Issac Pierce

Issac Pierce

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Following 37
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The system uses a thermal imaging camera, facial recognition, and Lidar
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Pliops Storage Processors promise to accelerate SSD performance of databases, as well as cutting hardware and power costs.
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Here are the companies in Indonesia that are attracting tons of investors and have the resources to spend on software, talent, and expansion.
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Here are a few tips and tricks to help navigate the basic procedures for Microsoft's Xbox One gaming console.
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Rural communities are getting better internet speeds.
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This week the government released a report that is its starting point for a new obesity strategy. In summary: you’re probably overweight, especially if you’re poor. The report reads: “Children in the most deprived parts of the country are more than twice as likely to be obese as their peers living in the richest areas,” which surprised a total of zero people. For most it confirmed one of two things; if you’re poor you’re to be patronised: clearly you don’t understand that pot noodle isn’t a vegetable. Or they’re to be pitied: they can’t afford the nutrients they need. And it’s true, if fruit and vegetables were cheaper more people would have access to them, but they’ll never be a treat.The government’s obesity plan treats food as something only to keep you going, rather than something to be enjoyed.Being on a beach drinking a cocktail from a hollowed-out pineapple is a treat – a pineapple isn’t a treat. The problem is not only that nutritious food is expensive and that junk food is cheap, it’s that people live with such limited resources that the only treat they can afford is something from the confectionary aisle. We’d often eat pizza for dinner when I was growing up, sometimes twice a week. The pizza was 99p and depending on how much change was left in “the tin” in the kitchen I’d have a whole one to myself or it would be halved and shared. The pizza was frozen with spongy dough thick as two fingers, the tomato sauce was thick and tasted like tomato puree and when the cheese melted it set again with an unnatural sheen like condensation on a window. It was what you would expect a 99p pizza to taste like, but it was a treat, nonetheless. Your appetite for nice things isn’t suspended when your credit card is. And, if you’re a parent with no money you spend more time than you’d like telling your child, no, they can’t have those nice things either.My parents gave me £1.60 for a portion of chips so often that the owner of the shop, an avuncular man who wore a white lab jacket, told me he’d be giving me extra chips, because I was a regular. They would have preferred to take me to Disneyland, or bought me toys to play with for an afternoon before they were replaced with more toys, but that wasn’t an option. Instead they gave me food laced with sugar and ingredients that sound like they belong on the periodic table. They could have bought me a courgette, but they wanted to give me something that would make me feel like I was lucky, something that felt like a treat. But it’s not only poor children who are obese, the government report tells us. “Obesity prevalence is highest amongst the most deprived groups in society.” The government’s response, of banning adverts for junk food before 9pm and buy-one-get-one-free deals misses the point. It treats food as something only to keep you going, rather than something to be enjoyed. And if you’re near broke, why would you deprive yourself of one of the few treats you can afford, when for £1 you can enjoy the luxury of a pack of Fox’s Chocolatey Ring Biscuits, just like everyone else. The response to the report was predictable. Annunziata Rees-Mogg, of the multi-millionaire Rees-Mogg family, tweeted that a bag of Tesco 1kg potatoes is 83p, while 950g of crisps were £1.35, this was in response to another tweet suggesting vegetables are too expensive for low income households. The suggestion is unclear – make your own crisps, invest the 52p you’ve saved (presuming there are no other costs) and become rich like her? What Annunziata’s tweet and others like it show is that if you’ve got no money you’ve got to defend wanting anything other than basic sustenance. Why eat crisps, when you could eat a sack of boiled potatoes? Eat up son, if you don’t finish your spuds, they’ll be no turnip for dessert. When my dad finishes a 12-hour shift, tired and underpaid, he doesn’t want a salad. He can’t afford a holiday to watch his weight for, and he wants something tasty – a treat – so he orders a combo meal from the chicken shop. He’s just not going to be convinced to switch to a healthy alternative through government messaging. My dad isn’t obese, however, living in a low-income area his neighbours likely are. If poverty and obesity are going to be untangled it won’t be with the window dressing that has been proposed. There are bigger, structural issues, that have gone unaddressed. Having the time and resources to think about living a healthier lifestyle is a privilege. If you’re poor you’ve got stuff on your mind: you’re more likely to likely to live in insecure housing, be in insecure employment and more likely to die from Covid-19. When someone is struggling to put food on the table is it any wonder, they’re unconcerned with what’s on the plate?Josh Schot is a freelance writer. Related... Opinion: Blaming Obesity Is Not The Solution To Coronavirus I've Been On A Weight Management Programme. Here's Why It Didn't Work. No.10 Slammed For 'Obesity Crackdown' That Ignores Poverty
