Michael Morehead

Michael Morehead

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Following 41
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(University of Münster) Almost all life on Earth, e.g. our food and health, depend on metabolism in plants. To understand how these metabolic processes function, researchers at Münster University with the participation of the University of Bonn are studying key mechanisms in the regulation of energy metabolism. A new method of in vivo biosensor technology has enabled them to monitor in real time what effects environmental changes have on the central metabolism of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.
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Throwback movies like Inception, The Empire Strikes Back and Black Panther will be shown on opening day.
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It’s no coincidence that in the week the UK dipped into the worst recession the country has ever seen, the government chose to redirect public attention to a small number of people crossing the British channel.Public mood suggests that the country wants answers to difficult questions, to understand the high death toll from coronavirus and the depth of the economic fallout. So, it’s no real surprise that the government is looking to find someone to blame.This is not a new tactic from the government. In a disturbingly regular cycle, when the news cycle is quiet, and the summer months are warm, the government turns its eye to the Channel.Related... Priti Patel Is Arguing With An Ice-Cream Company Over Migrant Crossings Using Navy To Stop Migrants Crossing The Channel Would Be 'Unlawful And Dangerous', Amnesty Warns Successive Home Secretaries have chosen this strategy, vilifying people who want nothing more than to live otherwise ordinary lives in safety, but whose only path is the dangerous journey across the Channel.When the public hears the stories of people granted refuge in the UK, they are sympathetic, understanding that fleeing war, persecution and hardship is a matter of life and death, and that being with the people you love is of utmost importance.Many of us have felt a fraction of this during the pandemic and can wholly relate – how many of us have desperately wished we could be with the people we love during lockdown? But what the government does not tell us is that the only difference between refugees in the UK and those in Calais, is 15 miles.The reality is these perilous journeys are a problem of the government’s making, one that has gotten progressively worse decade after decade.Where we can agree with the government is that these journeys need to end – no one wants these journeys to occur, least of all those forced to risk their lives on overcrowded dinghies and those providing services, support and legal advice. But the reality is that these perilous journeys are a problem of the government’s making, one that has gotten progressively worse decade after decade, and could be resolved with simple action.The government’s current proposals to “secure” the borders will do nothing to end dangerous crossings or curtail trafficking. We’ve heard all of this before – that it’s France’s responsibility, that the route should be made “unviable” and that that the Navy should “push people back” in breach of international refugee and maritime law.When the government abruptly closed camps in Calais in 2016, organisations on the ground warned that these strategies would push people away from oversight, and directly into the hands of traffickers. Similarly, a report from the Foreign Affairs Select Committee in 2019 highlighted that “policy that focuses exclusively on closing borders will drive migrants to take more dangerous routes, and push them into the hands of criminal groups” – Priti Patel sat on this very committee.The region of Calais acts as a black hole, where a small but steady population of homeless and destitute people are trapped, vulnerable to people traffickers and smugglers, exposed to violence from the French authorities, denied support service and legal advice.Related... I’m An Asylum Seeker. Coronavirus Is Tearing Apart My Second Chance At Life Many have family or loved ones in the UK and are desperate to reach them but in most cases, it is physically impossible to apply for asylum unless you are on British soil.The only existing routes to apply from outside the UK include the Global Resettlement Scheme, which is limited to Syrian refugees and has currently been suspended – no one has been resettled since March, and the Family Reunion Reunification route, which is extremely limited in its definition of “family”. Earlier this year, the government closed the Dubs route so that even unaccompanied children in the EU cannot reach the UK safely. The only way to ensure that these journeys are ended is to introduce accessible and legal ways for people to apply for asylum or entry from abroad, so that they can travel here safely and don’t have to rely on people traffickers.This could include expanding or recommitting to existing routes, introducing a claims processing centre in France or establishing Humanitarian Visas. Safe and legal routes would be a far more simple and pragmatic solution than building higher walls, putting a blindfold over our eyes and our hands over our hearts.In the coming months, we can expect to see the government increase their dangerous rhetoric about those crossing, as a means to scapegoat migrants for their catastrophic failings.It will be migrants who are to blame for the lack of jobs, a drop in house prices, the decimation of the high street and long queues at the Jobcentre – when this couldn’t be further from the truth. At this precise moment, it is vital that we call for safe and legal routes of entry to the UK, ensuring that no one dies trying to reach what should be home. But it is equally important that we stand fast against dangerous rhetoric – the same rhetoric that placed responsibility for the last financial crisis on to migrants. A compassionate and practical approach must be championed by everyone who wants to end dangerous crossings once and for all.Minnie Rahman is public affairs and campaigns manager for the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants.Related... Refugee Resettlement Scheme Still Closed Despite Record Channel Crossings Priti Patel Accused Of 'Sabre-Rattling' Over Reports Navy Could Turn Back Migrant Boats Opinion: Britain's Citizenship Test Is Racist A Tory MP Has Suggested 'Taking Back Calais' As Solution To Migrant Crossings
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Ericsson claims strong momentum in battle for 5G market .
