Gaston Alexander

Gaston Alexander

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UK
Kia has unveiled a new compact SUV that it calls a “smart urban compact SUV.” The vehicle will be built in India and will be available globally. Kia says that the Sonet is its entry into the burgeoning compact SUV segment and promises a new benchmark with first-in-class features. The Kia Sonet shares the same styling as other vehicles the … Continue reading
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T-Mobile had another strong quarter, which it says pushed it ahead of AT&T among America's largest wireless carriers.
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Xbox Game Pass Ultimate members will be able to play 100+ games on their Android phone or tablet - here's how.
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  Disney Plus is now available for a monthly price of $6.99 a month, or an annual rate of $69.99 a year. For these prices, subscribers get ad-free access to thousands of movies and TV shows, including programming from Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, National Geographic, and 20th Century Fox.  There's also a bundled package option with Disney Plus, Hulu, and ESPN+ for $12.99 a month, which is about $5 a month cheaper than paying for each service separately.  If you're an existing subscriber to one of these services, you can now upgrade to the bundle without cancelling your current membership. For detailed impressions on Disney Plus, check out our Disney Plus review here.   One of the most affordable streaming services on the market is now available on your TV. Disney Plus, a new ad-free streaming platform created by the Walt Disney Company, launched on November 12, 2019. To date, around 50 million people have signed up for Disney Plus around the world.  The service features programming from not only Disney, but also all of Disney's subsidiaries: Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, National Geographic, and 20th Century Fox. Subscribers can enjoy movies and TV series old and new, including programming that can only be found on Disney Plus, like "Hamilton" and "The Mandalorian." Find more information about the cost and features of Disney Plus below.  Updated on 07/30/2020 by Steven Cohen: Added links to our Disney Plus review, as well information about upgrading to the Disney Plus bundle.  How much does Disney Plus cost?  There are a few different prices, depending on whether you want to pay on a monthly basis, commit to a yearlong subscription, or bundle Disney Plus with Hulu and ESPN+. Though the standalone Disney Plus options originally came with a free seven-day trial for new subscribers, this promotion is no longer available. Month-by-month Disney Plus subscription: $6.99 a month (comes out to $83.88 for a year) Yearly Disney Plus subscription: $69.99 a year  Disney Plus, Hulu, and ESPN+ bundle: $12.99 a month ($17.97 a month if you sign up for each service individually) Disney Plus, Hulu (ad-free), and ESPN+ bundle: $18.99 a month ($23.97 if you sign up for each service individually). Disney Plus, Hulu + Live TV, and ESPN+ bundle: $61.99 a month ($66.97 if you sign up for each service individually).  Disney Plus, Hulu (ad-free) + Live TV, and ESPN+ bundle: $67.99 a month ($72.97 if you sign up for each service individually).  What's included in this price?  Ad-free streaming of thousands of Disney movies and TV shows, including original movies, series, and documentaries exclusive to Disney Plus Unlimited downloads Ability to stream on four devices simultaneously Ability to add up to seven profiles  How does the price of Disney Plus compare to that of other streaming services?  Disney Plus offers a competitive price. Here's how it compares to other popular, on-demand streaming services. The prices shown are for the ad-free plans (if applicable).  Netflix: $8.99 to $15.99/month  Hulu: $11.99/month  Amazon Prime Video: $8.99/month ($119 per year with a full Prime membership) Apple TV Plus: $4.99/month HBO Max: $14.99/month Peacock Premium Plus: $9.99/month What are the Disney Plus bundle options? If you want to watch sports content and additional movies and TV shows from non-Disney sources, you should consider the bundle option. The Disney Plus, Hulu, and ESPN+ bundle costs $12.99 a month. If you sign up for each of these services individually, the total would come out to $17.97 a month. This means that you can enjoy a $5 discount when bundling the three together. Existing Disney Plus or ESPN+ subscribers can also upgrade to the bundle without having to cancel their current memberships. To upgrade and save, you can visit the Disney Plus bundle page here.  With that said, just like the standalone Disney Plus plans, the bundle does not currently include a free trial. It should also be noted that the version of Hulu included in the bundle by default still features ads. If you pay a bit more, however, you can upgrade to the ad-free or live TV versions of Hulu and still take advantage of the bundle discount. In order to enjoy the ad-free or live TV version of Hulu while getting the savings of the bundle, you need to become a Hulu customer first. You can find detailed instructions for bundling different versions of Hulu with Disney Plus and ESPN+ here.    