John Robidoux

John Robidoux

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Following 35
UK
Japanese electric car owners have many reasons to visit the Nissan Pavilion in Yokohama, Japan. Apparently, guests can pay for parking with electricity from their EVs. This novel idea is a global first and showcases the many innovative features unique to Nissan’s Pavilion. “The Pavilion is a place where customers can see, feel, and be inspired by our near-future vision … Continue reading
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All eyes might be one the launch of Microsoft’s next-gen Xbox Series X console during the holiday season this year. However, the company seems poised to release a more affordable Xbox Series S in the meantime. According to photos of controller packaging posted by twitter user Zak and confirmed by The Verge, Microsoft will release a cheaper version of the Xbox Series X and it’ll be called Xbox Series S. The company hasn’t yet announced any details related to this. [Read: Stream Game Pass games to your Android with xCloud in September] The controller mention in photos was sold on an ecommerce site,… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Xbox
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The so-hot-it-won't-stay-in-stock $400 VR headset has been popping in and out of stock for months. Here's where you can find it right now.
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It sounds like a peaceful way to go, but what exactly does it entail? We asked the experts to find out.
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Facebook is rolling out official music videos across its platform as well as launching a new music destination on Facebook Watch in India, the United States and Thailand.
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(University of Sydney) Dubbed the "invisibility cloak", engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue.
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The overall winner of the Best of Android Awards was the OnePlus 8 Pro, and we're giving one away for free!
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Coronavirus has changed everything. Make sense of it all with the Waugh Zone, our evening politics briefing. Sign up now.Matt Hancock has said all future GP consultations should be done over the phone or by video unless there is a “compelling clinical reason” for a face-to-face appointment.In a speech on Thursday, the health secretary said it was wrong to “patronise older people” by not believing they were capable of using technology.“So from now on, all consultations should be teleconsultations unless there’s a compelling clinical reason not to,” he said. “Of course, if there’s an emergency, the NHS will be ready and waiting to see you in person – just as it always has been.“But if they are able to, patients should get in contact first – via the web or by calling in advance.“That way, care is easier to manage and the NHS can deliver a much better service.”Hancock said this change would be particularly useful in rural areas where it could save long travel times for doctors and patients.But Mencap, the learning disability charity, said moving away from in-person consultations could “seriously exacerbate the health inequalities that already exist”.Edel Harris, the charity’s chief executive, said: “The UK’s 1.5m people with a learning disability should be offered face-to-face consultations automatically – without needing to ask for them.“This is a reasonable adjustment and we will be asking NHS England to ensure this happens – starting with annual health checks.”Speaking at the Royal College of Physicians, Hancock also said he wanted the NHS to have “leaders at all levels” who have a mentality like Admiral Nelson and his fleet.“When the British Navy was heavily outnumbered at the Battle of Trafalgar, it was Nelson’s approach to leadership, the ‘Nelson touch’, that proved to be decisive,” he said.“Admiral Villeneuve, whose fleet was defeated by Nelson, said it best. He said to any other nation the loss of Nelson would have been irreparable, but in the British fleet every captain was a Nelson.“This is the mentality that we need. I want an NHS and care system that is full of leaders, leaders at all levels.”Hancock’s speech came shortly after an analysis by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) revealed England had the highest levels of excess mortality in Europe across the first half of 2020.It is the first time the ONS has compared mortality rates in different countries to measure the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.Related... UK Coronavirus Self-Isolation Period Extended To 10 Days With Immediate Effect PM Made 'Incorrect' Child Poverty Claims, Statistics Watchdog Rules
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“This is a Wright Brothers moment, but on another planet.”
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Image: General Motors General Motors is now set to unveil the all-electric Hummer truck sometime in the fourth quarter of this year, after scratching the original May 20th reveal due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But in the meantime, the company (and the GMC brand, under which the resurrected Hummer will be sold) is teasing a side profile of the truck — along with a more traditional SUV version without a pickup bed. The Hummer silhouettes appeared in a new ad that GMC released on Wednesday shortly after parent company GM announced its financial results for the second quarter of 2020. GM posted a nearly $800 million loss for the quarter, which was better than expected considering the company — like others — went through a weeks-long pandemic-related production... Continue reading…
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According to Qualcomm, its Quick Charge 5 system can charge handsets from zero to 50 percent within five minutes.
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He ran afoul of policies against posting coronavirus misinformation.
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A new study details the results of having healthy men under the age of 40 ‘stuff’ themselves with large quantities of pizza in order to demonstrate how the body handles this excessive indulgence. The results were somewhat surprising, though they come with an important caveat. Despite eating double the amount needed to feel full, the participants’ bodies were able to … Continue reading
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Divination in the digital age has never been easier.
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The World Beyond panel kicked things off with a new teaser that offered new glimpses of the series
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'Listen, we're in the middle of a global pandemic,' an Xbox manager said
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The workplace messaging company says tying Teams to Office violates competition law.
