Jeff Bautista

Jeff Bautista

Followers 63
Following 51
China
Sometimes it almost looks like the ongoing coronavirus pandemic hassle is never going to end. But we must stay optimistic, because eventually we will prevail ... The post Few more handy IR thermometers from Aliexpress appeared first on Gizchina.com.
UK
The Sony WH-1000XM4 Wireless Headphones have launched, boasting improved noise cancellation and Bluetooth 5.
US
Flapping wings instead of propellers help this bird-inspired drone hold its own against quadrotors
UK
Researchers from the University of Michigan have demonstrated that the behavior rules underpinning the Japanese art of origami could expand tiny robots’ capabilities. The researchers say that the principles hold the potential to expand these little machines’ capabilities and create the potential for greater use in a wide range of fields, from medical equipment to infrastructure sensing. Evgueni Filipov, assistant … Continue reading
US
Apple Retail taught the company a great deal concerning the future of retail, and a quiet technology acquisition shows it intends to go with the retail flow as it invests in a system that turns iPhones into POS payment systems.Apple Pay and Apple Payments While we already use Apple Pay to purchase items contact free using iPhones and Apple Watch, when it comes to taking payments most retailers rely on third-party payment systems. Square, Izito, PayPal Here, Sumup and other providers work to fill the gap – usually using some form of dongle.To read this article in full, please click here
US
(University College London) Fake audio or video content has been ranked by experts as the most worrying use of artificial intelligence in terms of its potential applications for crime or terrorism, according to a new UCL report.
US
A Chinese tech company owns TikTok, and US politicians worry that the Chinese government could use the app to spy on people and spread propaganda.
US
Image: PayPal CVS is expanding its payment options by teaming up with PayPal to use its QR codes as another touch-free form of payment at the retail pharmacy chain. PayPal and Venmo users can pay with money that’s already in their account instead of having to pay with a credit card, and Venmo users can also use Venmo Rewards to pay for items, all “without needing to touch a keypad or sign a receipt.” CVS says the new QR codes will arrive at 8,200 of its US stores in the fourth quarter of 2020. Since we’re in the middle of an ongoing pandemic, it’s not the most ideal to be touching in public, so if you don’t have tap-to-pay on your phone or simply don’t use it, it’s another way to do touch-free payment at stores. CVS says it will be the first... Continue reading…
US
A study from the University of Arizona finds that some face mask materials are more protective against COVID-19 infection than others.
US
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory (ARL) have entered into a $3.5 million cooperative agreement that supports machine learning-enabled additive manufacturing to enhance the expeditionary manufacturing capability of the Army. The funding marks the beginning of a five-year program, led by CMU's College of Engineering, with the Army awarding up to four years and totaling as much as $25 million.
US
The CEOs of Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook face a hostile House antitrust subcommittee.
US
About 25 percent of links to “low credibility” sources of coronavirus information come from bots
China
Vivo is honoring its commitment to filling the market with many 5G smartphones in all price spectrums. Now, the company is gearing up to introduce ... The post Vivo S7 official render surfaces through Chinese retailer appeared first on Gizchina.com.
US
Get that home clean feel your behind deserves, everywhere you go
UK
You'll wanna tune into this chat about SD-WAN, then Webcast  Research from Vanson Bourne found that more than half of surveyed businesses wished their SD-WAN – their software-defined wide area networking – was provided straight from their cloud vendor as opposed to a third party.…
UK
Qualcomm today announced its new fast-charging technology called the Qualcomm Quick Charging 5 (QC 5). This company claimed that this new standard will charge your 4,500mAh phone from 0 to 50% in five minutes, and to 100% in under 15 minutes. The chipmaker said that QC 5 will be available on devices with Snapdragon 865, Snapdragon 865+, and future high-end chipsets. The standard will support chargers with a power rating of more than 100W. [Read: Graphic novels are the ideal medium to get through these troubled times] Xiaomi has already committed to launching devices with QC 5. Zhang Lei, Mi Phone vice president… This story continues at The Next Web
US
(CNRS) Humans have a hard time identifying individual birds just by looking at the patterns on their plumage. An international study involving scientists form the CNRS, Université de Montpellier and the University of Porto in Portugal, among others, has shown how computers can learn to differentiate individual birds of a same species. The results are published on 27 July 2020 in Methods in Ecology and Evolution.
