Joseph Averitt

Joseph Averitt

Followers 47
Following 49
US
A judge ruled this week that ride-hailing companies must classify their drivers as employees in California.
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Having tried and failed to do it the other way around, the parent of UPC Switzerland has decided to take Swiss consolidation into its own hands.
UK
School is starting soon for many kids in the US and some countries around the world but it won’t be the same kind of school they’ve been used to for years. For many, school will be synonymous to home as educational institutions try to grapple with the restrictions imposed by the coronavirus pandemic. School will now be dependent on technology … Continue reading
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With a 6.0-liter W12 and all the leather, Alcantara and carbon fiber you could ever want, the Bentayga Speed is a serious statement of intent.
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Use of the tech needs to be narrower to conform to human rights law, court held.
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All of Time Warner's top executives have left the company since AT&T bought it in 2018 and formed WarnerMedia. They include HBO's Richard Plepler, who unexpectedly resigned last February, and Warner Bros. CEO Kevin Tsujihara, who stepped down last March following a report that alleged he had a sexual relationship with an actress, and promised to help her get roles. Now WarnerMedia is undergoing another major restructuring under new CEO Jason Kilar. Several top execs left WarnerMedia last week, including WarnerMedia Entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt, and Kevin Reilly, the content chief of the company's new streaming service HBO Max. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. After AT&T bought Time Warner in 2018 for a massive $85 billion, taking control of Time Warner's many assets including Warner Bros. and HBO, then-AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson sent a memo to employees. "It's been a long time coming, but well worth the effort: AT&T and Time Warner are now one company," Stephenson told employees in the June memo. But the acquisition, which formed the new WarnerMedia, brought with it a new set of complications. All of Time Warner's top executives were out less than a year after the deal finally closed after a months-long legal battle with the Justice Department, which sued AT&T in November 2017 in an effort to block the merger. From surprise resignations like HBO's Richard Plepler to a sex scandal that forced Warner Bros. CEO Kevin Tsujihara to resign, Time Warner's leadership was completely remade. And now WarnerMedia is undergoing another huge shakeup under new CEO Jason Kilar, who was named as the company's chief executive in April. He took over from John Stankey, who is now CEO of AT&T after Stephenson exited the role. The restructuring also comes after the company launched its flagship product, the HBO Max streaming service, in May. Last week, WarnerMedia announced the high-profile exits of WarnerMedia Entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt, HBO Max content chief Kevin Reilly, and head of corporate marketing Keith Cocozza. The new Warner Bros. CEO, Ann Sarnoff, was put in charge of all film, TV, and streaming assets, while HBO's head of programming, Casey Bloys, will also oversee original content for Max. "In looking at where we'd like to go and how the company was organized, we had two content organizations, and they both worked on HBO Max," Kilar told Bloomberg. "The tough decision I made was to go from having two to one." It didn't stop there. On Monday, Warner Bros., DC Comics, and the DC Universe streaming platform were hit with major layoffs, including Warner Bros. Worldwide Television Distribution president Jeff Schlesinger and DC Comics editor-in-chief Bob Harris. The majority of DCU employees were also laid off, according to The Hollywood Reporter.  Here are major leadership changes that have happened at WarnerMedia:SEE ALSO: Meet the power players of the Disney-Fox merger, who will lead its iconic franchises into the future and do battle with Netflix Kevin Reilly — former HBO Max content chief and president of TBS, TNT, and TruTV (August 2020) Reilly was axed last week as part of WarnerMedia's major restructuring before his contract could expire in 2022. Reilly joined Turner in 2014 as head of TNT and TBS. In an interview with Business Insider ahead of the launch of HBO Max in May, Reilly said that he had a list of potential acquisitions for Max and that it was "closing deals every week" for new content.  But the service has been overshadowed by some launch problems, particularly that it's still not available on Roku and Amazon platforms, the largest streaming distributors. Bob Greenblatt — former chair of WarnerMedia Entertainment and Direct-to-Consumer (August 2020) Greenblatt was ousted last week from his role at WarnerMedia along with HBO Max content chief Kevin Reilly as part of the company's major reorganization. Before joining WarnerMedia last year, Greenblatt was the chair of NBC Entertainment, where had pitched an over-the-top streaming service in 2015 that never gained traction, he told The Hollywood Reporter in December (NBCU did launch its own streaming service, Peacock, last month). He stepped down from NBCU in September 2018 after seven years with the company, telling THR, "I felt like I'd done everything I could do at NBC." In his role at WarnerMedia, he oversaw Max, HBO, TNT, TBS, and TruTV. They are now under Warner Bros. CEO Ann Sarnoff's supervision.       