James Mckinnis

James Mckinnis

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New owner hopes to sell pieces of the collectible for even more next week.
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We rigorously tested a group of popular cordless vacuum models to find out our favorites. On the list are models from Dyson, Shark, Hoover, Bissell, Moosoo and others.
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Exclusive: Microsoft's dual-screened Android phone shoots for practicality and productivity. I didn't get to use it yet, but I spent time with a see-through, non-working prototype to feel how it bends.
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The Redmi K30 Ultra is Xiaomi’s new affordable flagship in China. Powered by the MediaTek Dimensity 1000 Plus, here’s everything you need to know about it.
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And so will TikTok and Disney, with more to come Indonesia has found more tech companies willing to become collectors of the nation’s 10 percent digital services tax.…
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The YouTube channel was a big promoter of white nationalist rhetoric and ideas
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates has described the company’s potential TikTok deal as a poisoned chalice. In a wide-ranging interview with Wired, Gates makes it clear that Microsoft acquiring parts of TikTok won’t be easy or simple. “Who knows what’s going to happen with that deal,” says Gates. “But yes, it’s a poison[ed] chalice.” He also notes that being a big player in the social media business “is no simple game,” as Microsoft will have to contend with a whole new level of content moderation. Asked if Gates is wary of Microsoft getting into the social media game, he suggests that Facebook having some more competition is “probably a good thing” but that “having Trump kill off the only competitor, it’s pretty bizarre.” Gates seems as... Continue reading…
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Google is phasing out its original website builder so users must move their sites to new Google Sites by September of next year.
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Xbox claims that Apple is entirely to blame for the lack of cloud gaming apps and subscription services on iOS.
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With more real estate and power, the company's roomy new laptop retains everything we like about the 13-inch—almost.
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(Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery) A new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 17th Annual Meeting serves as the first prospective validation of the Rapid Arterial Occlusion Evaluation (RACE) scale in accurately identifying a severe clot stroke called a Large Vessel Occlusion (LVO) by U.S.-based EMS personnel in a pre-hospital setting.
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The phone will likely offer an edge-to-edge display with a hole-punch cutout
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What smart thermostat should you buy? Find out here.
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The ROG Phone 3's 144Hz refresh rate is already among the highest, but what if you want a little more?
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Inside the current hunt for "technosignatures" in radio waves.
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Despite being the backbone of most Internet and even corporate communication, many consider email to be archaic and inflexible. There are many things that the format and technology don’t and simply can’t afford. One of those would be redacting or deleting emails that have already been sent, received, and read, a feature that OnePlus may now wish did exist considering … Continue reading
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Samsung is getting ready to launch the Galaxy Note 20 and Galaxy Note 20 Ultra models in the weeks ahead. The countdown has begun for ... The post Samsung Galaxy S20 FE (S20 Lite) will arrive with a 4,500mAh battery appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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COVID-19 has been a difficult time to many companies, and Twitter has failed to buck the trend as the contraction of online advertising dollars shrinks the spreadsheets.
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Twitter’s advertising revenue was hit hard by the pandemic, and the company says that the “US civil unrest” in May and June also made matters worse. Advertising revenue declined 15 percent year-over-year in the final three weeks of June, Twitter said, as brands slowed or paused spending entirely. “Demand gradually improved once brands returned after the protests subsided,” Twitter said this morning in its Q2 2020 earnings report. Brands have been known to block ads from appearing near terms like “Black Lives Matter,” “George Floyd,” and “protest.” At the same time, several huge advertisers including Starbucks, Unilever, and Coca-Cola paused advertising across most social media platforms in June. The advertising pause was initially... Continue reading…
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Two years after the RX 2080 brought ray tracing to the mainstream, Nvidia preps a successor to its flagship.
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Remember these awesome TV shows from the past year? They could be in the running for Emmy nominations, scheduled to be announced next week.
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According to this TikTok community, there's a bad moon on the rise.
