Joseph Wiles

Joseph Wiles

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Following 45
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That's the lowest price ever, and it comes with a $75 e-gift card.
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Apple has built an elaborate fitness tracking system into the Apple Watch. We show you how to best use it.
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Isaura is a clearly Ghibli-influenced tale about the coastal folklore and culture of south and east Africa.
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The tech giant said in a statement that Apple is "alone" as the only general purpose platform denying access to its service.
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Facebook reportedly cleared misinformation “strikes” against several posts by conservatives in an apparent attempt to prevent them from being banned, BuzzFeed News reported. A Facebook employee reported that Joel Kaplan, the company’s vice president of global public policy, flagged for review an Instagram post from conservative commentator Charlie Kirk that had earned a “partly false” rating from a third-party fact-checker, according to BuzzFeed News. The same employee also noticed misinformation strikes against conservative website Breitbart had been “cleared without explanation,” although it was not clear whether Kaplan or another person was involved in that decision. “It appears that policy people have been intervening in fact-checks... Continue reading…
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If your dishwasher isn't washing and drying your dishes properly, this DIY fix-it guide might be able to help.
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Blue Mail's creators are helping the US government antitrust investigation into Google's practices.
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I've been testing the battery life of Blink's XT2 security cam for a year. Here's how it's going.
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A WIRED investigation found dozens of channels belong to children apparently under 13 and anonymous chat participants sending inappropriate messages their way.
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Want a great mid-range phone but not keen on the OnePlus Nord? These are the best alternatives.
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Trump campaign claims political texts were sent manually and thus not illegal.
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Hearst Magazines president Troy Young has resigned, Hearst's president and CEO told staff in a company-wide email on Thursday. "Troy Young and I have agreed that it is in the best interest of all of us that he resign as president of Hearst Magazines, effective immediately," the email read.  Young's resignation comes after a report in The New York Times detailed allegations of Young's history of lewd, sexist remarks and abusive behavior while at Hearst. As president, Young oversaw Hearst's iconic magazine portfolio, which includes Cosmopolitan, Elle, Good Housekeeping, Esquire, Seventeen, Marie Claire, and Harper's Bazaar. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Hearst Magazines president Troy Young has resigned from his position, effective immediately, Business Insider has learned. In an all-staff email Thursday night, Hearst president and CEO Steven R. Swartz announced that Young was no longer with the company. The announcement comes a day after a bombshell report in The New York Times detailed allegations of "bullying or harassing" behavior by Young, including making "lewd, sexist remarks" to employees and in at least one instance, sending pornography to an editor. "Troy Young and I have agreed that it is in the best interest of all of us that he resign as president of Hearst Magazines, effective immediately," Swartz wrote in the email, which has since been posted on Hearst's website. As president, Young oversaw Hearst's iconic magazines like Cosmopolitan, Elle, Good Housekeeping, Esquire, Seventeen, Marie Claire, and Harper's Bazaar. Current and former employees at those magazines told The Times of multiple instances of harassment, vulgar comments, and lewd remarks that Young made toward staffers, making them uncomfortable. In one instance, Young made an explicitly sexual gesture to a Cosmo staffer at a company holiday party. In another, he suggested that he was the father of a pregnant employee's child. At least four employees had complained about their experiences to Hearst's human resources department even before he became president, The New York Times reported.  In his response to The Times' article, Young called the allegations "untrue, greatly exaggerated or taken out of context." He also defended his behavior by arguing that sex was discussed "openly" at Cosmo and "defined the Cosmo brand for decades." After The Times published its report, Young sent a note to staff that said his comments "lacked an awareness." He also said his comments "do no represent who I am," and alleged the Times article "misrepresented" company culture. Young first joined Hearst in 2013 as its president of digital media, and took over as head of Hearst Magazines in 2018. SEE ALSO: Snap is investigating allegations of racism and sexism within the company after some employees complained of a 'whitewashed' culture Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Leslie Odom, Jr.'s $500,000 gamble that led to a starring role in 'Hamilton'
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ZFS features—with no command-line management.
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We know lots about the OnePlus Nord - but not quite everything yet. Here's what we still need to find out.