US
Lovecraft Country, dystopian thriller Utopia, Marvel horror series Helstrom, and more
4
UK
Kanye West has publicly apologised to Kim Kardashian West for making a series of claims about his wife and her family.In recent days, Kanye – who last month made headlines when he reiterated his intent to run for US president in 2020 – has caused concern with a number of tweets, as well as controversial comments he made at a rally of his in Charleston, South Carolina.On Wednesday, Kim called for “compassion and empathy” in a lengthy statement addressing her husband’s bipolar disorder, saying she hoped doing so could challenge the stigma around mental health.Following a difficult week for the music star, Kanye has now tweeted an apology.“I would like to apologise to my wife Kim for going public with something that was a private matter. I did not cover her like she has covered me,” he tweeted.“To Kim I want to say I know I hurt you. Please forgive me. Thank you for always being there for me.”I would like to apologize to my wife Kim for going public with something that was a private matter.I did not cover her like she has covered https://t.co/A2FwdMu0YU Kim I want to say I know I hurt you. Please forgive me. Thank you for always being there for me.— ye (@kanyewest) July 25, 2020The apology comes after Kim, the mother of Kanye’s four children, said she and her family were “powerless” to intervene and addressed his bipolar disorder publicly for the first time.She said: “He is a brilliant but complicated person who on top of the pressures of being an artist and a black man, who experienced the painful loss of his mother, and has to deal with the pressure and isolation that is heightened by his bi-polar disorder.”She added that she has not discussed his condition before because she is “very protective of our children and Kanye’s right to privacy when it comes to his health”.She added: “But today, I feel like I should comment on it because of the stigma and misconceptions about mental health.”READ MORE: 9 Ways You Can Support Someone With Bipolar Disorder Kim Kardashian Calls For Compassion And Empathy As She Addresses Husband Kanye West's Mental Health Kanye West Trudges On With Presidency Bid, Despite Rumours He'd Already Bowed Out Useful websites and helplinesMind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected] Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0300 5000 927 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.
US
Dell has said it is considering spinning off VMware next year, which raises questions on the future of the virtualization software company which is now an important player in cloud computing. Some experts explored another potential scenario: Dell selling VMware to another tech giant such as Microsoft, Amazon or Google. "VMware would be a valuable property to any company in the enterprise space with the means to execute the deal," analyst Roger Kay told Business Insider.  "What any of them gains is a competitive edge." Still, with a market cap of some $60 billion, VMware would be a hefty purchase, meaning only the deep-pocketed will likely even consider it. Here are 5 major technology players that could be interested in acquiring VMware: Click here for more BI Prime stories. Dell is considering spinning off VMware next year, raising questions on the future of a critical player in cloud computing. Dell acquired VMware in 2015 after its $67 billion merger with EMC ,giving it control of a powerhouse in virtualization software, which made it possible for businesses to tap disparate computer systems, reducing the need for hardware. VMware in particular has struck partnerships with Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud, and Microsoft – making it a secret superpower in the cloud wars. Dell announced last week that it was exploring the spinoff which it said would benefit the shareholders, partners and customers, although it is also open to maintaining its 81% ownership of the software giant. Some experts point to another scenario: VMware being acquired by another tech giant. VMware's virtualization technology made it a rising star of cloud computing, the fast-growing trend which allows businesses to set up their networks in web-based platforms, making it possible to scale down or even abandon private, on-premise data centers. VMware has become even more important in a newer trend called hybrid cloud, in which businesses maintain networks in web-based platforms, while keeping huge chunks of data and applications in private, on-premise data centers. These trends actually made VMware, an influential players in the cloud, and a valued partner for its top players: Amazon, Microsoft and Google. "The virtualization layer arbitrates whatever is below and above it," analyst Roger Kay of Endpoint Technologies Associates told Business Insider.  "VMware is the king of that. VMware would be a valuable property to any company in the enterprise space with the means to execute the deal.  What any of them gains is a competitive edge." But he also said VMware is "a pretty big fish to swallow.  So, whoever bought it would have to have a pretty big war chest." VMware has a market cap of about $57 billion. Analyst Ray Wang of Constellation Research estimated that VMware's price tag would be at least $70 billion, which means the pool of would-be buyers would be limited. These are 5 tech giants that may be interested in buying VMware if Dell decides to sell it, according to experts:SEE ALSO: Macquarie says it's betting on Microsoft, Dropbox, and 4 other stocks that are 'growing at a reasonable price' — or GARP — as market volatility sends other market caps soaring beyond their real value SEE ALSO: Microsoft, Citrix, VMware, and 4 'hot private vendors' are getting the biggest boost from the work-from-home shift due to the coronavirus crisis, according to a Wall Street analyst Microsoft Market Cap: $1.6 trillion Cash on hand: $137.6 billion Microsoft is a major player in the cloud, but it lags Amazon, which dominates that market.  Acquiring VMware — whose software is in wide use by most, if not all Fortune 500 companies — could close that gap, giving Microsoft a major lift in the cloud arena. Analyst Steve Allen of S2C Partners said Microsoft would be his "Number 1 pick" as a potential VMware buyer. He said Amazon could also make a bid, but "I pick Microsoft as #1 over Amazon #2 because Dell has a long history with Microsoft."       Amazon Market Cap: $1.6 trillion Cash on hand: $49.3 billion Amazon, undisputed market leader in cloud infrastructure, was initially seen as a key rival by VMware. But the two companies eventually became major partners. One Wall Street analyst pointed out that VMware is making it easier for businesses to set up networks on premise and in the cloud, particularly on Amazon's platform. VMware is value is "in serving as a hybrid cloud gateway to the on-premises work loads," analyst Ray Wang of Constellation Research told Business Insider.  That makes it attractive for company like Amazon, as well as for its top cloud rivals, Microsoft and Google.   Google Market Cap: $1.1 trillion Cash on hand: $117.2 billion Google occupies the Number 3 spot in the infrastructure cloud market, behind Amazon and Microsoft. Google has also become a key VMware partner. Late last year, Google even acquired a company called CloudSimple, whose technology helps make it easier for VMware customers to migrate to the cloud.  Having access to VMware's virtualization technology would help Google expand its reach in the enterprise market. That's why Wang of Constellation Research has the tech giant on his list top would-be buyers.       Oracle Market Cap:  $171.6 billion Cash on hand: $43.1 billion Oracle would certainly be a top candidate as a VMware buyer, given that it has a substantial cash position that would reduce the need to take debt to finance a hypothetical deal, says analyst Roger Kay of Endpoint Technologies Associates. Plus, Oracle is "enterprise-oriented," which will be key in making a VMware merger successful, he said. Oracle is not a major player in the infrastructure cloud market, though founder Larry Ellison has vowed to expand the software behemoth's position in that arena, which  would certainly get a boost from buying VMware.    IBM Market Cap: $112 billion Cash on hand: $12 billion Several analysts also point to IBM as a possible leading contender for VMware. Under the tech giant's new CEO Arvind Krishna, IBM is pushing to become the dominant company in hybrid cloud, which he projects will eventualy be worth $1.2 trillion market. Owning VMware would bring IBM a step closer to that goal, analysts say. But one of them, Robert Siegel, a veteran venture capital investor in Silicon Valley, also noted that the size of a VMware acquisition "would be huge, so it needs a big balance sheet." That could make it challenging for IBM, which is still digesting its $34 billion acquisition of RedHat in 2019. But Krishna has also indicated that M&A remains a critical part of its game plan.  "You should expect that over time — over time meaning just that as it gets past the next few months — we will get back to an acquisitive strategy," Krishna told analysts in April.    
US
It's the code word that will open doors, but what doors?
UK
Aimed at VFX creators working on shows it has commissioned, not the rest of us sadly Netflix has teased a desktop-as-service (DaaS) offering.…
US
Vizio's new budget soundbar system, with 5.1 audio and support for DTS Virtual:X audio, is quite the bargain.
