Johnny Ament

Johnny Ament

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(Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute has been awarded a $4.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to identify new therapies for mental health disorders. The research will be headed by Layton Smith, Ph.D., and Michael Jackson, Ph.D., of the Institute's Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics. The funding supports the discovery of new classes of drugs that target 'orphan' receptors to treat psychological conditions such as schizophrenia, depression, anxiety and substance abuse.
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Even though summer is clearly made for holidays, travelling and in general good time, this year we have been cut short thanks to the annoying ... The post Leather backpack with USB port on sale from Lululook appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Astronomy has come a long way in the past 50 years, especially for women.
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A researcher from the University of Houston has developed a new form of electronics known as drawn-on-skin electronics. The breakthrough allows multifunctional sensors and circuits to be drawn directly on the skin using an ink pen. The technique allows for the collection of precise motion artifact-free-health data. Movement has long been a problem with gathering high-quality health data from sensors … Continue reading
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Private-equity giant Blackstone just hired an Amazon Web Services exec in an effort to scout out tech deals. Christine Feng, a director in corporate development at AWS, joins Blackstone as senior managing director, three months after Blackstone poached another tech-focused dealmaker, Vini Letteri, from KKR. Both staff the firm's San Francisco office. Blackstone's head of tactical opportunities, Chris James, laid out why the firm is doubling down on tech, an area that's proven resilient throughout the pandemic.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Private-equity giant The Blackstone Group has hired a dealmaker from Amazon Web Services to scout out tech opportunities in Northern California, in a sign that Wall Street's large investors are looking to better compete in an area traditionally dominated by specialty players.  Of all the industries that have been slammed by the pandemic, tech is one that's stayed relatively resilient, and private-equity executives have told Business Insider to expect to see a greater focus on investing there, specifically in software companies. Chris James, the head of Blackstone's tactical opportunities group — a unit designed to quickly deploy capital in special situations — shared with Business Insider that the firm has brought onboard Christine Feng, a director in corporate development at AWS who previously worked in a similar role at Microsoft. "We are aggressively growing our Northern California presence," said James, calling Feng a "key anchor." At AWS, Feng was responsible for mergers and acquisitions, from sourcing to execution. And at Microsoft, where she worked between 2010 and 2016, she held another dealmaking position as a senior member of its corporate development team, executing acquisitions and divestitures across all of Microsoft's business units, according to her biography.  James said that Blackstone had approved the position toward the end of last year, pre-COVID, and that the firm had sought to add an executive with expertise and relationships in the tech community, which could translate to deal origination and execution. "Needless to say, the tech sector is quite broad and growing and there is nothing that is not touched by technology," James said.  "We are trying to do deals — and a lot of those deals, at their core, touch on technology." Some of the deals that have marked Blackstone's expansion in the tech sector include its investment in dating app Bumble owner MagicLab, as well as the financial-data company Refinitiv, which announced plans to merge with with the London Stock Exchange last year.  Read more: We talked to a dozen insiders about Jon Korngold, the investor driving Blackstone's big push into backing fast-growing companies like Bumble But Blackstone, with more than $560 billion in assets under management, is best known for its real-estate, credit and general private-equity investing, with portfolio companies spanning hotels, parks, and warehouse storage. Historically, the most prominent tech investors have been specialty players, like Silver Lake, Vista Equity Partners and Providence Equity Partners. Other recent tech investments from Blackstone include Ultimate Software, a cloud-based human resources applications developer, HealthEdge, administrative software for health insurers, mobile ad company Vungle and 21Vianet, a data-center services firm.  "Digital infrastructure is a big theme for us in tac opps," said James. "We have done a couple of data center and fiber deals, all of which are the underpinnings of this data revolution and people's demand for better information." By expanding in the area, Blackstone joins other large investors in the pursuit of tech assets at a time when digital operations seem to be among the wisest bets, as the pandemic clouds the financial prospects of physical, in-person businesses. The Carlyle Group, for instance, is another large firm that has been active in tech lately, having taken data company ZoomInfo public last month, raising $935 million, and selling off Eggplant, a provider of AI software, to Keysight Technologies. As for Blackstone, its size will be a key part of the pitch.  "We want to be able to go to companies and say listen, we have capital and we have a lot of resources. That capital can come in the form of credit, structured equity, we can buy you out completely or do a minority deal. We have it in all shapes and sizes," said James. In joining Blackstone, Feng will work across the firm's tactical opportunities and credit divisions. She will be based out of San Francisco, and is coming aboard just three months after the firm added another tech-focused dealmaker in the region: Vincent Letteri, who joined from KKR in May. Previously, Letteri had worked on operations at KKR portfolio company First Data.  "We want her opinion and feedback and bringing that tech perspective," said James, "Telling us, how would Amazon Web Services, Microsoft or Google think about this company or trend?"SEE ALSO: Meet the 4 dealmakers driving Blackstone's $325 billion commercial real estate portfolio. They walked us through how they're thinking about opportunities in the downturn. SEE ALSO: 40 insiders reveal the meteoric rise of Silver Lake's Egon Durban, the tech-focused PE firm's No. 1 dealmaker who strong-armed his way to the top and is about to get $18 billion more to invest SEE ALSO: We talked to a dozen insiders about Jon Korngold, the investor driving Blackstone's big push into backing fast-growing companies like Bumble Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
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Review: War for Cybertron -- decidedly not for kids -- paradoxically fleshes out icons like Optimus Prime and Megatron yet offers a thin, rushed story.
