James Dixon

James Dixon

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In the congressional hearing Wednesday into antitrust concerns in the tech industry, the four CEOs who testified all touted their companies American roots, and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg warned of competition from China. The appeal to patriotism and nationalistic sentiments is a familiar tactic; the tech companies have used it repeatedly in recent years as they've come under increasing scrutiny. But it also has a long history — giant companies routinely tout their all-American roots and the threat of foreign competitors when their market power gets questioned. Policymakers should ignore such appeals, because they're meant to distract from the real harms the companies are causing, and the best way to compete with foreign rivals is through innovation, which monopolies throttle. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Patriotism, as Samuel Johnson observed some 245 years ago, is the last refuge of the scoundrel. Making an appeal to national sentiments — or, relatedly, warning about the dire threat from foreign competitors — is also a time-worn tactic of corporate leaders who seek to evade scrutiny of their companies' behavior or shed what they see as onerous regulations. And so, on Wednesday, with Big Tech under the harsh glare of a Congressional antitrust investigation, the CEOs were quick to dust off the old playbook.  The success of Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon — four companies with a combined market value of roughly $5 trillion — is the epitome of the American Dream, their CEOs told lawmakers at the House of Representatives antitrust hearing. The success of these four tech giants is something to be cheered; the result of the American system, not any nefarious actions or problems in the market's rules, they insisted. Apple, CEO Tim Cook said, is "a uniquely American company whose success is only possible in this country."  Amazon's Jeff Bezos discussed the lessons in self-reliance and ingenuity that he learned being the son of a high-school aged single mother and the adopted son of an immigrant father. And on it went. Most importantly, the CEOs implied or said directly, the US needs national champions like their companies to lead the internet age, because without them, foreign competitors — most worryingly, Chinese ones — will take over. "China is building its own version of the internet focused on very different ideas, and they are exporting their vision to other countries," warned Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of "proud American company" Facebook. "We believe in values — democracy, competition, inclusion and free expression — that the American economy was built on," he said. If it sounds familiar... These types of arguments aren't new. Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's chief operating officer, deflected questions about her company's power by pointing at the threat from Chinese competitors in an interview with CNBC last year. In fact, these types of arguments long predate the scrutiny of the tech giants. They've been used for decades by all stripes of American corporations to evade concerns about their power. Financial services companies made similar arguments in the 1980s when they sought the repeal of regulations that limited their size and ability to operate across states lines, arguing that they needed to grow large to be able to compete against giant foreign banks. IBM and AT&T made such appeals when they faced antitrust scrutiny in the 1970s and 1980s, arguing that they were needed to help defend the US from the rising threat of competition from Japanese tech companies. Indeed, such patriotic or nationalist arguments go back as far as the 1910s, during some of the first efforts in the US at breaking up monopolies, said Matt Stoller, the author of "Goliath: The 100-Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy." "This is a long-standing trend," he said. He continued: "It's always, 'give us more power, we'll defend you.'" Every US company has an all-American story The problem with such arguments is they're banal, irrelevant, and misleading. Pretty much any US company big or small has an all-American story to tell. At a basic level, the success of Amazon or Apple is no more or less impressive than that of the corner grocery that was founded by immigrants fleeing war or oppression. Nearly all founders and entrepreneurs have to overcome challenges and hardships, and the American system has led to outsized success for lots of companies past and present. Amazon, Apple, Alphabet, and Facebook weren't the first, and they won't be the last, regardless of whether regulators seek to limit their power. What's more, many of the companies that are being quashed by the tech giants have American stories too. We shouldn't ignore, for example, how Amazon used underhanded tactics to undermine Quidsi, the owner of Diapers.com, or how it allegedly throttled the business of a small company that sold books through its site just