei nova 6 uses a full-screen display with a dual punch-hole camera in front.On the rear, it has triple vertical cameras while the fingerprint sensor is on the side.
US
Playwright and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin is taking issue with Facebook's policies on political ads -- specifically, CEO Mark Zuckerberg's defense that his company shouldn't fact-check the claims politicians make.Sorkin, who's been behind shows dealing in the worlds of news and politics like The West Wing and The Newsroom, wrote the screenplay for the 2010 film The Social Network, telling the story of Facebook's early days.In an open letter in The New York Times, published Thursday, Sorkin cited an ad from the Trump campaign targeting Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden:"Every square inch of that is a lie and it's under your logo," Sorkin wrote."That's not defending free speech, Mark, that's assaulting truth."He also pointed to Zuckerberg's own protests over The Social Network and how it portrayed him.
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