Jason Hill

Jason Hill

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New ultraviolet observations of the Red Planet highlight complex circulation patterns in the Martian atmosphere.
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Last week’s hearing with Silicon Valley CEOs provided a rare glimmer of hope that Congress can, occasionally, work across the aisle.
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If you're looking for a phone on a budget, check out CNET's top 8 picks.
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The Lyriq will be one of the first vehicles to feature GM’s new scalable battery architecture Continue reading…
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Photo by Bobby Quillard Guy “Dr Disrespect” Beahm has returned to streaming, this time on YouTube. His first stream goes live tomorrow at 3pm EDT. The controversial streamer was permanently banned from Twitch in late June, for reasons that are still unknown. Though he’d signed an exclusive deal with Twitch back in March, Beahm does not have a similar arrangement with YouTube. Sources close to Beahm say that he plans to experiment with other platforms like Facebook Gaming and his own personal website, the Champions Club. DrDisrespect has added a $4.99/Join button to his YouTube channel, went live on Instagram just now, and played a parody news report at the end saying that "DrDisrespect may return to streaming as soon as today" pic.twitter.com/rYLmL3ue6L—... Continue reading…
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It’s no surprise that AI has a carbon footprint, which refers to the amount of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide and methane, primarily) that producing and consuming AI releases into the atmosphere. In fact, training AI models requires so much computing power, some researchers have argued that the environmental costs outweigh the benefits. However, I believe they’ve not only underestimated the benefits of AI, but also overlooked the many ways that model training is becoming more efficient. Greenhouse gases are what economists refer to as an “externality” — a cost borne inadvertently by society at large, such as through the adverse impact of global warming, but inflicted on us all by private participants who have little incentive to refrain from the offending activity. Typically, public utilities emit these gases when they burn fossil fuels in order to generate electricity that powers the data centers, server farms, and other computing platforms upon which AI runs.To read this article in full, please click here
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The Galaxy Z Fold 2, from a leak | Evan Blass Today, Samsung is going to announce a giant pile of new gadgets. Here’s what to expect: Two Note 20 phones, a couple of Tab S7 Android tablets, a new Galaxy Watch, and Galaxy Ear Buds Live. I am on record that Samsung should have the guts to call those earbuds Ear Beans because tech needs to have a little more fun but also look at them. The event kicks off at 10AM ET and although it’s an online-only affair, we’ll be doing a liveblog with real-time commentary — so you can find it all in one place instead of trawling for takes on Twitter. If you ‘d rather just get the highlights, here’s a story stream that will have all the big news: Samsung Galaxy Note 20 event: all the latest rumors, news, and more. When Samsung first announced the... Continue reading…
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NASA on Saturday gave SpaceX a "go" to undock the company's first crewed space mission, called Demo-2, and land it on Sunday evening. Hurricane Isaias complicated original plans to return two astronauts to Earth aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon spaceship in the Atlantic Ocean. Elon Musk's aerospace company may now try to splash down NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley in the Gulf of Mexico. Two out of seven total landing sites near Florida must have good weather conditions, and NASA has until about 5 p.m. ET on Saturday to call off the undocking. Should the weather worsen, NASA and SpaceX can try again a day later or some other date over the next two months. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley have a "go" to return to Earth this weekend and wrap up an historic space mission for both NASA and SpaceX.  Behnken and Hurley launched to orbit aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle on May 30, then docked the spaceship (which they named "Endeavour") to the International Space Station. Their experimental mission, called Demo-2, is the first with humans ever launched by SpaceX, founded by Elon Musk. It also represents a new era of commercially developed and operated space vehicles started by NASA almost 10 years ago. But before the mission can succeed, the crew must safely land After a two-month stay in orbit, the men are preparing to undock from the ISS on Saturday at 7:34 p.m. ET. If that procedure goes well, they're due back to Earth on Sunday around 2:41 p.m. ET. (NASA TV's continuous live-streaming coverage, which you can watch at the end of this story, kicks off Saturday around 5:15 p.m. ET.) NASA is overseeing SpaceX's experimental mission. On Wednesday, the agency gave the company an initial "go" to proceed with its landing plans. But Hurricane Isaias could force the astronauts to stay in orbit a while longer. The cyclone has already hit Puerto Rico as a tropical storm with high winds and flash-floods, leaving hundreds of thousands without power. It later developed into a Category 1 