Jonathan Spitzer

Jonathan Spitzer

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Following 41
UK
UK govt portal among those borked Mozilla on Wednesday warned that an ongoing change in the way Firefox handles browser cookies may interfere with websites – and urged web developers to test their code.…
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Apple discontinues 8-core iMac Pro, now entry-level iMac Pro has 10-cores.
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"Ransomware attacks have evolved into a really amazing degree of sophistication." The post 96% of UK Businesses Suffered a Damaging Cyber Attack in the Last Year appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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There are late diagnoses and there are long overdue diagnoses, and figuring out a dinosaur that died 76 million years ago had aggressive cancer probably falls into the latter category. New research used modern diagnostics on very old bones, to figure out that a long-dead Centrosaurus apertus had the first identified case of dinosaur cancer. A horned dinosaur with large … Continue reading
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The transaction is expected to close in September.
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The Google Pixel 4a is tipped to be an affordable smartphone with an awesome camera, and that's all I really want.
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SpaceX made history in May when it launched two people to space in SpaceX's Crew Dragon, the company's first crew since Elon Musk founded the rocket company 18 years ago. NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley have spent two months on the International Space Station and are scheduled to come home on Sunday, August 2. Both men are military test pilots, engineers, and members of the same NASA astronaut class. They flew on two space-shuttle missions. They each also married a fellow astronaut and have a son. Fellow astronauts describe Behnken and Hurley as deceptively intelligent and say they'd fly with either or both of them in a moment. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The ways NASA's astronaut office picks a crew from the members of its esteemed corps is something of a mystery. But with the space agency's 2018 selection of Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to fly SpaceX's Crew Dragon spaceship, the process seems obvious in hindsight. Each man graduated from the same crop of astronaut candidates in 2000. Each is an engineer and flew military aircraft. Each has flown to space three times aboard a space shuttle. Each married a fellow astronaut who has journeyed to space and fathered a son with her. Each spent years working with SpaceX, founded by Elon Musk in 2002, to perfect the commercial spaceship they successfully rode to orbit.  And both shared the aspiration of every test pilot turned astronaut: the freak opportunity to fly a brand-new bird. "If you gave us one thing that we could have put on our list of dream jobs that we would have gotten to have someday, it would have been to be aboard a new spacecraft and conduct a test mission," Behnken told reporters on May 20, before SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launched him and Hurley into orbit. Since that launch, Behnken and Hurley have been living and conducting research on the International Space Station (ISS). They're slated to return to Earth on Sunday, a journey that involves a dangerous, fiery fall culminating in a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean. A high-stakes resurrection, 9 years in the making Prior to launching Behnken and Hurley, SpaceX had launched 85 orbital-class Falcon 9 rockets but had never flown a human being. NASA, meanwhile, flew its last space shuttle in July 2011. Since then, it has had no means to reach orbit except by paying Russia for seats aboard its Soyuz spacecraft.  What led to Behnken and Hurley's SpaceX mission, called Demo-2, is a roughly $8 billion, 10-year public-private effort called the Commercial Crew Program. NASA awarded SpaceX about $3.14 billion of that to develop, build, and fly Crew Dragon. The joining of forces was designed to help both entities overcome the obstacles to their own success. NASA got to groom the rocket company into a reliable commercial spaceflight provider that can sell the agency tickets to orbit for its astronauts. SpaceX, for its part, is now poised to finish the program with a human-rated spacecraft that will permit it to break open a new era of commercial spaceflight. "Unfortunately we're in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic. Our country has been through a lot. But this is a unique moment where all of America can take a moment and look at our country do something stunning again, and that is launch American astronauts on American rockets from American soil," Jim Bridenstine, NASA's administrator, said in May ahead of the launch. "We're transforming how we do spaceflight in general." Essential to that transformation are the two people proving the gambit actually works. SpaceX: They're 'badass' pilots, astronauts, and dads Hurley, 53, grew up in New York near the Pennsylvania border, graduated at the top of his class in high school, and chased a civil engineering degree from Tulane University. By joining the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps, he eventually would up as a test pilot in the Marine Corps with the call sign "Chunky" — and later a member of NASA's year 2000 astronaut class. Behnken, a 49-year-old Missouri native, followed a similar path. He pursued a mechanical-engineering degree from Washington University in St. Louis, later picking up a master's degree and a doctorate in the topic from Caltech. Amid that academic work, he joined the US Air Force's ROTC program, which led him to become a test pilot and also a member of the same class of NASA astronaut candidates. The men befriended each other in NASA's program and each flew two space-shuttle missions. Hurley's last mission, aboard space shuttle Atlantis in July 2011, was the final flight of NASA's program. Garrett Reisman, a former NASA astronaut who joined SpaceX in 2011 to help develop its spaceships and is now an astronautics professor at the University of Southern California, says he knows both the men well. He even overlapped with Behnken by sharing the same doctoral adviser and trekking in nature with his future fellow astronaut. "Doug likes to play a dumb pilot, but he's actually a really smart guy," Reisman told Business Insider. "And Bob's nickname is 'Dr. Bob.'" Reisman added that Behnken "is very even-keeled" and quiet