Jerry Turk

Jerry Turk

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On 20 May, Mylab Discovery Solutions announced that it has received approval from ICMR for a self-use rapid antigen test for Covid-19, CoviSelf
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Photo by EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images Darnella Frazier — the teen who used her smartphone to film the video of George Floyd’s murder in May 2020 that sparked a wave of Black Lives Matter protests worldwide, which culminated in the murder conviction of former police officer Derek Chauvin — will receive a special citation from the Pulitzer Board. Frazier was given the citation for “courageously recording the murder of George Floyd, a video that spurred protests against police brutality around the world, highlighting the crucial role of citizens in journalists’ quest for truth and justice,” the Pulitzer Board said (PDF). Frazier’s video, which was viewed by millions, ignited one of the biggest protest movements in American history and demonstrated how a smartphone with a... Continue reading…
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The new round brings the total funds raised by Licious to US$160 million.
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Burnt skin, dehydration, and end-of-day exhaustion – the same things happen during every heatwave in Britain, no matter how many times we’re told to do the opposite. The thing is, blistering hot weather doesn’t come around often in the UK – so when it does, Brits feel the need to enjoy every single second of it, before the inevitable return of the rain leaves us stuck indoors again.Considering there’s likely to be a mini heatwave starting this weekend – with highs of around 30°C in places like London – we’ve rounded up some of the mistakes Brits tend to make, and what they should be doing instead. Not putting suncream on (obviously)We can’t say these three things enough: as the song goes, wear sunscreen. You can burn even through cloud, and you should apply it throughout the day. Claire Knight, Cancer Research UK’s senior health information manager, says confusion and myths about sun safety put people at risk of skin damage.“The sun isn’t only strong abroad,” she explains. “It can be strong enough to cause damage in the UK from the start of April to the end of September.” Getting sunburnt just once every two years triples the risk of melanoma, a potentially deadly form of skin cancer. You should regularly and generously apply sun cream with at least SPF 15 and 4 or more stars, even when it’s cloudy – and remember to do your eyelids too, as they’re easy to miss out.Spreading suncream too thinlyEven if you’re using a high SPF, you could be leaving your skin vulnerable to sun damage because you’re applying sun cream too thinly. A 2019 study by King’s College London found when applied in the typical way, SPF 50 suncream provides just 40% of the protection we expect it to because we’re simply not using enough of it. In order to stay protected, the researchers suggested holidaymakers use 3ml (around half a teaspoon) of suncream on each arm, the face and the neck, plus 6ml (a full teaspoon) to each leg, the front and the back of the body. You should then reapply at least three times per day.All-day boozingThe sun sends many of us straight to a beer garden or out for a picnic. What’s better than cracking open a refreshing alcoholic beverage in the sun. And that’s okay. But the combination of sweating more in the heat, and going to the toilet more, means you’re losing more fluid than you take in.This is a fast track to dehydration unless you replace that lost fluid by drinking water, says Drinkaware. Avoid excess drinking, or make sure you pair every single boozy bevvie with a pint of water.Drinking your normal amount of waterYou need more – much, much more. We’re advised to drink around eight glasses of water per day, but you need to increase this amount when it’s hot. If you’re heading out for a picnic, pack several bottles of water in preparation.Dehydration is caused by not drinking enough water. Symptoms include: headaches, dark yellow and strong smelling urine, feeling dizzy, tiredness, dry mouth, and sweating less than usual. The general advice for curbing dehydration is taking sips of water, little and often, and gradually building up the amount you drink.Staying out in the sun all dayWe get it – why stay indoors when there’s beautiful sunshine and blue skies outdoors? But spending every single second of the day outside in a heatwave means your risk of ending up burnt, dehydrated, or with sunstroke are pretty high. Try to give yourself breaks from the heat – preferably between 11am and 3pm, suggests the NHS – and walk or sit in the shade. Thinking ‘less is more’ when getting dressedYou might be tempted to grab your tiniest shorts and tight vest for a day in the sun, but that’s not always the best option. Firstly, it means you have more skin on show to the sun, meaning you’ll need to keep topping up suncream on whatever flesh is showing. Instead, it’s best to go for light, loose-fitting cotton clothes, recommends Oxford Health. And don’t forget your hat. Burning your scalpEven if you put suncream on, our bet is you probably miss your scalp. Suncream down your parting (or right across your head if you’re on the bald side), or simply wear a hat to avoid a stingy shower the next day.Covering your head can also protect your hair, says hair expert Nicole Petty at Milk + Blush. “While hats do provide extra cover for the scalp against strong UV rays, they protect the hair from sun exposure, too,” she says. “When exposed to too much sunlight, the UVA and UVB rays can strip moisture from the hair and damage the hairs protein and cuticle, resulting in dry/brittle ends, frizziness, split ends, discolouration or even thinning.”Keeping windows and curtains open all dayOh no. No, no, no. You should close curtains on rooms that face the sun to keep indoor spaces cooler and remember it may be cooler outdoors than indoors. As simple as this may sound, keeping your blinds and curtains closed throughout the day deflects the sun’s powerful rays from heating your house. You should also keep windows closed when it’s hotter outside than inside, advises the government. Open windows at night when the air is cooler, but close ground floor windows when you leave the house or go to bed.Eating the wrong foodFoods that require more effort to digest – like those high in protein, sugar and fibre – are thought to generate more body heat, according to BBC Good Food. This includes ice cream – it cools