Freddie Gagne

Freddie Gagne

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Following 42
China
If all these months you have regularly hoped for the appearance of the Mi Mix Alpha smartphone in the range of Xiaomi, it’s time to ... The post Xiaomi Mi MIX Alpha will never made it to the shelves appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The side missions in the multiplayer-centric superhero game's beta left me a little cold, but I'm hopeful for its future. You can try it out free from Friday.
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Amazon saved nearly $2.6 billion in net profits last quarter by cutting its marketing spend and through a previously announced estimate change for its server costs. The change is noteworthy given how Amazon's net profit doubled to a record $2.6 billion last quarter, and shows how the company boosted its profitability in the face of a pandemic. Analysts say the growth in Amazon's high-margin businesses also helped offset the increased costs during the quarter, such as the $4 billion COVID-related expenses. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Amazon surprised many investors last week when it doubled its second-quarter profits to a record $5.2 billion — nearly seven times more than Street expectations. But Amazon's quarterly filings show a large portion of its profit gains were led by a change in accounting estimates and a marketing cutback, showing how the company was able to boost its bottom line in the face of a pandemic. Growth in its higher-margin businesses, such as its cloud and advertising units, helped too, as its retail profitability dropped during the quarter. According to Amazon's quarterly filings, it added $534 million in net income last quarter due to a previously announced change in the way it accounts for its servers' lifetime value. The extended "useful life" of its servers, a legitimate change that speaks to Amazon's infrastructure efficiency, helped spread out the depreciation cost by another year, resulting in a bump in profits. The bigger impact, however, came from a reduction in marketing expenses. Amazon's CFO Brian Olsavsky said in a call with analysts that the company cut its marketing spend by "about a third" in the quarter to reduce the heavy customer demand pressuring its supply chain during COVID-19. That means Amazon spent roughly $2.1 billion less on marketing than it normally would have during the quarter. Its marketing expense grew just 1% to $4.3 billion in the three months ending in June, a sharp decrease from the 37% growth seen all of last year. Combining those two figures ($534 million and $2.1 billion) results in roughly $2.6 billion in savings — almost exactly the same amount Amazon reported in its year-over-year profit gains for the quarter. Daniel Aobdia, an accounting professor at Northwestern University and a former fellow at the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, told Business Insider that those two factors were key to Amazon's record profits. Given Amazon spent more than $4 billion on COVID-related initiatives, those changes helped offset the loss. The bigger question, he said, is how to make future profit estimates, since Amazon will most likely have to ramp up its marketing spend once COVID-driven demand cools down, possibly making last quarter's profit gains an outlier. "One might wonder how much the increase in earnings will be sustained over the long run if marketing expenditures need to revert back to traditional levels," he said. Amazon's spokesperson declined to comment. High-margin businesses Aobdia said Amazon still deserves a lot of credit for being able to absorb the cost increases it saw in shipping and fulfilling products during the pandemic. Amazon said it plans to spend another $2 billion on COVID-related expenses this quarter. During last week's earnings call, Olsavsky credited the huge increase in sales, which grew 40% to $88.9 billion, and a mix-shift to more profitable items being sold for the record profits. Amazon's international business also turned a rare profit at $345 million. R.J. Hottovy, an analyst at Morningstar, said because of the massive $4 billion COVID-related expenses during the quarter, Amazon had to make up profits from other sources as well. That primarily came from Amazon's higher-margin units, including its cloud, advertising, and third-party seller marketplace, he said. While Amazon doesn't give a profit breakdown for its advertising and marketplace businesses, each unit's quarterly sales grew by 41% and 52%, respectively. The Amazon Web Services cloud segment's sales growth slowed to 29%, but its profit margins expanded by 6 percentage points. "The key takeaway from this quarter was that Amazon needs these higher-margin businesses to drive profitability going forward," Hottovy said. All this is particularly important because Amazon's retail efficiency appears to have worsened during the quarter, according to Anup Srivastava, an accounting professor at University of Calgary.  Amazon's gross margins decreased by 2 percentage points last quarter, while its fulfillment costs also grew as a percentage of total sales. North America retail margins slightly dipped as well, which Amazon blamed for the "increased shipping and fulfillment costs due in part to COVID-19" in its filings. "I don't see any significant improvement in retail profitability," Srivastava said. Still, the fact that Amazon saw significant sales growth without doing more marketing should pay off in the future, said Colin Sebastian, an analyst at R.W. Baird. The customers Amazon acquired very cheaply during the quarter are likely going to continue shopping on its site, adding to its growth and margins ahead. But even with that, it's hard to see Amazon maintaining the huge profit levels it saw from the second quarter, he said. "I don't think the Street is expecting those Q2 margins to continue in the near term," he said.SEE ALSO: Amazon quietly launched a new website for its big ad conference, which returns for its second straight year amid the company's surging digital ad sales Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What it takes to be a PGA Tour caddie
China
A couple of days ago, Google launched its much-awaited affordable Pixel 4a smartphone. Along with the $349 price tag, the search engine giant also announced ... The post Google Pixel 4 and Pixel 4 XL discontinues in US and other regions within an year appeared first on Gizchina.com.