and "tries not to let his mouth get out in front of him." Reisman shared a story about being in a SpaceX meeting with Behnken in which some employees began to talk to him "like a dumb pilot" him about vehicle-control theory — which the astronaut studied for his Ph.D. "I'm sitting there laughing my my ass off because I know that he knows more about this stuff than they do," Reisman said. Behnken and Hurley's experience, tenor, and attention to detail led NASA to pick the duo and two other astronauts in 2015 as part of a "Commercial Crew Cadre." The goal: Work with SpaceX and Boeing on new commercial spaceships. It also fast-tracked them for coveted spots on Crew Dragon. During a press briefing on May 1, Gwynne Shotwell, the president and COO of SpaceX, described both men as "badass" dads, pilots, and astronauts. When later asked what makes each other a badass — and while avoiding saying the expletive — Behnken said Hurley "is ready for anything all the time" and "always prepared." "When you're going to fly into space on a test mission, you couldn't ask for a better person or a better type of individual to be there with you," Behnken said. "I'm just thankful that, doing something like this, I'm doing it with with Doug Hurley." Hurley, for his part, praised Behnken's wit. "There is no stone unturned, there's no way that he doesn't have every potential eventuality already thought about five times ahead of almost anybody else," Hurley said. "There's no question I can ask him that he doesn't already have probably the best answer for." Both say their first real jobs were working for their dads, and it wasn't fun work, but it built them up. "That's probably the hardest boss that you ever worked for is your father," Behnken said in a NASA video. Leroy Chiao, who flew to space four times as a NASA astronaut before retiring, says the reputations of Behnken and Hurley precede them. "I would certainly fly with them, either one of them or both of them, in a moment," Chiao told Business Insider. 'When you're watching, you're just a spectator' Behnken and Hurley found a lot more as part of NASA's 2000 astronaut class than space shuttle flights: They also met their wives. Astronaut Karen Nyberg married Hurley, and their son Jack is now 11. Megan McArthur, who helped repair the Hubble Space Telescope in 2009, married Behnken. The two have a son, Theo, who's 6 years old.  Earlier this month, NASA selected McArthur to pilot Crew Dragon's second official mission to the ISS — the current mission is considered a demo — called Crew-2, next spring. She previously flew in the space shuttle Atlantis. In an interview with The Washington Post, McArthur expounded on the difficulty of seeing Behnken lift off. "One of the hardest things to do is watch the person that you love launch into space," she said. "It's much harder than actually doing it yourself when you're in the rocket. You have the training. You're prepared for the mission. When you're watching, you're just a spectator. And no matter what happens, there's nothing you can do to contribute to the situation." Still, having a spouse who understands what it takes to go to space has helped both couples parent their sons through the experience. Behnken said delays in the Commercial Crew Program — the first launch was supposed to happen in late 2017 — have worked to their advantage in the parenting department. "We've had a lot of the conversations over the years rather than having to have them all in the last couple of weeks," he told Business Insider. "It's kind of become more routine, if you will, in terms of expectation that I would eventually be flying on a SpaceX vehicle off to the Florida coast." As the astronauts prepare to leave the ISS, Behnken offered some practical advice for his wife and others preparing for their own future missions: Pack smart.  "Just like any trip that you make, if you if you pack things appropriately, it can be a very fun trip," he told reporters on July 31. Poor packing, on the other hand, can "eat into your enjoyment," he added. 'That's how we like it to be' In a press briefing following the launch of SpaceX's Demo-1 mission, which tested the Crew Dragon without any astronauts onboard in March, Behnken and Hurley joined Musk to answer questions. He noted that the astronauts had monitored launch data from the control room. "I went over and asked them what what they thought," Musk said. "How do you feel about flying on it? Seems like you're feeling good about flying on it?" "You guys told us what was going to happen, and that's what happened. That's how we like it to be," Behnken replied. That mission was a success, and Demo-2 has gone smoothly so far as well. But Musk has said the upcoming conclusion is the most stressful phase for him. The Crew Dragon's heat shield will have to protect the hardware and astronauts against temperatures up to 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit, while traveling at speeds up to 25 times the speed of sound.  "The part that I would worry most about would be reentry," he told Irene Klotz of Aviation Week ahead of the astronauts' launch. Weather permitting, Behnken and Hurley are scheduled to undock from the space station at 7:34 p.m. ET on Saturday, then splash down on Sunday at 2:42 p.m., off the coast of Florida. You can watch NASA's live coverage of the journey here.  This story has been updated with new information. It was originally published on May 27, 2020. Do you have a story or inside information to share about the spaceflight industry? Send Dave Mosher an email at [email protected] or a Twitter direct message at @davemosher. More secure communication options are listed here.SEE ALSO: 'We've grown up': SpaceX's failures have prepared the rocket company to launch NASA astronauts for the first time, says president Gwynne Shotwell DON'T MISS: An astronaut who's about to launch on SpaceX's first human mission reveals what impresses him most about the company, and it's not the rockets or the spaceships Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Elon Musk's multibillion-dollar Starship rocket could one day take people to the moon and Mars
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(Arizona State University) Using precise measurements from state-of-the-art satellite-based radar that can detect the land surface rise and fall with millimeter accuracy, an ASU research team has, for the first time, tracked the entire California coast's vertical land motion. They've identified local hotspots of the sinking coast, in the cities of San Diego, Los Angeles, Santa Cruz and San Francisco, who will be at a higher flooding risk during the decades ahead of projected sea-level rise.