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I don’t particularly enjoy convertibles, and that might seem like a rough place to start with the new 2021 Porsche 911 Targa 4. There are generally noise and performance compromises that come with a drop-top, I’m very pale and I burn easily, and they always feel a little more ostentatious and attention-seeking than their hard-top cousins. Then there are the … Continue reading
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After the pandemic hit its core business of food delivery, Swiggy has had to battle hard for survival. After it got into online groceries and vegetables delivery, Swiggy is launching InstaMart, a series of hyperlocal 'dark stores'.
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The potential for placebos — ‘medications’ that don’t have an active ingredient, that is — is well-known, though the exact reasons for their effectiveness remains a mystery. Generally speaking, a placebo is kept a secret; the idea is that if the recipient knows they’re receiving a sugar pill or some other faux intervention, the positive effects will disappear. A new … Continue reading
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Facial-recognition experts say the technology could become normalized during the coronavirus crisis as tenants and landlords seek seamless entry methods to reduce exposure to germs. The technology has been seen by some as a potential threat to privacy, but facial-recognition experts say it can be deployed responsibly in office workplaces.   Companies such as Clearview AI have raised concerns by scouring the internet for images and creating a database of billions of faces that can be used by surveillance systems to identify nearly anyone, without their consent.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Facial recognition has been quietly used in pharmacies, grocery stores, and by at least one major New York City landlord. The blowback was fierce, raising uneasy questions whether monitoring and cataloging faces could veer into surveillance and infringe on privacy. But those involved in the technology say the stigma may soften amid the coronavirus crisis if face reading can play a role in health screening and touchless entry to office buildings as tenants repopulate the workplace. "I think more and more now, we can use facial recognition in a responsible way to permit access," said Shaun Moore, the CEO and founder of Trueface, a firm that develops face-reading software. "People assume that it's a form of surveillance, but I think that many fail to acknowledge that if you use a mobile phone or an ATM card, it's the same thing. In fact, there might be more data attached to those." Read More: Facebook just reached a blockbuster deal to lease the massive Farley Building in NYC as a tech and engineering hub. Here's why it's a huge win for a shaken office market. Access to large office buildings has remained mostly unchanged for decades: tenants swipe keycards or fobs to pass through turnstiles and open locked doors and guests generally must check in at a security desk. Already, there was a movement afoot to update those methods. "We recently initiated a study for commercial buildings larger than 150,000 square feet and we found that only about 5% of commercial buildings are mobile phone app capable," said Aaron Lapsley, the head of Cushman & Wakefield's digital buildings practice. "But that number is increasing fast." Implementing seamless entry has shifted from a nifty amenity to a health imperative as landlords scramble to create a touchless environment for tenants wary of germs in the workplace. While smartphone apps can allow workers and visitors to walk into a building and dispatch an elevator without having to pull out a pass or press a button, experts say that facial recognition could be the ultimate outgrowth of the shift to seamlessness. Read More: Mandatory temperature-taking is largely seen as a critical way to return workers to offices. But some big NYC landlords are worried about its effectiveness. "If you want to enter a space using the phone in your pocket, you have to have an app running constantly in the background for it to communicate with the building's security systems," Lapsley said. Privacy concerns also pervade the practice of tracking smart phones, which have been used by companies to record consumer locations and behavior and sell that data or use it to market products to them thorough curated online advertising. "We do believe there's a future for facial recognition in buildings," said James Segil, the president and co-founder of Openpath, a company that manufactures access control equipment and systems. "It will take time, but it will get to a point of better adoption." Segil pointed out that the process of visually screening tenants will become more normalized through the use thermal scanning, which is being employed widely by landlords to check building employees and guests for fever. "It's not hard to add facial to that at some point," Segil said. Addressing privacy concerns around facial recognition Some of the recent concerns around facial recognition stem from controversies