Joe Richards

Joe Richards

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Following 44
OnePlus‘ experimental software team OneLab has released a new app called Clipt that lets you sends files, links, and images between your devices. The tool is currently available as an Android app and a browser extension with an iOS app in the works. Clipt’s idea is simple: it acts as a universal clipboard between your devices using Google Drive. It creates a temporary and siloed folder in your Google Drive to store files, text snippets, links, and images; so that you can access them from any of your devices. The app lets you retrieve the last 10 items in your clipboard…This story continues at The Next Web
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The DeVore family joins a group of other internet creators who have cashed in on viral digital content through NFT sales.
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(Lancaster University) A new experiment shows that the more energy consumed by a clock, the more accurate its timekeeping.This is the first time that a measurement has been made of the entropy - or heat loss - generated by a minimal clock tens of nanometers thick and 1.5 millimeters long. Understanding the thermodynamic cost involved in timekeeping is a central step along the way in the development of future technologies, as systems approach the quantum realm.
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As part of the Adweek Sustainability Playbook, Ben & Jerry's Head of Global Activism Strategy, Chris Miller, shares how companies can use their existing tools to advocate for change and become good corporate citizens. THE CHALLENGE The view of what it means to be a corporate citizen has shifted dramatically over the last couple of...
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Amazon’s free, ad-supported streaming service IMDb TV is getting its own mobile app. The company announced the news today at its first-ever NewFronts presentation to advertisers, where it also shared that its over-the-top streaming businesses combined — meaning, IMDb TV, Twitch, live sports like Thursday Night Football, Amazon’s News app and others — have now […]
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We've done the research, so you won't have to hire bounty hunters to get ideas for gift ideas from a galaxy far, far away.
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It is striking how many different tales the poet Benjamin Zephaniah can tell about being stopped by police.Recounted in the deft storytelling voice that has won him a remarkable literary career, the famous writer goes over a succession of incidents ranging from the bizarre to the brutally cruel.He is speaking to HuffPost UK as the conviction of Derek Chauvin for murdering George Floyd in the United States places renewed focus on the death of his own cousin, Mikey Powell killed in similar circumstances 18 years ago.Yesterday, in a special report, we spoke to the families of four British men who died in police custody between 1998 and 2010.Zephaniah, 63, and his brother Tippa Naphtali, 59, have been campaigning over the issue for decades, and Tippa set up a memorial fund in Mikey’s name to help other families in 2015.Tragically, the dub poet says, he was not surprised when a death happened within his family – because of his own encounters with police as a young man.“I just knew the way our communities were being policed and I knew that you could die, basically, because I’d known other families who it happened to,” he says.He remembers being pulled into a shop doorway and beaten by police when he was only 15 or 16 in Selly Oak, which he describes as “kind of a slightly posh Birmingham”.“I remember this police car just stopped at the side of me, they were marked, they were uniformed, they just got out, put me in a shop doorway and just beat me, jumped in the car and just drove off,” he says. “I didn’t understand what my rights were. I didn’t understand Citizens Advice Bureaux or anything like that, I just thought: ‘Well, that’s what the police do to us.’”On another occasion, in Stoke Newington, north London, in the 1980s, Zephaniah witnessed a woman being kidnapped and dragged into a car at knifepoint. He went into the nearby police station to report the crime but says police instead accused him of being the perpetrator of a burglary. “So they said, come around the back, and as soon as I walked around the back they dragged me and said: ‘You’re under arrest,’” he says. Zephaniah said he wanted to speak to his solicitor, giving the name and number of the renowned human rights barrister Michael Mansfield, who is a friend. “And they just looked at me – ‘Michael Mansfield, is this the Michael Mansfield?’ – and I went: ‘Yeah.’