James Bice

James Bice

Followers 44
Following 44
UK
GM has announced that its next-generation electric vehicles will be powered by a family of five interchangeable drive units and three motors known collectively as Ultium Drive. Ultium Drive will help GM to transition its current portfolio to a fully electric lineup and promises significant advantages over the automaker’s previous EVs in performance, scale, speed to market, and manufacturing efficiencies. … Continue reading
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Apple Fitness Plus is a clear challenger to Peloton, and it's a big part of how Apple plans to sustain the Apple Watch's growth over the long term.
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When the Galaxy Watch 3 debuted last month, only two models were available for purchase and featured stainless-steel cases with silicone or leather straps.
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If you don’t want to shell out for a Ring Video Doorbell, Arlo has a new security camera you might want to consider instead.
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China
Realme has already prepared an update for its GUI. As expected, the new Realme UI 2.0 contains many updates based on the official changes in ... The post Realme UI 2.0: these are the new features and improvements appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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(Chalmers University of Technology) Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, together with colleagues from other universities, have discovered the possibility to prepare one-atom thin platinum for use as a chemical sensor. The results were recently published in the scientific journal Advanced Material Interfaces.
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What you need to know about the promise (and peril) of networked lightbulbs, ovens, cameras, speakers and, well … everything.
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Ubisoft is bringing back one of its most legendary games with Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time Remake, a modern version of the classic action-adventure game set for release on the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC on January 21st, 2021. The company says that the new version of The Sands of Time is emphatically Ubisoft’s first full-fledged remake, not a remaster or reboot. Ubisoft Pune & Ubisoft Mumbai rebuilt the original game from the ground up using Ubisoft’s modern AnvilNext Engine, complete with new motion capture animation, new assets, and some adjustments to the gameplay for modern audiences. The Sands of Time Remake still strongly resembles the original, though, with the same storyline and gameplay. Don’t expect a... Continue reading…
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Loyalists had been mourning the physical keyboards (and Brick Breaker) until Onward Mobility announced a new 5G Android Blackberry arriving in 2021.
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At last, Lucid will show us what it's worked on for years now.
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One of the challenges astronauts face during space missions is a loss of muscle and bone mass. Microgravity causes muscles and bones to weaken over time. Currently, the way NASA fights bone and muscle loss for astronauts on the ISS is with specialized exercise programs. However, with longer duration missions, such as trips to Mars, exercise programs won’t be sufficient. … Continue reading
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Microsoft’s Netflix-like subscription service is getting a bit bigger. Today, the company announced that Xbox Game Pass Ultimate and Game Pass for PC subscribers will soon get an EA Play membership at no additional charge. Essentially, this means that if you shell out for Game Pass Ultimate or on PC, your subscription will also include access to more than 60 additional EA games, including big titles like The Sims, Mass Effect, and FIFA. “This means Ultimate members can enjoy EA Play on Xbox One, Xbox Series X and S, and Windows 10 PCs, and Xbox Game Pass for PC members get EA Play on Windows 10,” Microsoft explains. The addition of EA Play will start “this holiday.” EA Play was formerly known as EA Access before rebranding this summer.... Continue reading…
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After being postponed from the first weekend in May due to coronavirus concerns, the Derby went forward on September 5 with no fans in the stands.
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Sanders' provided the colorful description of communications specialist Josh Raffel in her new book, "Speaking for Myself."
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Voxi has just launched the perfect cheap SIM only deal offering 12GB of data for just £10 a month.
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Researchers say "proptech" like facial recognition and AI-powered applicant-screening software is helping landlords accelerate gentrification.