you when you eat it, but it doesn’t last. Warm chocolate is also a no-go, reports Love Food, and a “surefire way to headache city”. If you know you’re going to crave it, put it in the fridge and enjoy the sweet chocolate snap when you break a bit off. Food can account for around 20-30% of our fluid intake, so it’s a good idea to choose things that contain more water than others. Think: watermelon, strawberries, cucumber, celery, melon. Biochemist Shirley Corriher has previously spoken about the foods that work best to keep people cool. In 2012, she said fruits and vegetables are good in hot climates as they’re packed with water, Inside Science reported.Exercise too much outdoorsNone of us like to run outdoors when it’s freezing, snowing, or raining. But just because it’s a nice day, it doesn’t mean it’s the best time to go out for a jog. The NHS suggests avoiding exercising at the hottest part of the day – so between 11am and 3pm – and avoiding strenuous exercise in the heat at any time.It might be better to go for that cycle in the early morning or evening to avoid getting dehydrated. Taking your dog out for a lunchtime walk“All animals can suffer in the heat and it’s really important that we take extra special care of our pets during extremely hot and extremely cold weather,” RSPCA animal welfare expert Dr Samantha Gaines told HuffPost UK.Dogs still need exercise, but take advantage of the cooler hours first thing in the morning and evening. “If the pavement is too hot to touch with your hands, then it’s too hot for a dog’s paws,” said Gaines. Having a glass of wine (or a cuppa) before bedYou should avoid caffeine or alcohol before bed – both cause dehydration which makes sleep harder. The ideal temperature for sleeping is between 16-18°C, according to The Sleep Council. Anything above 24°C causes restless and interrupted sleep. Before hopping into bed make sure you opt for a sheet instead of a duvet, have a good fan set up (see our guide here) and have a quick cold shower to lower your body temperature.Related...Hangovers Get Better With Age, Apparently. We Don't Believe ItHow To Tell You're Dehydrated – And What To Do If You Are12 Baby Names Beautifully Inspired By The Four Seasons10 Of The UK's Best Outdoor Swimming Pools To Live The Lido LifeThe Heatwave Hacks You Need To Cool Down When It's Boiling OutsideThese Animals Well And Truly Bossed This Week's Heatwave
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Nitrous oxide (“laughing gas”) may offer significant relief from the symptoms of treatment-resistant depression, according to a new study from the Washington University School of Medicine and the University of Chicago. An hour spent inhaling a mixture of laughing gas and oxygen resulted in rapid improvements among patients who didn’t find relief in traditional antidepressant treatments. Treatment-resistant depression is exactly … Continue reading
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"Our current level of cash and cash equivalents are not sufficient to fund commercial scale production," warned Lordstown Motors to investors.
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Vivaldi says Vivaldi 4.0 is its most significant launch of the year, and the goal is to give users an alternative to Big Tech. The 4.0 update for the browser brings expansion of its integrated tools in the browser along with major additions, including Vivaldi Translate and beta versions of Vivaldi Mail, Calendar, and Feed Reader. Vivaldi says that a … Continue reading
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Fiat plans to go all-EV, transitioning the automaker’s range from 2025 as it shifts away from internal combustion. The announcement follows Fiat’s decision to only make an electric version of the new 500, its iconic city car. Announced last March, the latest Fiat 500 was an abrupt turnaround from the automaker’s previous 500e. Then, the electric version of the car … Continue reading
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The donation of 80 million doses will take place during June, with specific plans laid out Thursday regarding the first group of 25 million doses.
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Luckily the fix is simple and involves swapping the bad reflectors for new ones.
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We've seen one hour of Mario Golf: Super Rush and got a feel for its RPG and golf systems.
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Kamachi Industries has an outstanding of ₹355.93 crore against the bank and Tantia Agrochemicals owes ₹53.52 crore
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Tata Motors reported a 40% month-on-month decline in sales of its passenger vehicles to 15181 units when compared to 25095 units in the preceding month.Mahinda and Mahindra reported a 56.22% drop sequentially in its domestic passenger vehicle wholesale to just 8004 units in May
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Is Walmart having a Prime Day sale? It seems likely so we take a look at exactly what to expect from the sales event.
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Some people have come up with a creative solution for the flood of cicada shells that have cropped up across the country – with monster-inspired art. 
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Sometimes it makes good business sense to take a stand on sensitive topics.
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(Tokyo Metropolitan University) Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have enhanced "super-resolution" machine learning techniques to study phase transitions. They identified key features of how large arrays of interacting "particles" behave at different temperatures by simulating tiny arrays before using a convolutional neural network to generate a good estimate of what a larger array would look like using "correlation" configurations. The massive saving in computational cost may realize unique ways of understanding how materials behave.
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Catch up on the most important updates from this week.
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Given the increased attention to personal fitness and health in the past months since the pandemic hit last year, it’s really no surprise that smartwatch sales have considerably risen during that period. Given its focus on health and fitness as well as its track record in saving lives, it is also no surprise that the Apple Watch continues to lead … Continue reading
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