James Manzo

James Manzo

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Cloud HR startup Rippling raised $145 million in a Series B round led by Founders Fund at an estimated $1.45 billion valuation, according to PitchBook.  Rippling CEO Parker Conrad recalls how he pitched Founders Fund partner Brian Singerman when they met while on a long walk in hilly San Francisco neighborhood Noe Valley.  "I was kind of like huffing and puffing, marching up and down these hills, sort of pitching Brian on the company," he told Business Insider. "So that was definitely different than then sort of like normally, how things work." Click here for more BI Prime stories. Raising capital is tough in the middle of a pandemic and a severe downturn. It's likely even harder for startups serving a market that's been hit hard by the coronavirus crisis: small businesses. But Parker Conrad, CEO and cofounder of HR cloud startup Rippling, managed to pull it off, raising $145 million in a Series B round led by Founders Fund, at a $1.45 billion valuation according to PitchBook. Rippling's cloud platform makes it easier for small and medium sized businesses to manage employee records and needs. Conrad has said Rippling offers broader features and services, including more automation to help integrate employees into their company networks and workflows. It's a hot market in which it competes with the likes of Okta, Onelogin, and Paylocity.  Another rival is Zenefits, the hot cloud startup that Conrad also cofounded, but which he left amid an SEC scandal four years ago. Conrad has managed to raise capital for Rippling despite that rocky stint, although the pandemic made the recent round a bit challenging.  He had a meeting with Founders Fund two days before the lockdown in San Francisco where Rippling is based. "It was the last in-person I had before we started, you know, working from home," Conrad told Business Insider. Founders Fund reached out to Conrad's team in July to resume the conversation.  For Conrad, it was not the typical pitch meeting with a venture capital firm. He and Founders Fund partner Brian Singerman met in Noe Valley, a hilly San Francisco neighborhood. "We met outside with masks on and went for a walk," he said. "I'm not in the best shape in the world. I was kind of like huffing and puffing, marching up and down these hills, sort of pitching Brian on the company. So that was definitely different than then sort of like normally, how things work." Here are the metrics Rippling used to raise $145 million:SEE ALSO: Enterprise tech salaries revealed: How much Oracle, IBM, SAP, Cisco, Dell, VMware, ServiceNow and Workday pay engineers, developers, data scientists and others SEE ALSO: VCs say that these 29 companies are the top startups in the booming big data industry SEE ALSO: Experts predict 15 gigantic tech mergers we could see in a recession, from Amazon buying Oracle to IBM buying Dell
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The automaker needs people with expertise in the fields of construction, engineering and human resources.
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Hello, everyone! Welcome to the new edition of Insider Today. Please sign up here. QUOTE OF THE DAY "I'd like to say this is some good and necessary trouble,"— Hannah Waters, the Georgia high school student who was suspended after posting photos of North Paulding High School's crowded hallways on social media. The school rescinded Waters' suspension today following widespread criticism.  WHAT'S HAPPENING This weekend's Sturgis motorcycle rally is expected to attract 250,000 people. Most of the 7,000 residents of the South Dakota town want it postponed over Covid, but it's going forward, and the usual huge crowds are expected.  US economy added 1.8 million jobs in July, beating expectations. The unemployment rate declined nearly a point to 10.2%. (More below).  Negotiations are stalled over the pandemic relief bill. A week after the expiration of unemployment benefits, Democrats and the White House are still trillions apart. Republicans are offering $400 unemployment for four months. Democrats want to keep it at $600, and are demanding huge aid for state and local governments.  Trump executive orders ban US companies from working with TikTok parent ByteDance or WeChat. The order targeting the Chinese companies takes effect in 45 days, presumably giving Microsoft a chance to complete an acquisition of TikTok's US operations. TikTok says it will sue to overturn the order. The Trump administration also sanctioned Hong Kong's chief executive and other Hong Kong and Chinese officials for their role in Hong Kong's new security law.  VIEWS OF THE DAY The jobs report was good, but the labor market is still a mess.  Friday's jobs report showed that the US economy added 1.8 million jobs in July and the unemployment rate ticked down to 10%. This is good news, but it's important to put it in perspective.For one thing, the unemployment rate is still historically high — higher than at any point during the Great Recession. Secondly, the rate of jobs gains slowed from June, indicating that the resurgence in coronavirus cases may be cooling off the recovery. Third, we've still only added back around 40% of the jobs we lost in March and April, despite three straight months of jobs gains since then. Fourth, the recovery is unequal: the unemployment rate for white Americans is dropping much faster than for Black Americans. Basically this is a "well it's slightly less of a disaster" kind of report. For instance, the number of newly permanently laid off workers — as opposed to workers temporarily laid off but expecting to be hired back — stayed steady at around 2.9 million despite expectations that it would rise. But that's still 2.9 million more people not expecting their job to come back. The jobs report was good news and showed the labor market is improving. But that same labor market is also in historically terrible shape and millions of people are in dire economic straits. And, importantly, this report covers the period before the government aid dried up. — Bob Bryan How Trump's Census manipulation will hurt you.  The National Weather Service just predicted that this will be an "extremely active" hurricane season, with 10 to 16 more named storms, adding to the 9 that have already formed. That's huge, valuable news that will guide how cargo ships and planes are routed, how off-shore drilling rigs are staffed, when crops are harvested.  