John Feeney

John Feeney

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Following 46
UK
Doesn't matter if design was perfected at dawn of humankind, you still have to pay Cupertino tax Apple's $699 Mac Pro Wheel Kit provoked astonishment from the general public, swiftly followed by raucous laughter. Even by Apple's standards, these were a blatant piss-take. Fortunately, there's now an alternative for thrifty punters from Mac accessory biz OWC that costs "just" $199.…
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Hi! Welcome to the Insider Advertising daily for August 6. I'm Lauren Johnson, a senior advertising reporter at Business Insider. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. Send me feedback or tips at [email protected] Today's news: Disney Plus hits a new milestone but trails behind Netflix's revenue, salary data for top agency roles, and marketers weigh in on Microsoft's potential TikTok acquisition. Disney Plus' audience growth has wildly exceeded expectations but it brings in less than half the revenue Netflix does per subscriber Disney Plus hit 60 million subscribers nine months since launching, a milestone that executives originally thought wouldn't happen until 2024. However, Disney Plus' subscribers generate significantly less revenue per paying subscriber than rival Netflix. During the June quarter, Disney Plus' average revenue per paying subscriber was $4.62 while Netflix averages $10.80. Disney Plus' average revenue per user was also dragged down last quarter by its price point in India. Read the full story here. Top ad industry salaries, revealed: How much the biggest holding companies including WPP, Publicis, and Omnicom pay employees, from junior account directors to global creative leads Patrick Coffee dug into the US Office of Foreign Labor Certification's 2019 disclosure data to find out how much top roles are paid at the five largest ad holding companies: WPP, Publicis, Omnicom, IPG, and Dentsu. According to the data, a chief creative officer at WPP makes between $830,000 to $880,000 a year while a chief strategy officer at Omnicom makes between $300,000 to $500,000. The data looks at all foreign workers applying for both permanent green card visas and temporary H-1B, H1B1, and E-3 visas. It does not include every type of visa, pay rates for US-born employees, or compensation beyond base salaries. Read the full story here. Marketers warily continue to spend on TikTok but some are building escape clauses into their contracts because of the political uncertainty Dan Whateley and I looked at how agencies are reacting to Microsoft's reported acquisition of TikTok. Marketers said that they are not stopping ad spend but are reworking contracts with the possibility of moving spend to other platforms. Lyle Stevens, CEO of the influencer-marketing platform Mavrck, said that marketers are unlikely to cut ad budgets in the near term but could pull budgets if TikTok's ownership is not resolved by the time of the US elections and holiday season.  Microsoft has a mixed history with its advertising business and sold off most of it to AOL in 2015. However, an acquisition of TikTok could give the app some credibility with ad buyers, said Brendan Gahan, partner and chief social officer at ad agency Mekanism. Read the full story here. More stories we're reading: A YouTube creator explains Amazon's efforts to become a major player in the influencer business, from affiliate commissions to livestreaming (Business Insider) Houseplant sales are booming and so are 'Plantfluencers,' the social-media creators sharing plant tips, products, and content (Business Insider) The face of department stores is radically changing, and could soon look more like a warehouse than a boutique (Business Insider) As advertising plummets in Q2, NYT's total digital revenue exceeds print (AdExchanger) 'A significant uptick in deal flow': Why Europe is becoming a hotbed of ad tech innovation (Digiday) Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at [email protected] and subscribe to this daily email here. — LaurenJoin the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why you don't see brilliantly blue fireworks
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The EU Commission has announced it is launching an in-depth probe into Google's proposal to acquire wearables maker Fitbit. "The Commission is concerned that the proposed transaction would further entrench Google's market position in the online advertising markets," it said in a statement. Google says the deal is about the devices, not the data. But after Google broke a major promise after acquiring DoubleClick in 2008, regulators are wary. Last week's antitrust hearing was a reminder of that. Are you a Google or Fitbit insider with more to share? You can contact this reporter securely using encrypted messaging app Signal (+1 628-228-1836) or encrypted email ([email protected]). Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. It's been nine months since Google announced its intentions to buy Fitbit for $2.1 billion, and the deal still hasn't closed. Now, the companies will have to wait even longer: the EU Commission just announced it has launched an in-depth probe into the deal with a decision to be made by Dec. 9, potentially extending the entire process to over a year. Compared with talk of Microsoft potentially snapping up TikTok for as much as $50 billion, Google's Fitbit deal might look like small potatoes, but it still would be one of the largest acquisitions Google has ever made. More importantly, the data of more than 28 million users would be sucked up into the Google mothership, and it's this bit that regulators are worried about.  