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(University of Science and Technology of China) USTC researchers proposed a robust electrometric method utilizing continuous dynamic decoupling (CDD) technique, where the continuous driving fields provide a magnetic-field-resistant dressed frame.
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(Politecnico di Torino) Nature just published the research on unprecedented "Self-assembled poly-catenanes", which involved PoliTo's Professor Giovanni M. Pavan
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The Department of Health and Human Services will receive all new hospital data directly, according to The New York Times.
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Fisker, the latest car company from legendary car designer Henrik Fisker, has entered into an agreement with a special acquisition company which will see the EV startup listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Fisker becoming a publicly listed company! Today we announced a merger with Spartan Energy Acquisition Corp. (NYSE:SPAQ). I’m excited about our plans to become a global leader in the #EV space, starting with the 2022 Fisker Ocean. See https://t.co/eI1Xz4nX13 #Fisker #SPAQ #NYSE pic.twitter.com/F1R4c4C7Rc — Henrik Fisker (@henrikfisker) July 13, 2020 According to an announcement made earlier today, Fisker and Spartan Energy Acquisition Corp., a special purpose… This story continues at The Next Web
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I spent the first five years of my life in a foster home run by a white couple in affluent Chino Hills, California. I lived in a large, luxurious house and attended a prestigious, predominately white elementary school. I recall learning about shapes and colours, and enjoying playtime with my friends. I was oblivious to the fact that I was a different race than my foster family and classmates.  At 5, I was adopted by a Black single mother in Carson, a city in the South Bay region of Los Angeles. She was an older woman who had dedicated her life to raising foster children of colour, after being raised by her grandmother, a former slave. After the move, I was enrolled in a now-defunct elementary school in Compton. The lessons I learned in class were starkly different from those I learned in Chino Hills.  During and in the aftermath of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, my new classmates and I passed a number of burned storefronts on our way to school each morning. My teacher tried to explain the chaos we witnessed. She told us that a Black man, Rodney King, had been brutally beaten by police officers and that none of the officers went to prison.  When we did not understand why the Rodney King case led to some of our favourite stores being burned down, my teacher paused for a moment. After a thoughtful silence, she said that Black people have always been treated unfairly in this country due to the colour of our skin. Our community was angry, tired and hopeless. Some people in the community expressed their frustrations by rioting because it seemed that Black people would always be treated as second-class citizens who did not belong and did not deserve justice.  The lesson that day was a tough pill to swallow. Prior to my adoption, no one told me I was Black or that I could be subject to disparate treatment. It was jarring to learn that because of the colour of my skin ― something I could not control ― the world would perceive me as a threat, inferior and unwelcome. I was terrified to think that I could one day be subjected to violence like Rodney King was ― or even killed because of the stereotypes associated with my Black skin. I was even more saddened to think that people who looked like my former foster parents, whom I had called “mommy” and “daddy,” might discriminate against me because I did not look like them.  In my predominately Black school, our classroom dolls and action figures had white skin and straight, blonde hair. In our textbooks, I noticed that the illustrations were of white parents, students, teachers, professionals. In history classes, I took note that every single president of our country had been a white man.  When I celebrated those presidents during holidays ― or saw their names on our schools, bridges and tunnels ― I became uneasy knowing that many of them were slave owners and believed in the inferiority of my race. I was confused to learn that a number of states proudly raised flags and erected monuments to honour the very Confederacy that fought to keep my ancestors enslaved. I was confused not only because Confederate monuments felt aggressive and disrespectful to Black people, but also because it seemed counterintuitive to celebrate the losing side of a war. Prior to my adoption, no one told me I was Black or that I could be subject to disparate treatment. It was jarring to learn that because of the color of my skin ― something I could not control ― the world would perceive me as a threat, inferior and unwelcome.In my adolescence, I noticed how purportedly “flesh tone” everyday items such as bandages, hosiery and undergarments were manufactured in white skin tones. Until about five years ago, most mainstream makeup brands did not make products for brown skin tones (and most luxury brands still don’t). Commercials for hair products featured white or fair skinned models with straight hair, signalling that those products were not for kinkier, Black hair textures. When interviewing for jobs, I was advised to straighten my hair because my natural hair texture was seen as “unprofessional.”  