hurricane, with sustained winds of at least 75 mph. Isaias' current path threatens to bring dangerous weather to several potential landing sites by Sunday afternoon — the planned time for the astronauts' splashdown. "We won't leave the space station without some good landing opportunities in front of us," Behnken told reporters from the ISS on Friday morning, adding that NASA and SpaceX are keeping him and Hurley informed. "The lion's share that work happens on their end. We don't control the weather, and we know we can stay up here longer." However, in a blog post published on Saturday afternoon, NASA announced that the astronauts had a "go" to proceed with landing. "We cannot wait to get Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley back to Earth," Jim Bridenstine, NASA's administrator, said during a press briefing on Wednesday, noting the agency would continue to watch the weather. Crew Dragon can't land if there's rain, lightning, big waves, or winds exceeding 10 mph Isaias became a named tropical storm on Wednesday night, when its wind speeds exceeded 39 mph. It reached hurricane status the next day. The storm could affect several landing areas just as Endeavour is supposed to reenter Earth's atmosphere, deploy its parachutes, and splash into the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico. Recovery crews will be waiting to recover astronauts with boats, airplanes, and helicopters. Three of the seven landing zones that SpaceX and NASA prescribed for the test mission, called Demo-2, lie within the "cone of probability" for the storm's path. Those splashdown sites (shown below) are located in the Atlantic Ocean off the coasts of Cape Canaveral, Daytona, and Jacksonville. Given current conditions, mission managers are hoping to land Demo-2 in the Gulf of Mexico near Pensacola or, as a backup option, Panama City, NASA said on Saturday. "This mission will be a bit unusual as timelines will be in flux quite a bit up until undocking as we finalize landing locations," a NASA spokesperson told Business Insider in an email on Friday. Pensacola is the-westernmost location of the seven options, and Panama City is the second-westernmost. As of Saturday afternoon, the National Hurricane Center does not project that tropical-storm-force winds will affect the area. Depending on how large the storm grows and how nasty weather conditions become, mission managers may scrub the undocking and landing attempt. Steep waves, rain, lightning, low clouds, poor visibility (for helicopters to fly the astronauts from a SpaceX recovery boat back to land), or even winds stronger than about 10 mph can trigger a "no-go" decision. "We're going to watch the weather very carefully," Steve Stich, the manager of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, said on Wednesday. Given the intense preparatory work required to prepare Crew Dragon for its return, NASA and SpaceX have until about 5 p.m. ET to make the final call for undocking, the space agency said. Behnken and Hurley can stay in orbit another 2 months, if needed Once the astronauts undock, they have to land within about three days because the spaceship only has enough water and lithium hydroxide — which scrubs carbon dioxide from the air — to last Behnken and Hurley for that long, Stich said. While docked to the ISS, though, Endeavour can share life support and last much longer. The vehicle has been in space for more than 60 days, but this version of Crew Dragon is designed to last about 120 days due to its solar-panel design, Stich said. In theory, that gives SpaceX and NASA opportunities through most of September to safely get Behnken and Hurley back home. "We know we can stay up here longer," Behnken told reporters during a briefing on Friday morning. "There's more chow and I know the space station program's got more work that we can do." Stich noted SpaceX and NASA can make a call as late as an hour before undocking to delay the whole sequence and try again another day. "If the weather's looking bad that day, we're not even going to try to undock," Stich said. "The beauty of this vehicle is we can stay docked to the space station." As part of the process to approve a landing, NASA and SpaceX used a robotic arm to survey Crew Dragon's heat shield, which must withstand temperatures of of to 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit during atmospheric reentry, for damage by space debris. "There were no areas on the vehicle that were any concern for entry," Stich said. NASA TV will stream around-the-clock coverage of the astronauts' attempt to return to Earth starting around 5:15 p.m. ET on Saturday, August 1. You can watch the agency's broadcast via the YouTube feed below. Susie Neilson contributed reporting. This story was originally published July 29, 2020. It has been updated with new information. Do you have a story or inside information to share about the spaceflight industry? Send Dave Mosher an email at [email protected] or a Twitter direct message at @davemosher. More secure communication options are listed here.SEE ALSO: A fast-growing startup led by former SpaceX and Blue Origin employees just scored 2 huge wins in its quest to launch 3D-printed rockets DON'T MISS: SpaceX is recruiting volunteers to beta-test its new Starlink satellite internet service. Here's how to apply. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why NASA waited nearly a decade to send astronauts into space from the US
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Get growing with seeds, flower bulbs, plants and other garden supplies delivered safely to your home.
