John Murphy

John Murphy

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Following 46
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The coronavirus outbreak will have long-lasting effects on US workers, particularly when it comes to the open office made popular by Silicon Valley companies like Facebook and Google.  Experts say that the open office was never very positive for employees, who reported feeling less productive and more distracted, got sick more easily, and felt pressured to work longer and harder because of their lack of privacy.  When offices begin reopening, whether that's this year or next summer, we're likely to see a shift away from the open floor plan.  "Open floor plans are most definitely going to disappear," Rhiannon Staples, chief marketing officer at human resources management company Hibob, told Business Insider. "I feel like it was already on its way out and this was the kick it needed to get it out the door." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. As the coronavirus continues its spread, unabated, in many parts of the US, it's becoming increasingly apparent that a return to "normal" is still far in the future. That's true for American office workers, many of whom have been working from their homes since March. But when workers are able to return to work en masse, whether that's this winter or a year from now, the office probably won't look as they left it.  Corporations nationwide are considering how to reopen spaces, from new ventilation systems systems to socially distanced elevators and closed-off kitchens. But the biggest change might be to the space as a whole.  Experts predict that the wide-open office, popularized by tech industry titans like Google and Facebook, will become a thing of the past. The fad, already becoming passé, has become almost dangerous in the face of the virus — employees often sit packed in large, open rooms, with desks placed close enough to reach out and touch your coworker.  But don't mourn the death of that open-office floor plan just yet: though it was once heralded as the key to employee collaboration and productivity, it was never all that great for workers anyway.  The rise of the open office Beginning in the early aughts, American tech workers began leaving cubicles behind in favor of an open-floor-plan office space.  It all started with Google, which revealed its new headquarters, the Googleplex, in 2005. Based in Mountain View, California, it was — and still is — unlike any office in America. It had a bowling alley! And sleep pods! And even sand volleyball courts!  The Googleplex, with its open design and flexible spaces, was heralded as the future.  "The attitude was: We're inventing a new world, why do we need the old world?" Clive Wilkinson, the architect who designed the Googleplex, told Fast Company last year.   Soon, companies started coming to Wilkinson and saying they wanted to by like Google, he told Fast Company. Not long after, Facebook followed suit, opening what it says is the biggest open-floor-plan office in the world: approximately 2,800 employees working in "one giant room," CEO Mark Zuckerberg said when it opened in 2015.  "We saw a big pendulum shift where everyone came out of private offices and big cubicles into the open office, and that was an epic fail, because one size does not fit all. The open office has gotten a really bad rap as a result of doing it really badly," Melissa Hanley, CEO of the design firm Blitz, which counts Microsoft and Instacart among its clients, told Business Insider. At the time, the idea was that if you broke down physical barriers between workers, it would break down metaphorical ones as well. Employees would be able to easily collaborate on projects and would be enticed to engage in a free-flow of ideas with their next-door neighbor. The company's CEO, once ensconced in a glass corner office, would now sit right out on the floor next to their employees, a person of the people.  But that's not exactly what happened.  Instead, employees put on headphones to shut out the noise that came along with wide-open spaces. They reported feeling stressed, anxious, and less likely to collaborate with those around them. In fact, a Harvard Business Review study from last year found that when a company switched to an open office, face-to-face interactions actually decreased by 70% — employees just communicated electronically instead.  And that wasn't the only problem. A prescient 2018 piece by Vice's Mark Hay argued that open offices are vectors for disease, with employees who work in them taking more sick days than those who work in enclosed offices.  "In the workplace, it only follows that if you're working in close proximity and handling objects and interacting closely with each other, it's a very easy route of transmission for germs, viruses, bacteria," Melissa Perry, a public-health researcher at George Washington University's Milken Institute School of Public Health, told Business Insider earlier this year. Socializing productivity But beyond the prevalence of germs, there's another downside of the open office, at least for employees.  "The open-plan office has always been in some ways in the interest of the company rather than the worker, because it socializes productivity," Melissa Gregg, Intel's chief technologist for user experience, recently told The New York Times. "It forces workers to watch each other's work, and it creates very few spaces of privacy for individual workers."  Mentally, there's a pressure that comes with open offices. Workers don't want to look like they're not working hard, or like they're ducking out early. As Jeff Pochepan argued in Inc Magazine in 2018, this means that workers may work longer hours or feel undue pressure to be "on" and engaged 100% of the time, since everyone can see them.  "I definitely think there's a concept within agile workplaces about accountability and thinking that you set something out that you're going to do and then you have to report back, did you do it," Hanley said. "I do think that the visual access to each other is probably feeding into that."  Tracy Brower, a sociologist and principal in the Applied Research + Consulting Group at furniture manufacturer Steelcase, likened open offices to manufacturing, where workers generally kept an even, steady pace until a "rate-buster" came in — someone who worked harder and faster, thereby pushing the whole group too much. "There's hustle culture where, I may not actually be more productive, but by goodness, I'm going to stay later than my boss, no matter what," Brower told Business Insider. "I think we can get caught up in working for the sake of working and being busy for the sake of being busy."  'The kick it needed to get it out the door' In the short term, the office is already changing. Companies are considering density like never before, spacing out workstations, limiting large groups in conference rooms and elevators, and placing partitions in between desks, almost like the cubicles of yore.  But these cosmetic alterations are likely to be the precursor to a bigger change. Even though a full return to the office still appears to be a long way off, experts agree that when we do return — perhaps in summer 2021, as Google and Facebook expect — we should expect some permanent changes.  "Open floor plans are most definitely going to disappear," Rhiannon Staples, chief marketing officer at human resources management company Hibob, told Business Insider. "I feel like it was already on its way out and this was the kick it needed to get it out the door." But Brower said she doesn't think the open office is 100% dead — it's just going to feel different than it did in early 2020.  "The pendulum has really swung toward open, open, open, and lots of density," Brower said. "I think what has now happened is we're starting to swing that pendulum way to the other side — more barriers, more boundaries, less density." While that mentality is critical for the safety of employees in the near future, Brower said she doesn't expect things to stay that way.  "I think what we will end up seeing is that pendulum landing somewhere a little bit close to the middle," Brower said. "This is actually our opportunity to reimagine, reinvent, use the coronavirus almost as an accelerator to get to places that are maybe even better than it would have been." SEE ALSO: With no mandate to shut down even if employees get sick, one expert calls Silicon Valley's reopening 'a very easy route of transmission' Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How 'white savior' films like 'The Help' and 'Green Book' hurt Hollywood
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Plus: A Canon ransomware hack, a nasty Twitter bug, and more of the week's top security news.
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Commentary: I used to love, love, love Samsung Pay. But now its killer feature no longer feels so vital.
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Bozoma Saint John, Netflix's newly named chief marketing officer, has climbed the corporate-marketing ranks over 20 years using her celebrity connections and ability to tie brands like Pepsi and Apple to cultural trends. She's also known as unapologetically outspoken and a role model for women of color — who are notoriously underrepresented in the C-suites of corporations.  Netflix has long been synonymous with streaming video, but it needs to convince people to keep subscribing as new options from HBO and Disney emerge. Some say a chief marketing officer with huge personal stardom can risk overshadowing the very brands they're hired to promote. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Shortly after noon on a recent Saturday, Bozoma Saint John appeared on thousands of women's computer screens. It was the inaugural livestream of her event The Badass Workshop. Viewers paid $25 to learn Saint John's personal and work philosophies. Ciara's "Level Up" began playing, and in danced Saint John, blue stars glittering off her black jumpsuit. "I've seen all the descriptions of what it looks like to be a global CMO, and it's not supposed to look like this," Saint John said through fuchsia lipstick, half her hair pulled into a braided topknot.  