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Get the latest on coronavirus. Sign up to the Daily Brief for news, explainers, how-tos, opinion and more.Discrimination within the UK’s healthcare system could be one of the reasons south Asian people are disproportionately affected by coronavirus, doctors have said.South Asian women, in particular, have been known to complain about being dismissed by doctors who claim they are suffering from the so-called “Mrs Bibi syndrome”, also known as “Begum syndrome”.Derived after the common south Asian surnames “Bibi” and “Begum”, it refers to an imagined condition where south Asian women are said to exaggerate their health complaints despite showing few objective signs of ill health.This “medical racism” can make patients reluctant to open up to doctors and lead to neglect of health conditions, putting them more at risk from coronavirus.Research by Public Health England has suggested people of Bangladeshi ethnicity were twice as likely to die as those who are white British.A separate study showed south Asian people had a 19% higher chance of dying in hospital in the UK from Covid-19 than white people.Researchers say that risk is partly due to high levels of diabetes in the south Asian population.Statistics such as these have not come as any surprise to Prof Sunny Singh – the creative writing and English literature lecturer hasn’t seen a doctor or visited a surgery in the UK in 15 years. “I do not trust the NHS,” she said.Instead, she goes to India to get full medical checks or Skypes with her doctor in India to get prescription medicine.Her decision to eschew healthcare in Britain stems from early experiences of doctors here who “ignored or dismissed” her concerns. It’s an experience that many people from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities can relate to – especially women.Although often passed off as casual “banter”, racist and sexist stereotyping that “brown women complain about pain a lot” has the potential for very real health consequences. If her grievances are being dismissed as being exaggerated or fabricated, then her doctor risks misdiagnosing or overlooking a genuine problem.“I’ve been told that because I’m South Asian I’m a hypochondriac,” Singh told HuffPost UK. “It’s happened on multiple occasions.”Dr Harun Khan, who has previously written about the stereotype, says the problem is in part due to the class disparity between doctors and patients. A 2016 report in the British Medical Journal found only 4% of doctors in the UK came from working-class backgrounds.“This clear difference between ‘us and them’ on the wards creates a space for discriminatory stereotypes, targeting solely BAME patients, to exist,” he said.Khan describes a moment when a senior doctor mockingly referred to this “syndrome” while describing a patient – the woman was then discovered to have an acute finding on her CT scan which required elective surgery.He said he had only ever heard this syndrome being referred to in a derisive way, adding: “It’s more common than you think.”“If someone is coming with a bias or perception of you before you’ve even presented yourself, it inherently impacts the doctor-patient relationship,” he said. “From the patient’s point of view, it can be quite dehumanising to not be listened to.Dr Salman Waqar, a research fellow at Oxford University’s Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, agrees “there are issues around preconceived ideas of health professionals and their patient’s presentations – we all have them.“BAME patients do also report poor satisfaction with their GPs compared to white patients,” he told HuffPost UK.These experiences can exacerbate “acculturative stresses” that come from being part of an ethnic minority community and that are “probably exacerbated by the intersection with gender and faith, especially for Muslim women.”“When you add to that this narrative of ‘othering’ minorities that we have all internalised, it’s highly likely that south Asian women from unprivileged backgrounds and in poor health will be on the back foot to begin with.”Gender and language can also play a factor in creating this “dissonance”, where a vulnerable patient may struggle to articulate and advocate for herself to a physician. “This is particularly true however in chronic pain – where this Bibi/Begum Syndrome originates from, of all over body aches in a middle-aged south Asian woman,” Waqar added.He argues the inequalities of higher rates of diabetes, heart disease and conditions that put a person at greater risk of coronavirus are “to a large degree socially patterned, rather than as a result of a genetic disposition”.“If patients feel like their practitioners have not listened to them they will be reluctant to open up,” he continued. “And in relation to Covid-19, there certainly are pockets of the population who are scared about seeing anyone.”Trust is absolutely critical in a doctor-patient relationship. If a patient feels like she is not being heard or understood, she may very well choose to avoid seeing doctors altogether – like Singh. Her experiences with doctors in the UK were “infuriating” and “frustrating”. “Mostly it’s just fury,” she said. “Come on, I should just be able to get proper medical care without dealing with this kind of stupidity.”“It’s the kind of thing you have to wind yourself mentally up to go down to the surgery to get a check-up, to work up the emotional energy for that potential for bullshit.“I just don’t have the energy.” She admitted the pandemic had left her “slightly concerned”. “I’m thinking now: what do I do if I get sick? I just do not trust the NHS.”Dr Fizzah Ali, a neurology doctor who has also written about the “syndrome”, says that while “conscious bias is not compatible with a career in medicine”, the casual clinical stereotype can cause unconscious bias in doctors which could lead to missed diagnoses, delayed treatment and preventable unwanted outcomes.In the US, implicit bias has led to African American women being less likely to be referred for invasive cardiac procedures despite being at an increased statistical risk of cardiovascular disease.