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To ensure compliance in China while maximizing its allure internationally, the BSN is decoupling its governance and open-sourcing the international version.
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With Warburg Pincus and DTCP acquiring the controlling stake in London fibre broadband company Community Fibre, a £400 million investment has been promised for the city.
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Choose a pair of PJs that are both cozy and convenient during nursing sessions with your brand new little one. The post The best types of nursing pajamas for new moms appeared first on New Folks.
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Intel Chief Engineer Murthy Renduchintala is leaving the company, per a press release on Monday. The change comes after Intel announced that production problems have led to the delay of its next generation chips. The news caused Intel shares to fall sharply when it announced earnings last week. Murthy, who was a longtime president at Qualcomm, joined Intel in 2015 to help lead the company's bid to reclaim its dominance in the chip industry. Intel CEO Bob Swan announced changes to the Intel leadership team, including the appointment of Intel veteran Anne Kelleher as head of the chip giant's manufacturing operations. Click here for more BI Prime stories. Intel's chief engineer, Murthy Renduchintala, is leaving the chip giant, the company said Monday. The change comes as Intel reels from production woes that led to a delay of its next generation processors, stunning Wall Street and causing its stock to plummet. Murthy, a veteran of the semiconductor industry who served as Qualcomm president for 12 years, joined Intel in 2015. He was one of three engineering stars who formed what was expected to lead Intel's bid to regain its competitive edge in a rapidly changing market. The other engineering execs were Jim Keller, who came from Tesla and was a veteran of Apple, and Raja Koduri, one of the leading graphics chip engineers in the world, who joined from rival AMD.  Intel announced last month that Keller was leaving. And last week, Intel stunned Wall Street when it said it had run into problems with its transition to a new manufacturing process, causing a delay in its next generation chips. Intel CEO Bob Swan said Murthy, as Renduchintala is fondly called, will leave on August 3, as he also unveiled major changes in the Silicon Valley giant's leadership and engineering teams. Among them was the appointment of Ann Kelleher, an Intel veteran, to lead the company's manufacturing operations. Koduri will continue to lead Intel architecture, software and graphics teams. Got a tip about Intel or another tech company? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @benpimentel or send him a secure message through Signal at (510) 731-8429. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Claim your 20% discount on an annual subscription to BI Prime by clicking here. SEE ALSO: Here's how this founder sought to overcome Shark Tank's apparent aversion to tech startups that had already raised capital SEE ALSO: Intel's big fumble gives way to fears that it's 'about to give up its main source of competitive advantage,' as rivals like Arm, Nvidia, and AMD only get stronger Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Leslie Odom, Jr.'s $500,000 gamble that led to a starring role in 'Hamilton'
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While 2020 has undoubtedly been a year of doom and gloom, the autumn is set to get an injection of sparkle with the return of Strictly Come Dancing. The future of the BBC ballroom competition in the Covid era looked uncertain for a while, but in June, bosses finally confirmed it would be going ahead in order to bring us all some much-needed light relief. However, there will be a number of notable changes when the show returns, as it navigates the creative challenges the pandemic has presented. With that in mind, here’s everything we know so far about this year’s series...It’s getting a shorter run The show is going ahead with a shorter run, compared to the usual 13 weeks. A BBC spokesperson has said: “To ensure we deliver the high standards audiences know and love, and in light of the ongoing considerations around Covid-19, this year’s series of Strictly will have a slightly shorter run than usual.”Usually, the show airs a launch show in early September, where the celebrities are paired up with their professional partners, before they then have two weeks to train together ahead of the competition starting in full. While no dates have been confirmed, it is looking like the show will not begin until 24 October, running for nine weeks until 19 December. The pros will be quarantining together so they can record group routinesBack in June, the BBC revealed it was “considering isolating the dancers and key production members” together in a hotel for two weeks so they could then record a batch of group dances. This would be done in a small studio with skeleton crew to then be aired across the series.After the group routines are in the can, The Sun has reported that the pros will then be asked to self-isolate at home before they meet their celebrity partners and form support bubbles.During a recent interview on Lorraine, pro dancer Oti Mabuse confirmed the cast had been asked to self-isolate, saying: “We’ve had to adjust and adapt in these interesting times.