The very best meteorologists on the planet, trained at grand American universities and hired by the federal government, interpolated data from satellites launched at a cost of billions of dollars and weather stations and buoys and sensors distributed by the thousands. It's a triumph of data, complexity, human capital, and public investment.  On the other hand, the Census, the most magnificent collection of data in the history of the world, will be a cruddy mess this year. Even though the pandemic has caused havoc in the Census, Trump officials have cut short the count by a month, declined to extend the data analysis till April, and actively discouraged immigrants from completing census forms. All of this means that tens of millions of households will likely be missed. This would help Trump and his allies politically, and would send fewer federal resources to poorer parts of the country.  But it also spoils one of the most valuable tools the US has. Businesses rely on accurate Census data to make decisions on how to staff, where to put stores, how much to pay, and what kind of products to market. Governments rely on it to decide where to build roads and schools, what to tax, and where to rezone. Making it census data worse to meet a short-term political end will cascade error through the system, making all of us poorer and more ignorant. In their war against the nonexistent deep state, Trump and his allies have undermined and ruined one of America's greatest strengths. The federal government gathers and analyzes mass data better than any organization that has ever existed, and that has helped make us all rich. Corrupting that will harm the rest of us long after Trump has left Washington. — DP Trump's right: There should be a fourth presidential debate in early September. Like the child-custody arrangement in an especially hostile divorce, the presidential debate schedule is the worst — yet still tolerable — scheme you could come up with under the circumstances. Every four years, a bipartisan commission on debates manages to get everyone to agree to a bare minimum of debating: three very short, very controlled presidential debates, crammed into four weeks right before the vote.  Any reasonable observer of American politics should admit that it's a deeply inadequate and poorly timed arrangement. During the primaries, candidates debate over and over and over again for months, with wildly different formats. It's crazy that the two leading candidates for the most important job on the planet face off so briefly and so late. We've known it would be Biden vs Trump for nearly six months — and the country has experienced historic convulsions — yet they will only debate the issues for a few minutes during a brief burst from September 29 to October 22.  The Trump campaign is struggling and craves any opportunity to change the dynamics, so it's not surprising that Rudy Giuliani hectored the debate commission this week to add a fourth debate in early September, or at least to move the final late October debate to early September. The Commission yesterday rejected the proposal — that's not what was painstakingly agreed to — but the Trump campaign has a point!  For the pandemic and other reasons, both parties are making heroic efforts to get their people to vote early. By the time the first debate rolls around on September 29, early voting will have started in at least a dozen states and millions will have cast a ballot. In a political system where the presidential campaign lasts almost two years, it's stupid that people can vote before the candidates ever even debate.  The commission was right to reject Trump for trying to alter the rules in the eleventh hour, but they should remember his complaint in 2024. If we're going to extend voting back into September, then early voters should get the chance to see a debate before they mail in their ballot. — DP Focus, Donald, Focus If there is a single issue in global economics right now, it's ensuring that the US passes another coronavirus aid bill so that the mighty US consumer can keep spending.  Problem is, as I wrote in my column this morning, negotiations for this bill have fallen on the White House, and Trump can't seem to focus on this issue. For the past few weeks he's been trying to load it with worthless additions — like $1.8 billion for a new FBI building, and a payroll tax cut that economists say would only help the richest 20% of Americans. No one has time for this nonsense. Some of the blame for this should go to Senate Republicans, who wrote the first draft of the bill. As they were writing it their caucus descended into chaos, with more libertarian members of the party freaking out about giving too much money to people during this crisis (as if it's not our money.) They needed Trump's political cover to pass something with a huge price tag (which is what the country desperately needs), so the bill they put forward was weak and unacceptable to Democrats. All of that just adds more difficulty to the White House's negotiations at a time when Trump seems most interested in golf, bashing Joe Biden, and destroying TikTok. — Linette Lopez Twitter flags state-affiliated accounts, but what's the point?  The experiment in social media self-regulation had a couple of interesting developments yesterday. Twitter says that as part of a mission of "providing people with context so they can make informed decisions about what they see and how they engage," the company will now affix the label "government account" for official government accounts, but not the personal accounts of government officials and lawmakers. That means the @POTUS account (previously used by President Obama) gets the "government" label, but @realDonaldTrump — the account of far-greater consequence and much bigger audience — will not.  Same thing for Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's accounts: @RepAOC with 316,000 followers gets the "government" label, whereas @AOC with 8 million followers does not.  News outlets and the editors and reporters who work for them, such as the Russian government-funded RT and Sputnik, will be labeled "state-affiliated media." — Anthony Fisher BUSINESS & ECONOMY Hong Kong's rich are moving gold to Switzerland and Singapore. The outflow began a year ago, as they try to protect themselves from a possible Chinese crackdown.  What time of day should you apply for the job you want? Insider asked recruitment experiments, and the answer is 11 am. LIFE "Cloud Bread" — the fluffy, three-ingredient concoction that's taking over TikTok. It's not really bread, but a meringue with corn starch that can be colored and flavored in wild ways.  Bon Appetit tumult continues, as three Test Kitchen stars leave. All three are people of color, and all were dismayed by the slow pace of change at the food magazine, which has been accused of marginalizing and underpaying its non-white staff.  THE BIG 3* The US Air Force is developing a hypersonic Air Force One. Aerospace company Hermeus announced a contract to develop the presidential jet, which is intended to fly 3,300 miles per hour. It's at least 10 years from manufacture.  How big was the Beirut explosion? It was much bigger than the largest US conventional bomb, and like a 3.3 earthquake. Five of the best foods to lower blood sugar and control diabetes. Oatmeal and nuts are on the list, not surprisingly. *The most popular stories on Insider today.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How the Navy's largest hospital ship can help with the coronavirus