US
Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Since its launch in 2004, Google’s Gmail email app has grown to be the most popular email service out there. While it’s gone through a lot of changes since then and has added a wide variety of features, its main goal — and main advantage — remains that it provides free online email in an easy-to-understand and use format. However, behind that clean interface is actually a plethora of features, add-ons, and possible tweaks. In The Verge Guide to Gmail, we look at the wide variety of things you can do to make Gmail fit your particular needs, such as vacation responders, templates, snoozing, signatures, and smart replies. We also help you back up your emails just in case and get those hundreds of promotional emails out of your inbox. W... Continue reading…
UK
Pipeline looks good as C-level crystal balls predict need for more tech Indian services company Infosys has said that lower-than-planned costs for visas have helped it to record better-than-expected results for the first quarter of its financial year.…
US
Hyundai previously hinted we may see the Calligraphy trim in the US, and behold, here it is.
UK
Four years ago I coughed up blood.I saw an ear, nose and throat specialist and an oncologist in Corpus Christi, Texas, who suggested that perhaps I avoid tortilla chips, as I’d probably just cut my trachea eating. No big deal. A year later I got knocked up in a flurry of Hurricane Harvey tragedy excitement, which was pretty great, until I developed a cough so violent I vomited constantly and could hardly eat, drink or gain weight.The same ENT told me that there was nothing he could do ― after all, this was “what we sign up for when we become parents” and I’d probably be fine once I had the baby.I wasn’t.I never stopped coughing. All day, all night. Fast forward nine months and I developed a pneumonia I couldn’t shake while my son struggled with the knock-on effects of what turned out to be a misdiagnosed lung cancer. I must have missed the cancer sign-up sheet.Last May, a plucky pulmonologist diagnosed me with neuroendocrine cancer of the lung ― a rare disease that he insisted was the jackpot of malignant lung cancers.“It’s hardly cancer!” he told me. “It grows so slow, it’s Cancer Lite. Definitely the lung cancer you want to get. Definitely.”Was it really? I wondered, squirming in my 1990s nausea-patterned chair. Wasn’t not getting cancer the jackpot you wanted to hit? No matter. The doctor went on.“This is nothing. You cut out the lung. Bam, you’re back to your regular life.”I couldn’t quite integrate this knowledge with the facts of my regular life: I had a 10-month-old son, a 5-year-old daughter. I was 36, a nonsmoker, an obnoxious consumer of organic green peppers who religiously held her breath when driving past the local oil refineries three miles from our home. “What are you doing, Mama?” my daughter had asked years ago with fear and disgust. “Saving the life of your unborn half-fish, half-foetus brother!” I gasped after we careened past Refinery Row.But now, there it was, a tumour the size of a small city wedged smugly in my left bronchus. Mein Klein Corpus Christi.After my diagnosis came the referral to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, a steady drip of doctors’ appointments, blood and breathing tests. Then surgery, then recovery. For me, these three years were 8% of my life. For my daughter they were 60% of her life. For my son, 100%.Between my diagnosis and my lung surgery, I had one month to recover from pneumonia, prepare myself, and prepare my children. I thought I’d have years to give my children all my stories, all my experiences. Suddenly I had 720 hours ― there was no time for the comprehensive Western canon, or the compendium of my personal misadventures. Instead, I recorded myself reading Matilda and Pippi Longstocking. I played 99 Luftballoons on repeat while my daughter and I danced in the kitchen, again and again and again. I filmed myself singing my son to sleep in our ugly brown armchair ― to market, to market to buy a fat pig ― smiling at him snuggled in his carrier while we walked up and down the street and he laughed at the wind on his cheeks ― home again, home again, jiggity jig. All this would remain if I did not.My husband said I needed to get stronger, so I started running again. Down the street from my house, past the big Baptist church and over Ocean Drive. It hurt. I’d cough, my tumour pressing too hard into my bronchus, and my lungs would spasm. I’d keep going. At the top of the hill leading down to the hotels, I’d see myself scooping up my son in one arm and my daughter in the other. I would look out over our few skyscrapers and feel myself sprinting over their rooftops, my children warm and safe in my arms as we