Kristie Hernandez

Kristie Hernandez

Followers 49
Following 46
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Image: Microsoft Microsoft is adding Chromebook support to Minecraft: Education Edition, offering another way for schools to teach virtually this upcoming school year. Designed specifically for a classroom setting, Minecraft: Education Edition provides tools for educators like virtual chalkboards and a Classroom mode that allows teachers to communicate with their students and view where they are throughout the game world. Educators can find user-created lessons on the Minecraft: Education Edition website that cover subjects including history and math. The lessons have players exploring the game’s map, like one that has students going on a scavenger hunt to learn the elements of the periodic table, that help kids learn by playing the game. Minecraft:... Continue reading…
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Intel’s incoming laptop processors won’t go quad-core with Core i3 chips, rumor has it.
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‘Everyone can see that the US goal is to keep its monopoly in science and technology’ says Chinese foreign minister China has ridiculed America's plan to build a "clean network" free from Chinese tech and businesses, particularly in its telecoms infrastructure.…
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Is retweeting an officer’s photo cyber harassment? Continue reading…
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(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Vast areas of the Martian night sky pulse in ultraviolet light, according to images from NASA's MAVEN spacecraft. The results are being used to illuminate complex circulation patterns in the Martian atmosphere
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This discovery could be a crucial piece of the puzzle that is covid-19.
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Samsung and Microsoft announced at last year’s Galaxy Unpacked that they would be forming a closer partnership to help Android and Windows work better together. At today’s Galaxy Unpacked, the two companies revealed new integrations between their two ecosystems — including a way to run apps from your Galaxy Note 20 on your Windows 10 PC. Here’s a GIF from Microsoft showing a Windows 10 PC running WhatsApp and Instagram side by side from a Galaxy Note 20: You’ll only be able to use one app at a time on your PC at first, but Microsoft says that you’ll be able to run multiple apps, as is shown in the GIF, sometime in November. You’ll also be able to pin apps to your Windows taskbar or Start menu so you can access them more... Continue reading…
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Sheila Bair is worried that the current economic and health crisis will turn into a financial calamity. Bair, who was a key player in the government's response to the financial crisis a decade ago as the head of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, is concerned that regulators are focusing on the wrong things. Regulators, at the urging of the big banks, are moving to loosen capital requirements for financial institutions at the same time that the banks ought to be shoring up their balance sheets to protect themselves from a potential wave of corporate debt defaults, she said. Corporate debt is at record levels and huge chunks of it are held by US banks. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Sheila Bair is intimately familiar with what a financial crisis looks like and how devastating it can be. So when she says she's worried that we may be heading toward one, it's probably a good idea to pay attention. Bair, who was a key player in the federal government's response to the financial crisis a decade ago, sees plenty of danger signs of another such calamity, much of it in the form of corporate debt and the collateralized loan obligations that debt gets sliced and diced and reassembled into. She also worries that the big banks are pushing hard to loosen capital requirements right now — and regulators are accommodating them. "I think the regulators are focusing on the wrong things," Bair told Business Insider in an interview Tuesday. "My worst fear," she continued, "is that what is now a health and economic crisis turns into financial crisis. And that's what the regulators should be focusing on." Bair headed up the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation from 2006 to 2011. While there, she was part of the small group of policymakers that were trying to respond to the emerging crisis. Her job was to oversee the takeover and resolution of the numerous FDIC-backed banks that failed during that period. She also tried and failed to persuade then Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner to use a similar process to deal with the biggest financial institutions at the time, the ones that were later dubbed "too big to fail." It's perhaps no surprise then that she's again worried about the health of the banks. Banks are pushing for looser capital requirements Part of what concerns her is that the big banks are using the pandemic to persuade lawmakers and regulators to address one of their pet peeves: the amount of capital they have to keep on hand. In the wake of the Great Recession, in an effort to prevent another financial crisis, policymakers required banks of all stripes to increase the amount of capital they had on hand as proportion of their total assets, which include loans, investments, and real-estate holdings. Those institutions have been pressing ever since to lighten those requirements, claiming in part that the rules restrict their ability to make loans. This spring the Federal Reserve announced new regulations