Jeffrey Baldwin

Jeffrey Baldwin

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Following 39
UK
An algorithm used to calculate exam results in England risks unfairly punishing poorer pupils, politicians have warned. The system was introduced when school exams were cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Teachers were instead asked to hand over their predicted grades for each student to exam regulators. The algorithm then adjusts their estimates by comparing them to the school‘s past results. The approach aims to moderate teacher predictions that are overly generous. But critics fear that basing results on a school‘s past performance rather than a student’s work will unfairly penalise children from disadvantaged backgrounds. In Scotland, a similar system downgraded… This story continues at The Next Web
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FCC tentatively approves 14¢-per-minute limit but only for interstate calls.
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(Tokyo Institute of Technology) Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report that anthropogenic sources of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), not just oceanic sources, account for much of the missing source of OCS in the atmosphere. Their findings provide better context for estimates of global photosynthesis (taking up CO2) using OCS dynamics.
UK
Audi is adding a new, more affordable trim to its all-electric 2021 e-tron SUV, bringing down the cost of entry while also bumping up the range over the previous year. The electric luxury SUV is being joined in dealerships by the new 2021 Audi e-tron Sportback, a more stylish version with a swooping roofline. Until now, the cheapest way to … Continue reading
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The 27-inch BenQ 1080p monitor is a great device that makes it easier to tackle all your work and study.
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There are many ways that you can upgrade your Windows 7 PC to Windows 10 and keep your PC safe and sound.
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Hello and welcome to Trending, Business Insider's weekly look at the world of tech. I'm Matt Weinberger, deputy tech editor out of our San Francisco bureau, filling in for Alexei Oreskovic while he's on vacation. If you want to get Trending in your inbox every Wednesday, just click here. The clock goes tick-tock for TikTok Hello, and welcome to Trending, the Business Insider tech newsletter. As you may have already noticed, I'm not Alexei Oreskovic, your usual host — I'm Matt Weinberger, deputy tech editor out of our San Francisco bureau, filling in for Alexei while he takes some well-deserved time off.  In my day job, I oversee our enterprise tech coverage, which encompasses cloud computing, artificial intelligence, open source software, and productivity (shameless plug: you can read all about it on Hyperscale, my enterprise tech newsletter, which publishes via LinkedIn on Fridays). So imagine my surprise when Microsoft — the single largest company in the enterprise sector — suddenly and unexpectedly found itself inserted into the saga of Chinese-owned TikTok, the hottest consumer app in who knows how many years. As you've probably heard by now, Microsoft is in talks to buy up TikTok, or at least its American operations, in a deal likely to be worth many billions of dollars. Microsoft has said that it expects those talks to be completed, one way or the other, by September 15th. President Donald Trump has upped the pressure by saying that he intends to ban TikTok in the United States entirely if the app isn't owned by an American company by that date (and that the US should get a cut of the sale, which is generally not how that works). A brief Q&A on Microsoft/TikTok I won't pretend to be an expert in international trade or China relations, but I am pretty familiar with Microsoft and how it operates. While nothing is set in stone and another buyer could swoop in, Microsoft seems like the most likely buyer, not least because it has the cash to spare and because it's so far avoided the worst of the antitrust scrutiny that rivals like Google and Facebook now find themselves under.  Therefore, I've taken the liberty of throwing together a quick FAQ on what Microsoft might be thinking: Q: This is a weird deal, right? A: On the face of it, it's super weird. But, if you dig a little bit deeper — well, it's still super weird, but starts to make a little bit more sense.  Q: Isn't Microsoft all about cloud computing and Microsoft Teams and all that kind of thing these days? A: Sure is. Under CEO Satya Nadella, Microsoft has seen a tremendous bull run, thanks almost entirely to its focus on products like the Azure cloud platform and Office 365 productivity suite. In fact, Microsoft recently shuttered most of the Microsoft retail stores and the Mixer live-streaming service, a rival to Amazon's Twitch, in a move to make sure the company stayed on target. The Xbox game console is Microsoft's last major consumer brand. Q: So where does TikTok fit into that master plan? A: Honestly, it probably doesn't.  