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A-Level and GCSE students could face more chaos next year if the government delays exams but fails to ensure it has enough people to mark them, Labour has warned.Shadow education minister Emma Hardy told HuffPost UK’s Commons People podcast that pushing exams back was a good idea to allow students to catch up on learning lost to the coronavirus lockdown.But she warned that a postponement will leave less time for assessing grades and ministers may need to either start training and recruiting exam markers now or push back university application dates to avoid more problems next year.Education secretary Gavin Williamson has signalled he may delay 2021’s exams to give students time to catch up, but is still studying the proposals.Hardy also questioned whether the government’s £1bn catch-up service for school children would work effectively, stressing that many of the areas which need it the most also suffer from a lack of tutors.The Hull West and Hessle MP spoke following this summer’s exams fiasco, which saw many results unfairly downgraded by an algorithm used to determine grades before Williamson U-turned to allow teacher-assessed awards.And she warned that the situation was far from resolved for this year’s A-Level and GCSE students.Hardy told Commons People: “I find it so frustrating because as you know I was a teacher and worked in education and you can see the problems already.“If you push the exams back, which is a good idea, it gives people more chance to catch up, then you have less time for marking it if you want the Ucas system and higher education system to work effectively.“If you have less time to mark it you’re going to need more people marking the exams, therefore you are going to have to train and recruit examination markers to get there in place to mark the exams in the time needed, or you are going to have to push back the Ucas system – that’s obvious and no one’s mentioning it.”Hardy also warned that the government had another “blindspot” on its Covid catch-up.“They haven’t recognised when it comes to the tutoring that tutors are not in existence right now equally distributed throughout the country in every geographical region, that’s simply not the case,” she said.“The areas where we argue we’d probably want more tutors and more support for ours students are probably areas where we have the fewest numbers of tutors available, and again the government don’t seem to be looking at this or addressing it.”Hardy called on the government to look at training graduates as mentors for the pupils who need to catch-up, arguing it could solve the problem of graduate unemployment while also helping to fill gaps in tutoring.Sheffield Hallam university is running a similar programme with success and is working with the Northern Powerhouse Partnership to look at rolling the scheme out across the north, she said.“This would be a really good win-win situation in that we have a huge problem with graduate employment, lots of people looking and not being able to get into jobs that were previously available,” Hardy said.“So you have this problem, therefore if you look at ways of using that trained population we have to actually support pupils in the local schools it feels like a win-win idea.” Related... Matt Hancock Hopes For Mass Coronavirus Testing By End Of Year NHS Test And Trace 'Contact Tracing' Rate Lowest Since Launch Use Empty Office Blocks To Solve Winter Homeless Shelter Crisis, Say Campaigners
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(Penn State) Adding noise to enhance a weak signal is a sensing phenomenon common in the animal world but unusual in manmade sensors. Now Penn State researchers have added a small amount of background noise to enhance very weak signals in a light source too dim to sense.
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Social media giants have been accused of failing to act on “dangerous lies” that are fuelling anti-vaccine misinformation and the coronavirus – even when it is reported to them.A group of young volunteers scoured social networks and found 912 posts between July 21 and August 26, but only 4.9% were acted on after being flagged.False posts that were uncovered range from suggesting vaccines can change people’s DNA or are poisonous, to widely-disputed claims linking the virus to 5G.The Failure to Act report, by the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) and Restless Development, said Facebook took action on 33 of the 569 pieces of content brought to its attention, while Instagram acted on six out of 144 reported.On Twitter, six out of 137 were dealt with, but on YouTube no action was taken on the 41 reported to the video sharing website.Examples of the content reported to the platforms which was left online include false claims that vaccines change people’s DNA, are poisonous and cause autism and cancer. They also suggested Bill Gates wishes the world’s population to be “micro-chipped”, people who refuse vaccines will be forced into starvation and 5G mobile technology kills.The two groups say social networks are failing to act on their own policies.Researchers also said that platforms have still not acted on three-quarters of misinformation highlighted in its previous report published in June.A letter to home secretary Priti Patel, health secretary Matt Hancock, and culture secretary Oliver Dowden – signed by medics including Adam Kay, Dr Ellie Cannon, Dr Phil Hammond and Dr Dawn Harper – is calling for legislation to prevent dangerous misinformation about health and medicine being spread online.“A coronavirus vaccine is our best hope of a return to normality,” said Imran Ahmed, chief executive of the Center for Countering Digital Hate.“It would be a tragedy if it was unsuccessful in eradicating this disease because of lies told to people on social media.“While we have made enormous sacrifices to keep our society safe, social media companies are undermining their effort by failing to enforce their own policies and claims to act on dangerous misinformation.