Major Warner Bros. layoffs (August 2020) The following top execs were laid off from Warner Bros. on Monday: Jeff Schlesinger — former president of worldwide television distribution Kim Williams — former CFO Ron Sanders — former president of worldwide theatrical distribution & home entertainment, and executive vice president of international business operations Major DC layoffs (August 2020) The following execs were laid off from DC Comics on Monday, according to The Hollywood Reporter and Variety: Bob Harris — former editor-in-chief Hank Kanalz — former senior vice president of publishing strategy and support services Jonah Weiland — vice president of marketing and creative services Bobbie Chase — vice president of global publishing initiatives and digital strategy Brian Cunningham — senior story editor Mark Doyle — executive editor  Kevin Tsujihara — former Warner Bros. CEO (March 2019) In a report from The Hollywood Reporter last year, Tsujihara was accused of being involved in a sexual relationship with actress Charlotte Kirk and promising to get her acting roles; Kirk has denied that the relationship influenced her casting, and has said that the relationship ended many years ago. Tsujihara resigned in March 2019. "It is in the best interest of WarnerMedia, Warner Bros., our employees and our partners for Kevin to step down as Chairman and CEO of Warner Bros.," WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey said in a statement at the time. "Kevin has contributed greatly to the studio's success over the past 25 years and for that we thank him. Kevin acknowledges that his mistakes are inconsistent with the Company's leadership expectations and could impact the Company's ability to execute going forward." Tsujihara was the first person of Asian descent to be the head of a major movie studio, and started in the role in 2013. He joined Warner Bros. in 1994 as the director of special projects finance. Before being named CEO, he was the president of Warner Bros. Home Entertainment. Ann Sarnoff was named the new chair and CEO of Warner Bros. last June. Her role was expanded last week to oversee the new Studios and Networks Group, which includes HBO, Max, TNT, TBS, and TruTV. David Levy — former Turner president (March 2019) Levy announced last March that he was stepping down as president of Turner. "I have spent a considerable amount of time during the past few months discussing the future landscape and vision of the company with John Stankey and the senior leadership team," Levy wrote in a memo to staff. "After much consideration and more than 32 years at Turner, the past six years as the President of this great company, I have decided the time is right to leave my role." Levy oversaw the cable networks TBS, TNT, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Boomerang, truTV, and Turner Classic Movies. He also oversaw the company's sports rights deals. Richard Plepler — former HBO CEO (February 2019) Plepler unexpectedly resigned from his role of CEO of WarnerMedia's premium cable network, HBO, in February 2019.  "Hard as it is to think about leaving the company I love, and the people I love in it, it is the right time for me to do so," he wrote in a memo to staff at the time. "In the past weeks, I've thought a lot about the incredible journey of this company in the nearly 28 years that I have been blessed to be here. It's a journey of great pride and accomplishment because so many of you, and many others before us, have made HBO a cultural and business phenomenon." Plepler joined HBO in 1992 and became CEO in 2012 after serving as the network's copresident. Under Plepler, HBO continued its awards dominance, carrying its prestige status with Emmy-winning shows like "Game of Thrones," "Big Little Lies," and "Barry." The network always prided itself on quality over quantity, focusing heavily on a stacked Sunday-night lineup. But AT&T was quick to make its intentions for HBO known. The company aimed to increase the amount of content HBO develops in an effort to compete with Netflix and drive content for the Max streaming service. "It's not hours a week, and it's not hours a month," WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey said last July. "We need hours a day. You are competing with devices that sit in people's hands that capture their attention every 15 minutes. I want more hours of engagement." Other major HBO exits — Simon Sutton and Bernadette Aulestia (March 2019) HBO's president and revenue chief, Simon Sutton, left HBO last March. Bloomberg reported that Sutton's role became unnecessary after WarnerMedia named Gerhard Zeiler as chief revenue officer. Sutton's exit followed Bernadette Aulestia's, who also resigned from her role as HBO's global distribution head in March 2019.   Jeff Bewkes — former Time Warner CEO (June 2018) Bewkes was the CEO of HBO from 1995 to 2008, when he became CEO of Time Warner. Bewkes was tasked with cleaning up a troubled Time Warner, which had acquired AOL in 2000. The merger was a disaster and lost Time Warner $100 billion in 2002 because of a write-down on AOL, according to CNN. Under Bewkes, Time Warner spun off AOL, Time Warner Cable, and Time Inc. AOL was eventually bought by Verizon, and Time Warner Cable was bought by Charter Communications (now rebranded as Spectrum). "I'm very proud about what we have accomplished together, and I hope you're as excited as I am about the opportunities ahead," Bewkes said in a resignation video in June 2018. "Because as storytellers, as journalists, as business leaders and catalysts for change, our work is never really done. We can only run our leg of the relay, then pass the baton." John Martin — former Turner CEO (June 2018) Martin was previously CFO of Time Warner and became CEO of Turner in 2014 after being handpicked by former Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes, according to Deadline. He immediately stepped down once the Time Warner/AT&T deal closed. "You'll note that we have changed how Turner is organized given that John Martin will no longer be with the company as a result of the merger," Stankey wrote in a memo to staff at the time. "This initial Turner org structure will allow me to work more closely with more Turner leaders and accelerate my personal learning of the business as we define our shared priorities across the company." Martin was a top candidate to succeed Bewkes before he resigned, according to Recode.