As a young adult, I held a few internships in corporate offices of large companies. It quickly became apparent that corporate America was predominately white, especially at the executive level. During law school, it was disconcerting to realise that the law profession is especially white. There are so few Black lawyers that it is apparently difficult for many people to register that I am a litigator when I walk into a room. I am constantly ignored in hearings and conferences until I advise fellow lawyers that I, too, am an attorney. I am regularly mistaken for the pro bono client in court, or for the paralegal or assistant in depositions. Despite my education and professional success, I am still followed around stores when I shop, or ignored when I seek sales assistance in high-end boutiques.  Every day of my life, I have experiences that infer Black inferiority and anti-Blackness. It is exhausting to wake up each day and convince myself and others that I belong, that my life matters and that I am capable, despite being surrounded by social, cultural and professional cues that suggest otherwise. No matter how subtle or seemingly innocuous signals of Black exclusion and inferiority are, they diminish Black people’s dignity and humanity, erode our identity as Americans, and reinforce decades of stereotypes and discrimination intended to cement our status as second-class citizens. The prevalence of, say, white skin-toned bandages or dolls may seem inconsequential to some in the fight for racial justice. However, recall that in 1954, the Supreme Court was persuaded to desegregate public schools in its landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision largely based on the findings of Kenneth and Mamie Clark’s doll experiment. The study showed that Black girls preferred to play with white dolls because they thought that Black dolls were inferior. The Black girls’ inferiority complex demonstrated how even seemingly trivial Black subjugation and ostracisation inhibit diversity, racial equality, racial equity and inclusion.Anti-Blackness and Black inferiority are so ingrained in American culture that over time, some people cannot recognize acts of discrimination and brutality against Black people.Societal projections of anti-Blackness and Black inferiority are also embedded within imposter syndrome, from which even the most qualified and distinguished Black people can suffer. I am often saddened when brilliant, hard-working Black lawyers question their entitlement to raises, bonuses and promotions. After years of being harshly critiqued, cut off while speaking, ignored in conversations, excluded from casual networking outings and denied opportunities, they feel ostracised, silenced and inadequate. They’ve watched other Black colleagues struggle to get a foot in the door, only to quit or get fired under the weight of being unseen and unheard in the workplace.Often, imposter syndrome causes many talented Black lawyers to accept far less than they deserve because they are taught to feel lucky to be “one of the few.” Instead, we should be valuing ourselves as assets to our firms, as our white colleagues do.  Anti-Blackness and Black inferiority are so ingrained in U.S. culture that over time, some people cannot recognise acts of discrimination and brutality against Black people. Worse yet, many Black people have accepted such disparate treatment as an unchanging reality with which we must simply cope. It has been difficult to achieve progress with a boot or, say, a knee, on our necks. For far too long, the onus has perversely been on people of colour to include ourselves in predominately white professions and communities. We should not be doing the work to diversify these spaces and achieve greater equity when we do not have seats at the table to make the decisions necessary to implement change.Now, many are finally starting to get it. Six years ago, employers did not concern themselves with how the video-recorded death of Eric Garner traumatised their Black employees. White colleagues did not inquire about how the lack of charges in the Eric Garner case opened old wounds of racial injustice. But today, some of the world’s largest, most influential companies have openly denounced the recent slayings of Black men and women and have proudly stated that “Black lives matter.” White people around the world are protesting alongside people of colour and are as vocally outraged as we are at the disparate treatment of Black people in this country.However, to obtain systemic change in our society, the movement must expand beyond the protests. White people must become active voices in their communities, workplaces and social settings on a regular basis. This will not be easy. Some may be uncomfortable speaking up because they don’t believe this is their fight. Others may be scared of inadvertently saying or doing the wrong thing in the era of #cancelculture, or frightened of being derided as “social justice warriors.” To my white colleagues, I say discomfort be damned. While the recent protests and commentaries on racial injustice are encouraging harbingers of change, they must be followed by concrete, consistent action. I particularly challenge white people to lean into the discomfort. When you hear a friend, colleague or relative say