“These unrecognised biases and associations can alter our perceptions and behaviour,” Ali told HuffPost UK. “It could potentially affect clinical decision making.”“Medical racism is not an unknown phenomenon,” said Singh, who has tweeted about the subject on several occasions. “It’s not just doctors who deal with it, it’s about medical research and practice.”The impact of that on south Asian women, she says, is “huge”. “It’s everything from as major as reproductive health to something as small as vitamin D supplements – it’s part and parcel of healthcare in the UK.”She points to the studies linking coronavirus deaths to high levels of diabetes,hypertension and heart disease – conditions that people with south Asian backgrounds are at higher risk of developing.“Part of that must be a genetic propensity,” she said. “The rest is to do with our lack of access to healthcare and racism.”An official PHE inquiry suggested racism and discrimination were some of the “root causes” to these high death rates from coronavirus in BAME people.The PHE report described the relationship between ethnicity and health as “complex and likely to be the result of a combination of factors”, including that BAME communities are more likely to live in urban areas, in multigenerational households, in poorer and deprived areas, and occupy key worker roles that expose them to higher risk of Covid-19.“The unequal impact of Covid-19 on BAME communities may be explained by a number of factors ranging from social and economic inequalities, racism, discrimination and stigma, occupational risk, inequalities in the prevalence of conditions that increase the severity of disease including obesity, diabetes, hypertension and asthma,” the report concluded.The truth is not one single factor can explain why south Asian people are almost 20% more likely to die of coronavirus in hospital than white people.Ali, Khan and Waqar all agree we need to look beyond the current pandemic and focus on the structural barriers of racism within our healthcare system.“Being aware of these biases is the starter, but what I think is more powerful and effective than [for example] doing unconscious bias training, is having an inclusive healthcare system and a culture of practice that is looking to co-produce and be person-centric,” Waqar said.“If you look outside coronavirus, it’s about poorer outcomes in relation to health and barriers to accessing healthcare for ethnic minorities,” Ali said.“It’s about the marginalisation of women patients and women of colour. It’s about why Black women are five times as likely as to die in childbirth than white women, and Asian women twice as likely to die.”“The disproportionate Covid-19 deaths is related to the impact of structural racism on ethnic and racial minority communities, so we need to be talking about structural racism,” said Khan. “It’s a much broader conversation.“Why are Black and brown people more likely to die? Why are they in poverty? What structures do we have in our society that exacerbate these class disparities that affect healthcare provision?” he asked.For Singh, she plans to continue to fly abroad for her healthcare. “I trust medical care in India more,” she said.“It isn’t just me – we know women aren’t being taken seriously when they come in, women of colour even less.”She continued: “Racism is baked into the system; it’s baked into medicine.“When you really start looking at the bigger picture – it isn’t the virus that is killing south Asians. It’s medical racism.”Related... Black, Asian And Minority Ethnic Groups Could Be Among First To Get Coronavirus Vaccine Racism A Factor In Increased Risk Of BAME People Dying From Coronavirus, Suggests Report BAME People Pleaded For Help During The Coronavirus Pandemic. This Is How They Were Let Down Racists Are Using The Leicester Lockdown To Spread Lies About Its Asian Communities
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Instagram Reels, Facebook's competitor to TikTok, is expected to roll out in early August to users in the US and several other countries. It's already being tested in India, Brazil, France, and Germany. Reels is a new format for Instagram Stories that allows users to create and share short-form video content on the Explore page and with followers. Here's everything you need to know about Reels' launch and how it works. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Facebook's attempt to compete with TikTok — a new short-form video format on Instagram — is expected to roll out in early August to users in the US. Reels, which will live inside of the app's Stories feature, allows users to record and edit short-form videos with audio and music soundtracks — akin to what users already do on TikTok. Facebook first started testing Reels with users in Brazil in November, before rolling out last month to France and Germany. The debut of Instagram's Reels in the US — and in India in early July, as reported by Business Insider India — comes as concerns over TikTok's livelihood in both countries has created an opening in short-form video-sharing. The Indian government recently banned new user downloads of TikTok and other Chinese apps amid a bloody border dispute with China. In the US, the Trump administration is weighing a country-wide ban on TikTok due to its ties to China, where the app's parent company ByteDance is based. Nevertheless, TikTok is wildly popular: It has more than 2 billion global downloads and an estimated US userbase at as high as 80 million. Several tech companies have come out with apps similar to TikTok, but no platform has yet to successfully rival