Even when the livestream suddenly crashed, the expert marketer spun it positively: "WE BROKE THE INNANET!" Saint John proclaimed on Instagram. Saint John, who was named chief marketing officer of Netflix in June, has always taken an unconventional path. While the role has become increasingly the domain of data geeks, she's a glamourous executive who goes with her gut and is known for her work tying brands like Pepsi and Apple to cultural trends. Before joining Netflix, Saint John served as a marketing executive for Apple, Uber, and Endeavor. Netflix is one of the most popular streaming-video players. But it needs to convince people to keep subscribing as new options launch from competitors like HBO and Disney. Her hiring also comes at a moment when Silicon Valley, along the rest of corporate America, desperately needs more executives of color. Saint John, with her cultural magic touch, could be just what Netflix needs — but as her persona grows, some question if she risks overshadowing the companies she serves. Business Insider spoke with 18 of Saint John's colleagues, friends, and competitors for this story. Netflix declined to make Saint John available for an interview. Saint John stood out from others since childhood Until age 12, Saint John lived in Ghana. After the country's government fell to a military coup in the 1980s, Saint John's family relocated to Colorado Springs, Colorado. Now 43, the 5-foot-11 executive says she always stood out among mostly white faces in classrooms and boardrooms. Over time, Saint John has built a robust list of connections from the worlds of media, politics, entertainment, and tech, including Anna Wintour, the Obamas, and Facebook's Carolyn Everson. A recurring theme of Saint John is the idea of "bringing your whole self to work," which she frequently evokes in conversations and interviews. In 2014, Saint John captivated a crowd when she was named to the American Advertising Federation's Hall of Achievement. She gave a moving speech and talked about the loss of her husband, Peter, who died from cancer one year prior. "She won over not just the room but the whole industry," said Ross Martin, the president of the marketing services company Known, who received the same honor that year. Those high-profile ties and that honest nature are captured in Saint John's Instagram account, where she broadcasts a jet-setting life as "badassboz" as well as her role as the mother of a 10-year-old. She has also made rounds in the glossy lifestyle-magazine circuit — with interviewers calling her the "Queen of Silicon Valley" and "a better brand than Uber." Her acquaintances, like Tiffany R. Warren, the senior vice president and chief diversity officer at the ad giant Omnicom, speak of Saint John's open-book approach to life, informed by her African heritage and religious faith. "What you see is what you get," Warren said. "That's how I think of Boz." Other stories tell of her praying with the investor Anjula Acharia before a high-stakes presentation and subbing in for Arianna Huffington at the Cannes Lions festival at the last minute when Huffington was recovering from hip-replacement surgery. She uses her position as one of the few visible Black women in her field. She teamed up with Luvvie Ajayi Jones, Glennon Doyle, and Stacey Bendet to launch #ShareTheMicNow, an Instagram campaign to magnify people of color, and served as the Ghana ambassador for the education nonprofit Pencils of Promise. She built a career on emotional and cultural connections At a time when chief marketing officers increasingly live and die by the numbers, Saint John's stock-in-trade is connecting with consumers on an emotional level, and, in her own words, trusting her gut. This approach can open her to criticism that she doesn't care about return on investment as much as a chief marketing officer should. "There are some marketers that lead with logic and data, and there are other marketers that lead with instinct and culture. She sits far out on the instinct and culture side," her friend Jonathan Mildenhall, who is a cofounder of the consulting firm TwentyFirstCenturyBrand, said. At Pepsi, Saint John spearheaded projects like a series of livestreamed Twitter concerts with Katy Perry and others that marked a new union of social media, advertising, and pop music, the former Pepsi executive Shiv Singh said. She helped land Beyoncé for the 2013 Pepsi Super Bowl Halftime Show in New Orleans and assembled the trio of Kerry Washington, Mary J. Blige, and Taraji P. Henson for a buzzy Apple Music Emmy night ad in 2015. "She has such a strong understanding of culture that she gets how to embed a brand in it without it seeming inauthentic," said Joe Anthony, the founder of the agency Hero Collective, who met Saint John while working with Pepsi. At Apple's 2016 Worldwide Developers Conference, Saint John introduced a revamped Apple Music by leading the typically staid crowd through a raucous rendition of "Rapper's Delight." That and other public appearances paved the way for other Apple executives to develop public profiles, said Justina Omokhua, the senior vice president of brand marketing at Endeavor who also worked under Saint John at Apple. Putting out fires in Silicon Valley At Uber and Endeavor, Saint John also put her emotionally and celebrity-driven approach to work to fix crises. She joined Uber in 2017 as its