Read everything else you should know about Disney Plus here: Disney Plus: Everything you need to know about Disney's ad-free streaming service All the new movies you can watch on Disney Plus — from the live-action 'Lady and the Tramp' to holiday comedy 'Noelle' All the new shows you can watch on Disney Plus — from 'The Mandalorian' to new Pixar shorts All the kids' movies you can stream on Disney Plus — from 'Snow White' to 'Frozen' All the new kids' shows you can watch on Disney Plus — from 'Vampirina' to the new reboot of 'Star Wars: The Clone Wars' All the Marvel movies and shows you can stream on Disney Plus — from 'Iron Man' to the new 'Loki' Every single Star Wars movie will be available on Disney Plus All the Pixar films and shorts you can stream on Disney Plus — from 'Toy Story' to 'Inside Out' Join the conversation about this story »
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The four horsemen of the techpocalypse – the CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google – joined the US House of Representatives today for an antitrust hearing. We watched every second of the more than five and a half hours of Congress’ grilling of some of the richest men in the world so you wouldn’t have to. Let’s start with the ending. House Antitrust Committee Chairman David Cicilline closed today’s hearing with the following statement: This hearing has made one fact clear to me: these companies as they exist today have monopoly power. Some need to be broken up, all… This story continues at The Next Web
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Partisan antics aside, lawmakers on the antitrust subcommittee dished out some serious, probing questions to the CEOs of Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Apple.
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This could lead scientists to resolve a troubling impediment to a sustained human presence in space.
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Ready to go keyless in 2020? These smart locks make bringing your front door online a breeze.
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Apple CEO Tim Cook will testify alongside CEOs from Google, Amazon, and Facebook in an upcoming antitrust hearing next week. The App Store, a critical part of Apple's burgeoning services business, is expected to be at the heart of regulators' concerns when it comes to the iPhone maker. Apple has come under scrutiny for its policy of taking up to a 30% cut from App Store transactions, which some developers have said makes it difficult to compete with Apple. The biggest question is whether any action will result from the hearing and investigation. Apple's services business has become more important for the company than ever as it's been crucial in offsetting slowing iPhone sales.  The hearing will take place on Wednesday, June 29 at noon EDT, according to reports, and will be streaming live on the House Judiciary's YouTube channel. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Apple CEO Tim Cook is set to appear before Congress to testify alongside CEOs from Amazon, Google, and Facebook in an unprecedented antitrust hearing for the tech industry next week. For the iPhone maker, its all-important App Store is expected to be at the heart of lawmakers' concerns. Apple's App Store has come under scrutiny over the past year as developers and lawmakers have raised concerns about whether the company's position as the operator of the App Store gives it an unfair advantage. That tension is likely to culminate in the upcoming hearing, which is a critical part of the House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee's investigation into whether the digital platforms offered by these companies are harming competition in the industry. The hearing was initially scheduled for Monday, July 27 but has been postponed. Axios reported that the new date for the hearing is Wednesday, June 29. Apple's services segment, which includes revenue generated from the App Store, is a critical part of Apple's business, helping to offset slowing iPhone sales. Revenue from services hit an all-time record in the company's fiscal second-quarter of 2020, growing by 16% compared to the same quarter one year ago. Sales of iPhone, meanwhile, were down roughly 7% versus the same quarter one year ago. The concerns around the App Store are centered on Apple's policy of taking up to a 30% commission from transactions made through the Apple Store. But it's not just the rate alone that's inviting controversy — it's the fact that Apple offers its own services that are similar to those offered in the App Store. And since Apple doesn't have to pay a commission rate to make its premium services available on iPhones,  some app makers, like Spotify, have argued that it's more difficult for them to price their offerings competitively. "You have hundreds of thousands of developers, millions of developers, that the regulators are thinking about," Gene Munster, managing partner at Loup Ventures and a longtime Apple