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Finding the most profitable and enticing applications for public and private 5G remains the top challenge for all market participants.
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A possible Nokia 2.4 smartphone was spotted on TENAA certification recently, which in turn reveals most fo the specs of the upcoming Nokia budget device.
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The Galaxy Z Flip sports a foldable glass display that you'll want to keep protected. Here are the top cases.
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Two more studies prove that the much-hyped antimalarial doesn’t treat Covid-19.
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Airbnb has resumed preparations for an initial public offering, company CEO Brian Chesky told employees Wednesday. After being hit hard by the coronavirus crisis, Airbnb's business has bounced back, Chesky and the company have said. There are good reasons for the company to go through with its offering — the stock market has rebounded, recent tech-related IPOs have done well, and Airbnb employees run the risk that some of their options will expire and become worthless if the company doesn't debut this year. But there are reasons why the company might want to push back the IPO, such as the fact that travel-related stocks haven't recovered from the crisis, it's unclear how investors will receive a company that got hit hard by the pandemic, and there's a risk that the uptick in cases in the US and other countries will harm Airbnb's businesses. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky wants everyone to know that his company could still go public this year. Whether it should is another matter entirely. Chesky told company employees Wednesday that Airbnb's business has rebounded from the severe hit it took from the coronavirus crisis, according to a report in the New York Times. As a result, its much-anticipated initial public offering is back on track, he said. "We are resuming this work" of preparing for an IPO, Chesky said in an email to employees that was shared with Business Insider by a company representative. "We're not committing to going public this year, but we're not ruling it out. When the market is ready, we will be ready. We were down, but we're not out."   It's worth noting that Chesky did not actually provide a concrete timeframe for its IPO. Will it happen in 2020? or 2021? Airbnb isn't "ruling out" an IPO this year, but it's taking a pretty low-risk approach to declaring a "revival" in its home-sharing business. In addition to sharing the email with Business Insider, Airbnb allowed a New York Times reporter to attend the employee event, so it seems pretty clear Chesky wanted the news of Airbnb's comeback to be broadcast widely. Airbnb has rebounded from the crisis There's little doubt that Airbnb is in much better shape than it was even just a few months ago. In response to the spreading COVID-19 pandemic, governments around the world restricted the movement of their citizens, essentially quashing the travel business worldwide. Airbnb, like other travel companies, was hit hard. It cancelled numerous reservations, saw new bookings plunge, and Chesky warned that its revenue this year would be cut by more than half. To shore up its business, the online travel company cut 1,900 jobs, laid off hundred contract workers, and slashed its marketing budget. With the company in real danger of burning through its cash in a prolonged downturn, it raised $2 billion by selling debt at high interest rates. But things started looking up for the company in May as US states and countries around the world began to lift their restrictions on travel and commercial activity. By mid-May, the number of global bookings made each week for short-term rentals — Airbnb's core business — had bounced back almost to the levels they were at before the pandemic. Data the company released more recently indicates its business has only improved since then. On July 8, customers booked 1 million nights worth of reservations through Airbnb, the first time the company had seen that volume of bookings since March 3, the company said this week. And from June 1 to June 20, the number of US bookings on Airbnb for reservations that would accommodate at least one child was up 43% from the same period a year earlier, it said earlier this month. With business picking up, with the additional funds in its coffers, and with its decreased expenses, Airbnb is almost certainly out of its near-term cash crisis. Airbnb has good reasons to go public soon And the fact is there are good reasons for it to go public sooner, rather than later. Like Airbnb's business, the stock market has rebounded from the beating it took this spring from the coronavirus crisis. The Nasdaq is well above its pre-pandemic peak and is trading near its all-time high and the S&P 500 is near its pre-pandemic highs. Meanwhile, recent tech-related IPOs have been a hit with investors. NCino, a financial technology company, saw its share price nearly triple on its public market debut earlier this week. Online insurance company Lemonade's stock more than doubled on its first day of trading earlier this month. So too did online used vehicle trading site Vroom after it went public last month. While none of those companies were likely as affected by the coronavirus crisis as Airbnb was, they were all losing money even before the crisis. Chesky and his investors have almost certainly been watching those developments closely and fantasizing about how their own company — one of the best known and most highly valued private firms — would fare with public investors. Chesky has another reason to press forward with an IPO — employee pressure. Reportedly a significant portion of stock options awarded to some of the company's earliest employees are set to expire later this year. Much of the compensation that employees see at startups comes in the form of shares and options; many trade higher cash salaries for the chance that they'll see a big payoff when the startup goes public. The easiest way for Airbnb employees to be able to realize the value of those