Isiah Jone

Isiah Jone

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Following 54
US
Epic's direct payment system lowers prices for V-Bucks by up to 20% versus the App Store and Google Play Store.
UK
Mobile Device Management has become an increasingly important part of the business landscape, especially now with remote working.
UK
Vodafone has ramped up its efforts to be a competitive player among the big three telcos, with a new mobile plan and discounts on NBN and mobile bundles.
China
The Mi 10 Ultra is due for a launch this evening at 5 PM IST. However, some overly enthusiastic people on the Chinese blogosphere have ... The post Mi 10 Ultra with 120W charger unboxed ahead of launch appeared first on Gizchina.com.
US
(University of Massachusetts Amherst) Researchers at the Center for Smart and Connected Society at UMass Amherst recently released a new digital contact-tracing technique that is based on widely-deployed Wi-Fi technology. They intend the open-source software tool to help universities and colleges deploy campus contact tracing as students return under special pandemic management rules this fall.
US
Tinder does not notify users of screenshots taken by others, unlike apps like Snapchat. This means that you can take screenshots of profiles and conversations on Tinder without the other person being notified.  You should always remember, though, not to share anyone else's personal information online without their consent. Visit Business Insider's Tech Reference library for more stories. The widespread use of Snapchat has acclimated most social media users to the concept of the screenshot notification. If you're a Tinder user, there have probably been multiple occasions in which you wanted to take a screenshot of something on the app.  Maybe you had a conversation with a match that was too funny not to save — after all, on the off chance that you get married, that conversation will be a great relic to show your future grandchildren, right?   Or, maybe you've had an unsettling conversation that you want to share with a friend to get validation or a second opinion on your interpretation. It may even be something as simple as trying to decide how to swipe on someone you're not sure about, and wanting to get a friend's advice on their profile.  Regardless of the reason, you may have felt hesitation about screenshotting any part of an interaction on Tinder, worrying you may ruin your chances with the person you're screenshotting if they see that you're doing it. Tinder does not notify users of screenshots The good news on that front, though, is that Tinder doesn't notify anybody when you take a screenshot, unlike apps like Snapchat (and Instagram, in one instance). You can capture anything on the app and save it, and nobody will know. You can take a screenshot on almost any device, such as your Lenovo, HP, Dell, Windows, or Mac computer, or on your Google Pixel, iPhone, or Galaxy S10 mobile device.  Now, it's important to remember that you should be careful with how you use this power.  You should never expose someone's personal information without their permission, and just because Tinder doesn't notify them doesn't mean they can't find out another way if you post about them online or share their messages or profile with a large group. If you want to post a funny or creepy conversation on social media, do the polite thing and censor the person's personal information out of the picture. Related coverage from Tech Reference: How to cancel your Tinder subscription on an Android device in 2 different ways How to connect your Spotify account to your Tinder profile to display your music taste How to screenshot on a Chromebook in 2 different ways, and then open those screenshots later 'Does Instagram notify you of screenshots?': Here's what you need to know How to take a screenshot on your Apple Watch, and find those screenshots in the Photos app on your iPhone SEE ALSO: I tested the Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus for 2 months, and it made me question everything about my 'iPhone or nothing' mentality Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's what it's like to travel during the coronavirus outbreak
US
Google Google has injected a new cinematic slideshow above the top row of apps in the Android TV interface to make it easier to find content you might like. It will contain curated TV show, movie, and app recommendations from Google as well as sponsored content. Google says that “each source will be clearly labeled on the content, giving users transparency,” so that users can differentiate between curated recommendations and paid advertisements, and it will contain only media and entertainment-related content. If you pause on one of the items, it’ll start playing a preview, like how Netflix’s TV app does. Recommending popular, relevant content and apps will probably be useful for most people, but some likely won’t be too thrilled to see giant... Continue reading…
US
T-Mobile US has said its 5G coverage has increased by 30% thanks to its standalone deployment, though it is still only using low-band spectrum for this upgrade.
UK
Hisense to introduce a set of smart LED TVs in India including the Hisense A56E series of Android TVs and Hisense A71F 4K UHD TV series.
US
It's a win for campaigners challenging Home Office use of the algorithm, which for the past five years has been helping decide whether people are granted visas.