because Amazon has lots of American workers and Jeff Bezos was born to a single mother. While Americans may benefit from the services Amazon offers and the jobs it fills, they're hurt when it throttles competition. Prices can go up and employees of the competitors Amazon has stymied lose their jobs. There's little doubt that China and Chinese companies have a different vision for the internet than US companies. There are legitimate concerns about Chinese companies spreading the kind of surveillance and censorship that are endemic in China to other countries. But the best way to meet such international challenges is through encouraging innovation and competition here at home — not by giving the US tech giants a free pass to trample on their smaller domestic rivals. Giant monopolies tend to stop innovating. They become sclerotic and have trouble adapting as markets and fashions change. But breaking up said monopolies can spur innovation and the creation of whole new markets. Concentrated power destroys companies History bears this out, repeatedly. The worldwide dominance of the Big Three automakers in the 1950s and 1960s left them wholly unprepared for the oil shocks of the 1970s and the onset of competition from more nimble Japanese companies. Likewise, Boeing's troubles in recent years are attributable to its ability to wipe out all US competitors in the commercial airline market, said Stoller. "When you concentrate power, you destroy companies," he said. On the flip side, the antitrust actions against IBM and AT&T opened up the tech industry for Microsoft, Apple, and Intel and for the internet itself. And the later antitrust case against Microsoft allowed Google, Facebook, Netflix, and other companies to emerge. "It's pretty obvious that those companies wouldn't exist" if the Microsoft antitrust case hadn't happened," Stoller said. So ignore the patriotic appeals and the grim warnings about Chinese competition from the desperate CEOs. We'll all be better off if we break up Big Tech. Got a tip about Big Tech? Contact Troy Wolverton via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @troywolv, or send him a secure message through Signal at 415.515.5594. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Read more about antitrust issues in the tech industry: Newly released Steve Jobs emails, included in Congress' antitrust investigation, show how ruthless the Apple founder could be Trump says he'll 'bring fairness' to Big Tech via an executive order if Congress doesn't take action The FTC's latest shot at the tech giants has opened up an unexpected front in the war to constrain Apple, Amazon, Google, Microsoft, and Facebook Stunned venture capital investors say the government's move to kill the $1.4 billion acquisition of shaving upstart Harry's is a 'wakeup call' that could leave some types of startups unviable SEE ALSO: The Justice Department's new Big Tech investigation was announced with unusual fanfare, and some antitrust experts say it might not herald as big of a crackdown as it seems Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: A cleaning expert reveals her 3-step method for cleaning your entire home quickly
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(Office of Naval Research) The Office of Naval Research recently sponsored work to develop low-cost, easily built ventilator prototypes for both hospital and field settings. The ventilators would be valuable in emergency situations involving large patient surges and a lack of life-sustaining equipment.
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The exotic car, resort and luxury retailer purchases all came from the federal government's Paycheck Protection Program.
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A federal judge in New York ruled Tuesday that the state must quickly pay unemployment benefits to Uber and Lyft drivers, earlier reported by The New York Times. Drivers and an advocacy group sued the state, saying it was taking too long to pay drivers, and Tuesday's ruling requires the state to clear its backlog within 45 days as the case proceeds in court. Drivers have struggled to receive unemployment during the pandemic and have blamed Uber and Lyft for failing to provide earnings data to states that would speed up the process. The lawsuit argues that the state has failed to force Uber and Lyft to turn over that data, while the state says that Uber and Lyft have played "games" with their requests. The ruling the latest legal victory for drivers as they continue to seek unemployment insurance and other benefits typically guaranteed to traditional employees. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A federal judge in New York issued a preliminary injunction Tuesday requiring the state to urgently pay unemployment insurance to Uber and Lyft drivers who have been waiting months to receive benefits, earlier reported by The New York Times.  