chief brand officer. The company's reputation was being dragged by a series of punishing revelations about its corporate culture and treatment of drivers. After an eight-hour meeting with former CEO Travis Kalanick and board member Arianna Huffington, Saint John was hired. She and Huffington had first met six months earlier at a private dinner at the CES trade show. "I didn't know who she was, but she was such a force of nature that I was just taken by her," Huffington told Business Insider. "She recalled the story of how she once took her Uber driver to an Iggy Pop concert, and that's when I realized that she could really help humanize the brand." Saint John helped shift Uber's marketing focus from being a mere utility to something more essential in people's lives. Under her direction, the company worked with celebrities like LeBron James and ESPN's Cari Champion to promote that message, and she helped craft a 2018 spot that featured a heartfelt apology from Uber's new CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, about the company's toxic culture. Ari Emanuel, a Hollywood dealmaker and Endeavor's CEO,  wooed Saint John away from Uber in 2018. There, she rubbed elbows with celebrities like Wintour and Tom Ford at the Endeavor-owned New York Fashion Week, spoke with would-be investors for an ultimately unsuccessful initial public offering, and helped the ad agency 160over90 win new work from clients like McDonald's and Lowe's. She also helped Papa John's take responsibility for founder John Schnatter's racist missteps by using angry customer tweets to apologize. 'She's the CMO of herself' As her career has grown, so has Saint John's personal brand. In recent years, she's flirted with the idea of a Starz docuseries, started an iHeartMedia podcast with Katie Couric, and launched The Badass Workshop. Acharia, who is Priyanka Chopra's manager in addition to being an investor, saw all these activities as a natural progression for Saint John, whom she called a "born star." To Saint John, her sense of social responsibility is interconnected with the work she does as a marketer. But where some see stardom, others see a potential problem. Multiple people interviewed for this article said Saint John's outsize personality risked outshining the very brands that she's been hired to promote. "She puts on other coats, jackets, and uniforms sometimes, but she's only worked for one company the entire time, which is the Bozoma company," one marketing executive said. "She's the very definition of the CMO of herself."  This tension can be more intense for executives of color, who already face systemic bias. To Mildenhall, the bigger Saint John's profile gets, the greater tensions could become with the brands that employ her.  "Everybody should figure out what their authentic brand is, but that personal brand can never be bigger than the brand that you're in service of, or bigger than the company that you're working at," Mildenhall said. Netflix wants to have a bigger role in pop culture Netflix added 10.1 million paid streaming subscribers during the second quarter of 2020, even as the coronavirus pandemic decimated many other legacy and digital-media companies. It had a global marketing budget of $2.65 billion in 2019. But new competitors are challenging its service, including upstarts like Quibi and more successful launches like Disney Plus and HBO Max. Forrester principal analyst Jim Nail said co-CEOs Reed Hastings and Ted Sarandos have recently begun emphasizing Netflix's ability to influence pop culture through a steady stream of original hits like "Bird Box," which helps it retain subscribers and sign up new ones who don't want to miss out on the latest cultural phenomenon. Netflix has also sought to deepen its relationship with the Black community through investments in Black-owned businesses and colleges, as well as collaborations with influencers like former first lady Michelle Obama and the filmmaker Ava DuVernay.  Nail said Netflix's goal of influencing culture lined up with Saint John's record of helping companies stand out by co-opting trends beyond their industries. "It's almost a repositioning. They're certainly enhancing and enriching their positioning with the idea of being a key part of culture," he said. There may be no one better-suited to help it than Saint John, who built a career by ignoring the rules and finding a place in culture for everything from high-end headphones to canned sugar water. And for that, Saint John isn't apologizing. "You know how many times I've been told I'm too much? A lot. All the time," she said during her inaugural Badass Workshop. "But it's the reason I'm successful. It's the same things that they'll celebrate you for that they'll criticize about you too."SEE ALSO: We mapped out Netflix's 56 most powerful executives including its new co-CEO and CMO in an exclusive interactive chart Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