Q: Wait, but... A: The best and most educated guesses hold that Microsoft sees TikTok as a once-in-a-lifetime chance to win over an entire generation of fans. With an estimated 100 million mostly-younger daily active users, TikTok has a built-in audience, and the pressure from the White House to sell is expected to give Microsoft an edge in negotiations. Plus, it could be Microsoft's chance to wind the clock back and get another chance to take on Facebook and Google in online advertising. Otherwise, we'll have to wait and see. Q: So will it work? A: Great question. Nadella has largely earned the benefit of the doubt — his signature acquisitions of LinkedIn, GitHub, and "Minecraft" maker Mojang have all been very successful, and established a trend towards allowing big-money acquisitions to retain a level of independence previously thought unthinkable in the industry. But on the other hand...I already mentioned that Microsoft just shut down Mixer, right? Q: Last question: Doesn't it set a bizarre precedent for Silicon Valley in particular and American capitalism as a whole for a sitting president to get so involved in the affairs of a private company like Microsoft?  A: Great question! You're very good at asking smart questions. Keep it up. But it looks like we've run a bit long, so let's put a pin in this for now. But feel free to keep asking those sharp, sharp questions! So how did the Big Tech hearing go? The sudden news of a potential Microsoft and TikTok tie-up was only the capstone on a week that was already incredibly busy.  On Wednesday, Apple CEO Tim Cook, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and Google CEO Sundar Pichai all testified before Congress on allegations of anticompetitive behavior. As expected, there was plenty of grandstanding, but there was also some substance there. As Business Insider's Linette Lopez writes, the execs were forced to testify under oath about allegations about Amazon's use of third-party seller data, or Facebook's history of spying on the competition.  More interesting than the hearing, however, were the internal emails released by the House Judiciary Committee as part of its investigation. With the release of documents, we got a rare insight into how these tech giants do business: Everything from an email from Jeff Bezos on the $1 billion purchase of smart doorbell company Ring, to a missive from late Apple cofounder Steve Jobs recommending the company "cut off" a developer.  As Business Insider's Becky Peterson reports, the big takeaway is that in several cases, these mega-companies bought up startups not because they wanted their technology — which they often seemed to find lacking — but because they wanted to buy their way into a market. Either way, the real capstone on the hearing came a day letter, when all four of those companies simultaneously announced their quarterly earnings on Thursday. The big earnings bonanza Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook all blew away their earnings reports late last week, with the stocks surging in after-hours trading.  It wasn't entirely a clean victory for all of them, however: Amazon reported a slight miss on Amazon Web Services cloud revenue, booking $10.81 billion in sales for the quarter, versus the $11.01 billion Wall Street was looking for, demonstrating slower growth than expected. Google parent company Alphabet, meanwhile, showed its first quarterly decline in revenues for the first time ever since it went public. None of this is especially surprising, given the increased reliance on services from all four companies in a stay-at-home, work-remotely kind of world. But it's a funny sort of synchronicity that all four were able to take such a victory lap just a day after being raked over the coals by lawmakers over their size and influence. Congress may be able to shame you, but it's Wall Street that pays you. Lightning round Well, that's enough out of me. Before I give up this virtual podium and turn it back over to Alexei, here are a few various other recent highlights from the Business Insider tech team: Apple will start making its own chips to enable iPhone apps to run on future Mac computers. But developers say pulling that off may not be so easy. The president of cybersecurity giant RSA explains how its $2.1 billion breakup deal with Dell will return it to its 'scrappy' startup days: 'How often do you get to do that as a 38-year-old company?' Radish wants you to binge-read romance novels, and now it has a fresh $63.2 million to pay its soap opera writers to get you hooked Sheila Bair oversaw nearly 400 bank closures during the last financial crisis. She told us her worst fear about the coronavirus crisis and explained what regulators are getting wrong this time. These two VCs were hobby Bitcoin miners a decade ago, and now they've raised $110 million for a second fund focused on cryptocurrencies and blockchain startups Thanks for reading, and if you like this newsletter, tell your friends and colleagues they can sign up here to receive it.  — MattJoin the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