US
Trump defended his threat to condition the sale of TikTok to an American company on the US government receiving a "very big proportion" of the deal during a press conference Tuesday. "We have all the cards, without us you can't come into the United States," Trump said. Trump did not elaborate on how he plans to require the companies to pay up or which side the money would come from, but claimed that TikTok and Microsoft — which are in acquisition talks — both agreed that the US should receive a payout. Trump threatened to ban the app from operating in the US last month, citing national security concerns, though it's unclear what authority he has to do that. China responded by calling the US a "rogue country" and arguing Trump's proposal would be an "open robbery." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. President Donald Trump doubled down on his demand that any sale of TikTok to an American company involve the US government receiving a "very big proportion." "We have all the cards, without us you can't come into the United States," Trump said during a press conference Tuesday. "If they make a deal for TikTok, whether it's the 30% in the United States or the whole company, I say, 'it's okay, but if you do that, we're really making it possible because we're letting you operate here," Trump said, adding that "the United States Treasury would have to benefit also." Trump also claimed that both TikTok and Microsoft — which confirmed Sunday that it's in talks to buy the viral video app developer — agreed with his condition of cutting the US government in on the deal. TikTok has reportedly been privately valued as high as $50 billion.  "They understood that, and actually they agreed with me," Trump said. "I think they agreed with me very much." A Microsoft spokesperson referred Business Insider to a blog post the company published Sunday saying that it plans to continue talks with TikTok following a conversation between CEO Satya Nadella and Trump. "Microsoft fully appreciates the importance of addressing the President's concerns. It is committed to acquiring TikTok subject to a complete security review and providing proper economic benefits to the United States, including the United States Treasury," the post said. TikTok did not immediately respond to a request for comment on this story. The president didn't offer any specifics as to how he would force TikTok, which is owned by Chinese-based parent company ByteDance, or a potential buyer to share deal proceeds with the US government. Trump has the authority under a 1988 law to block foreign business deals pertaining to US companies if he considers the deals to be a national security threat, which he has used twice before to block deals involving firms from China and Singapore that were looking to acquire American companies. Chinese state media called Trump's proposal "open robbery" and a "smash and grab," and accused him of "turning the once great America into a rogue country." Trump threatened last month to ban the app from operating in the US entirely, but it's unclear what power he has to completely ban an app from the country. Trump said the ban was meant to punish China over the coronavirus, a motivation he reiterated Tuesday. Trump and other politicians including Joe Biden have ratcheted up their rhetoric against TikTok in recent months, citing concerns that the app could share data with Beijing or spy on Americans. However, experts have pointed out that the app collects user data in similar ways to US-based competitors like Facebook. Trump added that he thought Microsoft would be an acceptable buyer because of its "high-level" security clearances, which already allow it to do business with the Department of Defense and other federal agencies — though he said other companies are interested as well. Paige Leskin contributed reporting for this story.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What it's like inside North Korea's controversial restaurant chain
US
Just updated: Here's the retail status of the $200 portable version of Nintendo's hot gaming console.
UK
New rumor claims Team Red's next-generation graphics card will boast a maximum of 80 CUs
UK
To celebrate the very real holiday that is National Doll Day.