soon-to-expire shares would be for the company to go public; if it doesn't go public, there's a risk that they'll lose the chance to cash them in. But there are reasons why Airbnb should wait All that said, as Chesky indicated, it's not a sure thing that Airbnb will go public this year. And there are some good reasons why it might want to delay its debut. While investors have been hot for tech-related IPOs lately, the companies that hit the markets were not among those that were hardest hit by the coronavirus crisis. It's unclear what investors will make of the public debut of a company that was particularly affected by the pandemic — especially if it attempts to go out before it can show a decent track record of recovery and renewed growth. One potentially ominous sign for Airbnb is that the market remains down on travel companies. The share prices of the major carriers such as American Airlines and Southwest Airlines; the hotel chains, such as Hilton and Marriott; and the online reservation companies such as Expedia and Booking Holdings, are all still well off the levels they were at pre-pandemic. While Airbnb might be seeing a speedier recovery than those companies, investors are likely going to value it in part on the worth of those and similar peer companies. Another worry for Airbnb is that the pandemic hasn't gone away. While many countries have gotten the coronavirus under control, cases are exploding in the US, as well as in India, Brazil, and much of Latin America. In many of those Latin American countries, bookings have yet to bounce back after dropping off due to the pandemic, according to data from AirDNA, an industry research firm. In the US, while bookings surged in May and early June, they've tailed off in more recent weeks, according to AirDNA's data. That's likely due mostly to a mix of a return to normalcy after many Americans scratched their itch to get out and a seasonal slowdown, said Scott Shatford, CEO of the industry research firm. But the coronavirus could be playing a role too — and may play an even bigger one in coming months. Already, some states have started to reverse their reopening plans and reinstate restrictions on certain types of businesses. Further restrictions, including the re-imposition of shelter-in-place orders, are being debated or urged in some of the hardest hit areas.  There's a lot of uncertainty over what the "new normal" is going to look like in terms of people's lives and movements and what that's going to mean for the travel business, Shatford said. "Nobody has a crystal ball right now to see what it looks like three months from now," he said. And should Airbnb's business weaken again, that could undermine its effort to go public. So, yes, things look better for the company right now. And Chesky is right to be relieved. But don't be surprised if Airbnb stays private a while longer. Got a tip about Airbnb? Contact Troy Wolverton via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @troywolv, or send him a secure message through Signal at 415.515.5594. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Read more about Airbnb: Airbnb told employees it's resuming plans to go public as business slowly bounces back These are the 19 Airbnb execs rebuilding the company for growth and an IPO amid the biggest travel industry crisis in decades Airbnb's path to recovery is sending it on a collision course with vacation rental giant VRBO Airbnb might not get much of a bounce from the rebound in short-term rentals SEE ALSO: Airbnb just cut nearly 2,000 jobs, but the layoffs aren't even close to offsetting a $2.4 billion revenue shortfall this year Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How 'white savior' films like 'The Help' and 'Green Book' hurt Hollywood
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The long-awaited report on Russian interference in the UK will be published by next Wednesday.The Intelligence and Security Committee (ISC) agreed to make the report public as it sat for the first time after Julian Lewis was controversially elected chair over Boris Johnson’s favoured candidate Chris Grayling.The ISC, which oversees the work of the UK’s intelligence agencies such as MI5, MI6 and GCHQ, produced the report after examining possible Russian influence into the UK democratic process, particularly the 2016 EU referendum and 2017 general election.The prime minister has previously been criticised for the delay in publishing the report which he received in October as he was preparing for the December election.But No.10 insisted it could not be published until a new ISC was formed.Explained The Russia Report And Why Boris Johnson's Attempt To Get His Own Way Has Backfired The committee met for the first time on Thursday after it was finally put together, seven months after the general election.A spokesperson for the ISC said: “The committee has unanimously agreed this morning that it will publish the report on Russia prepared by its predecessor before the house rises for the summer recess. “There will be no further comment.”Russian interference into the US presidential election of 2016 is well-documented and there are fears that Vladimir Putin’s nation may have sought to exert similar influence in the UK.The report’s publication comes after Lewis accused Johnson of behaving in an “improper” way when he tried to tell Tory members of the ISC to choose Grayling as chair.Related... Julian Lewis Blasts 'Improper' Boris Johnson For Trying To Fix Intelligence Committee Vote How Julian Lewis Pulled Off A Very British Coup To Chair The Intelligence And Security Committee Chris Grayling Fails To Become Intelligence Committee Chairman