that temporarily allow big banks to ignore certain assets when calculating the amount of capital they need to have on hand. The move essentially allows them to keep less capital in reserve or, with the capital they already have on hand, to make more loans or buy up more assets. But the big banks are also pushing Congress to rewrite the section of the Dodd-Frank financial industry reform law that sets the capital requirements. The change, which Senate Republicans are reportedly planning to include in their next coronavirus stimulus bill, would allow the Federal Reserve to alter an alternate method of calculating the amount of capital banks need to have on hand than the one it already tweaked. The move would have a similar effect — giving banks a freer hand. Bair, who saw what happened when the big banks had a similarly free hand before the last financial crisis, thinks such changes are both bad and unnecessary. Research shows that well-capitalized banks not only are better for financial stability, they do a better job of continuing to offer credit through economic downturns such as the one the US is going through now, she said. "I don't want to lower anyone's capital requirements," Bair said. Looser rules won't necessarily lead to more lending And lowering the amount of capital the big banks have to keep on hand, won't necessarily spur more lending to consumers and small businesses, she said.  The banks that typically make loans to those kinds of customers are the regional and local institutions, she said. Those banks wouldn't be affected by the proposed changes. Meanwhile, the big banks that would be given more freedom could simply use that to do something like invest in US Treasury notes, pocketing the difference between what the government is paying in interest and the paltry amounts they pay their depositors, she said. Indeed, because the new rules the Fed put in place allow banks to exclude Treasury notes when calculating their assets, the regulations essentially encourage them to just park their money there during this and future crises, she said. "You could do that trade all day long," she said. "I'm not saying it would go to that extreme," she continued, "but I think that's going be the tendency now." And regulators have and had a much better way to encourage banks to do more lending, Bair said. Rather than allowing the institutions to weaken their balance sheets, they could have ordered them to stop paying dividends to their holding companies during the coronavirus crisis. FDIC-backed banks paid out $32.7 billion in dividends in the first quarter — nearly twice what they earned in the period — just as the pandemic was starting to get into full swing, the Financial Times reported last month. That money could have supported more than a half a trillion dollars in additional deposits, which in turn could have been used to make new loans. The danger is that with looser capital requirements, the big banks are going to make risky investments or understate the risks they're taking. Either way, the moves could blow up in their faces and pull down the financial system along with, just like what happened 10 years ago. The huge amount of corporate debt is a jumbo-sized danger sign And there's already plenty to worry about in terms of existing stresses on the financial system, Bair said. Her biggest concern is the tremendous amount of corporate debt. The total amount of debt held by non-financial companies hit a record $10.5 trillion in the first quarter, according to data from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. It's unclear exactly how much of that amount is held by banks, but it's almost certainly a large chunk. As part of its response to the coronavirus crisis, the Fed stepped in to backstop the corporate debt markets, buying up bonds from hundreds of companies. That move helped sparked a new wave of corporate debt issuance this spring. The Fed can't prop up that market forever, Bair said. If the economy continues to falter, the institution risks impeding structural changes that need to take place and keeping in business companies that are essentially zombies and have no real chance of making a comeback. Even if the Fed does continue to intervene for the time being in the corporate bond portion of the market, the big banks have other exposure to corporate debt that could hurt them. Many companies, for example, have credit lines with banks or other kinds of lending relationships. And then there are leveraged loans and the related collateralized loan obligations, or CLOs. Leveraged loans are those made to companies that are already highly indebted or are considered poor credit risks. CLOs are similar to the notorious collateralized debt obligations, or CDOs, that blew up in the financial crisis a decade ago. But instead of being amalgams of mortgages that are then sliced and sold by layers, according to assessed risk, CLOs are collections of leveraged loans, that are similarly sold by layers.  