“Big tech has proven that they do not care, they will not act, and they only listen when their profits are on the line.“Government must urgently legislate to ensure these platforms take down hate and misinformation that puts lives at risk.“And companies who advertise on social media can make their voice heard too, by pausing their adverts until action is taken.”Jo Stevens, shadow secretary of state for digital, culture, media and sport, responding to the report, said: “This research shows the shocking failure of social media companies to act.“Misinformation about vaccines – especially during a pandemic – is a matter of life and death.“We have called on the Government time and again to put the public health and safety before the interests of the big tech companies profiting on the back of a global pandemic and publish the long-awaited Online Harms Bill.”Facebook, Twitter and YouTube all responded to the report by saying they are committed to the removal of harmful Covid-19 content.“Since Covid-19 was declared a public health emergency we’ve taken aggressive steps to limit the spread of misinformation about the virus,” a Facebook spokesman said.Meanwhile, Twitter said: “We’re prioritising the removal of Covid-19 content when it has a call to action that could potentially cause harm.“As we’ve said previously, we will not take enforcement action on every tweet that contains incomplete or disputed information about Covid-19.”YouTube said: “We’ve taken a number of steps to combat harmful misinformation, including removing content that violates our policies, surfacing more authoritative content for people searching for vaccination-related topics and showing information panels with sources for fact-checking information.”A government spokesman said vaccine misinformation was “completely unacceptable”, adding: “It is everyone’s responsibility to seek NHS advice, so that they have the right information to make the right choice.“Since the start of the pandemic, specialist UK government units have also been working rapidly to identify and rebut false information about coronavirus, including working closely with social media companies.“We are also developing world-leading plans to protect people online and will introduce legislation as soon as possible.”Related... GoFundMe Page To 'Kill Gina Miller' Sees Democracy Campaigner Demand New Laws Jeremy Corbyn's Brother Piers Fined £10,000 Over Trafalgar Square Anti-Mask Protest Trump Defends Teenager Who Shot Dead Two Protesters: 'They Attacked Him'
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Microsoft is planning to release some significant changes to its built-in touch keyboard for Windows 10. The updated touch keyboard design builds on the company’s work with Windows 10X, bringing new key press animations, sounds, and all the all-important ability to search for and insert animated GIFs. Microsoft called this the WonderBar for Windows 10X, and the new design in Windows 10 also includes better layouts that are optimized for typing, and the ability to move the cursor in through the space bar on the touch keyboard. This is very similar to how iOS lets you operate the cursor, by placing a finger on the space bar and sliding left, right, up, and down to navigate around. The new cursor support with the... Continue reading…
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Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities may have been less trusting of Covid-19 health advice due to a lack of inclusive messaging, caused in part by the scarcity of non-white experts at the Downing Street briefings.A recent report by the Wellcome Trust found fewer than half (45%) of BAME people had “complete” or a “great deal of” trust in information from government scientific advisers, compared to 65% of white people.The survey of more than 2,650 people, carried out at the height of the outbreak in the UK, found just 38% of Black respondents said they trusted the government’s scientific advisers, compared with 52% of Asian people.Of the 92 daily Downing Street press conferences that took place between March 16 and June 23, just two BAME scientific advisers or public health officials appeared – England’s deputy chief medical officer, Professor Jonathan Van Tam, and Dr Nikki Kanani, NHS England’s medical director for primary care.On the ministerial front, chancellor Rishi Sunak, home secretary Priti Patel and business secretary Alok Sharma were the only BAME figures to address the public at the coronavirus briefings. Not one Black person was seen behind the Downing Street podiums.This lack of representation could play a part in why people from marginalised groups feel “disconnected” from the government’s coronavirus messaging, says Prof Kamaldeep Bhui, a psychiatry and epidemiology expert at the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences at the University of Oxford.“Emotionally, we connect with and are influenced by people who are more like us – not just by ethnicity, but by age and gender. So in this case, people from marginalised groups are asking, are these people like us – and largely they’re not,” he told HuffPost UK. “If minorities are living in positions of precarity, they’re less likely to trust from the start.“This isn’t irrational. This is built on an experience of society where people experience multiple disadvantages and face inequalities and discrimination. They’re going to be less likely to trust the messaging if it’s coming from the authorities.”A crucial problem with the government’s public health messaging was that it failed to take into account the needs and levels of health literacy of various communities.“Different ethnic groups have different perceptions of what illness is, what infection is or what a pandemic is,” said Bhui.