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Over the past year, Chinese and Japanese investors poured more than $3 billion into Latin American startups. Brazil has received the bulk of the capital to date, boosting five startups to unicorn status during this time. As these startups reach their growth and expansion stages, there’s been a notable uptick in competition between a few super-apps that dominate the market.  In the US, there is sufficient capital to help many similar competitors expand rapidly and succeed in the market, each serving its own niche. Meanwhile, Latin America’s under-invested startup ecosystem is looking a lot more like Asia, where a handful… This story continues at The Next Web
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Not too long ago, many pundits have declared tablets to be dead. Not only did they fail to account for the unwavering strength of Apple’s iPads, especially the new breed of iPad Pros, they also never saw the COVID-19 coronavirus coming. Both factors have now contributed to a surge in tablet shipments across the world in the second quarter of … Continue reading
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Drones of all sizes are being used by environmental advocates to monitor deforestation, by conservationists to track poachers, and by journalists and activists to document large protests. As a political sociologist who studies social movements and drones, I document a wide range of nonviolent and pro-social drone uses in my new book, “The Good Drone.” I show that these efforts have the potential to democratize surveillance. But when the Department of Homeland Security redirects large, fixed-wing drones from the U.S.-Mexico border to monitor protests, and when towns experiment with using drones to test people for fevers, it’s time to think… This story continues at The Next Web
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The expansion will release in early September
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(Aarhus University) An international team of researchers led by Aarhus University are the first to determine the crystal structure of an exopolysaccharide receptor. The results give insight into how plants and microbes communicate, and this knowledge can hopefully be used for more sustainable agriculture where microbes play an important role.
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  VCs have long invested in software and consumer apps, the low-hanging fruit of the early tech decades that yielded spectacular returns. But three brothers who followed that investing groove themselves are now looking to stray out of it.  The brothers are Max Altman, whose interest in climate change led to their partnership; Sam Altman, former president of Y Combinator; and Jack Altman, CEO and co-founder of Lattice. The Altman brothers noticed that people working in fields like non-carbon energy, solar geoengineering, and biological manufacturing have been neglected by the SaaS-centric startup ecosystem, so they decided to create Apollo, a fund that will invest $3 million in riskier startups known as "moonshot companies."  While there's a lot of risk involved in funding moonshots, the Altman brothers are betting that their portfolio companies can "get something to market that people are willing to pay for."  They hope that Apollo jump-starts long-lasting change that leads to a more sustainable world.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Like many Silicon Valley notables, the three Altman brothers have built their careers so far working and investing in the software and consumer app arenas. Sam Altman may be the best known for his former role as  president of the big accelerator Y Combinator, but his brothers Max and Jack are also established names in the startup ecosystem. Now they've joined up to try something different.  The three brothers have broken out of the SaaS mold and formed a new fund, Apollo, to funnel money into "moonshot" companies — think rapid-response vaccines, AR/VR, and non-carbon energy — that VCs have often turned a blind eye to. Max Altman told Business Insider how the idea came about. He'd begun his VC career by investing in software and apps like Glide, a platform that lets people create apps from a Google Sheet. Meanwhile, Sam Altman, his older brother, founded and sold his first startup, Loopt, for $43.4 million. He later served as the president of Y Combinator and is now the CEO of OpenAI, where he was previously co-chairperson with Elon Musk. Jack Altman, his younger brother, is CEO and co-founder of Lattice, a SaaS startup that raised $45 million in its Series D funding round in July.  But somewhere along the way, Max Altman developed an interest in combating climate change.  After working at Zenefits, Altman left San Francisco to become a scuba diving instructor. On scuba diving excursions to Central America and Southeast Asia, he saw first-hand how the rise in temperature due to climate change was destroying the ocean's ecosystems. Under water is "where you can see the effects of climate change the most rapidly," Altman explained.  Altman told Business Insider "there's nothing wrong with people working on" software, but said he decided to alter his path and dedicate his time to combating some of the globe's most pressing problems, including disruptions in the environment.  So Altman, along with his brothers, decided to launch Apollo. This new project will fund moonshot companies working on financially risky projects that, if successful, could transform the world.  