“And they wouldn’t think that a Rasta walking down Stoke Newington High Street knows Michael Mansfield, right?” says Zephaniah. “So when they saw that, I was free within like 10 minutes. If it wasn’t, that would be me probably framed up.”Two more recent experiences of being stopped by police in rural Lincolnshire, where he now lives, are described by Zephaniah as “kind of slightly sad but slightly hilarious”.In an incident he compares to what is bleakly known as “driving while Black”, the poet says he was pulled over while running.“I got stopped jogging once, and I think that was hilarious,” he says. “It was raining and the cop said: ‘Where are you coming from,’ and I said: ‘Well, home.’ “He said: ‘Where are you going to,’ and I went: ‘Well, home, I’m jogging around in circles.’ “He went: ‘Can I search you? Have you got any keys?’ and I actually said to him: ‘Have you just joined the force? Do you need to, kind of, prove something, you know?’ I just laughed and laughed at him.”On another occasion he was stopped in a local park while babysitting the white child of friends. There was a stand-off with police officers asking if the girl was his daughter.“I’ve got white friends who adopted a Black child and I said: ‘Have you ever been stopped for having a Black child?’ and he went: ‘No, absolutely not,’” he says. “It’s just a weird one being stopped for having a white kid.”But Zephaniah says he has to be cautious in what he says, or in making light of these stops, because of the treatment and racial profiling of younger Black people.“I do think I’ve always got to be careful about this because you see those situations of being stopped,” he says.For example, he says, “the young guys coming out of a pub or club or something like that and they’ve got no bus fare so they have to walk home – and there’s three or four of them and they’re walking home.”But the way police see it, he adds, “especially when it comes to Black youths, if there are more than three of you it’s a gang.“That’s how the police see it. It’s not like a group of friends as it would be with a white group. It’s a gang. And so their experience, the young people’s experiences, is so much different to mine.”Zephaniah also believes racism played a part in his cousin’s death.Mikey Powell died after being detained by West Midlands Police during a mental health crisis on September 7, 2003.“There’s a time I talk about in [my autobiography] where I’m at Thornhill Road police station, which is where Mikey died, actually,” he says.“And I’m in there and the police have given me a bit of a beating and then they take me into a room and on the wall of the room – it’s almost as if there are scalps – there are dreadlocks pinned on the wall of the room or hats. “And the police officer is telling me that this hat belonged to Errol, this hat belonged to Leroy, this hat belonged to Winston, this dreadlock I pulled it off this guy’s head. “It was just like a wall of scalps, trophies almost, and the police were bragging that they’d pulled out locks from these people and that if I don’t confess to something mine will be up there too. “Have you seen the TV programme Life On Mars? It was kind of like that.”In another incident, Zephaniah says police officers stamped on his toes in a corridor of Digbeth Police Station after a beating. “I mean, they had fun with us, you know. They knew we had nowhere to go,” he says.Zephaniah says his family tried to pursue justice for his cousin Mikey through the official legal channels.But he alleges police told him that if he spoke out he could end up prejudicing any legal case and made it clear that they would “come down” on him if he did.“So it was really weird, because in other cases of deaths in custody I was really active, but with Mikey I had to be really careful,” he says. “They were kind of waiting for me to put a word out for place. So, for that reason, I kind of stepped back.”But over his long career he has continually campaigned, written and spoken frankly about institutional racism in the police and wider structural racism in society.“My Stephen Lawrence poem, there’s a line in there where I say: ‘Why are we paying for a police force that will not work for us?’” says Zephaniah. “I mean, sometimes I think if I could take away the bit of my taxes that pays for the police, because they’re useless for me.”But the UK Black Lives Matter protests following George Floyd’s murder by white police officer Derek Chauvin in the US did give him hope.“I’ve seen these surges before and it goes away,” he says. “I really think the difference this time is that the Black Lives Matter movement is not just peopled by Black people. I think that’s one of the greatest things about this time.“I think there is something about the George Floyd video. You couldn’t watch that if you’re a mother or a parent or a student and go: ‘Well, it’s not that bad.’“And some of the young people I’ve seen just coming up and saying: ‘Not in my name.’ I’ve seen some of the banners people are carrying, they’re quite funny, but quite telling. “There’s one banner that says ‘Black Lives Matter’, and then it says something like: ‘Come on dad – don’t you get it?’“It’s young people who have got racist parents saying: ‘Come on – wake up.’ And that’s what it needs.” He wants to see a “cultural mindset change”.“I kind of have more faith in those at grassroots level, the students I work with, grassroots organisations,” he says.“What depresses me a little bit is government and they’re kind of hardened. Just thinking about the statues and stuff like that, and you’ve got people like [Boris] Johnson saying: ‘No, absolutely not, we’re not going to look at the history books, we’re not going to do anything.’“Well, they really need looking at. You know, because some of them are telling lies, some of them are telling half-truths and some of them are just not telling you the other half the story.”On the topic of policing reform, he says: “Let’s just say the amount of Black officers is completely representative of the amount of Black people in the country – that wouldn’t impress me because I want to know that the culture of policing has changed. So it’s not just one thing.”While he no longer feels an active threat from police, Zephaniah says he remains acutely aware that he may be at increased risk, like his cousin Mikey Powell, because of his race.“Well, when I walk or drive in the street, every time I pass a police officer there is a little thing that goes off inside me,” he says. “I don’t see them as a threat to me personally. But I know it’s not impossible that I could get harmed.”END KICKER: For more information on how you can support the National Mikey Powell Memorial Family Fund, please visit its official website or donate here. Readers can also donate to the Justice for the Family of Christopher Alder crowdfunding campaign. Visit the United Families & Friends Campaign which supports those affected by deaths in custodyRelated...Exclusive: The Met Police Are More Likely To Publish Your Mugshot If You're Black7 Things That Contradict The Claim Britain Is ‘Not Institutionally Racist’Labour MP Dawn Butler Accuses Met Police Of Racial Profiling After Being Stopped By OfficersWhat Brits Need To Know About The Derek Chauvin Murder Trial
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Halo Infinite will have cross-play and cross-progression support on Xbox Series X and PC, Microsoft has confirmed.
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Vedanta has promised to create an additional capacity of 1,000 critical care beds in 10 cities across the country amid Covid-19 crisis.
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Just a couple of days ago, Xiaomi introduced the gaming Redmi K40 Game Enhanced Edition, which came out with an interesting offer for its price ... The post Users prefer Redmi K40 over Redmi K40 Game Enhanced Edition appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The two plan to build a dream team of developers and speed up autonomous vehicle development.
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As a follow up to the Earth Day brand buzz last week, Adweek partnered with Harris Poll on a survey to gauge consumer sentiment on proposed solutions to one small piece of humankind's impact on the climate: littering and pollution from single-use fast food containers. This year, brands like Starbucks, Popeyes and Burger King have...
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Basketball fans will soon have the opportunity to stream a Marvel-themed game between the New Orleans Pelicans and the Golden State Warriors, ESPN has announced. Called Marvel’s Arena of Heroes, the alternate presentation will be the second live game made available through ESPN+, though it’ll also be available to watch on ESPN Deportes and ESPN2. This will be the first … Continue reading
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Space junk is an increasing problem and poses a threat to active satellites and even human life. Here's what one space agency is doing to deal with it.
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Over the next 4 years, BMW expects that 25% of its sales in China will be made up of by EVs. This is an ambitious increase of 21%, compared to last year. BMW’s China Chief, Jochen Goller, revealed the German marque’s goal during the 2021 edition of Auto Shanghai today, Reuters reports. He also announced that BMW will launch 12 electric models in China by 2023.  BMW, said Goller, is examining the possibility of expanding its production in China, although nothing is certain yet.  Despite issues with Huachen Group, the parent of its main China joint venture partner, Brilliance Automotive…This story continues at The Next Web
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A high-school coming-of-age tale... for hotshot basketball coach Marvyn Korn. Here we explain how to watch Big Shot online with Disney Plus.
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Confusion prevailed hours after chief minister Arvind Kejriwal’s address as mall owners and restaurants sought clarity on their days of operations
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Want a king of the middle of the road machine? Welcome to our top picks for mid-sized 15-inch laptops.