Banks hold a lot of leveraged loans and CLOs Both kinds of instruments could prove dangerous for the financial system if the economic situation forces companies to start defaulting en masse. As of 2018, US banks and their holding companies held more than $110 billion in CLOs that were issued just in the Cayman Islands alone, according to a study last year by the Fed. Its quite likely their overall exposure to those derivatives is much greater than that, as Frank Partnoy pointed out in a recent piece in The Atlantic. US banks also directly held some $760 billion in leveraged loans, mostly in the form of revolving lines of credit, at the end of 2018 and another $65 billion in such loans that they were in the process of turning into CLOs, according to a report at the end of last year by the Financial Stability Board. All told, for the average big bank in the major financial markets, the combination of CLOs and leveraged loans they held amounted to 60% of their capital. "If [corporations] start getting into trouble, that could cause a lot of problems for the banks," Bair said. The fact that regulators are focusing on loosening capital requirements right now instead of taking meaningful steps to shore up bank's balance sheets to help them weather a potential storm of defaults, indicates the degree to which their mindset has been warped, Bair said. They're essentially identifying and empathizing with the companies they're supposed to be keeping in check. Regulators have to recognize that what's in the banks' interest is not necessarily in the public interest, she said. Banks are in the business of increasing their return on equity. Looser capital requirements helps them do that — but could also get them in trouble. It's the job of Congress and regulators to protect the broader public from the risk of a financial collapse, Bair said. "Those [interests] are inherently at odds," she said. But she's particularly frustrated that the big banks are pushing for such looser regulations right now. With the pandemic still raging, millions unemployed, and jobless benefits running out, Congress in particular has a lot more to worry about than addressing the banks' pet issues. "I do think a lot of it is cynical," she said. "I think they're using the pandemic to get things that have been on their wish list for a long time. And shame on them." Got a tip about corporate America? Contact Troy Wolverton via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @troywolv, or send him a secure message through Signal at 415.515.5594. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop.  SEE ALSO: Big Tech's CEOs wrapped themselves in the flag and warned about China. Here's why their patriotic appeal was meaningless, misleading, and should be ignored. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
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Save $72 on Sony WH-CH710N Wireless Headphones, which are on sale for $128, marked down from $200.
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Google has added a slew of new party games for the Nest Hub Max and other smart displays.
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Chinese search engine Sogou‘s stock price jumped 50% after it revealed Tencent had proposed to buy all of the company’s remaining stock above asking price, delist it from the New York Stock Exchange, and take it private. Seeking future profits, traders immediately sent Sogou stock soaring by Monday’s market open. Tencent, China’s largest tech conglomerate valued at $640 billion, had just offered to buy Sogou shares for $9 each, well beyond its $5.75 market close on July 24. Sogou is China’s second largest search engine in terms of market share with 22%, according to StatCounter. The latest available analysis found… This story continues at The Next Web
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Yup, the second-generation Rolls-Royce Ghost is coming this autumn, but it won’t be arriving with the sort of extravagance you expect from a Rolls-Royce. The Ghost is the English carmaker’s most successful model to date. But according to Rolls-Royce’s team of luxury intelligence specialists, potential Ghost buyers are aiming for minimalism in their next luxury car. “We found that Ghost … Continue reading
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Top court won't nix links to accurate, fair journalism about director of financially rocked charity Germany's high court has sided with Google by upholding lower court rulings that rejected a right-to-be-forgotten privacy claim, and it delayed another case to seek clarification from top Euro judges.…
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Get the latest on coronavirus. Sign up to the Daily Brief for news, explainers, how-tos, opinion and more.There’s a *lot* riding on vaccines right now.While the fate of the world as we know it rests with scientists battling to find an inoculation that will tackle Covid-19, ministers are relying on the flu jab to save the NHS this winter in the face of a second surge in coronavirus cases. But despite this – and ministers having previously indicated they were keen to make some childhood vaccinations mandatory – the government has been quick to distance itself from talk it could make a coronavirus vaccine compulsory.So why is it so controversial?Which vaccines are we talking about? With the world unlikely to get back to normal until a vaccine is found for Covid-19 – which has killed almost 650,000 people around the world – all eyes are on trials for a jab that could offer immunity to the virus.Last week, findings from the first phase of the Oxford University trial suggested “promising” results, with early indications suggesting the vaccine was “safe, causes few side effects, and induces strong immune responses”. Meanwhile, on Friday the government announced it was expanding England’s flu vaccination programme to another 30m people to help stop the NHS becoming overwhelmed this winter in the face of another wave of coronavirus. Under the new plans, free flu jabs will also be offered to over 50s, people who are shielding because of coronavirus – and their households – and schoolchildren aged 11. That is in addition to the groups who are already eligible for the flu vaccine.  