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Listing comes amid rumors that Xbox Live Gold subscriptions may be on the way out.
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Times are tough, but don’t let malicious recruiters trick you with job offers too good to be true: North Korean hackers might be luring you into disclosing your private details with tempting career opportunities. An investigation by McAfee found that North Korean actors have been actively posing as recruiters over the past couple of months in hopes of infiltrating the networks of aerospace and defense firms on multiple continents, CyberScoop reports. The researchers have uncovered a months-long spying campaign that purportedly spread malware across the US and Europe. It remains unclear how successful the campaign has been so far, but… This story continues at The Next Web
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(Iowa State University) Iowa State and University of Texas engineers have developed high-fidelity computational models of replacement heart valves to examine the performance of biological tissues built into the valves. They found that thinner tissues can flap and flutter, which can damage the valves and even the blood that flows by.
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The social network says Trump Jr. violated its policy against spreading misleading and potentially harmful information on the coronavirus.
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Photo by Chris Welch / The Verge Apple’s AirPods are among the most popular headphones on the market. They’re compact, easy to pair with your devices, and they offer reliable connectivity, which can sometimes be a problem with truly wireless earphones. So there’s a chance that you might be looking for a deal on them. Surprisingly, they’re no stranger to the occasional price cut — even the more expensive AirPods Pro that offer noise cancellation and better sound than the standard second-generation model is commonly discounted. We’ll run through all three of the current models below, including the second-generation AirPods, the more expensive second-generation AirPods that include a wireless charging case, and finally, the AirPods Pro. AirPods deals You can... Continue reading…
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An English man took a picture of himself "playing" badminton with the NEOWISE comet above the Quantock Hills in Somerset, British news agency SWNS reports.
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An email from AT&T to customers suggested it was pushing 3G users off of its network, but the phase-out is still a year and a half away.
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Offices, hotels, and malls were emptied by the coronavirus. While some are reopening, the disruption has created a new normal.  Big firms are rethinking office needs — and some commercial real-estate deals are being put on ice as financing dries up.  A surge in e-commerce, meanwhile, is fueling demand for warehouse space from companies like Amazon.  For more stories like this, sign up here for our Wall Street Insider newsletter. The coronavirus threw the real-estate world into disarray, as people emptied out of offices, hotels, and malls and worked from their homes. The disruption is transforming how people and companies finance, operate, and occupy real estate.  Big firms are rethinking office needs — and some commercial real-estate deals are being put on ice as financing dries up. Coworking and flex-office firms are struggling under big rent obligations after years of rapid growth. A surge in e-commerce, meanwhile, is fueling demand for warehouse space as companies look for new ways to reach customers. Here's the latest news on how commercial and residential real estate is being upended, and how experts think these markets will play out in the long run.  Have a tip about layoffs or major changes in this space? Contact this reporter through the secure messaging app Signal at +1 (646) 768-4772 using a non-work phone, email at [email protected], or Twitter DM at @AlexONicoll. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Here's everything we know right now:  Latest news and deals WeWork is looking to fill 2 million square feet of vacancies in New York City, its biggest market. Here's what's sitting empty. Top management consulting salaries, revealed: how much Bain, BCG, and McKinsey consultants make, from entry-level through partner roles WeWork rival Knotel just told staff it's looking to raise $100 million as it faces a turbulent office market and a host of unpaid bills How commercial real-estate giant JLL is revamping its trainee program to help early-career brokers land deals virtually and navigate big disruptions in the market Office-rental startup Knotel bragged it was a nearly profitable