US
Many companies are deciding to give employees more permanent remote work options even after the pandemic ends, which requires having a consistent culture whether employees are in an office or distributed.  Michael Pryor, the cofounder and head of Trello, which Atlassian acquired in 2017, has been managing a team that's 80% remote for the last nine years, and offers advice for how to make it work.  He says executives need focus on three things: Being deliberate about the tools their employees use, setting clear guidelines for how those tools should be used, and making sure those rules establish a culture of trust within the company.  Click here to read more BI Prime stories.  As the coronavirus pandemic has shown that companies can be successful even when all employees are remote, many businesses are rethinking the future of work. Tech companies like Slack, Box, Facebook, and Twitter are among those planning to offer more permanent remote work options for employees even after the crisis ends.  Many executives are envisioning a future with both office workers and remote workers, which gives employees more flexibility. However, that system may also require a culture shift within the company to make sure that all employees have a level playing field. Michael Pryor, the cofounder and head of Trello, which Atlassian acquired in 2017, has been managing a team that's 80% remote for the last nine years. He says executives need to do three things when managing a distributed team: Be deliberate about the tools their employees use, set guidelines for how those tools should be used, and make sure those rules establish a culture of trust within the company.  "The future is now — it was like the pandemic just said, 'Everyone just got pushed into this new reality,'" Pryor told Business Insider. "I think that what people are realizing is that the tools have gotten so good and that there's a lot of benefits from people being flexible about how they're engaged."  Choosing tools that enable "asynchronous" work and setting guidelines for using them Choosing tools that allow people to collaborate while not needing to be in the same time zone or in the same office is key, Pryor said. That includes communication tools like Slack, Zoom, and Microsoft Teams, cloud based file sharing like Dropbox, and project management tools like his own Trello.  However, just having the tools isn't enough. Managers have to set guidelines for expected employee behavior and how each tool should be used. For example, setting best-practices for when people can expect to reach others on Slack, so people can maintain a work-life balance, or establishing rules for what types of communication is meant for email versus chat apps versus video chat.  "Those rituals that we used to have that happened in place in physical offices, you need to create similar things that accomplish the same goals, but now using digital tools," Pryor said. For example, Pryor's team uses both Slack and Trello for communicating and keeping track of work. If a question needs an answer ASAP, employees are supposed to use Slack, while using public channels rather than direct messages as much as possible. That keeps the discussion available for people in different time zones. However, if a message isn't urgent, employees are supposed to use Trello, to avoid overcrowding in Slack while ensuring the message is publicly logged.  He also suggests using a video chat tool that can record and transcribe a meeting, so it can be shared with those who couldn't join. Features like that help keep everyone informed and isn't a heavy-lift for those planning the meetings.  Replicating in-person practices with online tools to establish trust Equally as important is making sure to establish trust between employees. "[The] number one indicator of how a team can be effective is trust," Pryor said. In an office setting, trust is established via in-person communication, so companies moving to a distributed work model have to replicate that using digital tools, he said.  One step Trello takes is using non-verbal signals to indicate when you're available or busy. For example, if you walk past someone's office and the door is closed, you know they're busy. To get the same effect in a distributed environment, Pryor's employees set 'do not disturb' statuses in Slack to indicate when they're not available.  Additionally, employees should all feel like they have the same access and space within a company. So, if one person dials in on a video call, everyone else should dial in that way too, regardless of if they're in an office or not.  Another example is using tools to track progress for recurring one-on-one meetings between managers and their direct reports. Trello uses its own tool for this, but others also work. The goal is to have an agenda and set specific goals and deadlines, and document those so it can be a record for when performance reviews come up. It also makes sure managers are evaluating office employees and remote employees on the same criteria. "As a manager, it's not my space, it's a shared space between me and my employee," Pryor said. "And so we're putting things in there together. It's a collaborative meeting in order to grow people's careers" A big trust building factor that gets lost in a distributed environment is the casual conversation with coworkers. To make up for that, after virtual all hands meetings using Zoom, Trello employees get placed in breakout rooms to chat with coworkers they may or may not know.  "In this digital environment," Pryor said, "We had to figure out a way for people across the company to meet each other."  Got a tip? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected] or Signal at 925-364-4258. (PR pitches by email only, please.) You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop.SEE ALSO: Slack is laying the foundation for a new type of job, following in the footsteps of customers like IBM and Verizon who created dedicated roles to manage their use of the work chat app Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
US
(HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology) During the third phase, ENCODE consortium researchers drew closer to their goal of developing a comprehensive map of the functional elements of human and mouse genomes by adding to the ENCODE database millions of candidate DNA switches that regulate when and where genes are turned on. ENCODE 3 also offers a new registry that assigns some of the DNA switches to useful biological categories.
US
Illustration by James Bareham / The Verge The surge in Facebook usage during early shelter-in-place orders in the United States was not just a blip. Daily users of Facebook increased 12 percent year over year, to 1.79 billion. Monthly usage across its family of apps, which also include Instagram and WhatsApp, rose 14 percent, to 3.14 billion. And Facebook’s mostly ad-based based business rose along with them: the company’s revenue was up 11 percent year over year, to $18.69 billion. “We’re glad to be able to provide small businesses the tools they need to grow and be successful online during these challenging times,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a statement. “And we’re proud that people can rely on our services to stay connected when they can’t always be together in... Continue reading…
US
The Asus ROG Phone 3 packs in a huge 6,000mAh battery, but does that translate into a full day's worth of gaming time?