The brothers recognized that founders working in fields like non-carbon energy, solar geoengineering, and biological manufacturing have been neglected by the SaaS-centric investing ecosystem, even though many of them have PhDs and groundbreaking ideas.  Altman said that there's a "huge marketing opportunity" for life sciences and climate change technology, and some of the largest tech companies seem to agree.  Microsoft established a $1 billion fund to combat climate change earlier this year, while Google announced that it was launching an incubator for climate change startups. Apollo will be writing modest $3 million seed-round checks to get their founders off the ground, and the fund will get a 20% stake in each startup. Altman said that he and his brothers are advising their startups to build their version of a Tesla Roadster — Elon Musk's early, crazy-fast electric sportscar — and "get something to market that people are willing to pay for." The founders do not need to build their final project in order to get funding from Apollo, but they do need to prove that there is a market fit for their larger idea, he said.  "There's a lot of capital risk," Altman said. "The next rounds need to be $50 million. Then $500 million." "It's scary to start a company," he added, especially in these spaces when it might fail. When it comes to a new carbon capture technology, "you don't know if it's going to work," he said.  So far, the brothers have received hundreds of applications from people with PhDs, and they plan to make their funding decisions in August.  While Sam and Jack Altman will serve as advisors, all eyes will be on Max Altman, who is running the program's day-to-day operations. "My goal is to be a facilitator that sets people up for success," Altman said. The Altman brothers are betting that the younger generation will be willing to pay "a premium for something that is better for the environment," Altman said. He said he hopes that the fund will jump-start long-lasting change that leads to a more sustainable world. As an example of what he would like the fund to accomplish, Altman pointed to Norway's promise to require that all of its short-haul flights make use of electric aircraft in the next few decades. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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  Walmart+, the company's Amazon Prime competitor, is expected to launch this month, according to a report first published in Recode.  The retailer is expected to set the annual Walmart+ subscription price at $98 per year. The service will reportedly include same-day delivery of groceries and fuel discounts among other perks. Finally, the service could also include access to exclusive deals and shopping events before the general public, as well as automated checkout at Walmart stores. Read everything you need to know about the Walmart+ shopping subscription service here and see how Walmart+ vs. Amazon Prime shakes out based on what we know right now in our comparison of the two services. Amazon Prime is about to meet its first true challenger in Walmart+, the premium retail subscription from the nation's largest brick-and-mortar retailer. Walmart+ is expected to launch in July 2020 with a price of $98 per year, according to a report in Recode. For those keeping score, that's more than $20 cheaper than the cost of Amazon Prime, but the Walmart+ launch comes at a time when about 150 million people worldwide are already subscribed to Amazon's service. So, if you came to learn all about the price for Walmart+ and what you get for the money, let's break it down to give as thorough an answer as we possibly can right now.Walmart Plus price Walmart+ is expected to cost a flat fee of $98.00 per year. This subscription will include "same-day delivery of groceries and general merchandise, discounts on fuel at Walmart gas stations, and early access to product deals," Recode reports. The service will also reportedly include benefits like "unlimited same-day delivery of groceries and other goods from Walmart Supercenters, reserved delivery slots and open-slot notifications, as well as some access to Walmart's new Express two-hour delivery offering, though not unlimited usage," according to Recode. Walmart+ will additionally feature "discounts on fuel at Walmart gas stations, early access to some product deals, and a Scan & Go service that would allow shoppers to check out in Walmart stores without waiting in line," the Recode report reads. It's clear that the onus is on Walmart to deliver the perks necessary to make that $98 fee worthwhile. However, based on the early reports, if you find yourself shopping more from Walmart than you do Amazon (bonus points if that includes grocery shopping), then Walmart+ could very well be worth the cost.  