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Art: Microsoft It’s taken a while, especially considering the number of people who are looking for convenient ways to chat and videoconference these days, but Microsoft has finally created a version of its business Teams app for personal use. The app, which is considered to be in preview, is currently only available for mobile devices (iOS and Android). You get 10GB of file storage for your “team” and 2GB of personal file storage per person. What follows is a quick how-to on using Teams for communicating with friends and family. It is available for both iOS and Android; the two apps are extremely similar. The only difference may be in the placement of, say, the “Start new chat” button. The app offers a variety of ways to communicate: chat, audio-only,... Continue reading…
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The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has suggested banning the controversial social media app TikTok would violate the First Amendment of the US Constitution.
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In the summer of 2020 I reviewed the Toro 22″ (56cm) 60V MAX* Electric Battery Smartstow Personal Pace High Wheel Mower (20363) over the course of a couple of months. That’s an extremely long name for such a simple piece of machinery, but absolutely necessary when it comes to the testing of a tool that can take considerable wear and … Continue reading
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Poshmark is a social shopping app where users can resell clothing from their own closets or thrift stores. Some sellers earn tens of thousands of dollars in sales. Some Poshmark resellers are using social-media apps like Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok to not only grow their audiences, but also drive sales. "I think I would still be making a part-time income if it wasn't for Instagram," said Coco Cohen of Color Resale, a full-time Poshmark reseller from Portland, Oregon. Business Insider spoke with several Poshmark resellers about their social-media accounts and how they are using them to build their brands. Subscribe to Business Insider's influencer newsletter: Influencer Dashboard. Influencers often make money advertising the products of other brands. But some Poshmark sellers are using their social-media accounts — especially Instagram — to build their own brand awareness and drive sales. Poshmark is a social shopping app where users, sometimes referred to as "Poshers," buy and sell used clothing from their own closets, thrift stores, or other wholesale vendors on the Poshmark app. Some top sellers have turned their side hustles into full-time jobs, earning thousands of dollars each month. Jack Ermisch is a full-time Poshmark seller (@FlippedThrift) with an Instagram following of over 22,000 and a growing YouTube community of over 5,000 subscribers. He told Business Insider that he earns almost $1,000 in sales each week (after Poshmark takes a 20% cut). "It's given me a lot more returning customers," Ermisch said of his Instagram account. "There are people that specifically buy from me and my boyfriend just because they like our videos and they like our pictures." Some followers even purchase clothing from Ermisch straight through Instagram. Color Resale, another Poshmark closet (the app's term for a shop), has over 21,000 followers on Instagram. Coco Cohen, the owner of the Poshmark account, said she had prioritized building a strong community on social media as she was building her business.   As Cohen started sharing on Instagram, she realized she had a unique Poshmark story to share as a mother to a toddler. She leaned into this content, sharing tips for time management and helping others resell. "Then I started noticing that the more authentic I was, and the more I shared about things I didn't really think had to do with business, the more people started actually shopping from me," she said.  Today, her Instagram page has a high engagement rate of 6.4% (the average engagement rate sits around 3%) and Cohen said that nearly 80% of her Poshmark sales are driven through Instagram. Cohen was previously an early childhood education teacher in Portland, Oregon, and transitioned to reselling on Poshmark full time. Now she's making more on Poshmark than she did as a teacher, she said.  "I think I would still be making a part-time income if it wasn't for Instagram," she added. Instagram isn't the only social network that has proven useful to some Poshmark sellers. TikTok, YouTube, and Pinterest are also popular. Poshmark recently published a guide for its sellers titled, "How to Get Started on Social Media to Drive Poshmark Sales," which shares tips with users on how to use social media to drive traffic to their Poshmark closets. In the guide, the company said users that on average "20% more sales are made when you connect your Poshmark account to Pinterest." The company declined to comment on numbers for Instagram, TikTok, or YouTube. Poshmark also has its own version of 'influencer' programs for resellers Poshmark also has a few programs that create incentives for resellers to share Poshmark content on social media. The "Posh Ambassador" is the most accessible one, which provides resellers with the ambassador title, selling tips through a monthly newsletter, and the ability to appear on Poshmark's "Find People" page. "It just kind of helps your reputation, but it doesn't really boost up sales," said Poshmark seller Kaitlin Kao. Kao is a Posh Ambassador and runs Kao Closet, a popular account that has also gained traction on the short-form video app TikTok. Resellers can also earn Poshmark store credit through a rewards program called "Posh Affiliate," if they have least 5,000 followers on their respective social-media accounts