UK
Any concerns that the long-awaited Russia report would be a damp squib were blown out of the water on Tuesday, when a slew of revelations painted a damning picture of how the UK is dealing with the threat from a hostile foreign power.The government only “belatedly” realised the kind of threat Russia could pose to democracy and Tory ministers and intelligence agencies have not done enough to mitigate the menace, the 55-page ISC report said.But there is also a lot we didn’t learn. Including footnotes, there are a grand total of 175 redactions in the report, indicated simply by three asterisks.Of course there is one inference we can make about all of them – they’re redacted because they’re super juicy and top-secret.Here are the main ones.1) What is being targeted by Russian cyber-attackers?“Russia has also undertaken cyber pre-positioning activity on other nations’ Critical National Infrastructure (CNI). The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has advised that there is *** Russian cyber intrusion into the UK’s CNI – particularly marked in the *** sectors.”The report notes that Russia has already taken “cyber pre-positioning” into the infrastructure of other countries. This refers to identification of weak points in computer systems that control vital services such as the power grid or communications. These can then be exploited in the event of a conflict causing chaos.It has previously been reported that the US and Russia are involved in a low-level programme of infiltrating each other’s systems and the report says Russia has already been targeting the UK though it redacts just exactly which sectors – though it’s bad news no matter which ones it is.The UK has 13 national infrastructure sectors and they’re all crucial – chemicals, civil nuclear communications, defence, emergency services, energy, finance, food, government, health, space, transport and water.2) Just how much influence do Russian expatriates have in the UK? “The extent to which Russian expatriates are using their access to UK businesses and politicians to exert influence in the UK is ***: it is widely recognised that Russian intelligence and business are completely intertwined.”The report confirms the long-held belief that wealthy Russians living in the UK hold a certain amount of power and influence among the country’s business and political elite.Just how far this power and influence goes has, unfortunately, been redacted from the report – though journalist Christo Grozev had a good stab at what might be missing.*fucking unbelievable*? pic.twitter.com/fayLti2E0d— Christo Grozev (@christogrozev) July 21, 20203) Why did MI5 provide open-source materials?“In response to our request for written evidence at the outset of the inquiry, MI5 initially provided just six lines of text.”In a section that looks at the EU referendum as a case study of possible Russian interference, the report highlights the remarkably small amount of information provided by MI5, the UK’s domestic security agency. The six lines themselves have also been redacted.The report highlights how MI5 – in response to a query on whether there was secret intelligence to back-up publicly available open-source studies into Russian influence – then cited open-source and publicly available materials in its evidence.The report goes on to note that it is indicative of the intelligence agencies’ reluctance to involve themselves in the democratic process of the UK.What isn’t made clear, however, is whether MI5 (a) has information but didn’t provide it for political reasons or (b) didn’t even gather information in the first place because of political reasons.4) Did Russia actually meddle in the Scottish independence referendum?Despite making the front page of The Daily Telegraph on Tuesday, the report’s conclusion about possible Russian meddling in the Scottish Independence vote was very short and very unhelpful.“There has been credible open source commentary suggesting that Russia undertook influence campaigns in relation to the Scottish independence referendum in 2014.“However, at the time ***. It appears that *** what some commentators have described as potentially the first post-Soviet Russian interference in a Western democratic process. We note that – almost five years on – ***.”With the redactions as they are, it’s impossible to conclude either way at this stage.Tuesday’s @Telegraph says the long awaited #RussiaReport will disclose that the Kremlin tried to “influence” the result of the Scottish independence referendum but not the Brexit vote. pic.twitter.com/zQlPKf6o7N— Stuart Hughes (@stuartdhughes) July 20, 20205) What is the Intelligence Community focused on?“Most surprising, perhaps, was the extent to which much of the work of theIntelligence Community is focused on ***.”The report expresses surprise and shock that the UK’s intelligence agencies aren’t as focused on the threat from Russia as should be expected given the extent of the country’s interference in the UK.One of the apparent reasons for this is that resources are concentrated mostly on something that has been redacted.But one thing we do know is that the report makes numerous references to terrorism and even later on expresses concern that “as resources were being transferred to counter-terrorism, coverage of other areas had become increasingly thin”.Related... Spy Agencies 'Didn't Do Enough To Protect Brexit Vote From Russian Interference' Boris Johnson's Refusal To Probe Brexit Vote Is 'Green Light For Russian Meddling' Dominic Raab Accuses Russia Of 'Reprehensible' Attempt To Hack Coronavirus Research
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There's really not much separating the Bronco's cost to dealers and the manufacturer's suggested retail price.