Walmart Plus features Services like Walmart+ essentially live on the additional perks and features that they offer. For instance, Amazon Prime includes access to its unlimited video and music streaming services, as well as a litany of exclusive daily deals. So, what will the $98 annual fee for Walmart+ reportedly include? Same-day delivery of groceries and general merchandise Reserved delivery slots and open-slot notifications Discounts on fuel at Walmart gas stations Early access to product deals Access to Walmart's new Express two-hour delivery offering A Scan & Go automated checkout service at stores A Walmart+-branded credit card at some time after launch That's a good amount of additional perks for a launch, but the service is notably lacking in a serious entertainment bundle play similar to Amazon Prime Video. Based on early reports, it's unclear whether Walmart will include some kind of streaming service. On that note, it's also lacking a music subscription option and wide support from a network of connected devices.  Walmart Plus vs. Amazon Prime How does Walmart Plus stack up against Amazon Prime right now? We break it down in our comparison. Walmart+ has a lot going for it on paper and will be a boon for frequent Walmart shoppers if the reports prove true. Without official details, it's too early to say whether Walmart+ will be able to attract a large number of subscribers or convert current Amazon Prime subscribers. We'll keep you up to date with all the latest information as we learn more ahead of the official launch. Read our early take on Walmart Plus vs Amazon Prime
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Slumping car fortunes and ever-hotter crossover sales reportedly spell the end for US C-Class, E-Class and S-Class coupes and cabriolets.
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“I see it as kind of a Wright brothers moment on another planet,” says the project's chief engineer at JPL.
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Image: Microsoft Microsoft showed off a lot of games coming to the Xbox Series X, including exclusives and brand-new titles, at its July showcase event. We now have a much better idea of what’s in store for Microsoft’s upcoming console. If you weren’t able to watch the event live, we’ve collected some of the biggest trailers from the show right here, and you can catch a replay of the whole event on YouTube. Halo Infinite Microsoft shared the first look at Halo Infinite’s campaign today, including an extended gameplay sequence where Master Chief took on waves of aliens. 343 Industries said the game will run at a “flawless” 60 frames per second. Halo Infinite will launch this holiday season. Avowed Avowed is the newest game from famed studio Obsidian... Continue reading…
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Short, clever, blood-soaked: You have not played a pixelated Metroidvania like this.
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‘Abort’ is gone, too, and so is ‘segregate’ and ‘kill’ VMware has joined the ranks of companies issuing style guides that remove discriminatory language – though gone further than some of its peers by addressing gendered terms for hardware and virtualization-specific language.…
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The comet will make its closest approach to Earth on Thursday before it fades into black. Here's how you can catch a glimpse.
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DOJ alleges the hackers started work in 2009, hit military contractors.
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Home Assistants have increased in popularity in recent years but are they suited for South Africans?
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TSMC mass-produced the 7nm process two years ago, and this year it will mass-produce the 5nm process. Huawei and Apple have already pre-ordered most of ... The post TSMC revealed some details of its 3nm process appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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So many of the companies we admire followed a similar path as they grappled with their new priorities. And, even though companies started at different stages of the journey, we noticed some common themes and issues emerging. Because we’re students of the way people work together, we started to talk with the leaders of these […] The post Navigating the Disruption of Work appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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AMG's most insane GT yet has a crazy body kit and a giant rear wing.
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Microsoft said Monday it plans to follow California's digital privacy law throughout the US.The move expands the reach of the law, which gives consumers more control over how companies collect and manage their personal data.Microsoft said in a blog post that it's a strong supporter of the California Consumer Privacy Act, which goes into effect on Jan. 1.Passed in June 2018, California's law is meant to provide protection to California residents in the absence of federal law and to push the nation to offer more consumer protections."CCPA marks an important step toward providing people with more robust control over their data in the United States," Julie Brill, Microsoft's chief privacy officer, wrote in the post."It also shows that we can make progress to strengthen privacy protections in this country at the state level even when Congress can't or won't act."