TikTok's viral reach. But it looks like Facebook is putting its full weight behind Reels, and trying to capitalize on Instagram's popularity among a younger audience and success with copying other platform's big features — most notably, Snapchat Stories. Instagram has been tight-lipped thus far about how Reels is being received in other countries, so there's not a lot we know about the new format ahead of its US launch. Here's everything we know so far about how Instagram Reels will work:SEE ALSO: Dozens of high-profile Twitter accounts, including Obama, Biden, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and Kanye, were hacked in a colossal bitcoin scam: here's the full list Why is Instagram Reels such a big deal? In just a few years of its existence, TikTok has become a staple of internet culture and social interaction for Generation Z. The app has more than 2 billion all-time downloads, thanks to its flurry of short-form videos where users participate in viral challenges, lip sync and dance to music, show off comedic skits, and share their hot takes on society at large. It's quickly become a social media powerhouse, outperforming US-based apps that have attracted younger audiences — including Instagram.  But Facebook's first attempt at competing with TikTok was a failure. The company launched an app called Lasso in November 2018, but it failed to gain traction: Lasso had fewer than 600,000 downloads, according to Sensor Tower. Lasso shut down on July 10, making way for Facebook to throw all its short-video efforts behind Instagram Reels. Facebook is notorious for copying other platform's popular formats and features and bringing them to its own apps — with rousing success. Most notably, Facebook cloned Snap's Stories feature and brought it to Instagram, where it was wildly more popular than it ever was on Snapchat. Why is Instagram rolling out Reels to the US now? It's unclear how long Facebook has been readying Reels for an August launch, but the timing is particularly convenient. The Trump administration has increased its pressure on TikTok recently after months of scrutinizing the platform's ties to China, where its parent company ByteDance is based. Earlier this month, President Trump threatened to ban TikTok for what he said was punishment for the coronavirus. Others have called for TikTok's ban in the US due to concerns over how much access and influence the Chinese government is afforded over user data and content moderation. The imminent threat of TikTok disappearing has led both users and creators to panic, and scramble to find similar platforms where they can continue creating content in case TikTok disappears. Instagram Reels may be one of those platforms to which users migrate. What's the difference between Instagram Reels and TikTok? Until we actually get our hands on using Instagram Reels, the differences are not clear. It appears that Reels videos are limited to 15 seconds, while TikTok extended the maximum length of its videos to 60 seconds earlier this year. It's also not clear what kind of partnerships Facebook has struck up with music labels and agencies to allow Instagram users access to music and audio for Reels videos. But Facebook did recently announce it's soon launching licensed music videos, which could indicate the company is working on these partnerships.  As for similarities drawn between TikTok and Reels, an Instagram spokesperson said in a statement that "no two services are the same." "TikTok specifically has harnessed real consumer behavior, and done amazing things. We've also seen the rise of short-form video on Instagram, and think we can create something in a way that makes sense for our community," the spokesperson told Business Insider. "This responsiveness to consumer demand is competition at work and one of the longtime hallmarks of the tech sector. It increases choice, which is good for people." How will I know which posts on Instagram are Reels? Instagram has provided some basic screenshots of what Reels will look like when it launches. When scrolling through your home feed or Explore page, you'll be able to tell which posts are Reels clips by a clapperboard icon in the bottom-left corner. What will Reels videos look like on Instagram? On the surface, it seems viewing Reels will be a similar experience as viewing TikTok videos: You can like or comment on videos, and click through to see what audio track was used in a specific video. It's not clear if you're able to scroll vertically through videos — akin to TikTok's addictive "For You" feed" — or if you have to navigate back to the Explore page to find more Reels. Where can I find all of an individual user's Reels? A new tab will be added to users' profiles to showcase all their Reels in one place. The tab will live alongside the traditional grid of recent posts, as well as tabs for viewing IGTV videos or videos a user was tagged in. How do you create a Reels video on Instagram? Instagram has said that the Reels video format will live inside of Stories, which users can create in the top-left corner of the Home feed. It appears that Instagram is updating the Rolodex of options at the bottom of the screen — for creating Live videos, text posts, or Boomerangs — to add a tab for Reels. The creation process for Reels appears similar to that on TikTok, but it remains to be seen how seamless of an experience it is compared with TikTok's video-creating ease. When will Reels be available in my country? Facebook first started testing Reels with users in Brazil in November, before rolling out last month to France and Germany. Reels then rolled out in India earlier this month, Business Insider India reported. The planned rollout for early August is reportedly a global launch: Reels will debut not only in the US, but also in the United Kingdom, Japan, Mexico, and around 50 other countries, according to NBC News.