anti-WeWork. Now lawsuits are stacking up. 12 insiders reveal what happened to the $400 million Knotel said it raised last year. WeWork is leasing a big new office in Jersey City to house the headquarters of a planned spin-off from pharma giant Merck. Here's how the deal will work, and why it's a big win for the struggling coworking giant. Co-living is the real-estate industry's big bet on dorm-like housing for young professionals. Here's why players like Nuveen and Cushman & Wakefield remain bullish even during the pandemic. Women-focused coworking startup The Wing is almost $270,000 behind on rent and other charges at its Bryant Park location in New York, according to lawsuit The short-term rental market is consolidating in big cities as demand surges in rural areas. Here's how startups like Sonder are taking advantage of the shakeout. A growing group of lenders are looking to unload hundreds of millions of dollars of souring hotel loans. Teams hired to sell the portfolios say it's just the beginning of a surge in activity. A top Americas exec at commercial real-estate giant Cushman & Wakefield is out Billions of dollars of Las Vegas development hang in the balance right now, but the owner of Caesars Palace sees the city's crisis as an opportunity to imagine its next mega-project. Warehouse space is heating up Amazon just signed its largest-ever warehouse lease in NYC. Here's how it's been making deals left and right to grow its massive storage and distribution network. Amazon just signed a lease on a huge NYC warehouse used by one-time rival Jet.com. The e-commerce giant has been gobbling up industrial space as demand for deliveries surges. Warehouses are the new darling of commercial real-estate thanks to a surge in e-commerce, with firms like Macy's and Boeing selling while Amazon snaps space up A surge in grocery deliveries is creating a huge opportunity for industrial real-estate developers. Here's how the coronavirus is transforming retail and warehousing. Office sublease deals adding supply to the market Companies from banks to tech giants are looking to shed huge chunks of office space. Here's a look at 8 key sublease offers — and what they mean for rents in big-city markets. Macy's is slashing the size of its brand-new global headquarters by nearly 40% in another drastic step to cut costs How retail is faring  Commercial real-estate hiring is heating back up. From strategy-focused exec jobs to the red-hot industrial space, 4 recruiters lay out roles they're trying to fill. Brookfield CEO Bruce Flatt lays out how retail and office space can still thrive and why private infrastructure is the next big opportunity Bankrupt Neiman Marcus's $80 million flagship store in the glitzy Hudson Yards mega-mall is now being marketed as office space. It's another black eye for the city's retail market. Burning through cash and nothing coming in: We talked to 7 VC investors about what's keeping them up at night in their proptech portfolios Inside a 'big short' bet against malls: Investors are claiming wins, and a research analyst who said the wagers were misguided is out Lease obligations are 'suffocating' retailers — and a potential court fight over a Victoria's Secret flagship NYC store highlights a wider battle between tenants and landlords State of the commercial real-estate market Lenders are balking at financing mega commercial real-estate deals — and that's leaving buyers for buildings like the Transamerica Pyramid in limbo Big investors poured billions into student housing — thinking it was a recession-proof bet. Then the pandemic emptied campuses and turned that thesis on its head. Facebook is eyeing offices in cities like Dallas, Atlanta, and Denver to act as 'hubs' to support 50% of its workers staying remote — and it's a move that could upend Silicon Valley and NYC real estate Global firms are cutting down on their real-estate footprint as CEOs across industries are considering a permanent switch to remote work Meet the 4 dealmakers driving Blackstone's $325 billion commercial real estate portfolio. They walked us through how they're thinking about opportunities in the downturn. A blockbuster Facebook office deal is a make-or-break moment for the future of commercial real estate. 3 leasing experts lay out the stakes. Neiman Marcus just filed for bankruptcy, and it could mark a major blow to NYC's glitzy Hudson Yards — one of the most expensive mega-malls in US history. Here's why. Inside the drama over control of the iconic Chrysler Building: A real-estate tycoon and a prestigious college are renegotiating a critical $150 million deal The CEO of real estate heavy-hitter Eastdil explains the types of deals that are must-do right now — and warns that a 'de-retailing' trend is set to accelerate The lender to a trendy Brooklyn hotel is looking to offload an $80 million mortgage as the hospitality sector craters — and it's the type of deal distressed-debt investors have been waiting for Real-estate tycoon Aby Rosen is abandoning $600 million worth of acquisitions as the coronavirus slams New York City's multibillion-dollar sales market Major tenants are delaying big leases in NYC as they re-think their office space needs for the post-coronavirus world Blackstone bet big on 4 huge Las Vegas casinos. Then the coronavirus brought Sin City to a halt, right as the PE giant was trying to unload one of its multi-billion-dollar jewels. 