In the ruling, Judge LaShann DeArcy Hall said there had been an "an avoidable and inexcusable delay in the payment of unemployment insurance" to drivers. She gave the state 45 days to process pending and incorrectly denied claims, and ordered it to form a team of around 35 employees to expedite the work. In May, Uber and Lyft drivers, along with the advocacy group New York Taxi Workers Alliance, sued the New York Department of Labor, alleging that it took several months to pay drivers, if they were to be paid at all, despite the DOL processing claims from other eligible workers in two to three weeks. The lawsuit, which was filed in the US District Court for the Eastern District of New York, also argued that the state hadn't done enough to force Uber and Lyft to turn over driver earnings data that would significantly speed up the process of determining who is eligible and how much they're owed. Tuesday's ruling doesn't make a determination about those claims, but it does say the drivers have strong enough arguments and that they would suffer "irreparable harm" without the benefits, and therefore the state must pay them now while the case proceeds in court. "We are closely reviewing the decision and considering all of our options," a spokesperson for NYDOL told Business Insider. "Regardless, the Department of Labor has been providing benefits to rideshare drivers in New York and is committed to continuing that support." The state had argued in court documents that Uber and Lyft had slowed it down by playing "games" that kept it from getting access to the data it needed to process drivers' unemployment insurance claims. Without Uber or Lyft reporting their earnings to the state, drivers cannot get their claims approved. In her ruling, Hall criticized the state for letting the companies "lead it by the leash," saying that despite the companies' "categorical refusal to provide wage and earnings information for drivers, it is the duty of NYDOL to obtain the necessary information." A spokesperson for Uber told Business Insider the company "provided all data the NYDOL requested so they could give independent workers financial assistance." Uber and Lyft drivers have previously accused the companies of withholding earnings information from states, preventing unemployment agencies from processing drivers' claims. The companies have also challenged several states' rulings that drivers are eligible for traditional state unemployment benefits — which are more generous than benefits offered during the pandemic under the CARES Act. New York courts have ruled that drivers are eligible for the more robust state benefits. Tuesday's ruling is the latest victory for drivers in a string of legal battles over their employment status, which has major implications for the types of unemployment and healthcare benefits as well as labor protections they're guaranteed under state and federal law. In California, Uber and Lyft are facing a lawsuit from the state and several city attorneys general that seeks to force them to reclassify drivers as traditional employees, while Massachusetts' attorney general recently brought a similar case. Lyft did not immediately respond to a request for comment about the ruling.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
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It looks like the new normal is some way off, so it shouldn’t be too surprising that Apple’s iPhone 12 introduction will probably be a little different this year.The big reveal Are you going to the big reveal of the new device? I don’t think so; the pandemic suggests Apple will introduce its new device remotely, just as it held WWDC. I don’t think it will want to risk the health of partners and employees any more than it did in June.To read this article in full, please click here
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It may be your best chance to get a deal before the Galaxy Note 20 reaches stores.
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We know the planet is getting hot. A new study out today aims to help improve our understanding of just how hot it will get.
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This week AT&T started sending out emails about how users will need a new smartphone if they want to continue “receiving service.” AT&T’s message does not suggest that users will lose service instantly – but they DO suggest that some users will NEED to upgrade to a new phone if they plan on continuing to get phone calls by the … Continue reading
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The word ‘stunning’ is not usually associated with large pick-up trucks. But the 2020 Ram HD Blackout Edition begs to differ. Ram gave the 1500 its first taste of the blackout treatment last year, and now it’s the Ram 2500 and 3500’s turn to receive a monochromatic styling package. “The new Ram Heavy Duty Limited Black Edition is another example … Continue reading
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You'll have to find a less direct way of giving your money to a narcissistic US tech business.
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Three's 12GB for £10 SIM only deal is one of the best value options around right now.