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Facebook went from a college-networking site into a $70 billion digital-ad machine by cultivating close relationships with top marketers and the agencies that manage their multibillion-dollar budgets.  The company developed its ad business gradually and sold marketers on a cheap product with unprecedented growth and scale. It hired executives away from Google and mimicked its approach by dedicating teams to individual brands and agencies. The 2011 hire of Carolyn Everson and her development of Facebook's exclusive client council and Marketing Partners groups further cemented its status as an indispensable ad tool. Facebook also used industry events like Cannes and CES, as well as ski trips, to develop personal connections without the flashier perks offered by TV-network salespeople. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. In just over 15 years, Facebook has grown from a college-networking site into a $70 billion digital-ad machine.  Facebook achieved this unprecedented growth in large part by developing deep relationships with some of the big brands — like Coca-Cola, Starbucks, and Verizon — that are boycotting its platform, as well as the ad agencies that hold the keys to their multibillion-dollar budgets. A Facebook spokeswoman said, without going into detail, that this story mischaracterized "some elements about the history of our business." "We have a proven track record of working in close partnership with the advertising industry and together will continue to focus on what's ahead," she said. Facebook sold advertisers on scale Facebook made itself indispensable by selling sheer scale — even as advertisers complained it wasn't transparent enough with its data. In 2008 and 2010, Facebook hired away two key executives from its rival Google: Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and Chief Revenue Officer David Fischer. In 2011, it hired former MTV and Microsoft sales executive Carolyn Everson, who became the face of the company's ad business as vice president of global marketing solutions. Everson cozied up to ad agencies Facebook created teams dedicated to specific agencies and clients called global marketing solutions. Everson started Facebook's client council and the Facebook Marketing Partners program, which brought advertisers and company leadership closer together. The client council is a group of marketers and agency executives with outsize influence over Facebook's advertising business, and it has since expanded to include regional and specialty units around the world. The Marketing Partners are companies that have been certified by Facebook as experts in using its ad products. "The development of the client council created a 'club' that informed advertisers but effectively sold Facebook innovation and insulated Facebook when issues like reporting errors cropped up," said Rob Norman, an adviser to GroupM, the largest ad-buying network. People involved in both groups signed nondisclosure agreements — which Facebook said is standard industry practice — in exchange for an early look at Facebook features and ad tools before public release. CEO Mark Zuckerberg attended the first council meeting in 2011 via videoconference. Members got a hoodie and T-shirt, which mimicked Zuckerberg's de facto uniform, as swag. A former holding-company executive said Facebook used the council to shape press coverage, explaining problems to clients in a positive way and encouraging members to be sources for reporters. "Carolyn changed the understanding of agencies as second-class citizens at Facebook," Craig Atkinson, the chief client officer at digital agency Tinuiti, said. Agency executives said while Google's sales pitch was based on numbers, Everson's appeal was more emotional. When Facebook went through crises over inflated video metrics, data privacy, and hate speech, Everson was there to reassure clients and do damage control. "Does Carolyn need to be as close as possible to me and others? Absolutely," a holding-company executive who has been involved in several calls about the boycott said. "If I didn't know her, I would be attacking her." Facebook went straight to company CMOs Along with agencies, Facebook also went directly to advertisers. Chris Cox, Facebook's vice president of product at the time, and other executives met with Unilever's marketing team in May 2010. It was the first time Facebook had reached out to a major advertiser without an agency present, and ad execs feared the platform would threaten their