and participate in "campaigns" or challenges, such as using hashtags like #FromWhereIPosh. "The more campaigns they participate in, the more Posh Credit they earn to use on the platform," a Poshmark representative said. Kao said you get a certain amount of points toward Poshmark credit for actions like posting in a Poshmark social-media campaign and or signing up a new user. Kao said she participates in these opportunities often, and as a student at UCLA is also part of its college ambassador program called "Posh on Campus." She uses both her TikTok and Instagram to take part, adding a link in her bio that offers 10% off for new users, she said. So far, she has recruited over 57 new Poshmark users. Some Poshers end up partnering with brands for sponsorships Some Poshmark resellers with large enough followings have also built their own influencer careers and been hired by other brands for sponsorships. One reseller, Kirsten Russel, owns the boutique Shop Kirsten (which is also her name on Instagram and Poshmark). Her Instagram following has grown to 24,000 since she started in 2017. "I do not think I would be where I am today without my Instagram," Russel said.  Brands started gifting Russel products for reviews and content in 2018, but it wasn't until 2020 that she started being hired for brand sponsorships. She said that shifting her account toward lifestyle content and making it more of a personal brand around herself helped land these deals. Now she has booked deals for paid posts with brands like Rollo, a printing services company. For more stories about influencers and the resale industry, read these recent Business Insider pieces: How a clothing reseller used TikTok to double her sales to over $7,000 per month on the social shopping app Depop: Emma Rogue went viral on TikTok with over 6 million views. Business Insider spoke with her about what it was like to go viral and how she's doubled her sales since. How Instagram and TikTok are becoming powerful tools to help Poshmark clothing resellers drive sales: Two Poshmark resellers in their early 20s share how they've been using the social media apps to drive sales back to their Poshmark accounts. How artists are using TikTok to drive thousands of dollars in sales and find new customers: Artists are using TikTok's fast-growing audience to generate art commissions and sales on the ecommerce platform Etsy. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
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Humans built the pyramids, and Egypt has their tombs to prove it.
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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was among the powerful tech executives who testified Wednesday in front of lawmakers regarding their companies' potential antitrust violations. During the hearing, never-before-seen messages were made public detailing why the cofounders of Instagram, Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger, felt compelled to sell their app to Facebook in 2012. Systrom and early Instagram investor Matt Cohler discussed what to tell Zuckerberg about the photo app's future plans. In the text exchange, Systrom expresses concern about sending Zuckerberg into "destroy mode" if he turned down an acquisition offer, and being unable to "escape the wrath of Mark." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Never-before-seen text messages from 2012 show just how careful Instagram cofounders felt they needed to be in dealing with the "wrath" of Mark Zuckerberg in the months before Facebook acquired the photo-sharing app for $1 billion. A text exchange between Instagram cofounder Kevin Systrom and early investor Matt Cohler, then a partner at Benchmark, show the two strategizing how much to disclose to Zuckerberg about the photo-sharing app's future plans, and the cofounders' decision whether to get acquired or continue on independently. In the text conversation, Systrom voices his concerns to Cohler about possibly sending Zuckerberg into "destroy mode" or encountering "the wrath of Mark" if the Instagram cofounders were to rebuff Facebook's interest in buying the app. The text messages were made public Wednesday as Zuckerberg — as well as the CEOs of Apple, Google, and Amazon — appeared in front of the House Judiciary's antitrust subcommittee to answer lawmakers' questions about any potential violations of antitrust regulations. The exchange between Systrom and Cohler was just one of a trove of documents the House subcommittee made public during Wednesday's hearing to demonstrate possible anticompetitive practices by the four big US tech companies. Although Facebook's purchases of Instagram in 2012 and WhatsApp in 2014 weren't challenged at the time, lawmakers at Wednesday's hearing heavily scrutinized the acquisitions. Some representatives argued that Facebook's app acquisitions and clones of other platforms' features — like Snapchat's Stories and, most recently, TikTok — were evidence of monopolistic or anticompetitive behavior. The committee also published several email threads and online chat logs showing conversations that took place among Zuckerberg and various Facebook executives and employees to demonstrate the company's mindset during Instagram's $1 billion acquisition. By the start of 2012, Facebook was touting that its company comprised 95% of the social media market. However, Instagram was rapidly threatening that lead: In March 2012, Instagram's average daily users was growing at a rate of more than 1,700% week-over-week and 9.2 million percent month-over-month, according to documents published Wednesday. In emails Zuckerberg sent in 2012, the CEO calls Instagram a "threat," and reasons that buying Instagram would be a way to successfully "neutralize" its success. Zuckerberg told colleagues that Instagram "can hurt us meaningfully without becoming a huge business," and that acquiring Instagram would be "buying" time for the company. But Zuckerberg's plans to take on Instagram didn't come as a surprise to the app's cofounders, as is apparent by the text exchange between Systrom and Cohler. Systrom said he feared turning down an acquisition offer from Facebook would send Zuckerberg into "destroy mode" — a concern that Cohler affirmed. "Mark doesn't react emotionally, he reacts based on competition," Systrom later writes to Cohler. "Bottom line I don't think we'll ever escape the wrath of [M]ark. It just depends how long we avoid it." Just two months after this conversation took place, Facebook acquired Instagram for $1 billion in April 2012. In response to questions from Rep. Jerry Nadler at Wednesday's