“Marginalised groups, which include but are not limited to ethnic minorities, are particularly challenged because they may not have the same beliefs and health model. So the messaging should have been tailored to different literacy groups.”The Stay Home, Protect the NHS, Saves Lives slogan used at the peak of the outbreak also failed to account for all the key and frontline workers who continued going into work while the rest of us could stay in the safety of our homes.Instead, some of the initial messaging actually made things worse. “By pathologising them and suggesting they were drivers of problems, there was increasing levels of discrimination against minorities,” Bhui adds. “We’ve seen this with some Chinese people or some Muslim people in the northern parts of the UK, where they were perceived as not conforming to public health advice.”The problem with the government’s initial one-size-fits-all approach to public health messaging is that it rarely works, says Dan Wellings, of the policy team at the King’s Fund. He says that needs to change.“The results of this study show how important it is for clear and effective messaging to start with those communities,” he said. “In order to gain credibility in those communities, you need to understand from the first instance what’s going to work for them and who they will trust.“A lot of this work needs to be done at local level by people who are connected and familiar with the communities that they serve.”If the government’s coronavirus messaging or its messengers haven’t been inclusive enough, then neither have the reporters on the other side of the podium. Of the more than 550 questions at the Downing Street briefings, only a handful of them came from BAME journalists – among them were HuffPost UK’s deputy political editor, Arj Singh, and news reporter Nadine White.Anne Alexander, senior political producer at Good Morning Britain, was the first ever Black female Lobby journalist in Parliament. Eighteen years on, she remains the only Black female Lobby journalist. And she can count the number of BAME colleagues she’s worked with using just one hand.“We like to think the news is objective and impartial, but in reality news is subjective,” she told HuffPost UK. “How we decide what is important and how it should be reported is coloured by our upbringing and our background. That’s why it’s important to have a mixture of backgrounds.”Although BAME journalists do not always have to ask questions only relating to “BAME issues”, they can often call attention to topics that are neglected or considered of secondary importance to the overwhelmingly white, middle class reporters.When our reporter pressed health secretary Matt Hancock for a response on a study that found BAME people were disproportionately fined under coronavirus rules, Alexander says there was “much celebration” on social media.“If you look at the stories that emerged about the amount of ethnic minorities who were being adversely impacted by the coronavirus, a lot of that came from journalists like Nadine and other who kept on highlighting it. This was an important issue and it was being pushed by Black journalists.”Bhui said the pandemic served as a “wake-up call” for the government to recognise the gross inequalities and social injustice that already existed long before the pandemic.“Covid-19 just made things worse, and it’s minorities who are getting it in the neck. Not only as frontline workers, but as citizens.”Related... Exclusive: BBC Staff Accuse Corporation Of Being 'Institutionally Racist' I’m A Black Police Officer. This Is What I Know About Racism And Inequality 'My Biggest Concern Is A Sudden Outbreak': How Teachers Feel About Schools Reopening
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A newly published study notes that ozone pollution has risen over the past 20 years in the Northern Hemisphere.
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(Kyushu University) New research from Kyushu University and Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, shows that lasing for over one hour at room temperature can be achieved from low-cost quasi-2D perovskite materials by properly managing losses caused by triplet excitons. This new understanding will help lead the way toward a new class of easily fabricated lasers based on perovskites.
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NASA has captured thousands of images from space, many of which are made available on the agency’s website. Though many of these images aren’t terribly exciting, some of them have proven stunning, particularly ones showing off our own planet in a way we can’t perceive from the surface. The latest example of this kind of content is a new image … Continue reading
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Learn where to find inspiration, how to deal with a hot kitchen, and how to save time and effort so you can get out of your cooking rut.
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Shares of Tesla have gained more than 70% since the company announced in early August that it would split its stock.
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Which Samsung Ultra shoots better photos?
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(Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A team led by Steven L. Miller Chair professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Illinois, Huimin Zhao, was awarded a five-year $20 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the NSF Artificial Intelligence (AI) Institute for Molecular Discovery, Synthetic Strategy and Manufacturing (Molecule Maker Lab Institute or MMLI).
China
Two years ago, Realme has born as a Oppo sub-brand featuring budget smartphones. As you might know, Oppo always was a company that played in ... The post Realme is rolling out “Smooth Scrolling” feature for some phones appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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FritzFrog has been used to try and infiltrate government agencies, banks, telecom companies, and universities across the US and Europe.
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