livelihoods. Matt Britton, the CEO of the consumer-intelligence firm Suzy and founder of the digital agency MRY, said he invited a Facebook rep to a 2011 meeting with Johnson & Johnson and was surprised to see three sales people show up. "I felt like they were trying to take money away from us," he said. "They needed to get to the source, and the source is the CMO." Facebook used soft power to woo advertisers The more time agencies and clients spent with Facebook, the less attention they paid to its competitors. Everson courted advertisers by hosting parties at major industry events like the Cannes Lions festival and CES, where Facebook and Omnicom Media Group cosponsor an invite-only cocktail event every year. Everson takes industry leaders, like WPP's global chief client officer, each winter on multiday trips to the Deer Valley Ski Resort in Park City, Utah. Attendees can take in screenings of the latest movies, spa treatments, guided mountain tours, skiing sessions, and dinners in Park City every night, a media buyer who has been on these trips said. Everson also regularly invites a small number of the most important executives, like holding-company CEOs, to her home in Beaver Creek, Colorado. The former CEO of a holding-company agency said she never accepted these invites because she didn't want to feel obligated to direct her clients' money toward Facebook. But Everson found other ways to cater to executives like her, by hosting events with the professional women's group Fast Forward and inviting clients and agency leads to attend with a friend. Facebook turned off its spigot as it became a major ad player  Facebook's pitch to advertisers paid off early on — in 2006, the holding company IPG spent $5 million to acquire o.4% of the company. Facebook sealed the deal with advertisers by hooking them with the ability to reach audiences at minimal expense, then charging them for that reach. During Facebook's first marketing conference at New York's American Museum of Natural History in February 2012, Sandberg and Everson announced new premium ad products and guaranteed that a majority of brands' fans would see their messages — for a cost. Clients realized they'd spent millions to acquire fans that they were only "renting." "They flipped the switch, and there was Carolyn ready to take your money," the CEO of the holding company agency said. Facebook went public less than three months later. By this point, advertisers had little choice but to work with the biggest social platform. General Motors' chief marketing officer announced that his company would stop advertising on Facebook and found himself out of a job by the end of the year. Facebook's business has shifted toward small advertisers Even as they demanded more accountability from Facebook, big advertisers poured money into multiyear deals that gave them preferential pricing and access to new ad formats. Publicis Groupe pledged to put $500 million into Facebook in 2014, AdAge reported at the time. Two years later, the snack giant Mondelez bumped up its spend in 52 countries. Agencies and clients tried to get an in with Facebook by taking part in projects like its mid-2010s "clean room" program that let firms and clients access internal anonymized data on ad campaigns, as long as that information stayed within Facebook's walls. Omnicom was the first holding company to participate. A Facebook spokeswoman said this was a pilot program that didn't confer any special advantage. An Omnicom spokeswoman declined to comment. At the same time, Facebook let anyone run ads on the platform, which made it hard for big brands and agencies to gain a strategic edge. As the recent boycott has underscored, Facebook depends more on small and midsize advertisers than on big agencies and their clients. The 100 top-spending advertisers represent just 6% of its annual revenue. And those smaller companies continue to spend, while major firms like Dentsu's 360i and IPG Mediabrands have actively encouraged clients to join the boycott. Several people said the boycott was a way for execs to express years of frustration with Zuckerberg and his team over their lack of transparency, among other issues. But Facebook wouldn't have become the juggernaut it is today without their help.SEE ALSO: The 19 advertising execs who wield the most power and sway over Facebook Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
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Google is dropping a new deal every day this month starting with a big discount on its latest smart speakers.