something racist, don’t ignore it or gossip about it behind their backs. Confront the behaviour, tell them it is unacceptable, and educate them on why the behaviour will not be tolerated. When you notice something unjust or discriminatory in your community or workplace, speak up. To my white colleagues, I say discomfort be damned. While the recent protests and statements on racial injustice are encouraging harbingers of change, they must be followed by concrete, consistent action.When professional groups and associations of color welcome white colleagues to join our events, you should attend. Otherwise, we are left preaching to the choir. When we post articles and commentary about our experiences with racial injustice, we should see likes, shares and comments from the same white colleagues who privately tell us they found the post moving. For white people in positions of leadership, create policies that require all employees to participate in diversity, equity and inclusion training. Give business to people of colour. Mentor people of colour. Sponsor people of colour. Network with people of colour. Hire more people of colour. Retain more people of colour. Promote more people of colour.Remember that growth always requires some growing pains, and that these actions will not be easy. Your white friends, relatives and colleagues may even become angry. But also recall that, every day for the last 400 years, Black people have been made to feel uncomfortable by constant exposure to the anti-Blackness and Black inferiority embedded in nearly every aspect of American society.  I believe that change is possible and that change is imminent. I am hopeful that someday, Black children will not need to be warned about Black inferiority and can move through life expecting and receiving the same opportunities as equally qualified white people. I hope that Black children can one day bask in the same innocence that white children have always enjoyed. I want Black children to see themselves reflected in textbooks, toys, everyday personal items and mainstream American culture and society.  Because they, too, are American.Black children should see streets, schools, buildings and bridges named after accomplished Black people whom they can admire. Black children should see a succession of American presidents that is as diverse as the American electorate.  They should see monuments and currency reflecting the many Black people who have contributed to our society.  And when future Black students are finally taught about anti-Blackness, Black inferiority, police brutality and racial injustice, it is my hope that those lessons are taught in the past tense.  TaLona Holbert is a lawyer at Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP in New York City. This article first appeared on HuffPost Personal.Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal Black British Women Have Our Own Needs To Be Addressed Right Now. Here’s Why Black Teens Like Me Have The Future In Our Hands. Here’s What We Must Do With It How The ‘Hostile Environment’ Has Made This Pandemic Harder For Doctors Like Me
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Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energies Argonne National Laboratory have been working with Hong Kong University of Science and Technology to develop a new particle-level cathode coating for lithium-ion batteries meant to increase their life and safety. The new coating the team created is called PEDOT. PEDOT is an idea three years in the making scientists say is an … Continue reading
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Imagine a single tidal turbine capable of powering a community of 50 to 70 homes all year long.That's the potential of turbines being developed by Verdant Power, which builds marine energy systems that harness power generated from currents.Turbines whose design is currently being refined by researchers at Lehigh University's P.C."Verdant's turbine is a downstream turbine, which means the flow goes over the nacelle where the electronics and generator are located, before it hits the rotor blades," says Arindam Banerjee, an associate professor of mechanical engineering and mechanics.In addition, vortex shedding from the pylon introduces periodic disturbances in the flow which is known to reduce the life of the rotor blades themselves."Banerjee and his team recently received a $250,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the organization's Partnerships for Innovation program to design a pylon with fairings that will reduce this disturbance.
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Singapore-based startup Silent Eight, which uses AI to help financial institutions manage their compliance and risk obligations, has raised US$6.2 million in a series A round led by existing investor Wavemaker Partners.OTB Ventures, SC Ventures (Standard Chartered’s investment arm), and other existing investors also participated in the round.Paul Santos, managing partner for Wavemaker Partners Southeast Asia, has also joined Silent Eight’s board.Silent Eight plans to use the fresh capital to make new hires for its offices in Singapore, Warsaw, London, and New York.It is planning to double its headcount by the end of Q1 2020, according to a statement.The startup, founded in 2013, operates an AI-backed system that learns how to conduct investigations and can help weed out money laundering and terrorist financing.