7 charts show how the coronavirus could clobber real estate, from retail vacancies of nearly 15% to plunging office rents in Texas cities Coworking and short-term rentals WeWork is ditching a major Manhattan office it hasn't even moved into yet — and it's the first big step in a turnaround that's put its entire real-estate portfolio under review Vacancy rates are soaring above 15% in Washington DC's normally recession-proof office market. Here's how industry players think this downturn will shape up — and why some are still optimistic. Leaked financials from WeWork rival Knotel show huge pre-pandemic losses and a shrinking cash pile. It's a grim sign for the flex-office space. After 2 layoff rounds, a valuation nosedive, and chaotic landlord negotiations, Airbnb-backed Zeus Living is shifting its business model. Here's how the corporate-housing startup is moving forward. WeWork's US head of real estate is leaving the coworking giant as the firm works through a major turnaround attempt WeWork is rolling out global layoffs over Zoom and has kicked off talks to slash jobs in the UK as the coworking giant struggles to cope with coronavirus fallout IBM is ditching a big WeWork office it has been renting in NYC — showing risks for the flex-space model as the pandemic prompts big companies to rethink real-estate needs Knotel and insurance startup Rhino didn't disclose its CEOs were brothers when it struck a complex financial deal. Now a key partner could be on the hook as Knotel scrambles to pay bills, slashes staff, and plans to shed portions of its portfolio. WeWork's revenue growth rate was cut in half in Q1, as the company burned through nearly $500 million in 'free cash outflow' As WeWork and flex-space rivals stumble, 18 million square feet of space in NYC is at risk. Here's what that means for the real-estate market. Airbnb and RXR Realty are scrapping a partnership at Rockefeller Center that the home-sharing giant had touted as a '21st-century hospitality model' Airbnb-backed corporate housing startup Zeus Living is asking landlords to renegotiate their leases and withholding April and May rent until they sign Knotel is scrambling to pay millions in bills that started stacking up before the coronavirus hit, and hasn't paid April rent at some locations Leaked documents from Knotel show the WeWork competitor struggled to hit financial targets well before the coronavirus hit 'This is the day of reckoning' for companies like WeWork. 10 real-estate insiders lay out the future of flex-offices, and how employers are preparing now. Hospitality startup Sonder is pushing ahead with plans to open its largest NYC apartment hotel yet as coronavirus cripples the travel industry The future of real estate WeWork is bringing corporate staff back to New York offices in 3 waves as the city enters the next stage of reopening. Here are the details the coworking giant just gave workers. Home-financing startup EasyKnock just raised $20 million. Its CEO lays out plans for new launches including a marketplace to match investors with homeowners looking for equity. Construction firms that get tech right could see Silicon Valley-like valuations. Here's how an old-school industry can transform itself. Silver Lake just added to a string of recent travel bets by leading a $108 million investment in vacation property startup Vacasa Companies need to add contactless-entry tech to safely reopen offices. Here are 7 firms ranging from startups to huge conglomerates that are set for a surge in business. Robots, remote hires, and insourcing: A top UBS exec lays out how the Swiss bank is tackling the future of work and thinking about real-estate needs A smart home startup that raised $41 million from Amazon and Bain just launched an app that lets landlords and residents give remote access for deliveries, guests, and self-guided tours Zillow tapped a former US surgeon general for advice as it restarts its iBuyer business. She laid out how the company will get home-flipping up and running safely. Here's which real-estate tech startups will soar and which will flop in the new normal of how we occupy space, according to 7 top proptech VCs 10 CEOs from Coldwell Banker, JLL, Cushman Wakefield, and more lay out a post-pandemic future of how we'll buy, build, and use real estate The office as we knew it is dead Mandatory temperature-taking is largely seen as a critical way to return workers to offices. But some big NYC landlords are worried about its effectiveness. The future of real estate could be virtual open houses on Facebook. Coldwell Banker's CEO explains why the in-person industry needs to embrace going digital. 