Or, as the commission put it in a statement announcing the investigation: "The Commission is concerned that the proposed transaction would further entrench Google's market position in the online advertising markets by increasing the already vast amount of data that Google could use for personalization of the ads it serves and displays." In an effort to push the deal through, Google promised to keep this data in a separate "silo" away from its advertising business, but the EU said the pledge was "insufficient" and didn't cover "all the data that Google would access as a result of the transaction and would be valuable for advertising purposes."  The last time Brussels launched an all-out probe into one of Google's acquisitions was in 2007 when it investigated the company's plans to buy the internet advertising company DoubleClick. At the time, Google promised it wouldn't combine DoubleClick's database of user's web browsing information with Google's own account data, and the deal was approved following an extended investigation by the EU. Then in 2016, the company quietly removed that firewall and just meshed the two together anyway. Four years later, Google's move is coming back to bite it as regulators decide whether to approve or veto the Fitbit deal. Indeed, during last week's antitrust hearing, Val Demmings (D-FL) pressed Google CEO Sundar Pichai on whether he signed off on Google ultimately merging DoubleClick data with its own in 2016. "I am concerned that Google's bait and switch with DoubleClick is part of a broader pattern where Google buys up companies for the purposes of surveilling Americans," Demmings told Pichai. Like DoubleClick, user data is at the center of Google's Fitbit acquisition, and consumer groups from around the world have petitioned the regulators to closely scrutinize the deal. The European consumer organization BEUC said the deal would be a "test case" for analyzing potential data monopolies brought about through an acquisition. The Commission apparently listened, and says it will now investigate whether obtaining Fitbit's data would put Google at an unfair advantage, what the merger could mean for digital healthcare, and whether Google could "degrade the interoperability" of rival wearables that connect with Android. Google, for its part, insists this is all about hardware. "This deal is about devices, not data," said Google's SVP of devices and services Rick Osterloh in a statement, echoing a sentiment that Google has been sharing with reporters since the deal was announced. And if it were just about hardware, then Google would have a case. After all, Apple dominates the wearables market right now – something we were reminded of last week when the company announced its Q3 earnings. But the commission is more interested in the potential ramifications of Google grabbing Fitbit's data trove, and experts say the DoubleClick case is a lingering reminder for them to tread carefully.  Some commentators also believe that privacy should play a more central role in the investigation, which is currently focused primarily on competition. "I've argued generally that privacy is a competition problem," Tommaso Valletti, a professor of economics at Imperial College and prior chief economist of the Directorate General for Competition, told Business Insider. "I really hope that we won't repeat the same mistakes with DoubleClick," he said.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
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(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) ORNL Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion.
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We discuss the increasing amount of threats aimed at macOS, and reasons why you may want backup from an antivirus.
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In 2012, Facebook boasted that it makes up "95% of all social media in the US." The claim came in a marketing presentation it prepared to give to Vodafone's board of directors at the time. Facebook now faces intense antitrust scrutiny, and has changed its rhetoric — claiming it faces plenty of competition from many corners. On Wednesday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg argued that it's still competing with everyone from Apple to TikTok and the broader advertising industry. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. As Facebook faces mounting antitrust scrutiny, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has repeatedly asserted that the company faces intense competition and is not a monopoly. But eight years ago, the company was telling a very different story. In a marketing presentation from 2012, Facebook boasted about its market dominance — claiming to make up "95%" of total social media in the United States. The claim was made in a chart that compared Facebook's market share to those of rivals including Tumblr, Twitter, and MySpace for a presentation to telecoms firm Vodafone's board of directors, which was obtained by the US House Judiciary Committee as part of a year-long investigation into big tech antitrust issues and made public on Wednesday. The document is a striking illustration of how Facebook has historically emphasised its size and power as a marketing tool, and how drastically the company has changed its approach now it is the subject of growing political scrutiny and anti-monopoly investigations. CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before the Committee on Wednesday, and he used his opening remarks to assert that Facebook is still fighting considerable competitors.  "The most popular messaging service in the US is iMessage," he said. "The fastest-growing app is TikTok. The most popular app for video is YouTube. The fastest growing ads platform is Amazon. The largest ads platform is Google. And for every dollar spent on advertising in the US, less than 10 cents is spent with us." The House Committee obtained large numbers of documents from Facebook and others companies in its investigation. In another exchange between Zuckerberg and top executives in 2012, the CEO said that he viewed Instagram as a significant threat to Facebook's business before acquiring it. Facebook has long aggressively bought up competing businesses. Many of its core products, from Instagram to WhatsApp and Oculus started life as independent companies before being acquired. Regulators and politicians are now scrutinizing whether Facebook's acquisitions constitute anti-competitive behaviour. Got a tip? Contact Business Insider reporter Rob Price via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1 650-636-6268), encrypted email ([email protected]), standard email ([email protected]), Telegram/Wickr/WeChat (robaeprice), or Twitter DM (@robaeprice). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by standard email only, please.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What makes 'Parasite' so shocking is the twist that happens in a 10-minute sequence
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Tweets that link to violent content are no longer allowed either
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Over the past several years, a set of conspiracy theories tied to a fictional character named "Q" have leapt from the anonymous 4chan online message boards to the slogans chanted and signs held by President Trump's supporters at campaign rallies. The various theories tied to "Q" and "QAnon" are voluminous, but the general idea is that elites, Democratic Party leaders, and the so-called "Deep State" are all conspiring on a variety of nefarious acts, from pedophilia to mind control. "Q" – supposedly a secret person or persons with access to confidential information – is the origin of the conspiracies, which largely serve to present President Trump in a flattering light. On Tuesday night, Twitter announced action against QAnon-related content on its platform. The social media company said it banned over 7,000 accounts tied to the conspiracy theory, among other moderation efforts. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. For years, supporters of QAnon have peddled false conspiracy theories online, based in the belief that elites, Democratic Party leaders, and the so-called "Deep State" are all conspiring on a variety of nefarious acts, from pedophilia to mind control. Many people quickly dismiss these provably false theories. But for adherents of "Q" — who are also largely supporters of President Donald Trump — these conspiracies are core to an increasingly popular set of beliefs. Here's everything we know about QAnon:QAnon is relatively young in the realm of conspiracy theories: It's said to have originated in 2017 on the 4chan message boards, where anonymity is a standard. In October 2017, a 4chan forum post attributed to "Q Clearance Patriot" posted several messages in the politics section. The name was a direct reference to the Department of Energy's highest level of security clearance, which comes with access to nuclear weapons – an intentionally specific reference intended to convey the writer's sincerity. The idea was simple: A person, or persons, who identified as "Q," with deep access to the highest levels of the federal government, was committed to revealing the hidden truth. That includes claims that former President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton are Satanists involved in a global pedophilia ring, and that President Trump has been secretly planning a counter-coup against members of the so-called "deep state" (the term often used to describe career public officials), among other things. What are the core beliefs of QAnon? They're not far off from already existing conspiracy theories about the Illuminati. The foundational belief of QAnon supporters is that the world is being controlled by a cabal of Hollywood elites and political operatives, and that control extends beyond world governments to culture, science, and pretty much everything else. It's very similar to the Illuminati conspiracy theory. The election of Donald Trump thwarted that group of elites from achieving total world control, QAnon believers say. From that logic comes the idea that Trump, along with several unnamed "deep state" operatives, has been planning a secret counter-coup. The same logic leads to the conspiracy theory that an event known as "The Storm" is coming, where various cabal members will be rounded up and arrested, thus resulting in a military takeover of the US that would bring a state of utopia. Some QAnon loyalists believe that the secret group is involved in a vast pedophilia ring (a spinoff of the "Pizzagate" conspiracy), some believe that the elites involved are Satanists, and some believe both.  