hearing, Zuckerberg acknowledged the company viewed Instagram "as a competitor and a complement to our services" in 2012. The chair of the big tech hearing, Rep. David Cicilline, later told Axios that Zuckerberg's testimony proved Facebook displayed "classic monopoly behavior" and should be broke up. However, Zuckerberg also reasoned that Facebook had simply "adapted features" from competitors in response to lawmakers' grilling about whether it cloned competitors' products in order to maintain its social media dominance. Zuckerberg also argued that Facebook still faces competition from platforms like YouTube and TikTok. The Facebook CEO also disagreed with lawmakers' characterization that his conversations with Facebook executives regarding acquisition targets were viewed as a threat "in any way."SEE ALSO: Facebook, Google, and the US government all have their own reasons to make you believe that TikTok is unsafe and scary — and they're all self-serving Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
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Fisker Inc., fresh off a merger that valued the company at $3 billion and has given it $1 billion to work with, announced a lineup of four vehicles. The Ocean SUV (arriving in 2023), will be joined by a sports sedan, another SUV, and a pickup truck. Fisker is pursuing a lightweight business model: It doesn't want to build a factory, but rather work with contract manufacturers to make its vehicles. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Henrik Fisker, CEO of the electric-vehicle startup that bears his name, has $1 billion to work with — and a master plan to make the most of it. "When we created Fisker Inc., we set out to create a company that could deliver electric mobility as a service, but do so through a range of highly emotional and differentiated vehicles," he said in a statement. Earlier this month, Fisker Inc. merged with Apollo, the huge private-equity firm, in a once unusual, now increasingly common sort of deal that valued the company at $3 billion.   For more than year, Fisker has been avidly showcasing his Ocean SUV, the company's first offering, which until the merger remained a prototype, living primarily on social media. But Fisker — whose previous company, Fisker Automotive, was undone by the financial crisis and some freakishly bad luck — now has the cash not just to turn the Ocean into reality, but to roll out three more vehicles behind it. By mid-decade, the company said, its lineup will include the Ocean SUV, a "segment busting super-sports sedan," a sports crossover, and a pickup truck. Fisker doesn't want to be vertically integrated That's right, a pickup truck. These days, pickups are to EVs what sports cars were to the space a decade ago. (Who can forget the original Tesla Roadster?) The difference here is that the big automakers are getting into the game. GMC just announced a revived Hummer pickup will go into production next year. Chevy says an electric full-size is on the way. Everybody is waiting for the electric Ford F-150, and of course, Tesla is building a new factory in Texas, the heart of pickup country, to manufacture its Cybertruck. Fisker's approach, as the Danish-born designer and entrepreneur said in an interview with Insider, is to avoid owning the production process for its vehicles. "We don't want to be a vertically integrated car company," he said. "We're not going to do our own manufacturing. It would be stupid for any EV startup to make a brand-new factory." Instead, Fisker intends to contract out the work, leaving him to do what he does best: design compelling vehicles, promote them enthusiastically, and push a new business-model into the market, one based on experience. "A new generation of buyers has a new view on mobility," he said. "Their first ride in a car wasn't in their parents' old five-speed coupé. It was in the back seat of an Uber. They don't care how big the engine is. They're looking at the user interface." And maybe at the size of the bed, too. FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why hydrogen cars will be Tesla's biggest threat
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  ESPN+ is a sports streaming platform with original video content, live games, and in-depth news and analysis. The service is also home to special UFC events, including UFC Fight Night: Whittaker vs. Till on July 25.  You can access ESPN+ via the existing ESPN app on a variety of streaming players, mobile devices, and smart TVs. It costs $4.99 per month or $49.99 annually, saving you $10 on the monthly price. You can also bundle ESPN+ with Hulu and Disney+ for $12.99 a month.  See also: Disney Plus: Everything you need to know about Disney's ad-free streaming service   Streaming has largely overtaken cable and satellite as the preferred method to watch movies and TV shows at your leisure. Low price points and the ability to watch on the go are primary reasons for the migration, but one sector has largely resisted any such paradigm shift — professional sports. If you're a sports fan, you might be shelling out for traditional cable just to watch your favorite team. Hefty deals between sports leagues and TV networks have prevented services like Netflix from streaming games, but ESPN now has a low-cost service that should satiate many sports fans' appetites.  Updated on 07/24/2020 by Steven Cohen: We've revised this article to include details about UFC Fight Night on July 25. Added a link to our guide to watching the 2020 MLB season. Added details about a rumored price increase for ESPN+.  What is ESPN+? ESPN+ is a streaming subscription service that's considered a complement to existing ESPN content, not technically a separate platform. Think of it as an add-on to the standard ESPN app with live games, exclusive on-demand videos, and access to what was formerly known as ESPN Insider. Previously, ESPN Insider offered subscribers exclusive written articles for a monthly $4.99 fee. ESPN decided to add video to the mix and created ESPN+ for the same price, giving subscribers access to stories, live streaming, and on-demand videos. What's included with ESPN+? ESPN+ includes a bevy of exclusive video content from live games to on-demand shows and exclusive stories. Unfortunately, the live games come with commercials — just like regular TV. Subscribers can watch live games from the MLB, NHL, and MLS when their seasons are active; there are no live NBA or NFL games. There's also PGA golf, UFC, college football, international soccer, and tennis. You can read more details on how to watch Major League Baseball's 2020 season on ESPN+ and other services here. In addition to games, ESPN+ also features original shows, including in-depth game recaps and analyses hosted by Peyton Manning and Daniel Cormier, and a shorter version of "NFL Primetime." Documentary programs, like "30 for 30," as well as full replays of historic NFL games are also available to stream on-demand. Does ESPN+ offer UFC PPV and UFC Fight Night events? If you're a fan of UFC or boxing, ESPN+ will often offer exclusive pay-per-view (PPV) matches so you'll get even more content from the service. The PPV events cost $64.99 for existing subscribers. The most recent UFC PPV event was UFC 251 on July 11. In addition to PPV matches, ESPN+ also features access to UFC Fight Night events, including a trio of events on UFC's Fight Island in Abu Dhabi. Fight Nights are typically included as part of a regular ESPN+ subscription for $4.99 per month. The final Fight Island event is UFC Fight Night: Whittaker vs. Till on July 25.  