watcher, said to Business Insider. Apple has not made any public statements about what Cook's testimony will entail. But the company has made clear its stance that the App Store commission rates are fair and that the platform welcomes competition. The biggest evidence of this came earlier this week when economic consulting and strategy firm Analysis Group published an Apple-commissioned study showing that its App Store rates match those of other online marketplaces. It's a sign that Apple is wielding the tools it has at its disposal — which in this case includes funding research — to downplay antitrust concerns. Daniel Ives, an analyst with Wedbush Securities, called this a "preemptive strike" ahead of the hearing. "As we go into the congressional hearings, there's going to be a laser focus on that App Store stronghold," he told Business Insider. Among the biggest questions surrounding the hearing isn't what the regulators will bring up — it's whether any action will be taken that requires Apple or the other involved companies to change their businesses. If any action is taken, there's no way to really know what that could look like for Apple. But some analysts have offered speculation on what types of regulations could be imposed to address antitrust concerns around the App Store. Tom Forte, a senior research analyst at D.A. Davidson, mentioned the possibility of Apple granting third-party services more access to its platform. Apple recently made some changes in this area by allowing iPhone owners to change the default web browser and email options in iOS 14, its next major iPhone software update. In one extreme scenario, regulators could impose a new standardized pricing structure for app stores across the industry, Munster said. Apple also has an advantage that could be beneficial in this situation compared to Google and Facebook: its reputation. While companies like Facebook and Google have come under scrutiny about the way they handle, manage, and protect consumer data, Apple has dodged such criticism. The company has used public hearings to remind consumers that it does not rely on advertising-driven business model and therefore argues it has no interest in collecting consumer data.  "I think the general consensus is that Apple is a stronger steward of personal privacy," Robert Muller, an analyst for RBC Capital Markets, said. "So maybe that is one area that can help them out." Regardless, experts seem to think its unlikely that the industry will see a change anytime soon. "I think there's a light year gap between a hearing and actual changes," Munster said. "I suspect that this is something that's going to continue to be talked about, but ultimately, I don't think there's going to be any change."SEE ALSO: In a rare move from Apple, the new iPhone 12 could be cheaper than most other 5G phones Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: A cleaning expert reveals her 3-step method for cleaning your entire home quickly
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A 40-year-old man has been sentenced to two years and eight months in prison after attacking the Guardian columnist Owen Jones.Football hooligan James Healy, from Portsmouth, was sentenced at Snaresbrook Crown Court on Friday after attacking the journalist in August last year because of his political beliefs and his sexuality.Healy admitted assaulting Jones outside of a pub in August last year, but denied being motivated by Jones’s sexuality or political campaigning – claiming he did not know who he was.After a two-day hearing to determine Healy’s motive, Recorder Judge Anne Studd QC previously found the unprovoked attack could only be motivated by Jones’s media profile as a left-wing polemicist.She added: “I therefore propose to sentence Mr Healy on the basis that this was a wholly unprovoked attack on Mr Jones by reason of his widely published left-wing and LGBTQ beliefs by a man who has demonstrable right-wing sympathies.”Following Healy’s arrest, a search of his home found a number of items connected to far-right ideology, including a collection of pin badges linked to white supremacist groups.The Chelsea FC fan – who has a string of convictions for football-related violence – had argued he “had the hump” because the victim had bumped into him and spilled his drink.Jones suffered cuts and swelling to his back and head, and bruises all down his body in the incident outside the Lexington pub on the Pentonville Road in Islington, north London, on August 17.In his evidence, Jones said: “I’m an unapologetic socialist, I’m an anti-racist, I’m an anti-fascist and I’ve consistently used my profile to advocate left-wing causes.”Appearing at Snaresbrook Crown Court on Friday, Healy was given a two-year, eight-month prison sentence for affray and assault occasioning actual bodily harm.His two co-defendants – Charlie Ambrose, from Brighton, and Liam Tracey, from Camden – were given suspended sentences of eight months each, suspended for two years after pleading guilty to affray over the incident.This is a breaking news story and will be updated. Follow HuffPost UK on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.