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HuffPost may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Prices and availability subject to change.If you’re wondering whether the past year of in-and-out lockdowns has aged you, you’re not alone. Sure, we all are a year older – and perhaps a bit wiser – but there may be another reason you aren’t looking as fresh as you once thought: so-called “lockdown face”.And it’s no fault of your own. A year spent cooped up indoors, a lack of vitamin D, poor sleep, staring at screens, and even that cranked-up heating through the long winter has left us with dry skin, puffy eyes, and maybe even breakouts.When the topic of “lockdown face” came up on a HuffPost UK Zoom call, many of us could relate. We pondered why our faces, at times, looked a little off – especially when we were all in a video meeting at 8.30am each morning. Dr Hiba Injibar, consultant dermatologist and founder of Dermasurge, tells HuffPost UK the issue of ‘lockdown face’ is “fairly common” at the moment. “Many people believe that the absence of vitamin D, lengthy enforced periods of heating and permanently looking at our computers or televisions has had a detrimental effect on our complexions and general skin health,” she explains. Injibar says people are complaining about breakouts due to stress – whether that’s homeschooling, work pressures or general anxiety.“This kind of stress can cause a corticotrophin-releasing hormone to drive up the skin’s oil production, which can cause spots,” she says. “And for the same reason, many of my patients have complained their skin looks older since Covid hit… that their key ‘wrinkle areas’ of around the eyes, the forehead and lips are far more beset with fine lines. In some people, an excess of alcohol has had a damaging effect – it dehydrates and makes your skin duller and less ‘plump’.”Dr Injibar’s advice is to drink plenty of water, sleep more, exercise and reduce your screen time. “Up your vitamin D with some time outdoors (always remembering your SPF) and eat fish or seafood rich in vitamin D,” she adds.In terms of skincare, she advises to cleanse morning and night using products that are non-comedogenic (ie. that don’t block your pores) and to try salicylic-acid cleansers for any breakouts. Prompt enough for us to try some products – five to be exact, handpicked for their well-rated reviews online – to see if they made any difference to “lockdown face”. We tried them over the course of three days minimum – some for up to a week – to see if we could see any difference. Did the products actually work – or just feel nice?Brightening serumThe Ordinary Ascorbyl Glucoside Solution 12% 30m, £8.90 Reviewed by: Rachel Moss, Life reporter“The Ordinary’s brightening serum is designed to wake up the skin and reduce signs of ageing, but the forehead wrinkles I’ve acquired during lockdown are still alive and well after three weeks, yes weeks, of application. The skin across my face does feel slightly tighter and marginally more hydrated, but there’s little visible difference. My face is also left feeling a tad sticky and shiny after use – my boyfriend asks whether the same result could be achieved with PVA glue.“A bit harsh, I think, and important to note there’s plenty of positive reviews online from other people, even if it doesn’t hit the spot for me personally. One plus, is that it hasn’t actually irritated my eczema-prone skin at all. For under a tenner, it’s also decent value for money as you only use a tiny amount of liquid on each application. Still, I wouldn’t personally buy it again.” 2/5Sheet mask111Skin Sub-Zero De-Puffing Energy Facial Mask, £20Reviewed by: Amy Packham, Life editor “Puffy eyes during morning meetings have been starting to get on my nerves – I felt like I didn’t look like myself. This sheet mask aims to tackle the problem: it promises a ‘refined appearance’, leaving skin ‘invigorated and refreshed’, while reducing signs of puffiness and fatigue. I first use the mask in the evening, after staying indoors all day (it happens). It’s so soft and gloopy, and easy to put on and mould across my face. It’s cooling, then warm and even tingly in places. I happily leave it on for the 20 minutes, then pat my skin when I take it off.