There is no evidence to support any of the claims within these conspiracy theories. QAnon believers get a big boost from the president, who often retweets QAnon accounts. President Trump has amplified tweets from QAnon supporter accounts "at least 185 times via at least 114 individual accounts, some of them more than once," according to a Media Matters analysis. In at least one case, in December 2019, the president retweeted a pro-Trump video with direct references to the QAnon conspiracy movement. Moreover, several members of Trump's team have given far more explicit nods to the conspiracy theorist group. President Trump's son and presidential campaign surrogate, Eric Trump, used a primary QAnon hashtag in an image posted to his Instagram feed before a Trump 2020 campaign event last month: Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1274420389448421376?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw The president's middle son, a main campaign surrogate, posting a QAnon message on Instagram. pic.twitter.com/bT11puXuDs The post has since been removed from his Instagram feed. The hashtag in question was "#WWG1WGA," which stands for the QAnon slogan "Where we go one, we go all." QAnon believers have become increasingly visible at Trump rallies and and at anti-coronavirus lockdown protests At the core of the various QAnon conspiracy theories is a pro-Trump agenda, and QAnon supporters are increasingly visible at Trump 2020 campaign rallies and anti-coronavirus lockdown protests. Support for the president is threaded throughout various QAnon theories, including one that Hollywood elites and prominent members of the Democratic Party are involved in a secret pedophilia ring, and another about a secret actor (or actors) from the "deep state" feeding confidential information to users on a notoriously hate-filled anonymous forum. Trump is also no stranger to conspiracy theories himself: For years, he was a proponent of the false conspiracy theory that former president Barack Obama wasn't born in the US (he was). Social media services, including both Facebook and Twitter, have begun removing QAnon-related content. On Tuesday night, Twitter announced plans to curb QAnon accounts engaging in "behavior that has the potential to lead to offline harm." To that end, Twitter said it banned over 7,000 accounts, and is planning continued action on accounts, "Tweeting about these topics that we know are engaged in violations of our multi-account policy, coordinating abuse around individual victims, or are attempting to evade a previous suspension." Similarly, Facebook announced similar actions back in May, and used similar language to Twitter.  "The people behind this activity used fake accounts — some of which had already been detected and disabled by our automated systems — to create fictitious personas, like and comment on their own content making it appear more popular than it is, manage Pages and Groups, and evade detection and enforcement," Facebook said at the time.  In other words: Neither Facebook nor Twitter has banned QAnon accounts for spreading false conspiracy theories, but for violating terms of service rules about using fake accounts.
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After July 31, the phone's price rises to $700
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I’ve lived in Japan for nearly twelve years, and I’m still not used to the awful summers. Between the high temperatures and suffocating humidity, stepping outside in July and August feels like being slowly cooked in a sous vide pot. As a seemingly interminable rainy season comes to an end, I’m not going to need much encouragement to stay home. I don’t think my opinion on Japanese summers are particularly unusual, which is probably why Sony decided to go ahead with the Reon Pocket through its First Flight internal-startup-incubator-slash-crowdfunding-platform. First Flight has previously led to products like the FES E Ink watch, the Huis smart home universal remote, and the Wena Wrist modular smartwatch. Now we have the Reon Pocket,... Continue reading…
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No major design changes, but keep in mind, these may not be final for the US just yet.
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The OnePlus Nord is here, so here's everything you need to know.
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An ongoing legal dispute between two key battery suppliers to the electric vehicle market could lead to “catastrophic delays,” German carmaker Volkswagen says. Last year, two Korean battery-makers came to a head when LG Chem sued its smaller rival, SK Innovation, in the US for allegedly stealing trade secrets. LG Chem’s lawsuit attempts to prevent SK Innovation from setting up shop to produce EV batteries in the US. If this happens, the supply of key components to the American EV industry could be disrupted, Reuters reports. That includes the production of Ford’s upcoming all-electric F150 pickup truck. [Read: Uber refuses… This story continues at The Next Web
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OnePlus Nord teasers are finally coming to an end today.
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Yet again, Xiaomi's latest fitness tracker isn't as good in its worldwide release as it is in China.
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The US Federal Trade Commission is reportedly considering taking sworn legal testimony from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg.
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Scientists say we have one less thing to worry about
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But with the caveat that top staff take pay cuts.