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Startups are in a state of flux. Once ruled by college dropouts, Silicon Valley is starting to mature. It’s banished beer kegs and ping pong tables for codes of conduct and sensitivity training. Shifts in the Valley don’t happen in a vacuum. Around the world we’re seeing companies ditch the fraternal order in favor of the more mature, steady hand of a qualified C-suite. A college degree, once seen as optional, is now anything but. Of the Fortune 500 tech companies, none feature a (non-founding) CEO that dropped out of college. Of the 38 companies on the list, 22 of… This story continues at The Next Web
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Here, have a link to something vaguely related +Comment  Faced with an obvious falsehood pushed on its platform by a politician seeking re-election, Facebook has finally taken action... in the most grudging, useless way imaginable.…
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Realme is one of the most important smartphone brands nowadays. After two years of existence, the company is pretty much aware of all strategies for ... The post Realme 6i will land in India on July 24, It’s a rebranded Realme 6S appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Facebook is slowing its donations to US politicians, even as a hotly contested presidential election approaches. The social media company is on track to spend significantly less via its political action committee in 2020 than it did in either 2016 or 2018 — despite tripling revenues since 2016. The company is also slowing the speed at which it is making donations, an analysis of FEC filings by Business Insider found. And it is moving away from donating to candidates directly, instead directing its funds to Democratic and Republican Party committees only. Facebook is facing intense political and regulatory scrutiny right now. Facebook is taking an unusually conservative approach to political donations in 2020. The social networking giant is on track to spend less this electoral cycle than in either 2018 or 2016 despite growing massively over the same time period, a Business Insider review of Federal Election Commission (FEC) filings found, and it is also dialing back its direct donations to politicians. The change in strategy comes as Facebook faces intense political pressure over its perceived closeness to the Trump White House, increasing regulatory scrutiny, and even as rivals like Google maintain their own electoral spending. A Facebook spokesperson declined to comment on Facebook's donation strategy for 2020. Facebook, like many big tech companies, operates a political action committee (PAC) to route its donations to politicians in the US. (Companies cannot donate directly to candidates.) These PACS are largely fueled by donations from staffers at their respective companies (Facebook's donors have included CEO Mark Zuckerberg, CTO Mike Schroepfer, and CFO Michael Wehner, for example), and the donations are broadly bipartisan, fueling various campaign efforts for both Democrats and Republicans. In the past, Facebook has funded Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware, Republican Sen. Steve Daines of Montana, and Republican Congressman Mike Rounds of South Dakota, among others, and typically gives slightly more to Republican candidates than Democrats, according to a previous analysis by OpenSecrets.  On its corporate website, Facebook says its donations are aimed at "support[ing] the campaigns of candidates for public office in the United States who have certain policy stances that are consistent with Facebook's public policy views and business interests." Facebook's donations are dropping In 2016, Facebook's PAC spent roughly $675,600 over the two-year election period. The 2018 two-year election period's spend increased somewhat, to $721,750. But if Facebook continues to spend at a comparable rate in 2020 as it did in previous years, it is likely to spend noticeably less: Around $580,000. By July in the previous two election years, Facebook had spent roughly 73%-75% of its total spend for that two-year cycle. As of July 2020, Facebook has spent just under $430,000. Following a similar rate of spend, it would take the total for the cycle to around $100,000 less than it spent in 2016. (The company could still decide to make unusually large donations for the remainder of 2020, throwing off this prediction.) Meanwhile, Facebook's revenues have grown dramatically — from $5.4 billion in the first quarter of 2016 to $17.7 billion in the first quarter of 2020, along with its corresponding profits. The frequency of Facebook's donations is also slowing. Unlike in previous years, Facebook is now only making donations roughly every three months, making either no or negligible disbursements the other months. And the company's PAC appears to now be backing away from making donations directly to candidates. While in previous months and years Facebook has patronized a variety of politicians, in its July 2020 filing published Monday (that details donations from June 2020), it details donations to only four organisations: The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC), the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), and the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), of $15,000 apiece.  