UK
This is Sick Days, a collection of stories from readers on how the current Covid-19 health crisis is changing the way they work.
UK
It seems that Samsung Galaxy device owners — some of them, at least — are about to get a new exclusive Fortnite skin. The upcoming cosmetic leaked ahead of its official unveiling, revealing yet another galaxy-themed skin unlike any others available to purchase through the Item Shop. The new item appears to be a female version of the skin we … Continue reading
UK
Donald Trump has said he found a cognitive test which requires the identification of common animals and sums such as subtracting seven from 100 was “very hard”.In an interview with Fox News Sunday, the president was attempting to prove he is smarter than his Democratic rival Joe Biden by referencing a test he took in 2018 that looks for signs of dementia.Host Chris Wallace then revealed he too had taken the exam and it was “not the hardest” as one part simply required identifying a drawing of an elephant as an elephant."I took the [cognitive] test too, when I heard you passed it. It's not the hardest test. It shows a picture and it says, 'what's that,' and it's an elephant." -- Chris Wallace pushes back on Trump hyping the cognitive test he passed at Walter Reed pic.twitter.com/8Df8Ez10Ma— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) July 19, 2020Trump hit back: “Nah, nah, nah, that’s all misrepresentation. Because yes, the first few questions are easy but I bet you couldn’t even answer the last five questions.“They get very hard, the last five questions.”To which Wallace responded: “Well one of them was ‘count back from 100 by seven’.Undeterred, Trump said he could “guarantee you Joe Biden couldn’t answer those questions”, before proudly adding: “And I answered all 25 questions correctly.”Trump was referencing the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, and while the actual questions differ slightly, the following is a representative example.The last question on this example of the test, which Trump said was “very hard” ones, is “where are you right now and what is the date?”During the same interview, Trump also suggested he will not accept the result of November’s US presidential election if he loses to Biden.He also repeated his claim that coronavirus will “disappear”, saying: “I’ll be right eventually. I will be right eventually.“You know I said, ‘It’s going to disappear.’ I’ll say it again.”The United States recorded a total of at least 70,674 new Covid-19 infections on Friday after climbing by a record 77,499 a day earlier, the largest increase posted by any country since the pandemic started, according to a Reuters tally.US deaths on Friday rose by at least 912, the fourth day in a row that fatalities have exceeded 900 a day.The country has been averaging about 60,000 cases a day in July with cases rising in 41 states on Friday.Texas and Arkansas reported a record number of deaths on Friday, while Kansas, Ohio, North Dakota and Puerto Rico reported record numbers of infections.Trump has urged a return to normal, stressing the importance of reigniting the economy. Related... Donald Trump Suggests He Will Not Accept Presidential Election Result If He Loses 9 Charts That Show Just How Bad The Coronavirus Situation Is In The US
US
On this episode of the I'm So Obsessed podcast, Lanigan talks about the Disney Archives prop warehouse, owning a Jack Skellington puppet and working with action star Dolph Lundgren.
US
The technology boosts light-cell efficiency, enables high-res Lidar using commercial camera lenses
UK
The EU‘s Court of Justice has struck down its Privacy Shield pact with the United States due to concerns about US surveillance. In a statement on Thursday, EU judges said the data-sharing agreement doesn’t sufficiently protect the privacy of the bloc’s citizens. “The limitations on the protection of personal data arising from the domestic law of the United States on the access and use by US public authorities… are not circumscribed in a way that satisfies requirements that are essentially equivalent to those required under EU law,” the court said in a statement. #ECJ: the Decision on the adequacy of the… This story continues at The Next Web
US
There's no denying that America has an enduring fascination with unidentified flying objects, or UFOs. However, UFO interest extends far beyond the U.S. — sightings are reported worldwide, and multiple observations in far-flung locations describe aerial objects that are uncannily similar to each other, Luis Elizondo, former head of a top-secret U.S. government agency tasked with investigating UFOs, recently told Live Science.
UK
Tesla has quietly cut the price of its newest car, with the Model Y electric crossover trimmed by as much as $3,000. Deliveries of the Model Y only began in March 2020, amid close scrutiny by industry observers and investors alike as to how smooth the manufacturing process would be. Now, it’s already seeing a model shake-up. Today, you can … Continue reading
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