'We should be prepared for a new normal': 3 real estate experts on how the coronavirus is transforming offices and accelerating the rise of industrial property What to expect when you're back in the office: 7 real-estate experts break down what the transition will look like, and why the workplace may never be the same Virtual tours are being hyped as a way for commercial real estate giants like CBRE and JLL to keep deals flowing. Here's a look at how they work — and what factors they can't replace. Real-estate services giant JLL explains how the coronavirus could usher in a permanent 'paradigm shift' towards more remote work SEE ALSO: The ultimate guide to Wall Street's summer internships: Here's how they'll go virtual, and how to impress remotely SEE ALSO: POWER PLAYERS: Meet the bankers, traders, investors, and lawyers seeing huge opportunities in a wave of corporate distress and bankruptcies Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
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With many of us still spending a considerable time at home due to the ongoing pandemic, it’s a great time to learn something new and the Samsung Galaxy S20 Series has a camera system that is loaded with features. Advances made over the years have allowed companies like Samsung to build a phenomenal amount of technology through a combination of AI, software, and hardware to give you great results no matter what the conditions around you are. Let’s take a look at two specific features of the Galaxy S20 Series camera that are truly innovative.  Bright Night While almost any modern phone can take decent shots when there is plenty of lighting available, the true test of a phone’s camera is when you use it in lower-lit conditions. This is where many phones, including newer and higher-end models, struggle with pictures that are overly grainy with muted colors. With the Samsung Galaxy S20 Series, you have no issues taking photos under any lighting conditions. Samsung has used its expertise in camera technology to equip the Galaxy S20 Series with cutting-edge hardware. This tech is called Bright Night, and it pushes the boundaries when it comes to mobile photography.  (Image credit: Samsung) Bright Night lets you shoot like a pro with twice the light by using the increased sensor size, which produces vibrant and richer photos under low light. The mode works for both stills and videos, and uses a technique called multi-frame processing to combine 30 images into one clear photo. The extra light captured by the phones camera sensors delivers unprecedented picture quality in low or minimal lighting.  Single Take  The number of places where you can post your favorite picture keeps increasing by the day. Different social platforms have different image sizes and aspect ratios, and things get even more complicated when you add videos to the mix. Using its software expertise and AI technology, Samsung has built an extremely innovative solution on the Galaxy S20 Series to get multiple pictures and videos in different sizes and aspect ratios in just one take. The new camera mode called Single Take can get up to 14 different kinds or photos and video from your Galaxy S20 Series. It works from within the camera app - simply locate Single Take mode and tap the capture button, very much like you would for taking a regular photo. The phone automatically starts taking a short video and suggests you pan the camera around a scene with different angles. There are a lot more features on the Samsung Galaxy S20 Series besides Bright Mode and Single Take to help you get the best photos from your phone, but these two modes are standout features that showcase the amount of impressive camera tech that’s featured in the Samsung Galaxy S20 Series.  (Image credit: Samsung) The Samsung Galaxy S20 Series comes in three stunning new colours. The Galaxy S20 + 5G is refreshed in Aura Red and Aura Blue colours while the Galaxy S20 Ultra 5G is refreshed with a gorgeous Cloud White colour.Get yourself the Galaxy S20 Series on Samsung.com until 31st July 2020 and you can get your hands on a pair of Samsung Galaxy Buds+ worth Dh529 for free.
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I've loved iOS 14's new tweaks, even if they're mostly things Android got years ago – which tells me how low my Apple upgrade expectations are.
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Adult entertainment sites are among the most frequently visited in the world, especially since lockdown.