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Bithumb Global, the leading digital asset exchange in the world, announces the highly anticipated crypto asset, Bithumb Coin (BT), which is the native token for the recently announced Bithumb Chain.This press release features multimedia.View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20191111005703/en/Bithumb Global announces the release of their native token titled “Bithumb Coin” which will hold the ticker name, $BT.The token allows transactions within Bithumb Chain which enables a plethora of different use-cases.Bithumb Chain is the decentralized open-source protocol that powers the products, services, and infrastructure within the Bithumb Family ecosystem which helps capture value from both upstream and downstream of the trading business.
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If you've ever lost your Tupperware lids deep in a drawer, or if you tend to bang your fingers hammering a nail into anything, there may not be an app for that, but there sure is a gadget.Even better, there are budget-friendly products that come highly rated and reviewed on Amazon.We've rounded up 50 crazy-useful things you can get for under $20, each of which will make your life easier, whether you're traveling, working, showering or just straining some pasta.
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In a report released recently, TrendMicro claims to have discovered 49 malicious photo applications and games on the Play Store.In total, they were installed by 3 million devices.Once present on the smartphone of its victims, the application multiplies the tactics to avoid Google’s security systems.According to TrendMicro, the malicious code of each application is camouflaged by “custom algorithms”.If a Chrome shortcut mysteriously appears on the home screen of your phone, it may be that a malware is at work.As always, the malware waits several hours after installation before deploying ads.
China
The annual Chinese 11.11 massive sale is about to commence and major e-commerce platforms across China are already cutting prices.Yesterday the 8GB + 128GB version of the Xiaomi Mi 9 got its own price cut on Suning.This smartphone is currently selling for 2299 yuan ($329) which is very competitive.This smartphone hit the market in the first half of 2019.Although the 200 yuan ($28) price seems small, it is just enough for a smartphone that hit the market in February this year.This smartphone comes with a 6.39-inch Samsung AMOLED screen with a resolution of 2340 x 1080.
China
The collapse of fast fashion chain Forever 21, which filed for bankruptcy in the US this September, shook up the retail industry worldwide.Its CEO, David Jou – a member of the growing Lazada mafia – set up the omnichannel fashion startup in 2013, two years after co-founding Lazada’s Thailand business.This results in an easier return process, which Jou says remains the biggest pain point in fashion, plaguing even successful companies like British fashion e-tailer Asos.At an average return rate of 30% on a per unit basis, every order – assuming an average order size of three items – will likely generate one return, which doesn’t make a great customer experience, the CEO notes.Despite introducing 365-day returns, as well as including information on an item’s fit, size, and material composition on each product page, these alternatives could not substitute fitting rooms, Jou says.The result is a network of fitting rooms that include Pomelo retail stores, pickup-only locations – which do not hold any inventory for purchase – and partner locations such as cafes, co-working spaces, and independent clothing boutiques.
US
Some Samsung smart TVs will no longer include Netflix support starting Dec. 1, according to a Tuesday report.The change is due to technical limitations, BGR reported earlier.Samsung's support page includes a notice that reads: "Due to technical limitations, Netflix will no longer be supported on some devices beginning on December 1st, 2019.Some older Samsung smart TVs are affected by this change.In the future, Netflix can be viewed from many other devices capable of connecting to your TV."It's not clear which smart TVs specifically will be impacted.
UK
There has been quite the buzz around The Outer Worlds (trailer) since its announcement last year – and for good reason.The devs, frustrated at their hard work being binned, left and founded Obsidian Entertainment.Bethesda had remade Fallout in its image (and would do so again with 2015's fourth mainline instalment), eschewing Black Isle's isometric view for a first-person experience in the vein of 2006's The Elder Scrolls IV, better known as Oblivion.Obsidian proved that its bread-and-butter writing chops could thrive in this environment with New Vegas.This tongue-in-cheek sci-fi romp positions the player as some poor sod who has spent a rather chilly 70 years among the best and brightest scientists and technicians Earth has to offer in suspended animation aboard the vessel Hope, which was originally destined for the far-flung Halcyon colony.The ship is boarded by a rebel Doc Brown-type character, a nutty professor by the name of Phineas Vernon Welles, whose wanted poster can be seen across the colony.
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