China
Chinese short video making app, TikTok, has been at the center of controversies in recent times. TikTok took the market by storm offering what other ... The post Facebook is done copying TikTok – launches Instagram Reel appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Qualcomm bugs among the worst – including a critical hole in wireless networking Google has emitted the August edition of its Android software security updates.…
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Swedish e-scooter startup Voi has been picked to run an exclusive e-scooter trial in Cambridge and nearby Peterborough.  Business Insider also understands that the startup has been successful in its bid for Northamptonshire, another step towards winning over the rapidly changing UK scooter market.  The UK recently opened up trials for e-scooters — previously banned from streets — to keep people off public transport during the COVID-19 pandemic. Operators have rushed to take advantage. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Swedish scooter startup Voi has made its first steps into the lucrative UK market after it was exclusively awarded an e-scooter trial for Cambridgeshire.  Voi was picked from a group of 20 e-scooter operators vying to operate in the cities of Cambridge and nearby Peterborough. The trial will run for a year. Business Insider understands the Swedish startup, founded in 2018, has also been successful in its bid to operate in Northamptonshire — another step towards winning over the rapidly changing UK scooter market. The company will be keen to win as many markets as possible after losing out in lucrative tenders for Paris and Lyon.  Founded in 2018, the startup is now live in more than 45 cities in 11 countries, and recently raised a fresh $30 million funding round to expand into the UK. It claims revenues grow fifty-fold during 2019, while it increased headcount from 31 at the end of 2018 to 409 staff by the end of 2019.  "Having been picked from 20 world class e-scooter operators to serve Cambridge and Peterborugh exclusively shows just how serious Voi is in paving the way for truly safe, accessible and sustainable e-scooter operations in the UK," Voi CEO Fredrik Hjelm told Business Insider. "The UK with its 50 city trials, will be the largest e scooter market in Europe and we plan to be the leading operator." Although rental scooters have become a common sight in many European cities, traffic laws and vehicle restrictions previously stopped scooter companies from launching fully in the UK. During the coronavirus pandemic the UK government adopted new rules to allow rental scooters to use the road and cycle lanes. It set a speed limit of 15 mph, and said riders would not need to wear a helmet by law. US operator Lime recently won a trial in Milton Keynes, while other operators like Amsterdam-based Dott have won approval from the UK's Department for Transport. Other companies interested in the UK market include Spin, Tier, Bird, and Neuron.  European scooter companies have raised significantly less than their Silicon Valley rivals but are confident of coming out on top. US firms such Bird and Lime have benefited from huge tranches of venture capital funding, raising $623 million and $935 million respectively, per Crunchbase data.SEE ALSO: Uber-backed scooter startup Lime and European competitors Tier and Dott have won Paris' competitive e-scooter tender, a leaked email shows Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What it takes to be a PGA Tour caddie
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The idea is to allow users a quick and easy way to get information about messages that are being heavily shared.
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A Gmail user recently discovered that Google had added a Meet link to their Zoom meeting invite while in transit.
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Gaming-focused feature will arrive with TCL's next-generation 6-Series TV
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"Shifting the processing of personal data to these complex and sometimes opaque systems comes with inherent risks." The post ICO Warns on AI Data Compliance: Publishes New Auditing Framework appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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We store loads of valuable and sensitive information on our smartphones which is why we must protect them from falling into the wrong hands.