“Is there much of a difference? There’s a glowy dew to my skin, it’s incredibly soft, and I notice – right under my eyes – the once, slightly greasy patches look a little.. smoother? My face feels alive and alert, simply because it’s been cooled for a while. When I use it in the morning, before my work meeting, I appreciate the benefits more – mainly because it makes my tired face feel more awake. I’m left with a slight shine, which feels better than my usual appearance. Can I notice a world of difference? Not hugely. But it’s a treat and felt amazing.” 3/5  Jade rollerBeauty Bay, Jade Facial Roller, £9.60Reviewed by: Angela Hui, Life reporter“Lockdown has aged me horribly. I keep looking at before and after photos of myself from the start of the pandemic to now. So, in the hope of looking less Michelin Man, I turn to the ancient Chinese practice of Jade rolling. “I’ve heard rave reviews, but am sceptical about its claims to reduce facial tension and aid lymphatic drainage. You’re meant to store the dual-ended facial massage tool in the fridge before use and as soon as my skin comes in contact with the roller, I yelp in anticipation of how cold it’s going to be.  But it’s soothing and strangely relaxing. I close my eyes and pretend I’m standing on a Fox’s glacier mint, while someone is stroking my face. Used with the SkinHit Protecting Serum with it, it helps my skin drink and soak up the product.“After a few days, my face does feel both tighter and silkier, though I’m not sure it’s doing its job yet to reduce puffiness. There’s a lot of rolling involved – and by the end of my daily skincare regime, my right arm is pathetically trying to hold itself up. But with the words of Limp Bizkit in my head, I vow to keep rollin’, rollin’. Hey, I might even get a hench right arm from it, too. Win, win.” 3/5Eye CreamVichy Minéral 89 Eyes with Hyaluronic Acid + Caffeine 15ml, £15Reviewed by: Adam Bloodworth, features writer“I love the nourishing sensation I get when I use eye serums, and this one from Vichy definitely makes the skin around my eyes feel great. The idea is that the product smooths and brightens the eye area and while there is a little darkness still lurking after a few days’ use, I don’t expect miracles.“My eyes definitely look fresher and smoother and less like I’ve not left my lockdown setup in forever, so that’s a big win, especially as I start making more social plans. But as ever with these products, the fun is really in the routine of applying it, which feels luxurious. For £15, I suspect this serum – in a cute little blue bottle – will provide me with a satisfying morning and evening routine for a good few months, with or without perfect results.” 4/5Facial OilVirgin Marula Luxury Facial Oil (Drunk Elephant), £61Reviewed by: Tasha Hinde, Life reporter“At six months’ pregnant, I’ve been waiting for that pregnancy glow to kick in for a while now. Reader: I’m still waiting. The past year has taken a toll on my face – my forehead is dryer than the desert and more pronounced frown lines have appeared between my eyebrows. Recently, I moved to a hard water area and found my skin was even drier than normal. My everyday moisturiser wasn’t doing the trick on its own anymore.“I’ve been trialling this facial oil for over a week now and noticed a difference, but only when I’m wearing it – if I give my face a day off, I’m back to square one. The oil is described as “rehab for your skin” – rich in antioxidants and omegas 6 and 9, it’s meant to “nourish and balance” your skin “while restoring a youthful glow”. I wouldn’t say I’m glowing, but my flakey face is a little more dewy. My cheeks have a nice sheen to them (they were very ‘matte’ before).“The only issue is my forehead, which was the reason I wanted the extra help in the first place. When I apply my moisturiser and the oil, small spots appear. The oil does the trick on the rest of my face, leaving it feeling smooth and like I’ve had a facial. At £61, it’s expensive but I can see the appeal. As for my lockdown face, it’s looking much better – but I’m still on a quest for something that’ll quench my problematic forehead without causing a breakout.” 4/5Related...The 4 Ways Lockdown Has Messed With Your Eye Health39 Painfully Relatable Tweets About Early Pandemic NostalgiaWhy Is Boris Johnson Playing Down The Vaccine Impact?Long Queues Form For Surge Testing In London After South African Variant Found
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China isn't just cracking down on Jack Ma - the Communist Party is reining in billionaires as the wealth gap grows even wider.
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