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Ford announced on Tuesday that CEO Jim Hackett will retire October 1 and be replaced by current COO Jim Farley. Ford remains a family business, overseen by Bill Ford, the company's chairman and great-grandson of founder Henry Ford. The carmaker's share price has been in decline for years, through three different CEOs. The Ford family still controls the company — and relies on the stock. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. When Jim Hackett announced his retirement as CEO for Ford after a tough three years of restructuring, the first voice on a conference call with the media was that of Bill Ford. "I thank him for his brave leadership and his friendship," Ford said of Hackett.  The chairman of the automaker's board of directors served as CEO from 2001 to 2006, before stepping down to let former Boeing exec Alan Mulally steer Ford through the Great Recession. But 14 years and three CEOs later, Henry Ford's great-grandson commands a leading role in what is still very much a family business.  On the call, Bill Ford praised Hackett, whom the board elevated to CEO in 2017, after Mulally's successor, Mark Fields, failed to deliver on profit forecasts to Wall Street. But the 117-year-old company's stock continued to slide under Hackett, dropping 40% since 2017.  That puts Bill Ford in a tricky spot. Thanks to a special class of "super" shares, Henry Ford's descendants control 40% of the company — and they need their stake to perform well. Ford suspended its dividend earlier this year, as the coronavirus pandemic ravaged its US and European operations. The company has a fortress balance sheet with $39 in total liquidity, but has borrowed billions to brace for the COVID-19 shutdown. CFO Tim Stone said much of those credit lines would be repaid and that Ford expects to return to profitability in the third quarter. But the carmaker's market performance had been disappointing, even before the pandemic struck, despite a run of positive bottom-line years since the 2009 downturn. It hasn't been lost on Bill Ford, either, that Tesla's $266 billion market cap is ten times higher than Ford's, despite selling roughly 250,000 cars in 2019, compared to Ford's 5.4 million. Bill Ford wants a different future for his family's 117-year-old business Bill Ford has long been a forward-thinking leader, articulating a future for his family's company that stresses environmental stewardship and high-tech, urban-focused, connected mobility over simply building more F-150 pickup trucks. But the F-150s, with their juicy profit margins and history as America's best-selling vehicle, literally pay the bills. Ford's North American business makes up for struggles in Europe and South America, as well as a late start in China relative to competitors such as VW and GM. When Hackett, now 65, became CEO, the view in the industry was that his primary mission was to articulate Bull Ford's vision, which made sense as he had been overseeing Ford's "smart mobility" initiatives after a stint on the board. Two other executives, Joe Hinrichs and Farley, would manage the actual car business.  But Bill Ford remained very much in the picture, more so than he had been when Mulally was in charge, and even later when Fields became CEO. He made it clear on Tuesday that in Farley, Ford had committed to an industry veteran after taking a chance on an offbeat outsider who had run furniture maker Steelcase and had gotten involved with Silicon Valley through investments in influential California design firm IDEO. "My closest ally in this was Bill Ford," Hackett told Business Insider in an interview several weeks ago. "I've gotten to test ideas with him constantly. He and I would talk three or four times a day. The other day, he said, 'It's a better company since you've been here.' You could have knocked me over with a feather." Farley, who came to Ford from Toyota in 2007, was being tracked for the CEO job at least since the beginning of the year, when Hinrichs abruptly left the carmaker, clarifying the succession plan. Farley is a noted gearhead who likes to work on his own cars and frequents race tracks, but he's also known as a marketing maven. And with Ford in the middle of rolling out critical products including a new F-150, the revived Bronco SUV, and a marquee electric vehicle in the new Mustang Mach-E, the chairman's view could be that the time for talking up the future is over — and that the company needs to core business to do its job. That doesn't mean Ford can forget about the transformation of the auto industry that's now underway. But it could mean that in the next year or two, we'll be hearing a lot more about that from the man whose name is still on the building.FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How the Ford GT was aerodynamically designed
China
Following the Huawei Mate 40, a similar leak occurred for the bigger version of the flagship family – the Mate 40 Pro. The photos demonstrate ... The post Huawei Mate 40 Pro renders reveal the complete design of the smartphone appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Won't degrade. Won't catch fire. Will be a fine fit for electric vehicles South Korean battery-maker SK Innovation will team up with 2019 Nobel Prize-winner John Goodenough to develop a new solid-state gel battery.…
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Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge Qualcomm’s Q3 earnings report might indicate a delay for Apple’s upcoming 5G iPhones, with the company highlighting a “partial impact from the delay of a global 5G flagship phone launch” for its fourth quarter projections (which covers July, August, and September earnings). Looking at the calendar of upcoming phone releases, it’s hard to imagine that Qualcomm is talking about any device other than the upcoming 5G iPhones, which are expected to arrive this fall. Typically, Apple releases its new iPhone in September, and it’s one of the few upcoming devices that would sell in large enough numbers that Qualcomm might need to disclose the material impact on an earnings call. There are already rumors circulating of delays for Apple’s 5G... Continue reading…
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The country is concerned about privacy and security for another 275 apps.