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The past few months have changed how Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian invests in companies.  Ohanian is married to tennis star Serena Williams and wants to have a good answer when their daughter, Olympia, asks him what he does for a living.  Ohanian, a cofounder at the venture firm Initialized Capital and an early-stage investor, in June stepped down from Reddit's board in the wake of nationwide protests on racial justice.   He's now looking to invest in companies and founders with more purposeful missions.  For more stories like this, sign up here for our healthcare newsletter, Dispensed. Alexis Ohanian wants to have a good answer when his daughter asks him what he does for a living.  Alexis Ohanian, who cofounded of Reddit is married to tennis star Serena Williams. The two have a two-year-old daughter, Olympia.  Ohanian left Reddit's board in early June in the wake of nationwide protests on racial justice after the death of George Floyd by police, noting that the decision was spurred to by the need to answer his Black daughter when she asks "What did you do?" As he left, he urged the company to fill his spot with a Black candidate. Shortly after, Reddit added Y Combinator partner Michael Seibel to its board.  "That was definitely a turning point for me," Ohanian told Business Insider of the national conversation unfolding in June. "It really got me looking inward and thinking about all the things that I need to be doing a better job of."  That includes rethinking how he approaches investments. "Stepping down, that was one frankly just small step of protest and self-improvement for me," Ohanian said. "I want to know that in the work that I'm doing now — which is being that first check, that first advocate that first adviser, that first mentor to founders and CEOs — that I'm doing as deliberately as I possibly can."  Ohanian is moving on from Initialized, Axios reported in June, to focus on "pre-seed" investing. Ohanian cofounded Initialized Capital in 2012, and the firm manages $500 million in capital. Read more: The 21 billion-dollar startups to watch that are revolutionizing healthcare in 2020 Ohanian is factoring his daughter Olympia into how he vets future investments Ultimately, the hope, he said with future investments will be to have a good answer when his daughter Olympia grows up asks him around the dinner table how he makes his money. "At some point my daughter's going to learn about what her mom and her dad do," Ohanian said.  At that time, it'll be easy to explain the impact Williams has had on the world. "That's my competition," he said.  To be sure, he still wants to make money, just by picking companies with more purposeful ambitions. But from 2020 on, he said, he wants to be able to make the case for why a particular company he invests in will be improving the life of his daughter and other kids once that investment becomes a multibillion-dollar company.  "I do think there are companies that are just going to excite me more now because they're not just another mobile game," Ohanian said, an area he's invested in in the past. Read more: Telemedicine startups have raised hundreds of millions as the coronavirus puts them to the test. Meet the 12 startups forging a new path for healthcare. A new generation of founders  Founders are a big part of that. "This is just as much dictated by founders themselves," Ohanian said. "A big part of this is impressing my daughter, but just as big is the fact that the market of founders are actually really moving in the direction of being more purposeful."  Ohanian said that founders are coming to him looking to have a diverse group of investors. That includes often committing to having at least half of the investors on their capitalization tables be women, or setting a percentage they'd like to have be investors from underrepresented background.  "This is coming from the founders and CEOs now," Ohanian said. "I wish I had been that CEO in 2005. I wasn't, and who knows what could have gone differently? But I have an opportunity now." Ohanian said he'd put Ro CEO Zachariah Reitano in that camp. On Monday, Ro raised an additional $200 million from investors including Initialized in a round that valued the healthcare startup at $1.5 billion. Ohanian and Initialized were early investors in the company. "He's so earnest about solving this problem for every American," Ohanian said, referring to Ro's business, which connects people to doctors who can prescribe medications for a growing number of conditions.  Read more: Buzzy healthcare startup Ro built a huge business selling Viagra and hair loss treatments online. The CEO shared how allergy pills and 'digital health clinics' will fuel the next phase of growth. "The ambitions here are real and sincere," Ohanian said. "When this company IPOs one day and Olympia asks me about it, I'm going to have a giant smile on my face because I can tell her why this was so important to back from day one even when it seemed very, very far from a sure thing. And I'd like to be able to do more of that." Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why electric planes haven't taken off yet
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Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP via Getty Images The Consumer Electronics Show (CES), long the world’s largest tech trade show, will be all-digital in January 2021, the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) announced on Monday. The CTA cited the COVID-19 pandemic and concerns about the spread of the virus as its reasoning for canceling the in-person event CES usually takes place in Las Vegas and involves many large gatherings in tightly packed convention halls, as well as smaller meetings between retailers, manufacturers, and other industry professionals. Per the CTA, the digital CES will be a “new immersive experience.” The organization did not provide many details about what the online event will look like, but it claims it will be “highly personalized.” The organization still plans... Continue reading…
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The Moto G8 Plus already had excellent battery life, so an even higher capacity battery is good news.