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London-based ML startup Eigen Technologies works with top tier financial institutions and law firms to analyse contracts faster and more efficiently than humans for compliance and regulatory purposes. The natural language processor expects that the recession caused by the pandemic will be deeper than 2008's global financial crisis, prompting a greater need for assessment of financial and legal documents.  "When the music stops everyone looks at the docs," Lewis Liu, Eigen Technologies CEO and cofounder, told Business Insider in an interview. "This is going to be a deeper recession than 2008 so the data that we send from banks to governments has to be as good as possible. It's a chance for us to shine and show how our tech can help drive financial stability." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.  The 2008 global financial crisis triggered widespread regulatory reform to keep a tighter rein on banks and their risk-taking. Thanks to the creation of new oversight agencies under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, passed in 2010, there is now a cottage industry of workers focused on compliance, risk, and analytics who need a laser-sharp focus on documentation and detail. Banks continue to try and mitigate the resulting spiraling compliance costs, while also meeting the stringent requirements designed to prevent another systemic financial crisis. Compliance cost US banks $270 billion a year in 2017, and that number was estimated to double by 2022, according to professional services firm Duff & Phelps. To that end, technology startups across a number of disciplines are applying machine learning and AI principles to try and make compliance faster and cheaper. One such company is London-based Eigen Technologies, a startup that says it uses natural-language processing (NLP) to teach an algorithm to read and subsequently answer questions from potentially thousands of lengthy legal and financial documents. Eigen's initial focus was on financial institutions but has expanded its services to law firms and will soon serve healthcare and insurance providers.  Eigen was founded in 2014 by CEO Dr. Lewis Z. Liu and Jonathan Feuer, a managing partner at CVC Capital Partners, who is the company's chairman. The startup says it has been in demand during the coronavirus crisis as businesses try and establish the pandemic's impact on their balance sheets, and what a likely recession could do to the covenants and terms of loans and derivatives contracts.  "When the music stops everyone looks at the docs," Liu told Business Insider. "This is going to be a deeper recession than 2008 so the data that we send from banks to governments has to be as good as possible. It's a chance for us to shine and show how our tech can help drive financial stability." Bumper times ahead? Eigen is backed by Goldman Sachs, Temasek, and ING, and in November 2019 raised a $37 million Series B from European investors Lakestar and Dawn Capital. ING invested $5 million into the firm in March this year and is set to use Eigen's NLP technology to help move away from Libor as the pricing system becomes obsolete.  Despite the cash providing healthy capital runway into the rest of the year, Liu said it's been a stressful period for Eigen. Staff, for example, are struggling with the more hierarchical structure the business has taken during the COVID-19 lockdown due to remote work. Liu suggested that historically one of the startup's strengths had been its flat working structure where junior staff could suggest exciting changes or teams could work around a complex issue around a desk replete with pizza. That's harder to replicate via video chat.  Liu himself has faced additional time pressures with two young children and a partner in a busy banking role. Nonetheless, he told Business Insider that the startup is gearing up for a record Q3 and Q4 for the company.  "We see the unfreezing of banks in the second half of the year and it should be our biggest quarter ever," Liu said. "Law firms, in particular, have been more nimble than banks at coming to us and asking for quotes, we've doubled our client base of law firms during COVID-19." Eigen's technology focuses on what Liu calls "small data", a departure from traditional processes that see AI platforms read hundreds of thousands of pages to learn. Eigen's natural language processor can learn documentation from a handful of examples, Liu said. That in turn reduces the time taken to provide insight to clients. "You don't need to be a machine learning expert to use the platform," according to Liu. The result is that Eigen's roadmap for the rest of this year is aimed at supporting its new and existing clients to better understand the risk they have in their legal and financial contracts so as to provide better reporting data to government institutions. Liu told Business Insider that Eigen saved one unnamed financial institution millions of dollars earlier this year by identifying a trade that didn't meet regulatory hurdles and would have taken considerable time and money to unwind. SEE ALSO: Here are the 15 hottest European AI startups in 2020, according to 8 venture capitalists backing the technology Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
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They wouldn't weigh much more than typical eyeglasses.
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Twitter is working with those affected to see if any private data was compromised
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All work and no play makes… you’re coming with us, you clown Disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff is heading back to jail after he pleaded guilty to defrauding several thousand people out of millions of dollars by pushing what he claimed was a new, better, Bitcoin.…
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Just don't call this stationary smart bike a poor man's Peloton.