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We're gonna keeping punning this until someone pays us $5m An annoying vulnerability in the widely used GRUB2 bootloader can be potentially exploited by malware or a rogue insider already on a machine to thoroughly compromise the operating system or hypervisor while evading detection by users and security tools.…
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What do we all need? Next-gen masts. When do we need them? Sooner than they'll be ready Most UK cities now have some degree of 5G coverage, promising those with capable devices faster internet connections. But how much of a game change is it really? New data from RootMetrics highlight consistently nimble connections, albeit with some major differences between networks.…
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More specs for Pocket’s pair of FPGA boards, plus “original display modes” feature.
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Here are our top-rated picks in ultraportables, two-in-ones and laptops for creatives and gamers and even our favorite budget-friendly options.
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Oppo, out of nowhere, has quietly listed the Oppo A72 5G on its official store. The device has a display with 90Hz refresh rate, revamped ... The post Oppo A72 5G with Dimensity 720 goes official appeared first on Gizchina.com.
China
Meituan is taking a leaf out of Pinduoduo’s book by integrating social elements to its food delivery business hoping boost user engagement.
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Alternative data is an increasingly important part of hedge funds' investment processes, but the pandemic has changed the way firms use the info. Traditionally, quants and long-term stock-pickers use data to compare companies against each other, to find a winner in a certain field. The virus, however, has the entire world waiting on a restart — and it has turned just about every money manager into a macro investor, constantly thinking about the big picture. "Everybody's a macro trader now," says Abraham Thomas, chief data officer at Nasdaq's Quandl. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. At the beginning of the pandemic, the market fell with each new update on infection numbers — and alternative data firms were quick to roll out new indices and markers to track the virus. But the markets have become steadily disconnected with the virus, as the S&P 500 has nearly climbed to the heights it hit in February, and hedge funds trying to make sense of it all have had to rethink the way they use their alt data. For starters, tracking the virus and trying to correlate it to the markets "wasn't working," said Zak Selbert, founder of Indexica, which uses natural-language processing software to create indices around specific emotions based on news stories.  "I think that shift from tangible to feelings has happened," Selbert said about the markets' reaction to the virus. His firm found that the general public has been steadily consuming less news about the virus, meaning the drivers of the economy — consumers — weren't hanging on every new data point from officials about the spread. See more: Hedge funds are using these 10 alt-data sources to gain an investing edge as the coronavirus wreaks havoc on global markets This means the traditional way of using alternative data — to find winnners and losers in a certain field before others do — wasn't going to work, said Abraham Thomas, chief data officer of Nasdaq's Quandl. "Historically, most the users of alternative data use it to compare one company to another — the reality of 2020 is investors don't really care about that," he said. "Everybody is much more interested in the big picture." Auto sales, tracked through new insurance policies processed, is an example of a dataset that's being reimagined. It used to be a way for portfolio managers to see if GM was outperforming Ford. Now, it's used to get a gauge on consumer sentiment on the economy. "It's no longer about picking the right stock, it's about picking the right time to buy every stock," Thomas said. "Everybody's a macro trader now." Macro funds, after years of underperformance thanks to low interest rates and nonexistent market volatility, have come roaring back thanks to the pandemic, with managers like Brevan Howard enjoying the spoils.  See more: Goldman Sachs quants overseeing $200 billion rolled out a new model for handling COVID-19 risk way back in January. 2 exec walked us through how it works, and how they've fine-tuned it amid market madness. The key is to keep things simple, according to Daryl Smith, head of research for Neudata, a London-based data platform. Take, for example the "geolocation renaissance." This data uses footfall traffic from cell phones to show how many people are in public areas at certain times, and for how long. Prior to the pandemic, geolocation data feeds were trying to nail down specific buying patterns and how they related to certain brands. Now, it's used just to see if people are coming back and shopping again. "The use cases have become a hell of a lot more simplistic," Smith said. "The data that are in vogue at the moment are those with the most simplistic use cases." Read more: Credit-card data is broken. Here's how hedge funds and banks are being forced to rethink one of the earliest alt-data plays. Web traffic data shows the biggest winners and losers across 11 different industries during the pandemic: Interest in Chipotle soared while Gucci traffic sank SEE ALSO: The world's biggest hedge funds like Bridgewater are blending quantitative and fundamental trading. Here's why it's gaining hype on Wall Street. SEE ALSO: Big investors are pouring billions into macro funds — and even giving smaller names they normally wouldn't look twice at a chance. JPMorgan lays out what's driving the surge in interest. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
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Seismometers pick up human activity, like driving. When Covid arrived, scientists watched that global seismic noise plummet by 50 percent.