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Coronavirus has changed everything. Make sense of it all with the Waugh Zone, our evening politics briefing. Sign up now.Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) people with coronavirus should not be stigmatised, a shadow cabinet minister said ahead of the publication of postcode-level data on those who have tested positive.Ministers are pushing ahead with the release of data despite councils’ concerns that the plan, originally revealed by HuffPost UK, could lead to people in certain neighbourhoods being stigmatised and damage community cohesion.Lisa Nandy said that the country needs to have “a conversation” about how coronavirus is affecting BAME communities, amid suggestions that south Asian populations in places such as Leicester and Blackburn are bearing the brunt of new infections.And she stressed that the “key thing” was “making the data available to those who need it”, including local public health directors.But Nandy suggested the government could learn from South Korea’s approach, where after initial issues with social stigma those who self isolate are now hailed by the state as heroes.The shadow foreign secretary also revealed that the local public health director for her Wigan constituency was against the kind of street-by-street lockdown measures proposed by some in light of postcode-level data.She told HuffPost UK’s Commons People podcast: “What you absolutely cannot do is stigmatise people who test positive for Covid.“They have to feel that they can be as forthcoming as possible with people who are trying to trace and that they’re not going to stigmatise other people – friends and family that they have been in contact with – so they share that information and so that, then, people are able to follow these guidelines without then feeling it’s going to have a negative impact on them.“The South Koreans, who dealt with this very early on, that is the absolute number one lesson that they said came out of it.“When they go in and do local lockdowns, they put out press releases saying these people are heroes, they are sacrificing for the national interest.“My concern is that what we’re seeing in Britain is a very different approach when the government isn’t doing very much of that work and what we could end up with is a situation where people from Leicester or people from particular streets are being stigmatised for the fact they’ve got Covid and being punished for it.”Nandy stressed that there is already evidence to show BAME people fare worse than others once they contract the virus, but they also may be at higher risk because they are more likely to work in frontline jobs where they are in contact with lots of other people.She accused the government of being “very slow” to recognise the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on BAME people, women and children who may suffer mental health problems in the wake of lockdown measures.“There is definitely a conversation that we need to have, that we’ve been trying to have in the Labour party,” she said.“We’ve asked Doreen Lawrence to lead a piece of work looking at the different impact for BAME communities of Covid.“From a local perspective... there’s definitely an issue, it feels like there’s an issue about predisposition to Covid.“The scientific evidence that we do have out there shows that BAME groups are certainly much more impacted when they get it, if not more likely to get it, so that’s a problem.“There’s also an economic element to go alongside the racial aspect of this as well.“If you are more likely to be working on the frontline on trains, the buses, in a care home, it’s often frontline and fairly low-paid work that people in BAME communities end up doing because frankly we’ve got structural discrimination in this country.“There are huge issues around that just need to be properly explored.”Related... Postcode-Level Covid Data Will Be Published – Despite Fears It Could Stigmatise People Russian Hackers Targeted UK Coronavirus Vaccine Research, Says Government Boris Johnson Misses His 24-Hour Target For Covid Test Results
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Xiaomi has one of the world’s most popular custom Android skins in the form of MIUI. The company usually keeps good software support for most ... The post Mi 10 receives Android 11-based MIUI 12 Development Beta update in China appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Former acting CEO Jinyi Guo will replace Lu and lead the company as its new CEO.
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Two smartphones will be competing for attention on Samsung’s stage next month, even if only one of them will be immediately available. That said, earlier leaks suggested that Samsung will be adopting a rather novel schedule that will see a new smartphone launched for each month in the next three months. It seems, however, that the timeline might have been … Continue reading
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Earbuds could be harming our hearing – but one headphones company wants to protect it.
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(Okayama University) Many processes of photosynthesis, including the intake of magnesium, follow a pattern of variation over 24 hours. In a new study, scientists from Okayama University, Japan and Fujian A & F University, China, tested the effect of this variation on the efficiency of photosynthesis in rice plants. Their findings suggest potential candidates for modification for increasing the yield of rice crops, thereby offering a potential solution to the global food shortage.
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Instagram tells TechCrunch the hidden Likes test is expanding to a subset of people globally.The change could make users more comfortable sharing what’s important to them without the fear of publicly receiving an embarrassingly small number of Likes.Instagram began hiding Likes in April in Canada, then brought the test to Ireland, Italy, Japan, Brazil, Australia and New Zealand in July.Facebook started a similar experiment in Australia in September.Instagram tweets that feedback to the experiment so far has been positive, but it’s continuing to test because it’s such a fundamental change to the app.Instagram wants its app to be a place people feel comfortable expressing themselves, and can focus on photos and videos they share rather than how many Likes they get, a spokesperson tells TechCrunch.