What's not included with ESPN+? ESPN+ is technically separate from ESPN, ESPN2, and ESPNews, so a subscription will not grant you access to live games being broadcast on those networks, including any live games during Monday Night Football and Sunday Night Baseball. That said, MLB games are still available to be streamed. New docuseries airing on ESPN, like "The Last Dance," are also not included with a subscription. With that said, programs like this could be added to the ESPN+ library at a later date. Your ESPN+ account is not the same as a cable login with access to the ESPN networks, so there's no way of getting around it either.  How much does ESPN+ cost? An ESPN+ subscription will only run you $4.99 per month, or $49.99 annually — $10 less than what you'd pay if you go month to month. With that said, a report from The Verge indicates that ESPN could increase the price of ESPN+ to $5.99 a month starting in August. This price increase has not been confirmed yet. There's also a combo package that bundles ESPN+ with Hulu and the new Disney Plus streaming service for just $12.99 per month — a $5 savings each month compared to getting all three services separately. Where can I watch ESPN+? One of the cool things about ESPN+ is that you can access it through the current ESPN app. Instead of launching a separate app, all the ESPN+ content is unlocked in the ESPN app once you subscribe. The app is available on virtually every platform you can imagine — phones, tablets, laptops, Roku players, Fire TV products, Apple TV, Android TV, Chromecast, PS4, Xbox One, and Samsung smart TVs.  You can also stream on up to three devices simultaneously with one account. How do I sign up for ESPN+? Head over to the ESPN+ website and create an account, or open your existing ESPN account and you'll be prompted to sign up.   Read more about ESPN+ on Insider Reviews: A full price breakdown for ESPN's streaming service, ESPN+ — here's everything you need to know How to watch UFC pay-per-view events on ESPN+ 15 must-see '30 for 30' sports documentaries streaming on ESPN+ right now — a monthly subscription is only $5 ESPN+ has a ton of new original shows — here are the 5 best ones to stream Join the conversation about this story »
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(University of Chicago) A team lead by Pritzker Molecular Engineering researchers has developed an artificial intelligence-led process that uses big data to design new proteins.
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Kim Kardashian West has called for “compassion and empathy” in a statement addressing her husband Kanye West’s mental health for the first time.On Wednesday afternoon, Kim posted a lengthy statement on her Instagram story, in which she spoke about Kanye’s bipolar disorder, claiming she hoped doing so could challenge the stigma around mental health.“As many of you know, Kanye has bipolar disorder,” Kim wrote. “Anyone who has this or has a loved one in their life who does, knows how incredibly complicated and painful it is to understand.“I’ve never spoken publicly about how this has affected us at home because I am very protective of our children and Kanye’s right to privacy when it comes to his health. But today, I feel like I should comment on it because of the stigma and misconceptions about mental health.”Kim continued: “Those that understand mental illness or even compulsive behaviour know that the family is powerless unless the member is a minor.“People who are unaware or far removed from the experience can be judgemental and not understand that the individual themselves [has] to engage in the process of getting help no matter how hard family and friends try.“I understand Kanye is subject to criticism because he is a public figure and his actions at times can cause strong opinions and emotions. He is a brilliant but complicated person who on top of the pressures of being an artist and a Black man, who experienced the painful loss of his mother, and has to deal with the pressure and isolation that is heightened by his bipolar disorder.“Those who are close with Kanye know his heart and understand his words sometimes do not align with his intentions.” Kim concluded: “We as a society talk about giving grace to the issue of mental health as a whole, however we should also give it to the individuals who are living with it in times when they need it most.“I kindly ask that the media and public give us the compassion and empathy that is needed so that we can get through this. Thank you for those who have expressed concern for Kanye’s well-being and for your understanding.”In recent days, Kanye – who last month made headlines when he reiterated his intent to run for US president in 2020 – has caused concern with a number of tweets, as well as controversial comments he made at a rally of his in Charleston, South Carolina.The Grammy-winning musician first spoke publicly about his bipolar diagnosis on his album Ye, released in 2018.Useful websites and helplinesMind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected] Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0300 5000 927 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.READ MORE: Kanye West Says He's No Longer A Trump Supporter In New Interview About Presidential Hopes Sharon Osbourne Left Unimpressed By Kanye West's Twitter Post About Kim K's Billionaire Status People With Bipolar Disorder Share What Kanye West's Interview Means To Them
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Microsoft has shown us a glimpse of what future versions of Office will look like – and it includes replacing the divisive Ribbon toolbar.