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Despite the controversy in the creative community regarding video speed adjustment features, Netflix has decided to move ahead and give its users this option — at least those who watch on an Android phone or tablet. With this option, users will be able to speed up or slow down the rate at which content plays, making it possible to get … Continue reading
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Google One – introduced as a paid storage manager for Android – is coming to iOS and now has a free option for both platforms.
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Google is set to report its second-quarter earnings on Thursday. It's the company's first quarter to take place entirely within the pandemic. Analysts are expecting a revenue decline, but there could be signs of recovery for Google's advertising business. All eyes will be on YouTube and Cloud as possible bright spots. Analysts are also interested to see if Google mentions plans for its costly moonshot projects. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. It's a busy week for Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai. He is testifying before Congress as part of Wednesday's antitrust hearing, and on Thursday he'll announce the company's second-quarter earnings — and reveal just how much damage the pandemic has done to Google's business. Google managed to sail through the first quarter for the most part with ease, but its revenue took a big blow in the final few weeks of March, offering a preview of what might come when the company reports its second-quarter earnings results this week. Google doesn't provide forecasts, but Google Chief Financial Officer Ruth Porat previously said the June quarter would be "difficult" for advertising. The question is: How bad will it be? Analysts are expecting Google to report second-quarter revenue of $37 billion, which would represent a 4% year-on-year revenue drop. Google's search-advertising business proved remarkably resilient during the last economic recession in 2008 and 2009. But the pandemic presents new challenges. Like Facebook, Google has benefited from a boost in traffic to its services and products as the world has been trapped indoors, but there's a big question mark over how much of that increased engagement will translate into revenue. "Overall I think the expectations for Google heading into earnings are relatively muted as compared to Amazon or Facebook, simply given that Google has a relatively higher exposure to weak COVID spots," Rohit Kulkarni, an Alphabet analyst at MKM Partners, said. Those weak spots include areas such as travel and hospitality, medium-size businesses, and restaurants, which contribute significantly to Google's ad business and have seen a big pullback in the pandemic. But the numbers may also show some positive signs of recovery, as analysts believe advertising trends for the second quarter proved better than initially feared. "Over the last 12 weeks we have clearly seen better than previously expected recovery in the overall advertising market and e-commerce," Kulkarni said. And as parts of the world begin to open back up, advertising spending on areas like travel may show an uptick. All expectations are that the second quarter will mark the lowest point for Google this year. "Our conversations with agencies suggested April was probably the worst month," Hari Srinivasan, an analyst at  Neuberger Berman, said. All eyes on YouTube, Cloud, and even the moonshots Analysts will be paying close attention to Google's YouTube and Cloud businesses, which were the big stories of the last quarter. Google Cloud reported $2.78 billion in revenue in the first quarter, up 52% from a year before – and expectations are high that the cloud business will show a continued upward trend. "I think everyone is going to be watching how well the Google Cloud business is doing," Srinivasan said. "Given they're smaller than Amazon and Microsoft, we expect the growth rate should be the best among the three right now." YouTube was less steady, starting out strong in the first quarter before growth slowed in the latter part of the period. It's expected that YouTube has continued to see high engagement with everyone trapped indoors, but all eyes are on whether there will be a recovery in ad spending through the June quarter. Finally, analysts are watching closely for updates on Alphabet's "other bets," its collection of moonshot projects, which generated $135 million in revenue in the first quarter (compared with $170 million the previews quarter) and an operating loss of $1.12 billion. With the economy in flux, Alphabet's plans to prune or bolster investments in any of these endeavors could hint at the company's views of the business climate. "Alphabet may start spending less money on cash-burning projects that don't have any near-term revenue generation potential," Kulkarni said.SEE ALSO: In March, Trump announced Google would build a coronavirus testing tool. Some employees working on it describe exhausting conditions, stress, and tears as they work around-the-clock to pull it off. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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The Pocket, the handheld version of the retro console, is finally opening up for pre-orders soon. That’s the good news. The bad news is that it won’t be shipping until 2021, ostensibly because the coronavirus is making supplies a little scarce. Pocket pre-orders will open August 3rd, 2020 8am PST. Pocket is shipping May 2021. Limit 2 per order. Head to https://t.co/AHl6AiJr5Y for unannounced features & details, new accessories, small design changes, pricing & an FPGA developer program. MANY announcements below: pic.twitter.com/mCK6FYxzCS — Analogue (@analogue) July 27, 2020 We first discovered the Pocket last year — for those who don’t… This story continues at The Next Web