“We will all be quarantining because I think for most productions and most shows health safety is the most important thing. So we will be taking care of ourselves and all the pros will be quarantining to make sure we’re all fit and healthy to do the show.”There’s still a big question mark over the studio audienceOne of the biggest changes to the series could see the live audience locked out of the ballroom for the first time in Strictly history, due to social distancing rules. The BBC’s entertainment boss Kate Phillips said that “inevitably things are going to change” on the show, noting how RuPaul’s Drag Race still works well without a live audience. Speaking at the virtual Edinburgh TV Festival earlier this year, she said: [Drag Race] is a big shiny floor talent competition with all sorts of catwalks, singing, dancing, impressions – it never has an audience.“The audience is the four judges and I don’t think it suffers from that at all. I think it is a brilliant show.”However, tabloid reports have since claimed that a smaller audience made up of different households and support bubbles could happen, with the groups sat at a social distance from one another. Internationally, Australia aired three episodes of its most recent series of Dancing With The Stars without one (although it did end its run a week earlier than originally planned), while Germany’s Let’s Dance – where Motsi Mabuse also serves as a judge – also went ahead with no audience. One judge might not be returningLong-standing judge Bruno Tonioli has thrown his involvement in the new series into doubt because of his commitment to the US version, which he judges at the same time each year.Usually, Bruno jets back and forth from London to LA each week, but it is unlikely he will be able to do so this year due to coronavirus travel restrictions in the US. Speaking to The Sun in June, Bruno said his role was unclear, revealing: “Under normal circumstances I take a deep breath and do the travel. I love the show and love to do it and normally I’m destroyed by Christmas, but this year is different for everyone. Under the current restrictions they just won’t allow it. I don’t know what’s going to happen.” Cheryl Tweedy’s name was linked to his judges’ seat, but various reports have since claimed she will not replace Bruno. Instead, it is believed that Craig Revel Horwood, Shirley Ballas and Motsi Mabuse will judge the show as a trio. The Christmas special is reportedly off With the huge challenges facing the production of the normal Strictly series, the Daily Star suggested that the usual Christmas special – which sees contestants from previous years return to compete – is just too much extra work for just one episode. The BBC has yet to confirm this, but if it is the case, it will be the first time in the show’s 16-year history that a festive special has not aired on Christmas Day. There could be a number of other changes tooCharlotte Moore, the BBC’s director of content, did confirm to The Times (£) earlier this year that bosses were considering various other safeguarding measures, including testing participants’ temperatures and installing glass divides inside the studio “so that people feel even more protected”.We’re saying goodbye to some prosThis year has seen some high-profile departures from the professional line-up, with Kevin Clifton and AJ Pritchard both leaving the show. Kevin announced his exit back in March after seven years on the show, revealing he was set to star in a production of Strictly Ballroom, which has since been postponed due to the pandemic. AJ was originally announced as one of the pros returning for 2020, but he later said he would not be taking part, revealing he was pursuing a career in presenting with brother Curtis Pritchard. Oti Mabuse, Luba Mushtuk, Dianne Buswell, Nadiya Bychkova, Johannes Radebe, Janette Manrara, Ajaz Skorajanec, Katya Jones, Giovanni Pernice, Gorka Marquez, Neil Jones, Karen Hauer, Anton Du Beke, Amy Dowden and Graziano Di Prima are all confirmed to return. It has been reported Kevin and AJ will not be replaced, while it remains unclear whether Gorka and Graziano will receive celebrity partners this year, after sitting out the competition in 