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Many companies that manufacture smartphones take care of their customers who are used to medium and small phones. Samsung up to the current line of ... The post Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra will have a huge 7.1-inch screen appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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If you use a webcam cover, you should remove it before closing your MacBook, according to a new advisory from Apple. The company warns that closing a MacBook, including the Air and Pro models, while using a webcam cover may result in damage to the laptop’s display due to minimal clearance between it and the keyboard. Instead, Apple encourages users … Continue reading
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Oracle nemesis will be focusing on SkySQL cloud product MySQL cousin MariaDB has grabbed $25m in funding in what represents something of a mini fight-back for good ol' relational databases against the NoSQL family of systems, according to the CEO.…
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Until Java 9, Java’s top-level code organization element had been the package. Starting with Java 9 that changed: above the package now is the module. The module collects related packages together.The Java Platform Module System (JPMS) is a code-level structure, so it doesn’t change the fact that we package Java into JAR files. Ultimately, everything is still bundled together in JAR files. The module system adds a new, higher-level descriptor that JARs can use, by incorporating the module-info.java file. [ Also on InfoWorld: JDK 15: The new features in Java 15 ] Large-scale apps and organizations will take advantage of modules to better organize code. But everyone will be consuming modules, as the JDK and its classes are now modularized.To read this article in full, please click here
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Commercial satellite-imaging companies are set to benefit from the upcoming changes to regulations
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The bar cart has again become a staple of living rooms across the US.But it's around the holidays when a bar cart really stands out -- a vintage brass stunner dressed up in garlands and lights may upstage your tree (or replace it).But its the items on that cart that make all the difference and an upgrade from a single stainless steel bottle opener to a personalized combination of bar accessories and tumblers could make the perfect gift for that aspiring bartender.Whether you're looking to upgrade your own bar on wheels with a set of gold cocktail picks or level up a friend's wine game with a new decanter, we've got you covered.From fun bar accessories to unique decor, these no-fail cocktail-related bar gifts are perfect for every budget under $100.Spice things up with this small yet sturdy bamboo mortar and pestle set.
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Consumer spending on gaming hardware continued its plummet in October, according to The NPD Group.U.S. gamers spent $182 million on new consoles.That is down 41% from October 2018.But it’s worth noting that the comparison to 2018 is tough because Red Dead Redemption 2 launched for Xbox One and PlayStation 4 in October 2018.October 2019 did not have anything like that.But even without Red Dead, it’s clear that the younger Switch is still in the prime of its life.
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While global internet penetration is growing rapidly, half of the population is still unconnected, largely in emerging markets.This Telecoms.com Intelligence special briefing looks into what the business community and the public sector can do to overcome connectivity barriers on both the supply and demand sides.The aim of connecting the unconnected is not only to give everyone access to the tools many of us take for granted, but to do so in a sustainable way for the communications industry.complete the short form below to access this briefing.Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam.
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Bumble, the popular and profitable dating and networking app built around the ethos of women calling the shots on how connections get made and developed, has made a deal for some independence of its own, and its founder, Whitney Wolfe Herd, is coming out of it as CEO of an even bigger dating empire.Andrey Andreev, the founder of Badoo, the controversial London-based company that owns a series of dating apps and was the main backer and builder of Bumble, is selling his entire stake in MagicLab, the company that owned both Bumble and Badoo (and other dating apps), to Blackstone.Blackstone is world-class at maximizing the success of entrepreneur-led companies, which presents a tremendous opportunity.I will strive to lead the group with a continued values-based and mission-first focus, the same one that has been core to Bumble since I founded the company five years ago.We will keep working towards our goal of recalibrating gender norms and empowering people to connect globally, and now at a much faster pace with our new partner.”Bumble is consistently in the top 10 of lifestyle apps in the U.S., according to App Annie data.
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Anthropologists have uncovered the bones of at least 14 wooly mammoths in an excavated pit in the city of Tultepec in Mexico.They believe the remains point to the first-ever discovery of human-made mammoth traps, which would've been used to hunt the massive animals 15,000 years ago.Researchers from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History found that some of the bones bore signs showing the animals had been hunted.The pit appears to have been fashioned in the bottom of a then-receded lake where unnatural 90-degree cuts are still evident, a sharp drop toward which hunters are thought to have driven the beasts."[The discovery] represents a turning point, a touchstone on what until now we imagined was the interaction of hunter-gatherer bands with these enormous herbivores," INAH National Archeology Coordinator Pedro Francisco Sánchez said in a release Wednesday.Researchers have worked at the site, near where President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's government is building a new airport for Mexico City, for almost 10 months, recovering 824 bones in the roughy 26-feet-deep pit.
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The iPhone 11 is "the best $700 iPhone Apple has ever made," according to our full review.My car of choice was the McLaren 600LT Spider -- a V8-powered monster, capable of doing 0-60 mph in under 3 seconds and with a roof that folds away to let all of that beautiful outside in.As this is how I work with my pro equipment, it seemed the fairest comparison.It made for a tremendous backdrop and when I pulled up later at nearby Rogie waterfalls, the morning's golden light gave a beautiful glow to the autumnal colors.I took down the roof of the 600LT Spider immediately to take in my surroundings and help keep an eye out for good photo opportunities.My first stop was in the port town of Ullapool, where I pulled up and wandered down to the water's edge.
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