left this city, this sickness behind us. I will save you. I will carry you as far as I can go, and then a little farther.Between my diagnosis and lung surgery, I had one month to recover from pneumonia, prepare myself, and prepare my children. I thought I’d have years to give my children all my stories, all my experiences. Suddenly I had 720 hours ― there was no time for the comprehensive Western canon, or the compendium of my personal misadventures.On the morning of my lung surgery I was at my parents’ sprawling one-story house in the suburbs of Houston. It was 5am. I’d slept maybe two hours. The house was dark and seemed uninhabited, framed somehow. The blue and brown tile floors, the beige walls: here was a house where people lived, and now I was leaving it to go, well, elsewhere. My body would be on a table at MD Anderson, my lungs in the hands of my surgeon, but my mind, my soul that had, up until this point, been solely the province of my husband and my children ― where was that going? I felt tentative, apart, as if wires had been stuck through my arms and legs. I didn’t know whether this was fear or something different, something prior or adjacent to life.I gently opened my sister’s door to kiss her goodbye. My daughter was snoring next to her, her body small under the pea green cover, her bangs crooked and perfect in a way I couldn’t focus on if I was going to be able to leave her. She looked so unprotected, so alone. Was she hot or cold? Did she need another cover, or should I take this one off?I kissed my sister’s sweaty forehead and she stirred to hug me. I kept looking at my daughter. Her body, not mine; her body, not mine. She would stay here. I would go away. The wires in my arms started to sting and I walked out of the room. I hadn’t kissed my daughter. I hadn’t touched her ― I couldn’t.My son slept in the guest room next to my sister’s. The door was shut. I paused in the dark hallway, scrunched my toes on the faded maroon rug. Again my arms ached, and again I walked away.When they wheeled me off to surgery the last thing I said to my husband was to kiss the kids for me, every day, please. People started pushing me away from my husband, away from my children. “Please,” I whispered, “I didn’t kiss them goodbye.”If I didn’t make it out of surgery, who could ever love my children as I had? The world that I had found so strange, so beautiful — who would guide them through it? Who would hold their hands?I don’t remember waking up, but I do remember a figure next to me gently laughing and patting my hand, “She’s fine. She’s on her way here.” My daughter — I was asking if my daughter was okay. My logic was frantic, groping, inverted: if my daughter was okay, then I must be alive. I must have survived.Things got grim after surgery. Breathing, walking, sleeping ― it all hurt, like knives in my lungs, like a rusted birdcage in my chest, like a hunter inside me I could not escape. For two months I couldn’t lift more than 10 pounds; I couldn’t hold my son. I became completely separate from my children. Were they fed? Clothed? Loved? I didn’t know; I didn’t consider these things.My daughter wouldn’t sleep, she put gum in her cousin’s hair, emptied out all the toothpaste. My son stopped eating. He would cry and he would whimper but he wouldn’t eat. At one point I stumbled out of my bedroom into the kitchen where my mom was holding my son, trying anything to get him to take one bite of food. I walked over and put the spoon of watery baby oatmeal in his mouth. He ate it, then another, then another. I fumed at my mother for doing it wrong. Couldn’t any of these people just feed a baby? Couldn’t they do it just like me?My son twisted his torso toward me, reached out his arms. I can’t take you, I can’t hold you. I closed my eyes and walked back into my bedroom.My body had been their home, and now even I could hardly live there.Two weeks after my surgery, a tender-hearted friend dropped my son. I was sitting nearby and managed to catch him just before his head hit the floor. I sobbed so hard after that I was sure my chest tube wound would split. It didn’t.As long as I was sick, my children couldn’t be healthy ― it was that simple. My son learned not to reach for me, my daughter learned how to make her own toast ― these things, these small things, were my kids getting ready for a world without me? That little girl snoring under the pea green comforter, could I go back to her? Cut all this out, fold the olive ribbon of time back together and go home to the little girl who had been good, the little girl who had been mine?I found a video on my phone from a month after my surgery. My daughter and I are at the beach, and it’s an ugly beach ― grimy sand, murky water, oil rigs dotting the distant sandbars. My daughter is skipping around