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Unused designs for Mario, Pokemon, Star Fox, and more see the light of day.
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Recently, the stream of leaks regarding the Samsung Galaxy Note 20 series has increased. This is not surprising – the announcement is just around the ... The post Here is why the Galaxy Note 20 will have a 60Hz display only appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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New virtual summit covers endpoint management, digital experience monitoring and ITSM — save your seat now Promo  COVID-19 has caused the fastest change to the way people work in living memory. Research published this week shows 46 million US knowledge workers have gone from being office-based to home-based. And the thing is, many people who have left the office aren't looking to return full-time. IT knows this, and they must start listening.…
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Over the past year, the development of smartphone cameras skyrocketed from 48MP to 108 or 100MP. Unfortunately, an increase in the camera pixel does not ... The post Yu Chengdong: 100MP sounds high, but it’s not as good as the outsole CMOS appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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It's a major visual upgrade with a few twists to the game mechanics.
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The study was unveiled as the tech giant fends off antitrust investigations.
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LG surprised most of its costumes this year with the release of a new smartphone dubbed LG Velvet. The device cam as a massive overhaul ... The post LG Velvet reaches the United States with a $599 price tag appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Listen to our weekly podcast Am I Making You Uncomfortable? about women’s health, bodies and private lives. Available on Spotify, Apple, Audioboom and wherever you listen to your podcastsChildbirth is a painful experience. However, each woman’s level of discomfort and pain during labour varies substantially – to the relief of some and the loud screams of others.Turns out there could be a reason for that. Women who don’t need pain relief during childbirth may be carriers of a key genetic variant that acts a “natural epidural”, a new study suggests. In the journal Cell Reports, scientists at the University of Cambridge explain how this genetic variant limits the ability of nerve cells to send pain signals to the brain. Related... 'I Tore My Labia During Birth. I Tore Everything. We Need To Talk About This' A collaboration between scientists based at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, part of Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and the University of Cambridge investigated why some mothers report less pain during labour.A group of women were recruited by the team led by Dr Michael Lee from the University’s Division of Anaesthesia, all of whom had carried their first-born to full term and gave birth in an uncomplicated vaginal delivery, without requesting pain relief.Dr Lee and colleagues carried out a number of tests on the women, including applying heat and pressure to their arms and getting them to plunge their hands into icy water. And the results were telling.Compared to a control group of women who experienced similar births – but were given pain relief – the test group showed higher pain thresholds for heat, cold and mechanical pressure – consistent with them not requesting pain relief during childbirth. The researchers found no differences in the emotional and cognitive abilities of either group, suggesting instead a difference in their ability to detect pain.“It is unusual for women to not request gas and air, or epidural for pain relief during labour, particularly when delivering for the first time,” said Dr Lee, joint first author. “When we tested these women, it was clear their pain threshold was generally much higher than it was for other women.” Related... 'I Spent 3 Years Trying To Get Pregnant. Then Birth Terrified Me' Next, senior co-author, Professor Geoff Woods, and his colleagues at the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research looked at the genetic code of both groups of women. They found those in the test group had a higher-than-expected prevalence of a rare variant of the gene KCNG4. It’s estimated that approximately one in 100 women carry this variant.KCNG4 provides the code for the production of a protein that forms part of a “gate” – controlling the electric signal that flows along nerve cells. As Dr Van Lu showed, the rare genetic variant reduced the sensitivity of this “gatekeeper” – which limited the ability of nerve cells to send pain signals to the brain. This was confirmed in a study involving mice led by Dr St. John Smith, who showed that the threshold at which the ‘defective’ gates open, and hence the nerve cell switches ‘on’, is higher. Dr Smith explained: “The genetic variant that we found in women who feel less pain during childbirth leads to a ‘defect’ in the formation of the switch on the nerve cells. In fact, this defect acts like a natural epidural. It means it takes a much greater signal – in other words, stronger contractions during labour – to switch it on. This makes it less likely that pain signals can reach the brain.”Commenting on the study, Zeenath Uddin, head of quality and safety at the Royal College of Midwives, said: “Every woman is different, and every birth is unique; what is important is that you get the pain relief that is right for you.