The PM thinks anti-vaxxers are ‘nuts’On Friday, while promoting the new flu vaccination programme Boris Johnson called people who are actively-opposed to vaccinations “nuts”. Speaking to staff at a GP surgery in London, the prime minister said: “There’s all these anti-vaxxers now. They are nuts. They are nuts.” Johnson is not the only one in the cabinet who has shared similar sentiments. In September, health secretary Matt Hancock revealed to HuffPost UK he had received legal advice about how vaccinations for children could be made compulsory. “There is a very strong argument for having compulsory vaccinations for children for when they go to school – because otherwise they are putting other children at risk,” he said.“Actually, I’ve received advice inside government this week on how we might go about it. And I’m looking very seriously at it.”But when health minister Helen Whately was quizzed about potentially making the flu vaccine compulsory for NHS and care staff, it’s fair to say she was rather less forthcoming.“This year, I’m confident that people will realise the importance of getting a flu vaccination, and they’ll realise that this year it really, really is imperative to come forward if you’re eligible and get it, so we expect to see higher take-up rates,” she told BBC Radio 4′s Today programme, dodging the question spectacularly. Asked again whether ministers would make it compulsory, Whately said only: “We will look at what we need to do.” Meanwhile, a Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson told HuffPost UK: “In the UK, we do not currently have mandatory vaccination but operate a system of informed consent – it is everyone’s responsibility to seek NHS advice to get the right information to make an informed choice. “Our priority is to ensure any potential new Covid-19 vaccine is safe and effective, and that the balance of benefits outweighs the harm from Covid-19.”Are there are any compulsory vaccines in the UK already? At the start of the coronavirus pandemic, a number of rumours circulated on social media suggesting that a Covid-19 vaccine would be mandatory under the Coronavirus Act. These were untrue. In the UK, vaccines are not currently mandatory under law, with the Public Health (Control of Diseases) Act 1984 ruling out compulsory medical treatment – including vaccines. Why do people object to mandatory vaccines?Most arguments against mandatory vaccines centre on the individual freedoms and the right to choose.A lot of rhetoric from anti-vaccine campaigners, particularly in the US, uses phrases such as “my body, my choice”, more commonly associated with the abortion rights movement.But Michael Shermer, publisher of Skeptic magazine, points out that by refusing a vaccine, people are taking away choice from others, and the rest of society as a whole.“If anti-vaxxers have their way herd immunity will be breached and those vulnerable people who cannot get vaccinated (but want to) risk catching the germs of those who simply refuse to”, he told HuffPost UK.“That’s a violation of their freedom.“And there’s nothing unique at the idea of governments mandating vaccines, in the same manner that governments already mandate a great many things in our lives in the interest of public safety and security.”Would compulsory vaccination work in the UK? Professor Julian Savulescu, whose title is Uehiro chair in practical ethics at the University of Oxford, has argued that if a coronavirus vaccine is found it must be made compulsory. “Large numbers of people are dying from the virus, but also from the strategy,” he said on ITV’s Good Morning Britain, referring to the UK’s lockdown. “What people don’t realise is that we’re going to have large number of cancer deaths over many years because of delayed treatment. Already the estimates are that 200,000 people will die.“So the cost of going slow are also significant and that has to be balanced in this case.”Should the coronavirus vaccine be compulsory?'If the vaccine is safe, it's like putting on a seatbelt.'Prof @juliansavulescu says that given the 'grave situation' we're in, making the vaccine compulsory in the same way wearing seat belts is mandatory could help protect people pic.twitter.com/y06evtLl1J— Good Morning Britain (@GMB) July 21, 2020But Dr Doug Brown, who is the chief executive at the British Society for Immunology, disagrees. He told HuffPost UK that in most of the countries where mandatory vaccination has been introduced, it’s because of high anti-vaccination sentiment. For example, a 2018 Wellcome study revealed that in France – where compulsory vaccinations have been introduced – one-in-three people disagree with the idea that vaccines are safe. That is the highest percentage for any country in the world. In comparison, the survey found that 75% of Brits agree that vaccines are safe, with 9% disagreeing.“What we have seen is that in countries that have introduced mandatory programmes, that’s often off the back of there being quite a high anti-vaccine sentiment in those countries and lots of misinformation floating around,” Brown said. “What we need to be doing in the UK is to be tackling the issues we face, which are not around vaccine confidence, which is very high.” Instead, the UK must launch public health awareness campaigns about the importance of vaccines and how they work, he said. “We must ensure we have very high public awareness of vaccines, vaccine development, the value of vaccines – in particular with the coronavirus vaccine,” Brown said.“We need to take the general public on a journey with us so they can understand and trust that an eventual vaccine is safe and effective.”  Meanwhile, the UK must make sure it has the services on the ground to deliver vaccines. “One of the problems we have had in recent years is in the disinvestment in local vaccine services to make these vaccines accessible and openly available to everybody in the community who should be benefiting,” said Brown.