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A new report from the analytics company Conviva looked at the state of Instagram Stories in 2020. Having eight or more frames in an Instagram Story and turning on replies help increase reach rates across accounts, Conviva found. The most effective stories were shared by accounts with between 10,000 and 50,000 followers, according to the report. Stories contain fewer frames on average in 2020 than they did in 2019, but reach and engagement have increased. Business Insider broke down four key takeaways from the report for influencers, media companies, and marketers. Subscribe to Business Insider's influencer newsletter: Influencer Dashboard. What makes a good Instagram Story for influencers, media companies, and marketers? For starters, make sure you have eight or more frames and have your replies turned on, according to Conviva's 2020 Instagram Stories Benchmark Report.  Conviva, a social and streaming media analytics company, released its third annual report on Instagram Stories in late June. The report looked at 920 top Instagram accounts, over 28,700 stories, and over 165,000 individual frames.  "More than half of Instagram's one billion plus users are consuming Instagram Stories daily and they are one of the most powerful engagement tools in use by brands today," said Nick Cicero, Conviva's VP of strategy. In 2020, Instagram has introduced new features to its stories like e-commerce stickers for gift cards, orders, fundraising, and donations. And stories have only gotten more important as many people have sheltered in place during the pandemic. "There's been an exponentially higher amount of Story views and likes," Instagram influencer Erica Chan Coffman told Business Insider back in April.  Conviva's report found that the most effective users of Instagram Stories were accounts with 10,000 to 50,000 followers, which would fall into the category of micro influencer. Micro influencers were previously identified as the buzziest category of influencer for 2020 in a report from the influencer-marketing agency Linqia. Conviva also looked at how Instagram Story consumption behavior had changed from 2019 to 2020. Here are the four key takeaways from Conviva's 2020 report on Instagram Stories:People are sharing fewer stories in 2020, but reach and engagement are higher than in 2019. Conviva found that the amount of Instagram Stories "decreased slightly" in 2020 compared to 2019, when looking at stories per week and frames per story.  "Across all accounts, frames per story was down by 2.4 frames per story on average," the report said.  But despite fewer stories are being shared, the amount of people consuming Instagram Stories went up, with reach and engagement both increasing. Stories with 8 frames or more have better reach. Eight frames or more is the sweet spot for story reach, according to the Conviva. Generally, the more frames, the higher the reach — which peaked at 20 frames per story with about a 3.5% reach rate. The average completion rate across accounts remained steadily above 70% throughout the first 20 frames of a story in 2020.  "Despite this, only 26% of stories analyzed for this report were 8 frames or greater," Conviva said in the report. Right now, having replies on helps increase engagement. The replies feature, which allows users to comment or react to stories, has positively impacted reach rate across accounts, Conviva found. With replies on, accounts saw a reach rate of 9% compared to accounts with replies turned off, which got around 6%.  66% of accounts have their replies turned on, Conviva said. "This is a full reversal from 2019 when 66% of accounts had replies turned off," the report said. Users with 10,000 to 50,000 followers have the highest reach percentage. Instagram Story reach rates decrease (as a percentage of follower count) as accounts gain more than 50,000 followers, the report said. Conviva found that accounts with 10,000 to 50,000 followers were the most effective in terms of the percentage of the account's followers that a story generally reached. Conviva reported a breakdown for each range:  0-10,000: 12.9% 10,000-50,000: 13.3% 50,000-100,000: 9.6% 100,000-250,000: 7.0% 250,000-500,000: 6.5% 500,000-2 million: 4.9% Over 2 million: 3.7% The higher reach rates for accounts with 10,000 to 50,000 followers is good news for micro influencer accounts — a term for influencers within the range of 5,000 to 100,000 followers. In 2020, brands were heading toward working more closely and frequently with micro influencers versus macro (100,000 to 500,000) or mega (over 500,000) influencers. For more information on how social-media behaviors have been changing in 2020, read these Business Insider Prime posts:  A new survey of 1,021 Instagram influencers shows how the social-media platform has changed in recent weeks and what areas they're leaning into: Influencers are leaning into Instagram Stories and "Live" stories according to the influencer-marketing platform Klear. A new 22-page report breaks down how livestream video has surged in the last month on YouTube, Twitch, and other platforms. Here are the 4 key takeaways: As consumers spend time at home in an effort to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus, many are tuning into livestreams on platforms like YouTube, Twitch, and Facebook.  A top social-video data firm made a 22-page report on how the coronavirus has changed viewer habits on YouTube and other platforms. Here are the 5 takeaways: Tubular Labs, a leading social-video analytics firm, looked at what types of content digital creators are uploading and users are being drawn to as countries around the world enforce social isolation.
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Save $800 on this fantastic high-end gaming laptop from MSI. It's on sale at Newegg for a limited time only.
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