China
Xiaomi is all set to launch its much-awaited Mi 10 Ultra flagship smartphone in its homeland i.e. China tomorrow. For those who’re unaware, Mi 10 ... The post Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra surfaces on GeekBench ahead of the official reveal appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Xiaomi's CEO also said that Xiaomi is still working on developing its own chipsets.
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There's a lot to consider before buying a gaming computer. We're here to help.
UK
After successfully kicking out tech giants like Huawei and ZTE, the US government has apparently set its eyes on smaller fish. That said, the user bases of short-video platform TikTok and instant messaging service WeChat are so large that one can’t take for granted the immediate disruption a ban would have on both the companies owning them as well as … Continue reading
UK
If you're worried your ID has already been stolen, now is the time to take action.
UK
The Samsung Galaxy Tab S7 should be here soon – here's all we've heard about it, plus what we want to see in the tablet.
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Spider-Man has been confirmed for the upcoming Marvel's Avengers game, but only on PlayStation.
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Is it a car? Is it a truck? Is it a van? Well, it’s all of them and more… Electric vehicles present a unique opportunity for carmakers to show off unique designs. As motors and batteries can easily be built into the floor pan of the vehicle it lets designers have a lot more freedom with what they plonk on top. Companies like General Motors and Rivian have developed what they call “skateboards,” which allow them to use the same power and drivetrain on a host of vehicles and change the body work depending on customer needs. However, one German… This story continues at The Next Web
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Buying games from other countries at a discounted price will no longer be possible on Steam.
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Republican lawmakers used a widely-anticipated House subcommittee hearing with the world's most powerful tech CEOs to air grievances and accuse tech companies of secretly working to undermine President Donald Trump's reelection campaign. The hearing erupted into a shouting match several times as Democratic lawmakers accused their Republican colleagues of pushing "fringe conspiracy theories." Ohio congressman Jim Jordan implied Google is trying to give former Vice President Joe Biden an edge over Trump, and Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz accused the company of engaging in "election interference." GOP Rep. Greg Steube suggested Gmail is intentionally sending his campaign emails to users' spam folders, and Wisconsin Republican Jim Sensenbrenner asked Mark Zuckerberg — the CEO of Facebook — about Twitter's decision to temporarily suspend Donald Trump Jr.'s account this week. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A House subcommittee held a widely anticipated hearing Wednesday whose stated purpose was to grill the world's most powerful CEOs about whether tech companies have too much market control and violated antitrust laws. Instead, several Republican lawmakers hijacked the historic hearing to air conspiracy theories and accuse tech companies of secretly working to undermine President Donald Trump's reelection campaign. One notable outburst came from Ohio congressman Jim Jordan, one of Trump's most loyal attack dogs on Capitol Hill. During the hearing, Jordan asked Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai if he could "assure Americans" that Google wouldn't use its features to give former Vice President Joe Biden, the 2020 Democratic presidential nominee, an edge over Trump in the general election. Pichai testified that Google is "fully nonpartisan" and does not favor one candidate over another in elections. After Jordan was done with his questioning, Democratic Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon of Pennsylvania was up and said, "I'd like to redirect your attention to antitrust law rather than fringe conspiracy theories." Jordan erupted at his colleague, saying, "We have the email," presumably referring to an email that was leaked to Fox News in which Google's former head of multicultural market expressed support for increasing Latinx voter turnout. Other lawmakers in the hearing room subsequently began yelling at Jordan and telling him his time was up, while the subcommittee's chairman, Rep. David Cicilline of Rhode Island, repeatedly banged his gavel to silence Jordan and restore order. When Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin shouted at Jordan to "put your mask on," Jordan used the comment to pivot to another Republican conspiracy theory about the "unmasking" of former national security adviser Michael Flynn's name in US intelligence reports following the 2016 election. In another instance, Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida used a significant portion of his questioning time to grill Pichai about Google's search algorithm and suggest it was tailored to hurt conservatives. "You've confessed that there is a manual component to the