2019. But our hosts should be staying the sameWhile nothing has been confirmed, it is widely expected Tess Daly and Claudia Winkleman will front the series once again. And there’s plenty of big names who have been linked to the seriesAs ever, the BBC is keeping the names of this year’s famous contestants under wraps until closer to the launch date. However, there’s still plenty of big names who have been linked to the show in the press. They include former Radio 1 DJ Maya Jama, TV personality Myleene Klass, Love Island narrator Iain Stirling, vlogger Zoella, Drag Race star RuPaul and former EastEnders actor Tamzin Outhwaite. It has also been suggested Made In Chelsea star Jamie Laing will also be invited back to participate, after he was forced to withdraw from last year’s competition having injured himself during the filming of the launch show. Reports have also suggested 2020 will finally be the year the show includes its first same-sex pairing, after Dancing On Ice made TV history with Ian ‘H’ Watkins and Matt Evers’ partnership earlier this year. Check out a more in depth look at the line-up rumours here.READ MORE: Socially Come Distancing: Is A Corona-Era Edition Of Our Beloved Strictly Something We Really Want To Watch? Meet The Celebrities Rumoured For This Year's Strictly Come Dancing My Pride Anthems: Johannes Radebe Recalls His Iconic First Encounter With Kylie Minogue
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Grime artist Wiley has been dropped by his management company over accusations of anti-Semitism.The musician’s manager John Woolf said A-List Management had “cut all ties” with the musician following a series of social media posts made on accounts belonging to him on Friday.The Campaign Against Antisemitism has asked police to investigate the content and called for Wiley’s accounts to be shut down “to prevent further outpouring of anti-Jewish venom”.Mr Woolf, who is Jewish, wrote on Twitter on Saturday morning: “Following Wileys anti semitic tweets today we at @A_ListMGMT have cut all ties with him. There is no place in society for antisemitism.”He had earlier said he did not support or condone what Wiley posted but that he would speak to him privately and “help educate him”.Following Wileys anti semitic tweets today we at @A_ListMGMT have cut all ties with him. There is no place in society for antisemitism.— John Woolf (@Jrwoolfw) July 24, 2020One post on an unverified Twitter account in Wiley’s name, which Mr Woolf confirmed to the PA news agency belongs to the star, read: “I would challenge the whole world of Jewish community on my own I am not scared I can handle them.”The musician has since been given a temporary ban from Twitter. Wiley posted a screenshot on Instagram on Saturday morning, showing he had been given a temporary Twitter ban but will be allowed back into his account later this morning.However, the social media platform has been accused of “ignoring anti-semitism” because his tweets are still visible 12 hours after they were first posted.Wiley, known as the Godfather of Grime and whose real name is Richard Cowie, received an MBE for services to music in 2018.Mr Woolf earlier said in the 12 years in which he had worked with Wiley he “can say that he is not anti-Semitic”.The manager wrote on Twitter that he does not “support or condone what Wiley has said today online in anyway shape or form”.He added: “We are going to help educate him here on this.”In a statement issued on Friday, a spokesperson for the Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Our Crime Unit has reported this matter to the Metropolitan Police Service as we consider that Wiley has committed the offence of incitement to racial hatred, which can carry a substantial prison sentence.“We have additionally asked Twitter and Facebook, which owns Instagram, to close down his accounts which have hundreds of thousands of followers, to prevent further outpouring of anti-Jewish venom.”They added that they would be contacting the Cabinet Office to ask that Wiley’s MBE is revoked.
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What we still don't know about the COVID-19 pandemic, the worst health crisis in living memory.
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T-Mobile and Sprint customers will also be able to get a free one-year subscription to sports website The Athletic.
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Samsung confirmed it's unveiling 5 devices at its Unpacked event on August 5 – which could be the Galaxy Note 20, Galaxy Buds Live, Galaxy Watch 3, or others.
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Images taken by the Solar Orbiter spacecraft show "campfires" on the sun.
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Plusnet is going all out on its ADSL broadband deals, bringing prices right down to £13.83 a month.