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Tribit's new FlyBuds 3 true wireless earbuds, listed for $38, are on sale on Amazon for $5 off.
UK
Public sector workers on the front line of dealing with the coronavirus pandemic will be given a pay rise, the chancellor has announced.Doctors, teachers and police officers are among those who will see extra money in their pay packet after a testing few months since Covid-19 hit the UK.But social care workers, who have also been at the forefront of the battle at the deadly virus, are not part of the group being given an increased wage.The TUC is calling on the government to “urgently announce a pay rise for social care workers, who put their lives on the line to care for others during this pandemic”.  More than 300 NHS workers have died in England alone after contracting the deadly virus, many doing so while caring for patients.Teachers continued looking after the children of key workers throughout the lockdown while police have been enforcing social distancing rules, which at their sternest forbade leaving the house except for specified circumstances.The above-inflation pay rise announced on Tuesday will see almost 900,000 workers benefit, with teachers and doctors seeing the largest increase at 3.1% and 2.8% respectively, according to the Treasury.Chancellor Rishi Sunak said: “These past months have underlined what we always knew, that our public sector workers make a vital contribution to our country and that we can rely on them when we need them.“It’s right therefore that we follow the recommendations of the independent pay bodies with this set of real-terms pay rises.”Each award is recommended by independent pay review bodies, and this year the government has accepted the suggested rise for each workforce.Police, prison officers and National Crime Agency staff will be given a 2.5% rise in pay as a result and members of the armed forces will receive a 2% uplift.Meanwhile, members of the judiciary and senior civil servants will also see their pay topped up by 2%.The pay awards for the armed forces, prison officers, senior civil servants and NHS staff will be backdated to April, whereas the pay rise for police and teachers starts in September due to those professions operating on a different pay schedule running from September to August.Labour shadow chancellor Anneliese Dodds said the pay rise was “good news” but claimed it would not make up for a “decade of real-terms pay cuts” for frontline workers.TUC general secretary Frances O’Grady called for social care workers to join the ranks of those being offered a pay rise.“These rises are welcome, but there’s still a long way to go to restore pay after a decade of real terms cuts,” she said.“Many public sector workers, like job centre staff and local government workers, aren’t getting these rises. They deserve a decent pay settlement too.“And the government should urgently announce a pay rise for social care workers, who put their lives on the line to care for others during this pandemic.”Unison assistant general secretary Christina McAnea called for “more resources for local authorities” so council staff and social care workers could also be entitled to a “decent wage increase”.
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Today Samsung Galaxy Beans leaked in three colors. This product is a pair of wireless earbuds that come in a charging case the likes of which have become exceedingly popular over the past few years. Samsung’s new pair of earbuds are shaped more or less like lima beans, making them just about the most ideal shape to fit in your … Continue reading
China
Following the launch of the four-lens camera of P40, the new breakthrough model X30 from Cubot got recently officially launched with an amazing full view ... The post Cubot X30 with 48MP and five AI cameras starts at $148.99 appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Because encouraging people from all over the country to gather in your theme park in the midst of a pandemic is horror.
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Just days after announcing that its Crucible would be returning to a closed beta for additional work, another Amazon game is facing delays: New World. The MMO game was scheduled for release next month, but its developers have revealed that they need more time to make some important improvements to the game, ultimately bumping the debut by several months. READ: … Continue reading
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Samsung Galaxy S20 Plus deals are by no means cheap making this Three contract all the more desirable.
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I’m busy with a ton of responsibilities, and I’ve found that setting high expectations is rarely worth the effort.But that strategy didn’t work for Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order.And some of the talent that worked on Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare and God of War 3 took key positions on the production of Jedi: Fallen Order.And to get me even more excited, Respawn recently said it drew inspiration from Dark Souls, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, and Metroid Prime for this game.That singular theme connects the story, characters, and gameplay mechanics into a cohesive whole that left me in awe.That makes the progression from one bonfire-like meditation point to the next feel like a victory.