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We’re here to guide you through the coronavirus pandemic. Sign up to the Life newsletter for daily tips, advice, how-tos and escapism.When chancellor of the exchequer Rishi Sunak was spotted buying lunch from Pret, all eyes were on him and his fetching grey mask.The face covering fitted well to his face, covering his nose and mouth (top marks there), but it also featured a valve – and here lies the problem.Valved face covers are banned in some cities and counties in the United States because they can expel the wearer’s germs into the environment.People are told to wear face coverings to protect others. But when people wear face masks with valves, this doesn’t quite go to plan.Related... Why Experts Aren't Happy With This Government Video On Face Masks Making the most of @Pret's price cut in response to the VAT reduction that takes effect today for the tourism and hospitality sectors. As part of our #PlanForJobs this temporary cut will help over 150,000 businesses protect the jobs of 2.4 million people. pic.twitter.com/mSh6jOvBlp— Rishi Sunak (@RishiSunak) July 15, 2020Experts say the one-way valve closes when a person breathes in and opens when they breathe out. This means while the valve doesn’t let germs in, protecting the wearer, it does allow a person’s exhalations to leave the mask – and therefore does not protect others and slow the spread of the virus.Professor Trisha Greenhalgh, an expert in primary care at University of Oxford, told HuffPost UK: “The valve acts like an exhaust pipe, potentially spewing germs out to the environment.“Cloth face coverings are the best thing. They stop droplets – that’s why they get wet of course, and you have to change them when they do.“Droplets contain viral particles so the more droplets get caught in your face covering, the fewer germs get into the air. A valved mask bypasses the barrier and potentially emits the droplets in an explosive gas cloud.”The valve acts like an exhaust pipe, potentially spewing germs out to the environment.Professor Trisha GreenhalghSome people argue that valved masks can have filters between the mouth and the valve – therefore, isn’t the air people expelling going to be clean?“It’s true that some masks have a valve that isn’t as dangerous as most valves, but it’s still a very dumb thing for a politician to wear a valved mask because it gives the message that valved masks, in general, are a good thing,” says Prof Greenhalgh. “They’re not, they’re a bad thing.”A study published in the journal Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology concluded that the use of masks with valves in the community “may be an additional and under-recognised transmission source” – and therefore they shouldn’t be used.Earlier this month, Dr Bharat Pankhania, a senior clinical lecturer at the University of Exeter Medical School, urged people to stop wearing masks with valves in them. He told LBC they force a “high velocity flow of air from the mouth out through the valve which could create a plume of infection”.“Wearers can propel, much further, the very droplets we are trying to capture within the mask,” he said.Clear messaging on face masks is crucial for the adoption of wearing face masks and coverings by the general public, a study by the University of Oxford found. But so far, the messaging has been anything but.On Tuesday, the 10 Downing Street Twitter account shared a public health video which showed an animated man wearing what appeared to be a face mask with a valve on it. HuffPost UK contacted 10 Downing Street for comment on this, but is yet to hear back.Related... Why Experts Aren't Happy With This Government Video On Face Masks What We Know About The Long-Term Impact Of 'Mild' Covid-19 7 Things You Should Know About Face Masks
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The software company reveals a partnership with dairy cooperative Land O'Lakes that will equip cows with sensors and other gear to improve yields.
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More and more, it seems that notebook manufacturers are okay with removing ports from their devices in an attempt to make the thinnest and lightest laptop they can. Plugable claims to have the solution to disappearing connectivity options, today announcing two new USB display docks: the UD-3900Z and the UD-6950Z. The UD-3900Z is pitched as an upgrade to the UD-3900, … Continue reading
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What’s that smell? It could be Oh So Orange, Clearly White or Almost Black Google has revealed it employs people to invent colours and give them silly names, too.…
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The iPadOS 14 beta has been out for a few days now: here are our first thoughts on the new iPad operating system update.
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Video At a pseudo-rave slash launch party in Los Angeles on Wednesday night, Motorola revealed the 2019 Razr, an update on a flip phone that wowed people 15 years ago.Back in the old days, the Razr was the consummate flip phone – a well-engineered piece of kit that took design cues from the StarTAC handset and became a worldwide bestseller.The new 2019 Razr sticks to the flip-form phone format though instead of a physical keyboard and separate display, it has a 6.2" 2142-by-876-pixel pOLED folding touchscreen that runs the length of the inside of the flip phone.So, yes, it's one of those folding smartphones.It also sports a 16-megapixel rear camera and a front-facing 5MP cam, plus a fingerprint sensor and other gizmos.The thing is powered by Android 9, and a mid-range octo-core 2.2GHz Armv8-compatible Qualcomm Snapdragon 710 system-on-chip.
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The state of New South Wales (NSW) in south eastern Australia is continuing to experience devastating bushfires due to the dry tinder-like atmosphere in the territory: high winds, dry lightning and continuing heat.Approximately 69 fires are still raging in NSW according to its Facebook page and more than 70 are burning to the south in Queensland.And the summer has just begun in the region.NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the fires and the smoke pouring off the edge of Australia and into the southern Pacific Ocean on Nov. 13, 2019.Close to 1.1 million hectares (2.7 million acres) have burned since September.A short animation from 8 Nov to 13 Nov of the NOAA- NASA Suomi NPP satellite's OMPS instrument aerosol index shows the movement of the smoke and the resulting aerosols across the ocean.