UK
You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.Masking the problem?Oh, the irony. Boris Johnson, who famously described women wearing burkas as looking like “bank robbers”, is from Friday legally requiring the public to wear face coverings in shops. On Thursday, as he toured Scotland, the PM himself was sporting a black mask that made him look like an albino Dick Turpin.And in a double irony, the mass face mask wearing that will be compulsory in shops, cafes and supermarkets is not an act of ‘stand-and-deliver’ plunder but of self-interested selflessness. The science suggests that covering up does not protect you much from others who have coronavirus, but it does protect others if you unwittingly have the disease.‌The new practice (well, new to England) is in many ways the pandemic-induced version of the Golden Rule that has powered moral codes and religions for centuries. As the second commandment lyrically put it, do unto others as you would have them do unto you.Way back on March 3, when the ‘Three Amigos’ No.10 press conferences of Johnson, Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance first began, it was the chief medical officer who predicted: “The response of the British public to disasters and emergencies is extraordinary outbreaks of altruism.” But even though South Koreans and Japanese had long worn masks, that particular altruism wasn’t encouraged by Whitty or the government early in the covid wars.As we all get used to the new facial fashions (just as every other country apart from the US seems to be doing with little fuss) there’s even a hope that they could help stop the spread of flu this coming winter. One obvious benefit is that they will very visibly remind the public that despite ‘unlockdown’, this virus is lurking invisibly. At a stroke, they will do more to ram home the need for caution than No.10’s lame ‘Stay Alert’ slogan, a line that few can remember.Of course, the real defence against a second spike, or at least means of squeezing a second spike, is not a multicoloured mask. It is the NHS Test and Trace system. And today there was finally some good news from its chief Dido Harding, as the percentage of people testing positive for Covid and being reached by the system hit 79.7%. Among their contacts, 77.9% were reached. That’s just shy of the magic 80% Sage says is needed to make the whole thing viable.There was some bad news for the PM too though, or at least his target of turning round most tests within 24 hours by the end of June. The numbers on that went backwards for the second week in a row, with just 71.4% of ‘in-person’ tests completed within the timeframe. Still, the numbers for results returned “by the end of the next day” are better, and Harding clearly believes that’s what matters most.Like many businesspeople, Harding is a big believer in the “incremental gains” philosophy that saw Sir Dave Brailsford turn British cyclists into Olympic giants. If you disregard Johnson’s own target, she can claim some success in slowly improving the test and trace system to get it to a place where we can all trust it will snuff out the disease in local outbreaks. Combined with local public health knowledge, maybe the dire 50% contact rates in places like Blackburn can be improved, and not so incrementally.‌There was another major shift in emphasis today on testing, however. Although no one in government will say it explicitly, the home testing kits are quietly being killed off. These whizzo swabs (whose posting out helped Matt Hancock his 100k a day target met, but also got him into trouble with the statistics authority) just can’t be reliably turned around within 24 hours (that’s why they were never in the PM’s target). They will still be used to provide negative tests for people waiting for hospital operations, but as a positive indicator of covid their use will wither on the vine.Few will lament the home kit’s demise. And the other shift today was the announcement that there will be at least 200 more walk-in test centres, massively expanding the 15 at present, by the end of October. The ‘ambition’ (not a target, don’t be silly) is to ensure everyone in an urban area will be just 30 minutes’ walk away from a test. In rural areas, everyone will be a 30 minute drive away from a test.Crucially, these testing centres can turn round results far faster than home kits. They can also help with translation for people with English as a second language and give access to the poorest who don’t have a car.As I pointed out earlier this week, having blundered early on in key areas the real test for the government is whether it can learn from its mistakes as it goes along through this pandemic. The one big new mistake could however be the withdrawal of furlough in September. Will the Treasury finally change course on that too, allowing targeted sectors to keep getting the money, if there’s a swift spike in unemployment?‌If not, Rishi Sunak and Boris Johnson could both be portrayed not as bank robbers, but as the nation’s job robbers in chief - just as we brace for that second wave. There’ll be no point going into the shops, mask or no mask, if those people have no wages to spend.Quote Of The Day“Considerable gaps remain in the most difficult areas, that is, the so-called level playing field and on fisheries.”David Frost, UK negotiator on a new EU trade dealThursday Cheat SheetBoris Johnson sparked fury from Nicola Sturgeon when he claimed that an independent Scotland would not have had the financial muscle to stop coronavirus causing an economic “disaster”. The “sheer might” of the UK union had been proven, he said on a visit that avoided the general Scottish public.Public Health England published full guidance on wearing face coverings in shops, less than 12 hours before the new rules come into force. It will be compulsory to