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We’re ready to release another insightful interview as a part of our Break Free B2B series, this time with Brody Dorland, co-founder of the popular content planning platform, Divvy HQ.That’s why we were so excited to sit down with him for a few minutes and pick his brain.We not only spoke about what B2B content marketers can start doing to boost the success of their content marketing initiatives, but also gain insight into where B2B content marketing is headed in the future.Here are a few of our favorite moments from the interview with Brody.Over the years, what have you seen as the biggest improvements?Actually, this morning [at CMW 2019], they talked about the latest data from Content Marketing Institute’s, saying that 41% of marketers now have a content strategy in place, which is up from last year, which I think was 34%.
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Before the marketing departments of the world got ahold of the term “artificial intelligence,” it used to bring to mind some sort of robot.Raibert attended the conference to talk about three robots Boston Dynamics is currently focused on, and he categorized them by time: today (Spot), tomorrow (Handle), and the future (Atlas).He did share, however, that they’re currently being leased for “a few thousand dollars a month.” And he added that “each deal is a custom deal” that pertains to how many robots a company leases, for how long, and so on.Some of these construction companies have thousands of simultaneous construction sites they’d like to do progress monitoring on, and they’re limited in how many people they have to do that.”Over the next year, the most likely place that you might spot a Spot would be a warehouse, construction area, or industrial installation, Raibert told VentureBeat.It’s performed intermittently now, Raibert says, so doing the work more regularly could be valuable to these facilities.
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How about the collision of an experimental car with a woman walking across a street?During an interview aired on Sunday, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said he believed both were mistakes.The interview, filmed with journalists Mike Allen and Dan Primack for the program Axios on HBO, touched on the company’s relationship to its fifth largest shareholder, the Saudi Arabia sovereign wealth fund.“That government said that they made a mistake,” Khosrowshahi said of the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, in a response to a question about Uber’s continued relationship with Saudi Arabia.(Last year, the Washington Post columnist disappeared into the Saudi Arabian embassy in Turkey; a few months later, the CIA concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman himself had ordered the journalist’s assassination.)“We've made mistakes, too, with self-driving, and we stopped driving and we're recovering from that mistake.
China
China’s music streamers face a struggle to keep their users satisfied if they provide them with only songs, said the general manager of QQ Music.Young and tech-savvy internet users make up the bulk of paid subscribers on music-streaming platforms in China.They are looking for more opportunities to engage with their idols, as well as the opportunity to become a create music themselves,” said GM Oscar Hu at TechCrunch Shenzhen 2019 on Monday.Founded in 2008, QQ Music has built up a userbase of around 300 million, said Hu.The country’s online music market has undergone a rapid transformation in recent years, fueled by intensifying mobile internet penetration.Up to just a few years ago, the streaming market was plagued by illegal file-sharing and unlicensed music downloads.
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Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The VergeDon’t look now, but there’s something on your shirt... and your arm, and your... well, everything.Her background as both a scientist, researching Alzheimer’s at Columbia, and an artist allows her to communicate complex ideas in thoughtful engaging ways.She’s teamed up with microbiologist Anne Madden and The Cooper Union to bring the wonderfully weird world of the microscopic directly to your eyes, phones, and tablets.So for example, in our gut there, there’s a microbe that goes into other microbes, multiplies and explodes.But if you can wrap it with color and story, and make it so that these microbes become these characters that you can kind of empathize and understand, then there’s opportunity for people to see the wonder in science.
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We’re just under two weeks shy of the Google Stadia release date.Opinion: Why Google Stadia could be game on for Chrome OS tabletsThat’s all we’re getting for now, however, as to get any further you’ll need an invite code from either the Founder’s Edition or Premiere Edition.Both devices were running Android 10 build number QD1A.190821.011.C4 and have the October 5 security patch.You get the idea: the Pixel 4 is great, but…Gorilla Glass 5 front and back
China
Facebook is again in the spotlight for a case related to the use of personal data.Recent revelations have accused the social media giant of having exploited the information of its users to put pressure on its competitors.Confidential documents reveal that the social network used the personal data of the members of the platform.To harm its competitors and privilege its partners.The US media NBC News has in its possession 7000 pages of internal documents.That reveal how Facebook has used the data of its users as a means of reward for its partners.
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"Pokémon Sword and Shield" are the newest Pokémon games, and they're coming to the Nintendo Switch on November 15th."Sword and Shield" will introduce hundreds of new Pokémon, bringing the total number of Pokémon in the franchise to nearly 1,000.The new game takes place in a region called Galar, a fictional land loosely based on the United Kingdom.Pokémon producer Junichi Masuda said choosing to exclude Pokémon from "Sword and Shield" was a very difficult decision, but urged fans to embrace the new games.The Pokémon Company, the entity behind the game, says that it has merely chosen to prioritize the critters that best fit the new game, rather than spending the time to include every last one.But fans who have spent years migrating their favorite Pokémon between each new adventure in the series aren't happy, and it's led to quite the controversy — some fans are calling the new games "lazy," alleging that developer Game Freak is putting "low effort" into the first main-series Pokémon sequel on a home console.
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