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Ett år senare har hans Snafu Records nu säkrat 30 miljoner kronor i kapital, där en av investerarna är Abbas Agnetha Fältskog.”Utvecklingen sker mycket långsammare på stora företag”, säger han.Det svenska skivbolaget Snafu Records, startat 2018, kombinerar teknik med musik i jakten på morgondagens artister.Därefter avgör Snafu Records huruvida de vill gå vidare med någon av artisterna och därmed skriva avtal med dem.”Datorn skannar bland annat av Spotify, Soundcloud, Instagram, blogginlägg och Twitter.Bland investerarna syns bland annat namn som Abbas Agnetha Fältskog, Leif Henriksson som grundat liveunderhållningsföretaget Blixten & Co, Spotifys tidigare rådgivare John Bonten, samt riskkapitalbolaget Truesight Ventures.
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By solving a complex protein structure, biologists have unlocked a critical mechanism in plants that could lead to improvements in how photosynthesis works, and by consequence, greater crop yields.Photosynthesis is a brilliant invention of nature, but that’s not stopping scientists from trying to make it even better.The researchers are calling this mechanism the “beating heart” of photosynthesis.By making sense of the complicated spaghetti-like shape of cytochrome b6f, the scientists were able to visualise the electrical connections between a pair of light-powered chlorophyll-proteins inside plant cells.By building the new model, the researchers could see how cytochrome b6f taps into the electrical currents passing through it, which it does to power-up a proton gradient, a process that’s analogous to plugging in a rechargeable battery.The stored energy in this “proton battery” is used by the plant to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP) – the energy currency of cells.
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“I barely slept last night,” Jessica Zahn told me a few weeks ago.In New Zealand, though, it was 5 the following morning, and the moment Zahn and her team at Microsoft had been working toward for nearly two years was finally nigh.When the clock struck 6, they would press a button, after which point anyone waking up in the Land of Taika Waititi who opened the Apple App Store or Google Play on their smartphone would find Minecraft Earth ready for download.Since that morning, Microsoft’s augmented-reality game has landed in Iceland, Mexico, Sweden, the Philippines, Australia, South Korea, Canada, and the United Kingdom—each time in “early access” mode, what effectively amounts to an open beta for what is already a living, breathing global game project.People have been using Minecraft to create fantastic imaginary realms for a decade, but today Minecraft Earth marches out of the imagination and into the real world.What sounds like a single title really encompasses three distinct play experiences.
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Not gonna happen again before 2032Mercury, the smallest planet in our Solar System, appeared as a tiny black dot on Monday as it crossed the Sun’s surface in between the Earth and its star.Images captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) show a stark silhouette of a spherical object floating across the bright orange backdrop of the Sun.The phenomenon known as a transit happens fairly infrequently, around a dozen times a century, and the next one won’t happen until 2032.The event began when the planet began passing at one side of the star on Monday at 1235 UTC and ended nearly six hours later at 1804 UTC when completed its transit.Due to Mercury’s tiny size and the Sun’s glare, the transit was not visible to the naked eye.
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T-Mobile took some shots at AT and Verizon on Thursday during its "new T-Mobile Un-Carrier" event and now AT is firing back.In a statement provided to CNET, an AT spokesperson called out T-Mobile's newest pledges for first responders and education as a "marketing stunt.""We have a deep and genuine commitment to connecting first responders and using technology to enrich education, not marketing stunts contingent on getting something approved," the AT spokesperson said."If they believe it's critical to offer free access to these communities they would do it today, no conditions or questions asked."On Thursday T-Mobile announced a host of new initiatives -- including free service for 10 years for first responders, a new $15 per month 5G plan and free home internet for 10 million households for five years -- in a bid to try and get its pending $26.5 billion merger with Sprint across the finish line.While approved by the Federal Communications Commission and Department of Justice, 16 state attorneys general led by New York and California are suing to block the deal over concerns that it is anti-competitive and will lead to higher prices for consumers.
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Scams have been in existence from the earliest days of human civilization but technology and the Internet have given less conscientious agents a broader and longer reach than ever before.Such scams cove a wide variety of techniques and consequences, ranging from the annoying to the destructive.A new breed of scams is now starting to go around affecting Firefox users that, while not entirely destructive, may appear so legitimate that it will scare users into some harmful reaction.On the surface, the Firefox bug that enables these scams is a simple one.It basically locks users out of their browsers by preventing any form of action to be taken, including closing the tab or simply closing the browser itself.The only way to end the freeze is to force close Firefox using Windows’ or macOS’ system tools that most users probably know nothing about.
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