Facebook is under attack As the 2020 election ramps up, Facebook has found itself increasingly under fire from all sides. Many on the right have accused the social network, without proof, of deliberately censoring conservatives. And increased awareness of the market power and dominance of tech companies has prompted growing calls on the left for antitrust action to be taken against Facebook.  Meanwhile, the company's refusal to take action against posts by Donald Trump that critics said glorified violence sparked mass outrage, including among the company's employees, who in June staged a virtual walkout of several hundred workers — the largest show of worker unrest in the company's history. And concerns continue to remain about the spread of fake news and hate speech on the social network. Throughout July, numerous high-profile advertisers are taking part in a boycott of the company's ad products, including Starbucks, Adidas, Unilever, and Ford. Faced with this sustained hostility, the company may be trying to avoid any potential blowback from donations to individual candidates, without pulling the plug on its donations and the political goodwill they generate altogether. Google has previously faced scrutiny over its donations to controversial right-wing politicians — though it continues to donate directly to candidates' PACs, as of its July 2020 FEC filing. Do you work at Facebook? Contact Business Insider reporter Rob Price via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1 650-636-6268), encrypted email ([email protected]), standard email ([email protected]), Telegram/Wickr/WeChat (robaeprice), or Twitter DM (@robaeprice). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by standard email only, please.SEE ALSO: Mark Zuckerberg called the Trump administration's response to COVID-19 'really disappointing' in a Facebook interview with Fauci Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why electric planes haven't taken off yet
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Google Chrome could soon replace your dedicated Android download manager.
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A rare but risky problem can cause the earbuds to overheat when charging
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We’re here to guide you through the coronavirus pandemic. Sign up to the Life newsletter for daily tips, advice, how-tos and escapism.Bored of the view from your window? Why not swap it for grazing cows in the rural fields of the Philippines or the dazzling lights of the Manhattan skyline?Travel may still be restricted, but a new video project will virtually transport you around the world, allowing you to watch the view from someone else’s window. The relaxing footage is just the thing you need after months of lockdown. The project, titled Window Swap, was created by Sonali Ranjit and her husband Vaishnav Balasubramaniam, two advertising creatives based in Singapore.Between them, they’ve previously lived and worked in India, Shanghai, Singapore, San Francisco and Stockholm, so spent lockdown wondering how their friends abroad were getting on. READ MORE: The 10 Trending Staycation Destinations For UK Holidays “For over two months, all we had was the view from our window because even going to our postbox felt like a dangerous journey,” the couple say in a joint email to HuffPost UK. “We often wondered how it would be to trade places with our friends, just to be able to see something different outside our windows.”The couple initially exchanged footage with a close group of friends. They enjoyed the experience so much they decided to open it up so anyone could join. Now, there are more than 60 videos from 26 countries. “We loved the experience so much, it really felt like an escape,” they say. “Even though we’re not as contained in our houses anymore, travel is still a distant dream.” Taking part in the project is simple: users can submit a short video from their window or balcony to an email address listed on the website. All videos are reviewed by the couple before they’re uploaded.The videos should be two to 10-minutes long, shot horizontally and steadily, preferably in HD. Ideally, at least a corner or two of your window or door frame should be seen in the shot.“We welcome all kinds of windows, whatever the shape, whatever the view,” they said, “because what we usually take for granted, is gold for someone else.The couple has managed to get videos from 26 countries, ranging from Medellin in Colombia, Cordoba in Argentian, Rowville in the suburbs of Melbourne, Bangalore in India, La Baule in the South of France, and a view of the Manhattan skyline in New York.“We have views with contented cats on window sills, church bells in Bergamo, Italy, grazing cows in Pampanga in rural Philippines, and cyclists in Copenhagen,” they say. “Each one of them is so unique and personal it’s hard to select a favourite! It depends on the day and the mood we are in.”View more pictures of the views below or visit window-swap.com to watch the relaxing footage, bird sounds and all. READ MORE: What Intensive Care Looks Like In A Crisis, Captured By A Doctor Scream Into Your Phone And They'll Play It Out Loud In Iceland Burying Poos And Finding Water: The Dos And Don'ts Of Wild Camping
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The Long Range AWD variant took a price cut of $3,000 this weekend as Tesla shuffles things around.