wear one in cafes like Pret A Manger when buying food and drink to takeaway. But if you sit down and eat/drink you can remove the mask.The UK and EU have both said they still remain some way off reaching a post-Brexit trade agreement, following the latest negotiations in London.Howard Beckett, one of Keir Starmer’s most vociferous critics, was confirmed as having lost to Steve Turner for the crucial endorsement of the United Left faction of Unite the union.Gavin Williamson is facing calls to provide extra funding for school cleaning after a new Unison survey suggested heads were struggling to make premises Covid-secure for pupils ahead of reopening in September.What I’m ReadingWhat Happens If Trump Refuses To Concede Defeat? - New YorkerGot A Tip?Send tips, stories, quotes, pics, plugs or gossip to [email protected] Subscribe To Commons PeopleFor our final Commons People before the summer break we are joined by Tom Tugendhat, the chairman of the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee. Hear us chinwag through the ISC report, Russia, China and Starmer and Johnson’s pandemic record.Tugendhat has some stern words for MI5 too, saying its failure to proactively tackle the Russian threat to UK elections risks undermining its key role “defending the realm”. Click HERE to listen on audioboom or below for iTunes. Search for Commons People wherever you listen to podcasts and subscribe.Related... People Who Identify As Right-Wing Less Likely To Wear Face Masks, Study Finds This Is Where You Have To Wear A Face Mask In England From July 24 Our Face Masks Say Who We Are: 'When I Wear Mine, I Feel Seen'
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These cans might seem like a laugh, but the performance they deliver is anything but a joke.
UK
No Man's Sky (2018) turned from train-wreck to transcendental experience in the course of four busy years.
UK
Vivo‘s launching its ambitious X50 pro smartphone with a gimbal-supported camera today in India. While the company’s pushing the camera to be the centerpiece of the show, the build and design of the phone are charming. I’ve been using the device for less than two days, and it has left a good impression in a lot of areas, including the camera. Before I talk about all that, let’s look at the specifications of the device: Specifications: Screen: 6.56-inch full HD screen with a 90Hz refresh rate Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 765G RAM: 8GB Rear camera: 48-megapixel gimbal-supported main sensor + 8-megapixel super-wide-angle sensor (120-degree field of… This story continues at The Next Web
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Illustration: Alex Castro / The Verge Google Play Pass, Google’s subscription service that gives you access to hundreds of Android games and apps with no ads or in-app purchases, is rolling out to nine new countries this week, the company announced today. The service has only been available in the US since it launched in September, but it will soon be available to Android users in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, New Zealand, Spain, and the UK. Google is also rolling out a new annual subscription option for Play Pass that gives you a nice discount if you opt to pay for 12 months up front. Play Pass typically costs $4.99 per month, but the new annual subscription will cost $29.99 in the US. That price also undercuts Apple Arcade, an app subscription service... Continue reading…
UK
Microsoft Flight Simulator had its official launch date revealed this morning alongside details about an Xbox Game Pass for PC (Beta). This game will be released in a basic iteration called “The Microsoft Flight Simulator Standard Edition” for approximately $60 USD. That first edition will include 20 “highly detailed planes” with 30 airports and a set of unique flight models. … Continue reading
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Masvidal finally gets his title fight against Usman at UFC 251.
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(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA used satellite data to create an animation of Fay's development and progression over the past few days, showing how the storm organized into a tropical storm. Additionally, NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to find the location of the strongest storms in Tropical Storm Fay occurring in the northeastern quadrant of the storm, mostly over the Atlantic Ocean.
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An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Laboratory of Nanomaterials at the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) have rationally designed a novel p-type flexible transparent conductor using single-walled carbon nanotubes.This opens new avenues for its applications in next generation opto-electronics and energy technologies.The results of the study were published in the prestigious international journal Nano Energy.Most of the optical and electronic devices encountered daily are constituted of transparent conductors.However, all the presently available transparent conductors are n-type semiconductors, thus restricting technological advancement.Its further development will be tremendously instrumental for various opto-electronics and energy technologies.
Sweden
”Det är inte som på Tessin, där bankerna har högre prioritet på sina lån” säger vd:n Erik Englund.På nystartade Co-Properties erbjuds användarna att investera i andelar i semesterhus i utlandet.”Vi vill hjälpa småsparare att bygga en fastighetsportfölj”, säger Erik Englund, vd och medgrundare på Co-Properties.I oktober registrerades bolaget som finansiellt institut av finansinspektionen.Dessa används i sin tur för att förvärva specifika bostadsobjekt.Det är inte som på exempelvis Tessin, där bankerna har högre prioritet på sina lån.