“Midwives will ensure you are getting all the available information during your pregnancy when it comes to pain control and birthing techniques, so you can make the choices that are right for you.”Related... Frustrated, Upset, Forgotten: How Pregnant Women Feel With No End of Lockdown In Sight 'I Lost So Much Blood At My Son's Birth, It Took An Hour To Sew Me Up' Sex After Childbirth Takes Time – But I’ve Learned It’s More Than Worth The Wait
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Images: Ford Performance About a year ago, before the Mustang Mach-E broke cover, Ford’s motorsports division quietly started work on something outrageous: a one-off version of the electric vehicle that makes 1,400 horsepower. Now, the company is showing it off for the first time. Dubbed the Mustang Mach-E 1400, it’s a wicked-looking three-seater demonstration car that screams like a banshee and smokes tires like they’re kindling. Equipped with a massive rear wing, aerodynamic bodywork, and seven — yes, seven — electric motors, the Mustang Mach-E 1400 has a top speed of around 160 miles per hour. It can presumably reach that speed in very quick fashion, though Ford says it hasn’t yet benchmarked a 0-60 mph or quarter-mile time. Powered by seven — yes, seven —... Continue reading…
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Video games, even the most immersive ones, can really only offer approximations. Nowhere is that more evident than in the input controls, where a mouse click or button press makes your character swing a sword or jump. Some actions, however, do seem to map more closely to their in-game equivalents, like clicking with your finger to tap a gun’s trigger … Continue reading
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There are plenty of rumours emerging as the UK attempts to deal with a Huawei-less future, including guidance from the Japanese, TikTok kicking off and diverting attention to the US.
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The Trump campaign is now running political ads on Facebook and Instagram that accuse TikTok of "spying" on users. The ads, launched Friday, encourage users to sign a petition banning TikTok, the viral app that's raising national security concerns due to its ties to China through its parent company ByteDance. In recent weeks, the president and government officials have said they're considering banning TikTok in the US, where the app has an estimated userbase as high as 80 million. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. As Donald Trump considers banning TikTok, his political campaign has started running ads on Facebook and Instagram accusing the China-based platform of "spying" on its users. More than 100 iterations of ads were launched Friday encouraging Facebook users to sign a petition banning TikTok in the US. The ads, first spotted by New York Times reporter Taylor Lorenz, come as the US government threatens to instate a country-wide ban on the viral video-sharing app over its ties to China. Facebook removed one version of the anti-TikTok ad on Friday evening. The ad in question includes a graphic with "yes" and "no" checkboxes, which appears to be a violation of Facebook's policy against ads with "nonexistent functionality." Facebook did not respond to Business Insider's request for comment. Another anti-TikTok ad tells users: "Protect our kids from China."  TikTok's roots in China — where the app's parent company, ByteDance, is located — have long raised questions from US lawmakers and security experts about how much access and influence the Chinese government is afforded over user data and content moderation. Concerns over the TikTok-China connection have skyrocketed in recent weeks after India decided to instate its own ban on the app earlier this month. The campaign's political ads also claim that "TikTok has been caught red-handed by monitoring what is on your phone's clipboard." The accusation is based on research from March showing how apps are able to access content stored on the clipboard — the copy-and-paste feature — of users' iPhones and iPads. TikTok was only one of the dozens of the apps caught spying on iPhone clipboards, including LinkedIn and Fox News. ByteDance has since said it will stop accessing clipboard content. In recent weeks, the Trump campaign has also taken out ads against Twitter and Snapchat, claiming they're "attempting to silence" the president. In early July, both President Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo publicly said they were considering a TikTok ban in the US: Trump said the ban would be a way to punish China over its role in the coronavirus pandemic, while Pompeo cited national security concerns. On Thursday, White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow told reporters he expected TikTok to "pull out of the holding