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Researchers from the University of Missouri have demonstrated an exciting combination of pencils and paper that could be used to draw devices to monitor the personal health of people at home. Much research is being conducted into the use of flexible electronics and sensors that can be worn on the body to capture health-related information. In the study, the researchers … Continue reading
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Coronavirus has changed everything. Make sense of it all with the Waugh Zone, our evening politics briefing. Sign up now.Priti Patel has been urged by a Tory MP to create a care and hospital workers’ immigration scheme to avoid a “gaping hole” being left in the sectors’ low-paid jobs.Sir Roger Gale told HuffPost UK the scheme could be modelled on the seasonal agricultural workers’ scheme that will allow low-skilled migrants to continue to come to the UK after the Brexit transition.Gale is the first Tory to raise concerns about the home secretary’s new points-based immigration system, which will come into force after the Brexit transition period ends on December 31.Patel faced criticism when it emerged that a new NHS and care visa would still exclude low-paid social care workers and hospital ancillary staff like porters and cleaners.It came amid increased focus on care and hospital workers who have played vital frontline roles during the coronavirus pandemic.According to the Office for National Statistics, almost 30,000 more care home residents died during the outbreak than during the same time period last year.Gale, who is the first Tory to speak out since Patel unveiled the rules on Monday, said he had “real concern” about the care sector because “what we actually need and rely on very heavily is imported ancillary workers”.“What concerns me is we could be left with a gaping hole in the provision of the people who do the messy jobs,” he told HuffPost UK.“Care workers in residential homes, hospital staff doing sluices and all the muck that the Brits won’t do.“It worries me that we may find ourselves, having warned about it, light of the people we need to do the jobs that have to be done.”Gale said a care workers’ immigration scheme could allow low-skilled staff to come to the UK on two-year rolling visas to fill job vacancies.Unlike fruit-pickers, they would need to speak English. They would also need to have a clean criminal record, while experts could work out exactly how many people are required, Gale suggested.He expressed doubts about ministers’ claims that British people would step up to fill gaps as foreign care workers currently in the UK return to their home countries.“There may in the short-term be quite a significant pool of unemployed labour because of Covid but that doesn’t mean they are going to do these jobs, and if they do they won’t want to do it for long,” he said.“You’re going to have to pay them a lot more and if you pay them a lot more you have got to find the money because it is not there in the care home system.“There’s a fond belief that care homes are a licence to print money, they are not, they are operating on the margins.“They pay low wages because they can’t pay any more, in most cases.”It is understood that the door has not been completely shut on care workers, with the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) currently reviewing the shortage occupation list.People coming to the UK for jobs on that list will find it easier to get a visa under Patel’s new immigration rules than they would otherwise.But Home Office sources highlighted immigration minister Kevin Foster’s defence of the new visa in the Commons.He told MPs on Monday: “We support our care workers. “Senior care workers will qualify under the new points-based system. “People will look at what has happened over the past few months and surely they will not think that our vision for the social care sector should be to carry on looking abroad to recruit at or near the minimum wage. “We need to be prioritising jobs in this country.”Foster also insisted there was unlikely to be a labour shortage next year given the mass unemployment predicted to follow the coronavirus crisis.“It is hard to believe that many will believe that there is a labour shortage,” he said.“We engage regularly with the care sector and we listen to what it says. “Our priority is that in future these jobs will be valued, rewarded and trained for, and that immigration should not be an alternative.”Related... The Government Doesn't Know How Many People Are Breaking Test And Trace Self-Isolation Rules Millions Could Be Made Jobless Due To Coronavirus, Fiscal Watchdog Says Coronavirus: Second Wave Could See 120,000 Deaths This Winter In 'Worst Case Scenario'
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Graphcore’s new 7nm GC200 IPU is the world’s most complex, with 59.4 billion transistors. | Nick Rochowski Photography Graphcore, a well-funded and ambitious British chip designer that focuses solely on AI applications, has unveiled what it says is the world’s most complex chip: the Colossus MK2 or GC200 IPU. The processor has 59.4 billion transistors and offers an eight times performance increase from the company’s Colossus MK1, says Graphcore. It boasts more than the 54 billion transistors found in Nvidia’s A100, which previously held the title as the world’s largest processor, and which the American firm announced earlier this year. The 7nm GC200 boasts 59.4 billion transistors Each GC200 chip has 1,472 independent processor cores and 8,832 separate parallel threads, all supported by 900MB of in-processor RAM. Graphcore will be making the GC200... Continue reading…
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(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Ground robots will be trained to receive demonstration commands -- instead of verbal commands -- to interpret, follow, recall and apply in similar contexts as part of a new Army research project starting this month with the University of Texas at Austin.