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The latest game in the Forza racing game franchise is currently in early development for Microsoft's next-gen console.
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Some might presume that AMD and even Qualcomm ARE Intel’s greatest rivals but, in truth, it might be the entire ARM world that has already silently surpassed the PC chipmaker. The ARM instruction set architecture or ISA is what drives many of the world’s devices, from smartphones to routers to IoT to in-vehicle infotainment to supercomputers. ALL of these pay … Continue reading
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The social media company did not specify how many accounts attackers were able to control.
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Admins sent scrambling as latest patch blamed for crashes Microsoft's desktop email client Outlook has stopped working worldwide for countless users, whether they are using it with an on-premises Exchange server or with the Office 365 cloud.…
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Part of the fun in Animal Crossing: New Horizons is its customization, which is bolstered by using QR codes.
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Update: Vivo has launched the X50 and X50 Pro in India. Here's what you need to know about pricing and specs.
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The beautiful iPhone XR is everything you could need in a smartphone -- but only if you can keep it protected.
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Nvidia’s RTX 2070 and 2080 models are reportedly discontinued – and prices could rise ahead of RTX 3000 debut.
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Supply chains are working again Global PC shipments climbed back into recovery mode for the second quarter thanks to increased demand from the surge of home working.…
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An index by CBR's parent company NS Media Group shows a great deal of room for improvement in the UK’s tech infrastructure, as Lara Williams reports. The post Tech Preparedness Index Shows UK Lagging Behind European Counterparts appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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I'm fortunate enough to have a car with heated seats, and every time I arrive home and have to leave that warm, cozy spot, I wonder: Why can't we have heated seats in the house?This isn't quite that, but it's close: For a limited time, and while supplies last, the MaxKare wearable heating pad is $28.85 when you clip the on-page 12%-off coupon and then apply promo code FGY7XLCA at checkout.Most heating pads are exactly that: square pads you have to kind of wedge in wherever you need heat.This is something you wear like a vest, though with robe-like ties in the front.Although you have to stay tethered to an AC outlet, you can position yourself any which way (sitting up, lying down and so on) and still enjoy the warmth.The inline controller offers five heat levels and two auto-off timer settings.
China
As demand grows from consumers to stay connected when in their vehicles, Chinese automakers are creating intelligent in-car systems to lead the still-nascent market.But less than 4% or about one million of these motors came with connectivity.“We believe the market will be mature once that number rises beyond three million units,” said Yang Dongsheng, general manager at BYD Auto Product Planning & New Technology Research Institute.The Warren Buffet-backed EV maker launched DiLink, a system solution for connected vehicles, in April last year and later opened it up to app developers.Through a partnership with Baidu, the fully cloud-connected service also offers drivers the ability to monitor power consumption and more conveniently navigate to local charging stations.“Smart connectivity is where differentiation is created to grasp the changing needs from consumers, and that is the key to leadership in the future market,” Yang added.
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Though Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a hot topic for businesses right now, it has so far failed to shake up the real estate industry and the use of property software in the same way it has transformed sectors such as banking and healthcare.By definition, artificial intelligence is technology that can perform human-like tasks.For many, there are fears that our increasing dependence on AI will generate widespread unemployment in jobs that could, in theory, be automated.Yet AI has already made a huge impact within diverse sectors such as agriculture and manufacturing, without eliminating jobs.In reality, the introduction of AI to these industries has helped individuals carry out their jobs more efficiently, reducing the time spent on tedious and time-consuming tasks with office software, which could be better handled automatically.In light of this, the property industry seems comparatively stagnant due to its reliance on traditional methods, making it well positioned for disruption with the successful implementation of AI.
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