company which is China-run and operate as an independent American company." Since TikTok launched in the US in 2018, the app has successfully been able to brush off lawmakers' calls for investigations and national security experts' warnings. Most recently, TikTok launched a content advisory council to guide policy changes and appointed a US-based CEO in June to show it was distancing itself from its Chinese roots. But TikTok has also run afoul of the Trump campaign for reasons beyond its ties to China. Swarms of TikTok teens and K-pop fans were credited last month with signing up en masse for tickets to a major Trump rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Instead of the big comeback that the Trump campaign advertised, attendance at the rally was considerably lacking. TikTok's reported influence on the Tulsa rally demonstrates how the app has grown into a social media powerhouse, establishing itself as a staple of internet culture and social interaction for Generation Z. The app has more than 2 billion global downloads, and an estimated US userbase at as high as 80 million. It outperforms US-based apps with younger audiences such as Snapchat and Instagram in both new downloads and time spent.  The imminent threat of TikTok disappearing from the US has already signaled panic among users and creators, and has led attempts by tech companies to capitalize on the chaos to lure the app's loyal following to their competing platforms.SEE ALSO: TikTok's under pressure from the US government, and competitors like Snapchat, YouTube, and Instagram are capitalizing on the app's uncertain future Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
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Back in June, the Indian government banned 59 Chinese apps citing “security” reasons. These apps can no longer operate in India and some of them ... The post Alibaba shuts down the operations of UC Browser and UC News in India appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The black hole's corona was destroyed, only to be born anew even brighter than before.
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T-Mobile is offering free services to customers to help them ward off spam and robocalls. The spam-blocking features will allow subscribers to block suspicious callers, use a second phone number to keep their primary one secure, and change their number if they begin to receive too many spam calls.  The services will be free for all customers across the T-Mobile, Sprint, and Metro networks. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. T-Mobile says it's doing even more to crack down on robocalls. The cell phone carrier, which also owns Metro and Sprint, is arming its subscribers across all three networks with free tools to help ward off spam calls, according to a press release. Dubbed Scam Shield, the initiative will give customers an option to turn on a spam-blocking, which will block calls that appear suspicious, and will feature improved caller ID capabilities. It will also offer the option of using a second phone number to keep your primary one more secure and make it easier to change your number if you believe you're receiving too many spam calls. Robocalls have become a major annoyance for the wireless network industry. Americans were hit with more than 58 billion robocalls in 2019 and almost 23 billion in 2020 so far, according to YouMail. A 2019 insight report from Truecaller, a mobile app that lets you see and block callers, found that phone scams finagled $10 billion out of Americans in early 2019 and late 2018. Some carriers, as Axios notes, charge people for tools that help protect them for spam calls, like Verizon's $8 monthly fee for such protection.SEE ALSO: T-Mobile completes merger with Sprint, new CEO takes over Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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Google revealed a big unification redesign for Gmail and services like Google Docs, Chat, and Meet calling, making the future of work a top priority. This redesign was revealed during the Google Cloud “Cloud Next ’20 OnAir” streamed event, before the fact, in the “Productivity & Collaboration” category. This system looks like it’ll target the present and near future of … Continue reading
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Some years ago I embarked into the adventure of learning Python, I already knew some other programming languages like PHP (the first language which introduced me to web development), JavaScript (to which I was already pretty good at it, and was writing a UI library) and C# which was responsible for my income at the time. I learned Python by working on an app solo, and thus I incorporated many JavaScript and C# way of doing things into my code, which was terrible, though sometimes it worked. It took me some time, reading other’s people code and working with others… This story continues at The Next Web