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We just don’t know what it’s called.
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First, they were rectangular boxes. Then they became canisters or pucks. Over the years, wireless speakers have changed their form and now Google seems to be considering yet another revolution in speaker design. Practically confirming an earlier leak, Google has apparently been sending out more or less official marketing material for what may be the successor of the Google Home … Continue reading
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The theme to Apple’s 2019 has definitely been subscription services, with the company launching a bunch of new ones like Apple News+, Apple TV+, and Apple Arcade.Now that all of these new subscriptions are out there, it may not be long before Apple looks to bundle them together.In doing so, it would be taking a page out of Amazon’s playbook, which bundles a variety of services with Prime.While Apple hasn’t announced anything official yet, Bloomberg spoke to people familiar with the company’s plans who say that it could begin bundling Apple News+, Apple Music, and Apple TV+ into one package as early as next year.There’s no word on pricing yet, but it seems like a logical next step for Apple, which may want to offer a bundle deal to tempt people into using all three services.Interestingly enough, Apple Arcade doesn’t seem to be included in Apple’s bundle, which is somewhat strange.
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Boffins say even latest chips can be twisted into leaking data between processor coresIntel is once again moving to patch its CPU microcode following the revelation of yet another data-leaking side-channel vulnerability.The same group of university boffins who helped uncover the infamous Spectre and Meltdown flaws say that a third issue, reported back in May under the name ZombieLoad, extends even further into Chipzilla's processor line than previously thought.A previously unreported ZombieLoad eavesdropping technique will work even on fully up-to-date processors that feature Intel's Transactional Synchronization Extensions (TSX) and TSX Asynchronous Abort (TAA) mechanisms – even on Meltdown and Foreshadow-resistant silicon.The crew of Michael Schwarz, Moritz Lipp, Daniel Moghimi, Jo Van Bulck, Julian Stecklina, Thomas Prescher, and Daniel Gruss will today reissue their original ZombieLoad paper to say as much."Hence, despite Intel's claims, we show that the hardware fixes in new CPUs are not sufficient."
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If you frequently make small mistakes, a unique type of meditation may help change that.According to a new study out of Michigan State University, open monitoring meditation — as opposed to mindfulness meditation — triggers neural activity changes in the brain when it comes to the signal that occurs when someone notices that a mistake has been made.Simply put, when we make a mistake and notice that mistake — such as entering the wrong number in a spreadsheet — a signal called ‘error positivity’ happens in the brain approximately half a second later.This signal is linked to the conscious recognition of the fact that a mistake happened, enabling the individual to fix the problem.Researchers selected volunteers who had no history of meditation and instructed them to spend 20 minutes in open monitoring meditation.Unlike mindfulness meditation, this version involves focusing inward on what is happening in one’s mind and body without latching onto any given thought.
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Combined with those problems, a battle between European organizations over the satellite system, and a delayed independent report into the July cock-up, means things aren’t looking good for Europe’s answer to America’s GPS system.In mid-July, the agency in charge of the network of 26 satellites, the European Global Navigation Satellite Systems Agency (EGSA), warned of a “service degradation” but assured everyone that it would quickly be resolved.It wasn’t resolved however, and six days later the system was not only still down but getting increasingly inaccurate, with satellites reporting that they were in completely different positions in orbit than they were supposed to be - a big problem for a system whose entire purpose is to provide state-of-the-art positional accuracy to within 20 centimeters.In September, it was announced that there would be an independent inquiry into what happened - largely as a result of the lack of information.That inquiry’s “preliminary recommendations” were due in October - last month.Then, earlier this week, the man in overall charge of the system, the EC’s deputy director general in charge of space and defense industries Pierre Delsaux, broke the silence at a breakfast meeting on the EU’s space policy in Washington DC no less.
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