Lillian Barnwell

Lillian Barnwell

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Following 42
Vivo is in a roll recently with monthly smartphone launches. The company recently unveiled its Vivo V20 series and now is ready to debut a ... The post Vivo Y30 and Y3s will be available in China on October 26 appeared first on Gizchina.com.
These are the best smart speakers you can buy right now, no matter which voice assistant you prefer.
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It plans to set up a five million square feet logistics park on the plot of land in two to three phrase over the next three to five years.
The XB-1, unveiled Wednesday, will be a test aircraft for the company's planned commercial supersonic airplane.
Photo by Hunter Martin / Getty Images This year has been a tumultuous one for the Overwatch League. It wasn’t supposed to be this way: the 2020 season was slated to be a breakout year, a chance to finally realize the ambition of having a truly global league with teams traveling all over the world to compete against one another. That dream was halted due to the ongoing pandemic and the inability for teams and players to travel. To make matters worse, viewership dropped after a shift from Twitch to YouTube, and the rapid rise of Riot’s team-shooter Valorant kicked off an exodus of big-name players, led by 2019 OWL MVP Jay “Sinatraa” Won. At one point, the second-best team in the league dropped its entire roster. But things have steadily been turning around. After shifting to... Continue reading…
Bethesda's games are hitting Xbox Series S/X, according to an ESRB listing.
Today, Coolpad launched an entry-level smartphone equipped with Unigroup Spreadtrum SoC. The chip model is unknown. The company only revealed that it has three Cortex ... The post Coolpad Cool 12A Launched, Starting At 569 Yuan ($84) appeared first on Gizchina.com.
The pallet industry has warned that it will need several more months to prepare for changes brought about by Brexit.
Huawei smartphone business has been at the hub of controversies since the beginning of last year. After the initial U.S. ban, the Chinese manufacturer had ... The post Huawei smartphone business is going down – reduces its workforce in Bangladesh appeared first on Gizchina.com.
Open-source projects aim to give researchers, startups a helping hand IBM has published two open-source artificial intelligence projects it hopes will help astronomers better deal with space junk – and encourage startups to circle Earth with swarms of CubeSats.…
(Technion-Israel Institute of Technology) The suggested apparatus produces controlled radiation with a narrow spectrum that can be tuned with high resolution, at a relatively low energy investment. The findings are likely to lead to breakthroughs in a variety of fields, including the analysis of chemicals and biological materials, medical imaging, X-ray equipment for security screening, and other uses of accurate X-ray sources
Allform, the direct-to-consumer sofa brand from Helix, is a solid choice for someone in need of sturdy furniture without wanting to break the bank.
ECB president Lagarde hints that the central bank may follow the Federal Reserve in tweaking its inflation target.
What UK businesses can learn from Florence Nightingale when it comes to digital transformation.
It’s August. I’m at a (socially-distanced) picnic, munching a sandwich and keeping half an eye on a slightly shifty New Forest pony, when I have a realisation: my ten-month-old son has never touched another baby.He’s sitting on my picnic blanket with me, watching on with his trademark frown, while a couple of his friends tussle over a lift-the-flap book. These babies are going to nursery now that their parents are back at work, and they’re clearly confident about playing with other children. But my baby just watches, a little unsure. If the rules stay the same for the foreseeable future, is he going to grow up like this, always sitting on the edge?Due to the global pandemic, he isn’t technically allowed any physical contact with other babies, unless he’s at nursery. The long and short of it is, he’s not allowed to play with his friends, but if I pay £50+ a day for a nursery place that we don’t need, he can play with children we don’t know.After that picnic, we had a lot of worried conversations over the dinner table. Will distancing damage our baby’s social development? Should we just ignore the rules, and let him play with other babies? These feel like privileged worries – we’re healthy and safe, and others aren’t so lucky – but I can’t help but obsess over it.We’ve been cautious all through the pandemic, and we’re particularly worried about inadvertently passing anything onto our parents. But now that my son is active enough to play with other babies, it feels like I’m weighing up two risks against each other: the risk of catching or spreading the virus, and the risk to my son’s social development. Which is the greater risk for him? Which would be more damaging in the long term?For months, the only people who held him were my husband and I, and he only saw family and friends through an iPhone screen.My son has spent more than half his life in lockdown. He was only four months when the pandemic hit, and at that point (in the pre-crawling era) he dutifully sat, lay, or slept where you put him. Social distancing was not an issue. I was more feeling sorry for myself, sad that I’d lost the maternity leave that I had imagined for myself.To begin with, my main concern was that my baby couldn’t cuddle his grandparents. For months, the only people who held him were my husband and I, and he only saw family and friends through an iPhone screen, which might explain why he’s so obsessed with getting his hands on our phones – to him, it’s where Grandma lives. Outdoor, and eventually indoor, meet-ups were finally allowed, but still he couldn’t go in for a cuddle. It was love from a distance. Then the rules became more and more complex, and harder to navigate. We bubbled with one grandparent, and once babysitting was allowed the other grandparents were finally reunited with their only grandchild for play dates. But that was where the socialising ended.Now, baby classes are running again. But as we row, row, row our boats, we’re spread out in a hall with two metres between each mat. When my son crawls off at the speed of light towards his friend and I hurriedly swoop him back up before he plants a drool-soaked hand on her face, I feel like I’m telling him that interacting with others is wrong. I’m teaching him to not socialise. It’s natural for babies to play together, so what damage are we doing by keeping them apart?It feels more and more like we’re being left to make our own decisions. What if the decisions we make are the wrong ones?A few weeks ago, I got a message in my mamas’ WhatsApp group: Anyone want to go to soft play next week? I worked in a soft play centre as a teenager, and in two years of Saturdays and summer holidays, I can’t remember a single time when it was cleaned. In fact, I distinctly remember the time I was asked to go and remove an actual poo from the ball pit (I’m a terrible person and delegated the job). Those places are gross. But up until now, I wouldn’t have worried about the germs – that’s how kids build up an immune system. I knew this would be a good opportunity for my baby to socialise with others and put his new crawling powers to good use, but I worried about whether it was the responsible thing to do. Should we go? Should we stay home?We went. The centre limited visitors, took our temperatures, and had plenty of signs up about hand-washing and mask-wearing outside the play area, but the signs were pretty much the extent of the measures. There is no way that children in a soft play centre are going to stay two metres apart from each other. My son had an absolute blast, and perhaps predictably we both came down with a cold a few days later. As the rules become murkier, riddled with contradictions, inconsistencies, and that trip to Barnard Castle, it feels more and more like we’re being left to make our own decisions. What if the decisions we make are the wrong ones? Ultimately, we can only be responsible for our own choices, and go into it with our eyes open to the risks.This week, I’m taking my son back to swimming classes. Inevitably, he’ll come within splashing distance of a baby friend. I desperately want him to play freely with other babies, have a normal babyhood, and explore his social skills. But whenever he crosses that invisible two metre barrier, with his unashamedly unmasked face and newfound love of fake coughing (great timing, kid), I can’t help but worry about that lurking virus.Katie Dancey-Downs is a freelance journalist. Follow her on Twitter at @Katie_DanceyHave a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal Britain’s Preparing For A Second Wave. But Shielders Like Me Are Being Left Behind I Knew Uni Would Be Different. But I Wasn’t Prepared For This I’ve Been Unemployed This Entire Pandemic. I’m Terrified About What A Second Wave Would Mean
(University of Delaware) A new study found some hackers aren't in it for the money; they want to expose firms that engage in phony philanthropy. These hackers -- which include everyone from disgruntled employees to hacktivist groups -- can "sniff out" actions that only give the appearance of corporate social responsibility.
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