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Blockchain fantasy soccer startup Sorare has raised $4 million in a funding round backed by Seedcamp and German striker Andre Schurrle.  Schurrle told Business Insider he was "immediately impressed" by founders Nicolas Julia and Adrien Montfort, and that he will be "helping them along the journey" to build their card-trading game. In 2019, the global fantasy sport market was valued at around $18 billion, according to analysts at Market Watch – and is expected to almost double to $43 billion by 2026.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Fantasy soccer startup Sorare just raised $4 million in a funding round backed by Seedcamp and German striker Andre Schurrle.  Founded in 2018, Paris-based Sorare lets players collect and trade limited-edition cards of their favorite players, and compete with other users. It has officially licensed cards for almost 2,000 professional soccers players from Europe, the US, and Asia. "As a kid, I loved collecting my favorite football players in the Panini albums," said Schurrle, who has played for Chelsea and Borussia Dortmund, and who won the 2014 World Cup with the German national team. He was "immediately impressed" by founders Nicolas Julia and Adrien Montfort, he told Business Insider. "The cards are beautiful, the fantasy game is for fans that love this amazing game all around the world. I will be helping them along the journey to build the most exciting fantasy football game." The new funding round, which was also backed by Fabric Ventures and e.ventures, will pay for new hires and help push the number of licensing partnerships from 70 clubs to 150 by the end of 2020. "Sorare's mission is to make fantasy football global and rewarding with a new kind of collectibles: digital football cards," Julia said. "We are creating the easiest way for football fans to leverage their football knowledge and play with skin in the game. We are delighted to be backed by an incredible syndicate of investors who will help us drive the adoption of fantasy football forward."SEE ALSO: The biggest chess star on Earth just casually became the number one ranked player in the world's largest fantasy soccer league Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What it's like inside North Korea's controversial restaurant chain
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(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The first images from ESA/NASA's Solar Orbiter are now available to the public, including the closest pictures ever taken of the Sun.
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We’re here to guide you through the coronavirus pandemic. Sign up to the Life newsletter for daily tips, advice, how-tos and escapism.Nothing unites British office workers quite like a shared caffeine addiction, but Covid-19 has brought a new dawn of remote working and unprecedented hygiene standards.We waved goodbye to the silent 10am stand-off, where parched colleagues wait to see who’ll crack and offer that first bumper round. We haven’t whispered ‘anyone for tea?’ for months (half hoping not to be heard). And the impossible conundrum – juggle eight mugs and burn your hands as the scolding liquid sloshes the sides, or make four trips from the kitchen to the desk – is no more.The office tea round is dead – and we mourn it with mixed emotions. READ MORE: This Is How Remote Workers Will Look In 25 Years, Apparently We used to internally grimace when anyone ordered anything that wasn’t plain builder’s – but now, Susan’s Earl Grey with soya and half a sugar isn’t looking so bad. In fact, we religiously committed preferences to memory and took pride in getting it right, it’s almost sad to see that knowledge become redundant. What we won’t miss, however, is the pure disappointment when a colleague isn’t so conscientious – when you sip and realise they’ve forgotten your sugar, or an insipid substance is plopped under your nose. The chipped, mismatched cups that never quite looked clean can also fade into the past, thank you very much. Ditto the questionably stained teaspoons. And nothing is more gutting than when the brew you were offered – right when you needed it – is forgotten, because your colleague got side-tracked with, well, actual work. The chipped, mismatched cups that never quite looked clean can fade into the past, thank you very much.But for all its faults, the tea round punctuated the working day into manageable chunks. It gave us the nudge we needed to look away from our screens and talk to one another about something other than work. Those moments of shared giggles or united frustrations when a colleague ambled over to the kettle for a natter will be cherished. So too, will the times someone noticed you were stressed and delivered the perfect brew – no questions asked. And if someone offered you a chocolate digestive on a particularly tough day, you knew you’d made a friend for life. Through a shared cuppa, you realise that somewhere between the endless meetings, tight deadlines, promotion successes and disappointments, you and your colleagues became firm allies.  In some ways, the office tea round is a bit like the National Lottery: most of the time you lose, but the occasional small win makes it worthwhile. We love to hate it – an extension of our feelings about office work in general, perhaps – but without it, the working day will never be quite the same. READ MORE: How To Cut Down On Alcohol If The Quarantinis Got Out Of Hand Davina McCall’s Life In Lockdown: ‘It Felt Like The World Was Collapsing’ How To Deal With The Uncertainty Of Redundancy In A Pandemic
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The plan could start to be implemented as early as next year.
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Samsung is working on a new entry-level smartphone with model number SM-A105F whose name, according to rumors, should be the Galaxy A01.To provide us with the first information in this regard is the FCC, the US institution has published the relevant certification anticipating the presence of a 3,000 mAh battery and a rear photographic compartment that includes two cameras and an LED flash.Further explanations on the product’s technical sheet are provided by Geekbench, where a few weeks ago, the device popped up showing an octa-core SoC made by Qualcomm, 2GB of RAM and the latest Android version.According to what reported by 91mobiles, The Samsung Galaxy A01 should also have a 5.7″ display and a 16GB of internal memory.The rear body, as can be deduced from an image provided by the FCC will presumably be made of plastic.And the phone does not lack the 3.5mm headphone jack.
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