way in which you blacklist content," Gaetz told Pichai. "It seems to be no coincidence that it's sites like Gateway Pundit, The Western Journal, American Spectator, Daily Caller, and Breitbart, that receive the ire or the negative treatment." Many of the websites Gaetz mentioned have been known to promote far-right propaganda and conspiratorial content. "The manual black list targets that Google specifically goes after are those who support President Trump, who hold a conservative viewpoint," Gaetz said, adding that he believes Google is "engaging in election interference." "When you empower individuals, the same individuals that [the right-wing activist group] Project Veritas has exposed as labeling people as terrorists who say, 'Make America great again,' or support the president ... that, in fact, could be the very election interference that we're concerned about," the congressman from Florida said. At another point during Wednesday's hearing, Gaetz's Florida colleague Rep. Greg Steube suggested that YouTube, which is owned by Alphabet, took down a video promoting hydroxychloroquine as a cure for the coronavirus because it wanted to censor right-wing views. "Yesterday I was sent a YouTube video about doctors discussing [hydroxychloroquine] and discussing the not-dangers of children returning to school," Steube told Pichai. He added that YouTube has since taken the video down for violating its community guidelines, and he asked why that video was removed when other videos depicting violence are left up. Pichai replied that when videos promoting cures for a disease are uploaded to YouTube, particularly during a pandemic, the website relies on "local health officials" and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to review whether claims in the video are legitimate. If a video does not meet CDC guidelines, Pichai said, it gets taken down. Many Republican lawmakers and the president have promoted hydroxychloroquine as a potential cure for the novel coronavirus, which causes a disease known as COVID-19. But the Food and Drug Administration has determined that the anti-malaria drug is not an effective coronavirus treatment. Steube's questioning about the treatment also came as Trump accuses social-media companies of censorship after Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube removed video clips showing a controversial Texas doctor promoting hydroxychloroquine as a COVID-19 cure. The Florida lawmaker also said that many of his campaign emails are getting sent to users' spam folders and implied that Gmail was intentionally working to undermine him. Steube then turned to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and said, "I think at this point it's fairly obvious that technology platforms have been stifling conservative news and opinions." Republican Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin also grilled the CEOs, at one point asking Zuckerberg about Twitter's decision this week to temporarily suspend Donald Trump Jr.'s account when he shared the Texas doctor's video touting hydroxychloroquine as a coronavirus cure. "I wouldn't take it myself, but there's still a debate about whether it's effective in either treating or preventing COVID-19," Sensenbrenner said. "I think what you're referring to happened on Twitter," Zuckerberg replied, "so it's hard for me to speak to that."Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why American sunscreens may not be protecting you as much as European sunscreens
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CEO Mark Zuckerberg was grilled about acquiring and copying competitors
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Return date is pushed back again as COVID-19 continues to spread in the U.S.
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(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Hurricane Douglas is a major hurricane tracking through the Central Pacific Ocean on a forecast track to Hawaii. NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures and found them surrounding the eyewall of the powerful hurricane. In addition, images from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite were used to generate an animated track of Douglas' movement and intensification over four days.
UK
Cali federal judge admits he can only do so much against businesses based in Middle Kingdom Three Chinese companies accused by Cisco of selling counterfeit components badged with its logo on have had their US bank accounts frozen by a federal district court judge.…
UK
The BadPower hack, which works by manipulating the firmware inside fast charge power adapters, can set your phone aflame.
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Get ready for ninjas, pinched fingers, and new memoji options, too
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Microsoft sends its unique control accessory down the final memory hole.
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Subscription plan just got a massive streaming upgrade without a price hike
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For all its previous belligerent posturing, the Chinese Communist Party has been uncharacteristically reserved in response to the UK Huawei ban.
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