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While the cost of a premium coffee machine is quite high, Amazon sweetens up some deals on two DeLonghi coffee and espresso machines that lets you in on up to $108 in savings.The DeLonghi BCO430BM is a one-stop-shop for anyone who can’t decide if they want a shot of espresso, a cup of coffee, or a creamy cappuccino.Its near-perfect 4.5-star rating in our review barely comes as a surprise for a machine that does it all quite impressively with a push of a button.It even made it to our list of the best espresso machines of 2019.It does have a lot of tricks under the hood that guarantees a robust coffee experience every time and an intuitive operation.Both coffee and water reservoirs are accessible from the front which makes it easy for you to load what you need without having to move or go around this bulk of a machine.
Sweden
Quixel was founded in 2011 in Uppsala by Teddy Bergsman and Waqar Azim.The use of an in-house developed scanning technology that is able to make copies of, for example, the landscape – from the smallest blade of grass to the largest mountain.the service is used mainly in the game industry and the film and television industry, where its technology is among the factors that have contributed to the recent animated version of the jungle Book.a Company with more than 100 employees, has since its inception brought in 38 million in venture capital funding from, among others, GP Bullhound, and the Lundinfamiljens investment company Back In the Black.But for now, it is clear that the speljätten Epic Games ' acquisition of the English startupbolaget.We believe in the same future, Epic Games, and this will accelerate our vision is that the to scan the entire world and make all the material available to any creator,” said Quixels, ceo and co-founder of the Teddy Bergsman for Di-Update.
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This was certainly the case with Tesla's Gigafactory 2 in Buffalo, New York, which was heavily incentivized by Governor Andrew Cuomo and then sat more or less idle while Tesla went through its Model 3 production woes.Tesla's Gigafactory 2 was a part of Governor Cuomo's plan to revitalize the manufacturing industry in upstate New York, and all told, the Empire State sunk nearly $1 billion into building and outfitting it.It essentially means that the state is saying that the value of that property and the equipment in it is now worth $884 million less than it initially believed.Instead, it's owned by a nonprofit entity called Fort Schuyler Management Corp., which is run by officials from the State University of New York Polytechnic (SUNY Poly) university and other New York state agencies.The Fort Schuyler group has asserted that the write-downs were merely technical adjustments to the books and not to be taken at face value.By that, he means that when Tesla made its deal with the group -- and by extension, the state -- it agreed to meet several conditions related to employment and investment in the community.
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Segway-Ninebot introduced Tuesday an electric dirt bike that marks the company’s expansion into the powersports market.The Chinese scooter company launched two versions of its new “Dirt eBike” at the automotive specialty products show SEMA in Las Vegas.Segway’s first foray into powersports products combines aspects of a mountain bike with the get-up-and-go of a dirt bike.These days, Segway is known for its micromobility products, namely scooters.For instance, Segwey unveiled in January the Model Max scooter, a more robust product designed to help shared-scooter services like Bird and Lime reduce operating and maintenance costs.The company wants to offer a range of mobility devices that combine software, robotics and its patent-protected Segway self-balancing technology.
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As worries about a US or even global recession have emerged over the past 12-18 months, Wall Street analysts economic pundits, and fretful economists have been looking for data that might suggest a downturn is coming.The S index is up 15% year-to-date, after enduring a swoon earlier in 2019.The stock market isn't the economy, but as a proxy for economic confidence, is pointing in a positive direction.After cratering in the US following the financial crisis, auto sales have run at record levels for the past four years.It was looking like 2019 might finally see a retreat below the 17-million mark.That hasn't made the auto market any less attractive for recession prophets.
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Artificial intelligence is likely to change how every job is performed, eliminating work related to repetitive tasks but increasing the need for creative thinkers, according to a new study.These findings are contained in a report released this week by the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab called “The Future of Work: How New Technologies Are Transforming Tasks.” The study found signs that AI is beginning to slowly redefine the nature of tasks performed in certain jobs as automation gains ground.“As new technologies continue to scale within businesses and across industries, it is our responsibility as innovators to understand not only the business process implications, but also the societal impact,” said Martin Fleming, vice president and chief economist of IBM, in a statement.“To that end, this empirical research from the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab sheds new light on how tasks are reorganizing between people and machines as a result of AI and new technologies.”With the rise of AI and automation, there has been growing debate and anxiety about how these trends will disrupt current job markets.While some have argued AI and automation will be job killers, others have said the emerging technology will be a net creator of new jobs.
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