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Fractured Minds, a first-person puzzle adventure game highlighting the impact of mental health issues, has launched digitally on the PC, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.The title comes from Emily Mitchell, a 17-year-old who wanted to make a game about severe anxiety and depression.She found solace through game development, and she won the 2017 BAFTA Young Games Designers award.Now the game has been spruced up and published by Wired Productions, which is making it available for $1.99.80% of the proceeds are going to Mitchell, who lives in Watford, United Kingdom, and Safe In Our World, a new games industry charity dedicated to raising and supporting mental health awareness.Inspired by Mitchell’s personal journey through severe anxiety, Fractured Minds seeks to create greater understanding and stand in solidarity with mental health sufferers around the world.
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Their influence is being felt across healthcare, where games are delivering neurodevelopmental assessments to children, to defense, where military simulations in virtual reality add an unprecedented, tactile layer to training.It’s estimated that the serious games sector will be worth just over $9 billion by 2023.Across the United States and Europe, conferences and other annual gatherings have formed to bring industry specialists and developers together: Games for Health Europe is entering its tenth year; and Games for Change will be hosting its 17th festival in 2020.Serious games as a strategyWhile serious games and their associated communities seem to largely operate outside the games industry, they may represent a feasible but underused product diversification strategy for industry insiders.To start, adding a serious games layer to an existing game could present another revenue stream for developers looking for ethical and even impactful alternatives to controversial microtransactions.
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Consumer expectations are higher than ever as a new generation of shoppers look to shop for experiences rather than commodities.To be forward-looking, brands and retailers are turning to startups in image recognition and machine learning to know, at a very deep level, what each consumer’s current context and personal preferences are and how they evolve.But while brands and retailers are sitting on enormous amounts of data, only a handful are actually leveraging it to its full potential.To provide hyper-personalization in real time, a brand needs a deep understanding of its products and customer data.Imagine a case where a shopper is browsing the website for an edgy dress and the brand can recognize the shopper’s context and preference in other features like style, fit, occasion, color etc., then use this information implicitly while fetching similar dresses for the user.Another situation is where the shopper searches for clothes inspired by their favorite fashion bloggers or Instagram influencers using images in place of text search.
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Snooping workers blamed for bunch of data breachesOne UK police staffer is disciplined every three days for breaking data protection rules or otherwise misusing IT systems, according to a Freedom of Information request by think tank Parliament Street.In the last two years, 237 officers and admin staff have been punished for a variety of offences, including taking pictures of screens showing police databases and sharing them online, accessing data relating to civil cases that staff were involved in, and misusing social media.In total, 11 people were sacked from police forces and six resigned as a result of data breaches.In Gwent, Wales, three people were dismissed for researching the database for named persons and then disclosing that information.Merseyside fired two officers and the Metropolitan Police sacked one staffer for misusing the Criminal Records Information System.
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US officials have increased their criticism of allies who are “opening their arms” to 5G equipment from Chinese vendors.Chinese telecoms vendor Huawei is one of the few suppliers used in global networks.The vendor has built a reputation for innovative and cost-effective gear.“We may not see eye-to-eye on every aspect of technology policy, but we all agree on the principles that matter most,” said Kratsios.Last month, a German spy chief warned about involving Huawei in 5G networks.Bruno Kahl, head of Germany's foreign intelligence, told a parliamentary committee that “infrastructure is not a suitable area for a group that cannot be trusted fully.”
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She is a sought-after speaker, and in this video — fresh off of a workshop presentation at MarketingProfs B2B Forum that absolutely rocked — she shares fascinating ideas about how to make an ongoing B2B influencer content marketing program not only work but drive organizational change and success.Break Free B2B Marketing Interview with Amisha GandhiBelow are some of our favorite insights from the chat between Amisha and our president and co-founder Susan Misukanis.Sue: I’ll always get calls from B2B marketers who say they want to deploy the Kardashian model for their long-tale, B2B influencer program that is still in its infancy, and I feel like I need to redirect.Amisha: I think a lot of people, when they think about influencer marketing, they think it’s all celebrity, but in reality, when you’re looking at it, they are brand ambassadors.We have brand ambassadors because that really helps with awareness.
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