“With those two issues solved, we’re confident that there will be a high enough uptake of flu vaccine and a potential vaccine for coronavirus.” Brown – along with other scientists – are also worried that making vaccines mandatory could increase health inequalities. “If you penalise people who aren’t having the vaccine [...] you’re penalising parts of the population who will really struggle,” he said. It could increase health inequalities if people are barred from other health services, or if children are unable to attend nursery or school without certain jabs.Which countries already have compulsory vaccinations? While there are no mandatory vaccines in the UK, in other countries there are compulsory vaccination programmes. In the US, children must be vaccinated before they can attend school or nursery, with each state deciding which vaccinations are required. There are some exceptions to the rule based on factors such as health issues and religious beliefs. However, New York banned religious exemptions for school vaccines in 2019 after an outbreak of measles. Last year, Italy introduced a new law which allowed parents to be fined up to €500 if they sent their unvaccinated children to school. Among the mandatory vaccinations are jabs for chickenpox, polio, measles, mumps and rubella, the BBC reported. Children under the age of six can be turned away from school if their parents can’t provide proof they have had their vaccines. In recent years, France has also added extra vaccinations to the list of jabs children must have.  Related... Boris Johnson Says Anti-Vaxxers Are 'Nuts' Oxford Coronavirus Vaccine 'Safe' And Showing 'Promising Results' Matt Hancock Reveals Vaccinations Could Be Made Compulsory
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You see, there is a COVID-19 silver lining. For employers. For the rest of us, welcome to the machine Google has gone all-in on its work-from-home policy, telling techies they don’t need to return to the office until July 2021 at the earliest.…
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Some headphone manufacturers expect us to pay for products that only afford a fraction of the marketed functionality.
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LG's gorgeous and stylish Velvet smartphone is officially coming to Australia – here's how much it will cost.
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(City University London) Several calls to action are offered including the need for social responsibility to be embedded in STEM curricula and the setting up of a National Engineering Policy Centre to improve the communication between the engineering community and policy makers.
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(Lancaster University) Science fiction authors foresaw augmented reality video games, the rise of social media and trends of hyper-consumption, and can help predict future consumer patterns.
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On the official page of Realme in the Chinese social network Weibo, a new poster has appeared, with the help of which the company has ... The post The upcoming Realme smartphone has a quad rear rectangular camera appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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This damage may be directly caused by the virus as well as by an immune system thrown off-kilter by the infection.
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Commentary: One of the final major PS4 exclusives is a joyous open-world experience.
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Hi! I'm Lauren Johnson, a senior advertising reporter at Business Insider, and welcome to Advertising Insider daily, where we brief you on the top advertising and media news. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. Today we look at Facebook's relationships with agencies, the startups that investors think will take off this year, and creators' experiences with Instagram's shopping tools. Ski trips, cocktails, and exclusive groups: How Facebook made itself indispensable to advertisers and built an ad juggernaut Patrick Coffee and I looked at how Facebook built its $70 billion advertising business by building relationships with advertisers and big ad holding companies that handle multi-million budgets for brands. In addition to pitching its ballooning user base, Facebook also hired Microsoft sales executive Carolyn Everson, who started Facebook's client council and Facebook Marketing Partners program. Everson also hosts multi-day trips for large advertisers to the Deer Valley Ski Resort in Park City, Utah and invites executives to her house in Beaver Creek, Colorado. Facebook's business has since shifted towards small and midsize marketers that now represent its largest group of advertisers. Read the full story here. 17 advertising and marketing startups that investors say are poised to take off despite the coronavirus It's getting harder for advertising and marketing startups to raise funds as investors look for strong returns on their investments. Despite the hit that the ad industry has taken from the coronavirus, investors still believe some advertising and marketing startups have a strong future. They said ones that are solving problems like helping with data collection and building creative for social media are primed to take off. Read the full story here. Instagram influencers describe what it's like to use the app's expanded shopping features and the changes they still want to see Sydney Bradley talked to creators about a recent change in eligibility standards for Instagram's shopping feature. "This tool is definitely a time saver and offers a better linking experience for the creator, a better shopping experience for the users, and better conversion potential for the brand," influencer Katie Sturino told Sydney. But creators said that