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UK scientists turn to comics to help educate people about the risks of covid-19.
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Bioprinting could happen via minimally invasive surgery
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SoftBank's strategy is to pour so much money into a company that it leaves competitors in the dust and consumers with no choice.Softbank — the Japanese conglomerate and investment firm with seemingly limitless resources — is suffering.It was the company's first quarterly loss in 14 years.WeWork, as you likely know, imploded dramatically during an attempt to make it to the public markets.And in his presentation to investors Masayoshi Son, SoftBank's founder and CEO, was liberal with his mea culpas.He bemoaned the fact that he gave now former WeWork CEO Adam Neumann so much power, which ultimately led to Softbank's stunning $4.7 billion loss (so far) on that single investment.
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They're surprisingly essential, making backing up and parking both easier and safer.In fact, I guarantee that if you spend even a little time driving a car with a backup camera and then take the wheel of a car without one, you'll immediately notice the difference.There are a lot of aftermarket backup camera kits you can use to upgrade your car, but most of them suffer from the same problem: installation is just too darned difficult.And now you can get the Solar Wireless Backup Camera Kit for $127.49 when you use the coupon on the product page and apply code TT8LWC8C at checkout.That's a savings of 25% off the list price of $170.Manufacturer AUTO-VOX claims that installation takes a total of five minutes and needs nothing more than a screwdriver to perform.
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Spigen is a well-known manufacturer of phone cases and has often been able to anticipate the arrival of smartphones not yet announced through its rich online store.The same could happen in the case of the Pocophone F2, whose traces have been lost since last September.In the manufacturer’s catalog, two cases have been included – Liquid Crystal and Rugged Armor – dedicated to the Pocophone 2.As evident from the images, the smartphone inserted in the transparent case is the Redmi K20, the one in the rugged case might seem to be K20 Pro (judging by the red ring that surrounds the first lens at the top).Pocophone F2 is coming soonIn summary, at least from the point of view of the size and positioning of the various elements.
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Instead of using third-party platforms like Youtube and Twitch, artists will soon be able to livestream their process directly through whatever Adobe Creative Cloud app they’re working in according to a Verge report.It’s one of many experimental features the company announced at this week’s Adobe Max creativity conference, including some pretty impressive demos that show off how artificial intelligence is changing the creative game.Adobe’s new built-in streaming function would perform similarly to that of other platforms: When you want to start a broadcast, just click the go-live button and you’ll receive a shareable link so anyone can come watch you work and leave comments.Chief product officer Scott Belsky even compared it directly to Twitch, albeit with a larger focus on practical demonstrations, per the Verge’s report.“When you see a live stream of someone in our products, you want to know what tool they’re using – when they use the tool and when they stop using it – almost like a form of the waveform of video.But imagine a waveform related to what tools people are using, and imagine being able to source all live streams that have ever been done in a particular product, by a particular tool, to be able to learn how people are doing something,” Belsky told the Verge.
