Juan Hackwell

Juan Hackwell

Followers 44
Following 43
Daniel Kirchert, co-founder and CEO of Byton, has left the business and the company's board of directors have approved a restructuring plan.
2
The company is expected to debut the iPhone 12 during a streaming presentation Tuesday. Here's how to tune in.
1
In the upper left corner of the United States resides an inconvenient truth for President Donald Trump and his followers: A highly successful mail-in voting system.Amid a pandemic that has made in-person interactions dangerous, Trump and his allies have attempted to sow fear and uncertainty around mail-in voting even as he attends in-person rallies and events that we now know may have exposed hundreds to Covid-19. But his dangerous tall tales of fraud and tossed ballots are readily dispelled against the backdrop of Washington state’s entirely by-mail voting system. Voting by mail is the safest, most secure way to get this election done and to restore trust in a bedrock of our democracy.I know this because I chair the council for King County, Washington, which has run vote-by-mail elections for over a decade. We are the largest jurisdiction in the United States to conduct all elections by mail. Our nonpartisan regional government represents 2.2million people who live in Seattle, Bellevue and dozens of other cities and surrounding communities. And we have been voting exclusively by mail here since 2009, and statewide in Washington since 2011.This means that our elections — for president, Congress, governor, county and city councils, school boards, special districts — are all conducted fully by mail. And I can tell you without any doubt whatsoever that Trump, and those repeating his propaganda, are wrong about voting by mail. Voting by mail is simple. It works. It’s convenient and secure. It has bipartisan support. In fact, Washington state Republicans overwhelmingly support the system, including our Republican Secretary of State, who herself was elected by mail-in ballots, in our increasingly blue-trending state. Even after being inundated with months of the president’s outright lies, a new poll released last week by the respected western states research, public affairs and communications firm Strategies 360 found that a majority of conservatives in our state still support it. Our system has been reviewed and found to be very accurate. In the 2018 election, Washington state found just 142 cases of improper voting out of 3.1 million ballots cast, an error rate of 0.00004581.A well-designed vote-by-mail system is at least as secure ― and far more inclusive ― than voting in person. In Washington, we take a multitude of steps to ensure that neither ballots, nor ballot drop boxes, are tampered with. Ballots are tracked and verified. Votes are not dumped or double-counted. Only ballots from confirmed registered voters are counted. Our system has been reviewed and found to be very accurate. In the 2018 election, Washington state found just 142 cases of improper voting out of 3.1million ballots cast, an error rate of 0.00004581.In King County, the effect of our robust vote-by-mail system means voter turnout in record numbers. We saw 82% voter turnout in the 2016 general election, and 76% in 2018. Compare that with the national turnout of 61.4% in 2016 and 53.4% in 2018, according to U.S. Census Bureau records. Indeed, an August study published in Science Advances found that mail-in voting increases voter participation, often significantly. We are so confident that our system is accessible to everyone that our county’s nonpartisan elections director has credibly set an audacious voter turnout goal of 90% in this year’s general election.Voting by mail also reduces the opportunity for voter suppression through intimidation or other factors and it offers a physically distant way to vote as the Covid-19 pandemic wears on. Voters cast their ballot from the privacy of their home and then mail their ballots (no postage necessary in Washington state) or drop them in a ballot box without interacting with anyone. President Trump seems to fear this ease of voting. During the first presidential debate last week, he told his followers to go out to the polls and “watch very carefully,” a suggestion that could amount to illegal voter intimidation. Earlier this month, Trump supporters blocked voters from entering a polling place in Virginia. But with mail-in ballots, neither he nor his henchmen can stand in the way.So, what can we do? First, make a plan for how and when you’ll vote. Check your registration, be sure your ballot will be mailed to your current address or update it if you need to. If you are traveling away from home, request a ballot be sent to you if your state or county allows it. Talk to your friends and family about voting and how you can be sure your voice is heard. Vote early if you can. Once you cast your vote, track your ballot. You can track your ballot in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.This pandemic-year election will chart the course for the future of our country. Voters must be given every opportunity to take part in it. Vote-by-mail is the best way to give all voters every opportunity to take part in it. We must ignore the fear-mongering and attempts to suppress our vote and instead embrace this safe and easy method that allows everyone to have a say in our selecting our government leaders.Claudia Balducci serves as Chair of the Metropolitan King County Council, the governing body for King County. This article first appeared on HuffPost Personal.Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal I'm More Afraid Of A Second Trump Term Than My Cancer Coming Back. Here's Why I Run A Muslim Mental Health Helpline. Covid Has Put My Community In Crisis I Found Out I Was Losing My Cineworld Job On Social Media
10