they would like the availability to tag more brands in their posts as well as integrations with affiliate networks that they can use to drive sales of products that they post about. Read the full story here. More stories we're reading: Netflix names content chief Ted Sarandos as co-CEO with Reed Hastings (Business Insider) eMarketer cuts Alibaba's 2020 ad forecast as search struggles amid the coronavirus pandemic (Insider Intelligence) Facebook is adding a label to all posts about voting from political candidates, including the president (Business Insider) S4 Capital Hopes to Raise $126 Million to Further Expand Through Mergers (Adweek) Media Agency Review Activity Spikes During COVID-19 (Ad Exchanger) Hollywood Stays Away From Facebook Ad Boycott (New York Times) Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at [email protected] and subscribe to this daily email here. — LaurenJoin the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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In February 2018, Google made a bold proclamation: It was ready to "raise the bar of excellence for enterprise devices and services," and it was launching a new program called Android Enterprise Recommended to make that happen.The program, according to Google, would establish "best practices and common requirements for devices and services, backed by a thorough testing process" conducted by Google itself. It would ensure that any devices with the Android Enterprise Recommended stamp of approval would receive timely and reliable software updates, among other things — including support of the current Android version and delivery of all security patches within 90 days of their release for a minimum of three years.To read this article in full, please click here
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Vodafone's latest broadband deal is excellent, boasting large Amazon vouchers, fast speeds and affordable prices.
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Getting bamboozled by online misinformation can be like trying to charge your smartphone in a microwave: embarrassing, expensive, and mildly explosive.Hot glue, bereft of editing software and careful lighting, turns out to be ill-suited to making sandals.It can also get much, much worse, and the dangerous lies that spring to mind most readily—4chan’s bomb-making instructions, racist conspiracy theories that seem designed to whip people into homicidal fury—aren’t the only ones going around the internet.Other, seemingly innocuous distortions of reality can be just as lethal.After people began to blame the YouTuber behind the hack, Ms Yeah took to Chinese social media platform Weibo to apologize and promise to never make such videos again.The kind of misinformation that resulted in Zhe Zhe’s death is unlikely to be caught as dangerous by any social media bot or algorithm.
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When Samsung announced the Space Monitor, I knew in an instant that it was going to be something I had to try out in person.Now that I’ve had time to do so, I’m happy to say it’s much as advertised, a streamlined and solid monitor with a smart new design — but not necessarily one for everybody.I reviewed the smaller one, as the large one has a lower refresh rate and I really don’t have any use for 4K in my workflow.The colors are vibrant and the default settings are solid, if perhaps a little warm (easily adjusted, of course).The bezel is narrow, a bit more than a quarter inch, a little thicker on the bottom side.It’s also nearly flush on the top and sides so you don’t feel like the bezels protrude towards you.
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The Beijing office of the Cyber Administration of China (CAC) on Monday summoned executives from Bytedance’s Jinri Toutiao for allowing search results which defamed a late Communist Party military leader, ordering the company to clean up its search function.Why it matters: As one of the largest and most popular content aggregators in China, Jinri Toutiao is known for sensationalized content, leading to censure from internet regulators on a number of occasions.However, low quality content continues to thrive on the platform despite cleanup efforts.The CAC summoned executives of Jinri Toutiao in November 2018, demanding that the platform conduct a self-cleanup campaign.Details: In a post on its official WeChat account, the internet regulator said that the search engine on Jinri Toutiao linked to slanderous search results about Fang Zhimin, who is officially recognized as a revolutionary martyr in China.The Beijing office of the CAC said requested Jinri Toutiao to “thoroughly clean up relevant information and punish responsible personnel,” as well as improve the platform’s search function.
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poppiesfishandchips in London from December 1.Pray you don't get a fruit creme... fishandchips QualityStreet buff.ly/36InMIz
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The open ecosystem's flexibility also makes it relatively easy for tainted apps to circulate on third-party app stores or malicious websites.Worse still, malware-ridden apps sneak into the official Play Store with disappointing frequency.After grappling with the issue for a decade, Google is calling in some reinforcements.All three companies have done extensive Android malware research over the years, and have existing relationships with Google to report problems they find."What the App Defense Alliance enables us to do is take the open ecosystem approach to the next level.The companies are looking for anything from trojans, adware, and ransomware to banking malware or even phishing campaigns.
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