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Antitrust laws were created to keep the big conglomerates, or trusts, that were forming across oil, railroad, steel, and other sectors in the late 1800s and early 1900s from growing too large and powerful. Now, they're coming after 21st-century big tech. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Google and Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and Apple CEO Tim Cook will attempt to make their case as to why their firms aren't infringing on the competition in a hearing Wednesday. The hearing is part of a yearlong congressional investigation into online market competition. The ongoing investigation could eventually lead to more specific legislation designed to keep tech companies from growing too big and mighty — just like how three original antitrust laws began reining in the oil and railroad companies over 100 years ago. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The CEOs of Apple, Amazon, Google, and Facebook will be grilled in front of Congress on Wednesday over whether they violate antitrust regulations. The law term "antitrust" has a long history in the United States. These hearings will attempt to determine if antitrust regulations can be applied to four large tech companies that dominate the industry. But let's back up a bit: What does "antitrust" mean? Around the turn of the 20th century, "trust" was used as a term to describe a new type of large corporation, as American business titans in the steel, oil, railroad, and banking industries began to form larger conglomerates. For example, the railroad sector needed corralling as hundreds of smaller railroad operators were acquired and clumped together into mega-companies. Another example is Standard Oil, a major oil monopoly, or trust, run by John D. Rockefeller starting in the late 1800s and into the 20th-century. And so regulators sought to establish laws to keep big businesses across every sector from growing too large and powerful and to maintain a healthy amount of competition in the market.  Trust: This term refers to the big businesses (in this case, in railroad, oil, and steel) that began to form and encroach on smaller competitors in the US  Antitrust: The term that was given to the "trust-busting" set of laws that were created to counteract that encroachment and stem the corporations' growth in size and power There are three core federal US antitrust laws you should care about: the Sherman Act of 1890, the Clayton Act of 1914, and the Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914. The latter would lead to the creation of the Federal Trade Commission, which is the main government entity tasked with enforcing antitrust laws today. Here's what they do, according to Investopedia: Sherman Act of 1890: This is the backbone of American antitrust policy. It allows the federal government to take companies to court that it believes are participating in anticompetitive practices and abusing their monopoly power. Clayton Act of 1914: This act was passed to fill in the gaps left by the Sherman Act. It prohibits certain business practices that can weaken economic competition, like anticompetitive mergers and acquisitions and price-fixing. Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914: Similarly to the Clayton Act, this one was passed to further round out antitrust legislation and banned more competitive practices that were deemed unfair or deceptive, such as those that violate consumer protection laws. How have these laws been used to rein in US businesses in the past? The Sherman Act was used to break up Standard Oil, which was found to have lowered their prices specifically to drive their competitors out of business, in the early 1900s. It was divided into dozens of companies, including what is now ExxonMobil and Chevron. In 1969, the US Justice Department filed a lawsuit against IBM, the New York-based tech firm whose computer market dominance put it on the government's radar. However, the case was thrown out. In 1982, the US under President Reagan used the Sherman Act to divide phone service goliath AT&T, or "Ma Bell," into eight different companies, or "Baby Bells." And in the late 1990s, Microsoft was hit with an antitrust lawsuit as Internet Explorer began to dominate the internet browser market by bundling its browser with Windows software and making it difficult for Windows users to install and run competing browsers. A federal judge ruled that the company was indeed in violation, and the company settled in 2001, but it was a pivotal moment for the tech industry as its players began to realize they may have to eventually reckon with oversight from Uncle Sam. Why is it bad if companies break antitrust laws? The main reason is that economists say healthy competition is key to a steady, thriving economy, one in which small business owners and consumers benefit. If big businesses squash out smaller competitors, and the market is instead ruled by a small number of monopolies, that could result in a shaky economy. Consolidating economic power into a handful of companies could also be dangerous to the nation's democracy, as