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The Alibaba Group and French hospitality group Accor are forming a strategic partnership to develop a series of digital applications and loyalty programs designed to facilitate international travel for the Chinese e-commerce giant’s 700 million consumers.Why it matters: For Accor, Alibaba offers access to the lucrative but slowing market of Chinese traveling overseas.Meanwhile, Alibaba’s Fliggy travel platform will be able to bolster its listings with Accor’s 4,900 hotels and residences in 110 countries.The partnership also stands to aid in Alibaba’s push to popularize Alipay internationally, as customers will now be able to use the payment service to book accommodations through Accor with the facilitation of its travel agency platform, Fliggy.Details: With Alibaba’s help, Accor plans to spend $255 million on a new loyalty program called Accor Live Limitless (ALL).Alibaba will provide assistance on its rollout by offering digital marketing and other capabilities, according to a report by Skift.
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However, the plant doesn't do well in high temperatures, so plant breeders are trying to help.Researchers, led by professor Kevin Murphy at Washington State University, have been looking into more efficient methods for determining heat tolerance in quinoa.This can help us find heat-tolerant plant types in our breeding program and incorporate those genetics in new varieties."To conduct the research, hand-held devices are placed near the plant to measure the light they absorb and reflect.For example, plants may reflect near infrared light while absorbing red light.These measurements -- although involving complex math -- are easy, cheap, and quick to take in the field.
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The lawyer who allegedly laundered some of the proceeds from the multi-billion dollar OneCoin cryptocurrency scam is currently standing trial in New York.Mark Scott is accused of siphoning some $300 million from the US using corporate accounts at the Bank of Ireland, whose employees were asked to testify against him in September.Scott allegedly created several offshore investment vehicles, called the “Fenero Funds,” which were then reportedly used to launder the proceeds from the scam.Additionally, prosecutors claim he spent some of the proceeds on several luxury items, including a yacht, three homes, and a Ferrari.A former partner at major law firm Locke Lord, Scott was arrested a little over a year ago at his beachfront property in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.Scott previously denied knowing that OneCoin’s activities were potentially unlawful.
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German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas on Monday questioned whether the country should allow Huawei access to its fifth-generation wireless network rollout because the company is compelled to hand information over to the Chinese government, Reuters reported.Why it matters: The remarks came just weeks after German authorities drafted security guidelines calling for would-be suppliers to 5G network operators to pledge that they won’t reveal data to their home governments under legal pressure, a strong sign that Berlin may exclude Huawei from its 5G network build.The guidelines require 5G equipment suppliers to submit a document self-declaring their trustworthiness.The German government documents echo an earlier report by the European Union which warned “hostile third countries” may force 5G suppliers to facilitate cyberattacks serving their own national interests.Details: Maas told reporters in Berlin that Huawei was a company dependent on the Chinese state due to its national security laws.A 2017 law requires organizations and citizens to “support, assist and cooperate with the state intelligence work.”
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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey engaged in a bit of cross-platform trolling last week, announcing that his company would ban political advertising from the platform, and adding a snarky subtweet aimed at Facebook’s stated policy of tolerance for paid political misinformation.Yet there’s something very strange about the centrality of paid ads in our ongoing debate about how to grapple with viral lies and their distorting effect on democracy.Restricting this particular form of communication may be a simple solution—and one that’s easy to import from familiar debates about campaign finance in the television era—but it holds no real promise for addressing the problem.Paid ads have very little to do with how political deception spreads online, and doing away with them will likely hamper legitimate political speech.Any conversation about misinformation on social media must, of course, engage with Russia’s well-documented campaign of interference in the 2016 American presidential race.While we may never know with any certainty whether that campaign altered the outcome of the election, it’s clear that paid ads were not themselves a significant factor.
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