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HBO's former chairman and CEO Richard Plepler may join Apple, according to a Tuesday report.Plepler is in talks for a production deal with the company's TV Plus streaming service, a person familiar with the matter told The Wall Street Journal.Plepler's new company, called RLP & Co., would reportedly make original Apple TV Plus content.It's not certain a deal will go through, but if it does it could be finalized in a matter of a few weeks, the source told the Journal.Apple didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.The former HBO head, who oversaw the company's rise with hits like Game of Thrones, said he was stepping down in February.
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That famous scene in the original 1977 Star Wars where Han shoots Greedo in the Mos Eisley cantina has its newest, possibly weirdest edit yet.If you watch the movie on the new Disney Plus streaming service, you'll distinctly hear the alien shout "Maclunkey!"before he's famously shot by Han Solo.The account also noted some other changes to the scene, including a new explosion as the firing happens.A representative for Lucasfilm confirmed in an email that the edits to the scene were made by Star Wars creator George Lucas himself before Disney acquired the company.And "Maclunkey" may sound odd, but it's not completely new to the Star Wars galaxy.
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It's easy to sum in Excel in two different ways to add a series of numbers together.You can add two or more numbers using the AutoSum tool, or by manually totaling them with plus signs.You can see the details of the calculation by clicking the cell with the sum and looking at the formula bar at the top of the screen.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Both methods will always give you the same result, so you can use whichever one is more convenient.Check out the products mentioned in this article:
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We’re now a week out from the launch of Pokemon Sword and Shield, which are scheduled to launch on the Nintendo Switch on November 15th.What should be an exciting launch has been marred with controversy, as a number of leaks have indicated major cuts to the Pokedex in Pokemon Sword and Shield.A number of longtime fans of the franchise seem to take issue with that, leading to conversations about Sword and Shield that are dominated by talk of the incomplete national Pokedex.The Pokemon Company revealed today that a previously-scheduled launch event for Pokemon Sword and Shield will no longer be happening.The event was scheduled to happen on November 15th at the Sunshine City Fountain Square in Ikebukuro, Tokyo.The company said that the event has been cancelled due to “operational reasons,” but didn’t clarify beyond that.
China
T-Mobile has set December 6 as the date for its launch of the low-band 5G.As the carrier claims, it will cover 200 million people in the United States.And though this is going to be one of the largest 5G markets on the globe, it’s still far behind South Korea and China.The company’s CEO, John Ledger, and President and Chief Operating Officer Mike Sievert announced the launch date in a recent event on Thursday.The company expects that by the end of this year, 5G networks will cover 5,000 cities in the United States.Those terminals include the Samsung Galaxy Note 10 and OnePlus 7T Pro 5G McLaren Edition smartphones.
Sweden
this Is the Scoop on the first bike ever to be inspired by the work bench?The Swedish elmotorcykeltillverkaren they've now unveiled their latest creation-after debutante writer Notes.It was, however, not a Bump, which in this article, the ceo and founder Stefan Ytterborn, thought, in the spring of this year.instead, it's Throwing now for us.the Most prominent feature is the long beam which forms a resilient mounting for the seat as well as a variety of accessories like baskets, bags & hooks, depending on the application.the lithium-ion Battery can also serve as a source of power for the hand-held power tools, or music for those who would like to organise a concert in the forest.
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For 20 years, Véronique Dehant, a space scientist at University of Louvain (UCLouvain) and the Royal Observatory of Belgium, has been working on understanding the Earth's core.In a few months, she will be able to complete her research by studying the heart of Mars, thanks to the ExoMars mission.Its purpose is to collect Martian radio science data and analyse the planet's rotation in order to better understand the red planet's innards and thus determine whether life is feasible on Mars.In the end, for Véronique Dehant, 'This UCLouvain research is one more brick in the wall of understanding outer space.'A bit of space historyFor a planet to be habitable, it needs water on its surface.
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