Wired notes. So what's the parallel between tech companies and the big businesses around the turn of the 20th century? Google, Amazon, Apple, and Facebook — the world's most powerful tech companies — are being investigated over business practices designed to step on smaller competitors and maintain their dominant position in the marketplace. They're all being investigated over antitrust violations, but they're not necessarily being probed for the same thing: Google: Lawmakers will likely question CEO Sundar Pichai regarding the company's iron grip on the advertising and search market and how it has affected other online businesses. Amazon: The Seattle-based firm will be investigated over whether it promotes its own brands ahead of third-party sellers on its online marketplace. Apple: CEO Tim Cook will likely field questions regarding claims that the company gives its own apps special treatment over third parties in its App Store. Facebook: The social media giant is in the spotlight for the acquisitions it has made in recent years of would-be competitors, like WhatsApp and Instagram. Why are antitrust laws difficult to enforce in tech? Simply put, these laws were created in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Retrofitting the century-old laws — or creating new ones — to accommodate 21st-century companies offering products that are at the forefront of tech innovation won't be an easy task. There is also the issue that "anticompetitive" laws in the US need to show that consumers are being harmed, something much harder to do when it comes to big tech. Take the example of a search engine like Google dominating. When Standard Oil controlled the marketplace, consumers had only one option for where to buy. Google, meanwhile, wins because consumers mainly choose to use Google. Consumers aren't being harmed – but other companies that want to compete against Google (or Apple or Facebook or Amazon) arguably are. The task in front of Congress is determining whether that's enough to declare these tech companies in violation of antitrust regulation. So then what's going to happen? As a direct result of Wednesday's hearing, almost nothing. This isn't a trial, and no one will be found guilty at the end of the inquiry. The hearing is instead an opportunity for lawmakers to question the tech executives and gather evidence about their business practices by listening to their testimonies. The lawmakers involved in the hearing sit on the House Judiciary's antitrust subcommittee, a group that has already been conducting a yearlong investigation into how companies operate in the digital marketplace. The subcommittee members have been speaking with smaller competitors, who have alleged that tech's biggest firms engage in anticompetitive business practices. The leaders of the "big four" tech companies will attempt to make their case as to why they aren't infringing on the competition. Their answers will inform the subcommittee's ongoing investigation, which could eventually lead to more specific legislation designed to keep tech companies from growing too large and powerful — just like how the three original antitrust laws began reining in big oil and big railroad over 100 years ago.SEE ALSO: The leaders of the world's most powerful tech companies — Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google — will be speaking in front of Congress this week. Here's what we're expecting, and why it's a huge deal. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How 'white savior' films like 'The Help' and 'Green Book' hurt Hollywood
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Coronavirus has changed everything. Make sense of it all with the Waugh Zone, our evening politics briefing. Sign up now.Boris Johnson said the UK must be “vigilant” regarding the threat of a second wave of coronavirus in Europe, after the government imposed a 14-day quarantine on people returning from Spain.The prime minister said on Tuesday while he was looking at ways to “mitigate” the impact of forcing people to isolate, the public had to “stick with the guidance”.“If we do see signs of a second wave in other countries, it really is our job to act swiftly and decisively to stop travellers coming back from those places seeding the disease here in the UK,” he said.“Clearly we now face, I’m afraid, the threat of a second wave in other parts of Europe and we just have to be vigilant and we have to be very mindful.”The government is caught in a diplomatic storm with Spain amid warnings that its policy on travel to the country risks major damage to business and confusion for holidaymakers.The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has warned against all but essential travel to Spain’s Balearic and Canary Islands, having already issued the same advice for the mainland.Travellers from all parts of Spain are required to quarantine for a fortnight on arrival in the UK, a change imposed at short notice over the weekend.Spain’s prime minister Pedro Sanchez described the latest move as an “error”.He pointed out that the upsurge in coronavirus cases is focused in two regions, Catalonia and Aragon, adding: “In most of Spain, the incidence is very much inferior to even the numbers registered in the United Kingdom.”Madrid had been urging the UK to exclude the Canaries and Balearics— which include popular tourist resorts on Ibiza, Majorca and Menorca— from its quarantine requirements.But instead, official travel advice was tightened to bring the islands in line with the Spanish mainland.The UK has rejected the Spanish criticism of its response. Local government minister Simon Clarke told BBC Breakfast: “We respectfully disagree with the Spanish government’s position on this.