Juniper Networks now offers a VPN solution to allow remote workers to securely access their corporate networks.
7
The US refused to join the Covax vaccine initiative in September, with the White House calling the World Health Organization "corrupt."
6
Now all we need is a Prodigy / Picard crossover to reunite her with Seven.
4
Trump's absence was the most noticeable aspect of the night, in the sense that it allowed for an actual discussion on the biggest issues of the day.
1
The Konnect-i backpack will help users make the most of their smartphones without constantly looking down.
7
This article was originally published by Christopher Carey on Cities Today, the leading news platform on urban mobility and innovation, reaching an international audience of city leaders. For the latest updates follow Cities Today on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and YouTube, or sign up for Cities Today News. Uber hands thousands of vital ‘pieces of intelligence’ to UK authorities each year, complying with over 2,000 requests for data in the capital alone last year. The information emerged at a London court in September as the ride-hailing company fought to regain its license to operate in the city. The final decision was made on… This story continues at The Next Web
6
Mary Trump, an outspoken critic of her uncle Donald Trump, made the remarks to NPR's "All Things Considered" after the president's COVID-19 diagnosis.
5
This weekend's gaming laptop deals could save you a pretty penny on a brand new machine, courtesy of Dell and Lenovo.
4
A Tovla kids' knife set is a great way to introduce your child to the kitchen and meal prep, all while creating an opportunity to spend time together.
9
Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge At Best Buy and Amazon, Apple’s second-gen AirPods that come with a wireless charging case are $151 (usually $200) for the rest of the day. This isn’t quite as good a deal as one in August that saw them discounted by $60, but this is currently the best price you’ll find. This model includes a wireless charging case that lets you recharge the AirPods via Qi wireless, though you’ll need to furnish the wireless charging pad. One of our favorites is just $7 at Amazon right now after you clip the product page coupon. Image: Ring Ring’s Video Doorbell 3, the latest version that released just a few months ago, is $10 off when purchased through Daily Steals. Enter the code VERGERNG at checkout to get one for $90 (usually... Continue reading…
8
Boris Johnson has been accused by the Commons Speaker of treating parliament with “contempt” by bringing in new coronavirus restrictions without debates or votes.Sir Lindsay Hoyle said the prime minister had shown a “total disregard” for the Commons by publishing new regulations just hours before they come into force, and before they have been laid in Parliament.Johnson has been facing a major rebellion from Tory MPs who feel he has been ruling “by decree” by passing Covid-19 laws without prior approval from the Commons.The government has instead resorted to a parliamentary procedure that allows it to make regulations and then seek retrospective approval from MPs, almost always without a proper debate or vote.Sir Graham Brady, chair of the powerful 1922 backbench Tory committee, had hoped to force Johnson into granting MPs a veto over new regulations with an amendment on Wednesday afternoon.But Hoyle said he could not select Brady’s amendment because it could lead to legal uncertainty as MPs were only being asked by the government to make a “narrow, binary” choice about whether emergency powers under the Coronavirus Act 2020 should continue."I look to the government to rebuild the trust with this House and not treat it with the contempt it has shown" Speaker Lindsay Hoyle makes statement ahead of government’s emergency coronavirus powers debate and says he won't select Brady amendmenthttps://t.co/xpfjt3uGyX#PMQspic.twitter.com/lr1lPK1L4v— BBC Politics (@BBCPolitics) September 30, 2020“I have not taken this decision lightly. I am looking to the government to remedy a situation I regard as completely unsatisfactory,” the Speaker said at the start of prime minister’s questions.“I am now looking to the government to rebuild trust with this House and not treat it with the contempt that it has shown.”Hoyle did hold out an olive branch to rebels and put the government on notice by offering “very sympathetic consideration” to MPs’ demands for urgent questions or emergency debates that force ministers to the Commons to justify new restrictions.And he urged Johnson to bring forward “substantive motions”, which crucially can be amended by rebels, on the operation of coronavirus emergency powers.“The way in which the government has exercised its powers to make secondary legislation during this crisis has been totally unsatisfactory,” Hoyle said. “All too often important statutory instruments have been published a matter of hours before coming into force and some explanations why important measures have come into effect before they have been laid in this House have been unconvincing and show a total disregard for the House.”But Hoyle said he could not select the Brady amendment for debate on Wednesday afternoon, stressing his decision was “guided by professional advice”.He concluded that the amendment would “risk giving rise to uncertainty about the decision the House has taken” on extending the Coronavirus Act 2020 emergency powers, and could lead to challenges in the courts.“Lack of clarity in such matters risks undermining the rule of law,” the Speaker said.Related... A Chef Labelled Boris Johnson A ‘T*T’ On BBC News, But You Would Have Missed It Opinion: Coronavirus Has Created A Crisis Of Over-Policing. Parliament Must Act Now – Before It's Too Late Asking Boris Johnson To Explain His Own Coronavirus Rules Is 'Gotcha' Journalism, Says Minister
2
More

Top