the camera, around me. She’s wearing a bright blue shirt with a picture of a cherry red schoolhouse, and her hair is braided. Two little French plaits tightly wound at the top of her head and then frizzing out marvellously below. The waves crash around her small bare feet. A crane stands still on a cement wall just past us. My daughter darts a few feet ahead and shouts, “Wind and seashells ... today!” She jumps briefly into the waves, then out, then cocks her head to a horizon I’m not looking at and smiles. Just barely. A smile only a mother would see.She was going to be okay. I was going to be her mother again. In fits and starts and slowly now, I could come back to her as I came back to my own life.Two months later I could hold my son again. He learned to turn back my way when he was hungry or tired or scared. He would crawl and then walk toward me, his mother.Precedent tells me I’m now supposed to say we found joy. We found meaning. We found a sublime sort of redemption in the ugliness and pain of it all. But that isn’t at all what happened, or what continues to happen. We just made it, that’s all. We plodded through time, or time plodded through us. One day followed another, soon those days stacked up to weeks, and those weeks to months.Now my son runs, now my daughter poorly attempts to do basic math that is staggeringly boring. Life. It goes on whether or not I rejoice, whether or not I can rediscover the facile pleasure of complaining without sensing the distant heavy thud of a scythe or whatever it is death now wields (Reopening orders? A ventilator?).It’s been a year since my surgery. While there are treatments for neuroendocrine cancer, there’s still no cure for it. Should the cancer cells that spread to my lymphovascular system decide to organise elsewhere, I’ll undergo another surgery, shedding bits of myself like little unwanted Horcruxes. For now, the doctors watch my lungs, and I reassemble the pick-up sticks of my life.As long as I was sick, my children couldn’t be healthy ― it was that simple.When I came back from Houston after my last CT scan in January, I took my kids to the mall, my daughter’s favorite place. I used to find trips to the mall synonymous with existential dread, and they certainly still are, but this time, somewhere between the Sbarro pizza and the bathrooms, the dread was mixed with a bewildering ecstasy.I picked my son up out of his stroller and held my daughter’s hand. I squeezed them both. None of us made a sound as we stood together amid the ebb and flow of the pizza line that we, a small band of survivors, could watch from a new distance, a further orbit. We had brushed an edge, an unholy terror, and now we were somehow apart from the people all around us who didn’t know how lucky we were just to touch each other.I wanted to say all this to my son and daughter, to tell them that I am still your mother, and even though we carry this cancer with us, and even though I know you’re scarred where no one else can see, I’m still yours. I’m still here. I have carried you over the rooftops, I have folded up the ribbon of time, and now we are back together.But I didn’t say anything. I picked my daughter up, balancing her on the hip opposite my son. A bird squeaked above us. “Buh, buh,” my son babbled. “Bird!” my daughter shouted. “Bird!” We all tilted our heads upward and watched as a sparrow flitted across the steel beams of the Sbarro. I squeezed them both, held their small bodies close to mine.“Yes, that’s a bird,” I said. I closed my eyes and breathed in as deeply as I could.The grassy smell of my children’s hair, the doughy warmth of their arms and legs, the stench of cheese, a bird chirping in the mall rafters: jackpot. On the far shore of sickness, home.Sarah McClung is a writer recovering from cancer while raising her two small children. This article first appeared on HuffPost Personal.Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal This Is What It’s Like To Be A Paramedic On The Coronavirus Frontline As A Mum In Lockdown, My Social Life Has Never Been Better. What Happens Now? I Knew Miscarriage Was Lonely. Then I Lost My Pregnancy In Lockdown
US
Researchers discovered a feline skeleton along the Silk Road that suggests humans had cared for it.
US
The Compass app comes pre-installed on every new iPhone, and can help you figure out your direction and elevation.Though not always accurate, the iPhone's Compass app can come in handy when you want to make sure you're on the right path.The Compass app comes built-in on every new iPhone, and it's helpful when you want to make sure you're going in the right direction.Here's how to launch the app, calibrate it, and use it to find your way.Check out the products mentioned in this article:iPhone 11 (From $699.99 at Best Buy)
More

Top