“We obviously continue to work closely with them and we wish them every success in managing this outbreak, but we’ve seen a very sharp increase in cases in Spain.“A 75% increase in cases reported between the middle of last week and the end of last week. That’s why we took the action that we have.“Clearly, you do have to make decisions on a country-wide basis. There is going to be internal transfer within Spain and it’s important that we do our utmost to protect the public.”Nicola Sturgeon, the first minister of Scotland, also warned today about people returning home from abroad.“We are currently seeing a worrying resurgence of Covid cases, not just in far away parts of the world, but also in several countries across Europe right now,” she told a press conference.Related... Why The Government Is So Reluctant To Make Vaccinations Mandatory
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We’re dropping in on Day 2 of Pokemon GO Fest 2020 with details on the event for both ticket holders and non-ticket-holders alike! This day’s all about Team GO Rocket and their evil takeover of the entire planet. There are some STRANGE features out today, including but not limited to new Shadow Pokemon, a new Giovanni line-up, and bonuses galore. … Continue reading
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Moscow says offending bird is a mere maintenance drone The USA and UK have alleged that Russia last week trialled an in-orbit satellite-killer weapon.…
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(Canadian Glycomics Network) The Canadian Glycomics Network (GlycoNet) today awarded $3.9 million in grant funding to 11 collaborative research projects. The fund will support a wide range of multidisciplinary research teams across 17 Canadian research institutions and their industry partners to address unmet medical needs in cancer, gastrointestinal inflammations, cystic fibrosis, Sanfillipo disease, Parkinson's, and autoimmune diseases.
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Back to school supplies are a must wherever school is held this fall. Get started with these big Best Buy deals.
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Consumers have been anticipating the arrival of the Galaxy Z Flip 5G variant for quite a while now — the 4G version was announced earlier this year, but until now, we haven’t had word on when the 5G version would arrive. That has finally changed, with Samsung formally launching the Galaxy Z Flip 5G model and revealing the availability and … Continue reading
China
One of the notable smartphones of the first half of 2019 in the affordable segment was the Redmi Note 7. The device turned out to ... The post Redmi Note 7 receives stable beta Android 10 update globally appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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In a surprise happening, a leaked screenshot of the OnePlus Nord Amazon listing has been doing the rounds on social media. The screenshot of Amazon ... The post OnePlus Nord fake Rs 19,999 Amazon price pops up online appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Jeff Bezos, the owner of Amazon, added a record $13 billion to his net worth on Monday, Bloomberg reported. He's now worth $189.3 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. Bezos is also on track to become the first trillionaire in the US by 2026, Business Insider reported. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Jeff Bezos, the owner of Amazon, added a record $13 billion to his net worth on Monday, Bloomberg reported.  According to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, Bezos' is now worth $189.3 billion. While the US economy has shrunk due to the coronavirus pandemic, the founder of the online shopping giant has gained $74 billion this year.  His record is the highest anyone has earned in a single day since Bloomberg Billionaires Index was started in 2012. Bezos founded Amazon in 1995 and the company has now grown to "one of the most valuable, powerful companies on the planet," as Business Insider previously reported. Business Insider also reported that Bezos is on track to be the first trillionaire by 2026.  However, Bezos isn't the only billionaire to see his wealth grow throughout the pandemic.  A new analysis by the Americans for Tax Fairness and the Institute for Policy Studies found that the more than 600 Americans billionaires had their wealth grow an average of $42 billion during each week of the coronavirus pandemic between March 18 and July 16, for a total of over $700 billion over the course of the pandemic. SEE ALSO: Jeff Bezos is on track to become a trillionaire by 2026 — despite an economy-killing pandemic and losing $38 billion in his recent divorce Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Inside London during COVID-19 lockdown
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(Data Science Institute at Columbia) Columbia Professor receives NSF Career Award to design more efficient e-commerce and service systems that embrace consumer flexibility.
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Sleep tracking features on wearable devices offer little proven benefit, and in fact may do more harm than good. We recommend charging your device overnight instead of wearing it.
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