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Amazon is launching 20 healthcare clinics in five US cities as part of a pilot program for warehouse workers and their families. The first is now open in Dallas-Fort Worth, and the rest will roll out in Phoenix, Louisville, Detroit, and California's San Bernardino-Moreno Valley area in the few months, according to the company. The clinics were in the works before the pandemic and will not offer testing or care related to COVID-19, a company spokesperson told Business Insider. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Amazon is rolling out 20 healthcare clinics for the company's warehouse workers and their families in five US cities, according to a blog post published Tuesday. As CNBC reports, the clinics' services will include preventive primary care, prescription medications, and vaccinations. They will be operated by Crossover Health, a startup that has run onsite clinics for the likes of Apple, Facebook, and LinkedIn. The company announced that the pilot program will launch its first clinic in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area, where more than 20,000 Amazon employees reside. Of those, 11,000 are operation employees, according to the company. The rest of the pilot clinics will be established in Phoenix, Louisville, Detroit, and California's San Bernardino-Moreno Valley area in the next few months. The program has been in the works since before the pandemic, a company spokesperson told Business Insider. The clinics will not offer testing or care related to the coronavirus disease. If the clinics — which will be situated close to fulfillment centers and operations facilities — are successful, the company will look into a wider rollout in 2021. The new program comes after the e-commerce giant last October launched a pilot program called Amazon Care, which included video and text visits with clinicians, as well as in-home care, for employees in Seattle.  Employees have called Amazon's warehouses a "breeding ground" for the coronavirus disease as social distancing proves difficult in such environments, according to a Business Insider report in April. The employees also said that Amazon was not doing enough to help prevent COVID-19 from infecting them and the communities they serve. In early June, CNBC reported the company was aiming to test the majority of its warehouse workers for the disease every other week. Amazon has said it expects to spend $1 billion in employee testing in 2020.SEE ALSO: Amazon drops $2 coronavirus pay rise for warehouse workers as CEO Jeff Bezos' fortune nears $150 billion Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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We’re here to guide you through the coronavirus pandemic. Sign up to the Life newsletter for daily tips, advice, how-tos and escapism.A doctor has photographed his colleagues working in an intensive care unit during the coronavirus pandemic, highlighting the “stresses and pressure” on the ward, as well as the “immense humanity” on display. Teaching fellow Dr Matthew Jones took the intimate photos of staff during their shifts at The James Cook University Hospital. The doctors and nurses have been busy treating patients from Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire, and the surrounding areas – some of the hardest-hit areas in the UK.  READ MORE: Lockdown Rules: Here’s What You Still Can’t Do In England Dr Jones was inspired to capture the series, titled Care in a Crisis, after previously documenting a ward in South Sudan, where he worked as a doctor in 2018. “I found that photography was a powerful way to help me understand the experience as it unfolded at such speed,” he said. “It gave a means to pause and reflect and find answers, and continues to do so even now. “I wanted to offer that simple resource to staff in intensive care at James Cook, so they could process events and move forward with a sense of what they had achieved.”Jones described the atmosphere in the intensive care unit as “amazing”.“You sensed the strong bonds that existed between them all, a real spirit of care for each other’s welfare,” he said.“I think the photos do a little justice to the stresses and pressure of the environment, but also the immense humanity on display as staff made such an effort to build bonds with the patients despite the obstacles they faced.” Intensive care consultant Alex Scott worked with Dr Jones to launch a website featuring some of the striking images. Some of their favourites are also on display in the hospital’s main atrium.“This project stands in honour to all those staff who have committed their lives to caring, and had the courage to do so at personal risk in the worst crisis of modern times, and also in tribute to our patients,” said Scott. View a selection of photos from the series below or visit Care in a Crisis to see the full collection. READ MORE: 'It's Self-Care.' Women Celebrate Their First Beauty Treatment In Months Am I Immune To Covid-19 – And How Would I Know? The Psychology Behind Why Some People Wear Face Masks – And Others Don't
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A snapshot of articles we enjoyed the past few days, from the fall of a luxury e-tailer to the opportunities spotted by HR tech firms
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UFC arrives on Fight Island with huge welterweight title clash - here's how to live stream Usman vs Masvidal with ESPN+ and watch UFC 251 online right now.
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