regarding Clearview AI, a company that developed algorithms that quietly gathered billions of faces globally from pictures posted on the internet and amassed them into a database. The company produced apps and cameras that utilized that data to identify nearly anyone, without their consent or knowledge. A March report in Buzzfeed revealed that the large New York City landlord Rudin Management used Clearview AI's system as a screening tool at its properties. The company told Buzzfeed that it had discontinued the use of those systems. Facial-recognition experts say that the methods they envision using in office buildings are far different. Tenants and landlords would control the databases storing facial data, participation would be voluntary, and individuals who no longer want their biometric information stored would have the right to have it deleted. "Privacy is a legitimate concern if this is not done the right way," Moore said. "We spend a lot of time with clients educating them on how to do this." Moore said interest is growing. Trueface, he said, is on track to double its revenues this year. He said the company has so far raised about $5 million in funding from investors and doesn't disclose its earnings.  Openpath, which uses Trueface's software, has raised $63 million in funding in the past four years, its founder, Segil, said. He said its access-control products are used in about 2,000 buildings so far.  "We have a good traction in a short amount of time," Segil said. "We have broader and bigger plans." Still, many landlords have remained reticent to employ the technology.  "Based on my conversations with tenants, many find the concept of facial recognition to be creepy and they are opposed to the idea," said Craig Deitelzweig, CEO of Marx Realty, which has a portfolio of 4.6 million square feet of commercial space.  Those sentiments could change shortly as tenants begin to filter back to the workplace, Lapsley said, a return that most anticipate will begin after Labor Day. "It's hard to say when the growth will be," Lapsley said. "We're in August and the decisions to go back to the office space have been delayed and delayed and occupancy levels are 10% or less in most major cities. It's unclear when the money for access entry advances will be deployed, but we think it will be significant for large office buildings and we expect it to happen soon as users return." Have a tip? Contact Daniel Geiger at [email protected] or via encrypted messaging app Signal at +1 (646) 352-2884, or Twitter DM at @dangeiger79. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. SEE ALSO: Mandatory temperature-taking is largely seen as a critical way to return workers to offices. But some big NYC landlords are worried about its effectiveness. SEE ALSO: Facebook just reached a blockbuster deal to lease the massive Farley Building in NYC as a tech and engineering hub. Here's why it's a huge win for a shaken office market. SEE ALSO: 20% of WeWork's New York space is sitting empty. Here's a look at key vacancies the city's biggest office tenant is trying to fill. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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(Purdue University) Adranos Inc., a Purdue University-affiliated company that has developed a high-performance solid rocket fuel called ALITEC for missile and space launch systems, has obtained more than $1.1 million in contracts collectively from the U.S. Army's Aviation and Missile Center and the OUSD (R&E)'s Rapid Reaction Technology Office. One of these contracts will use Purdue's Zucrow Laboratories' heated air system, which is capable of simulating Mach 4 environments for hypersonic research.
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Apple still leading in anti-cookie diet, Google – predictably – in the rearguard A week after Firefox 79 debuted, Mozilla says that it plans to start rolling out version 2.0 of its Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) scheme to prevent redirect tracking on the web.…
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E-bikes make riding so much more fun, especially for those of us who are not super athletic.
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Considering a thermostat upgrade? Find out which one you should buy.
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Recently, a new phone with a thick protective shell appeared in a subway. Judging from the Mi logo and status bar on the protective shell, ... The post Alleged Xiaomi Mi CC10 Appeared In Spy Photos In Subway appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Chad Moore, an artist who lives in Oakland, California, uses reclaimed plastic to examine consumerism through sculpture.
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Enhanced video quality, color night vision, and smart A.I. features make the weatherproof and wireless Arlo Pro 3 a top pick for smart home surveillance.
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Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images On the list of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s most-pressing problems right now, porn is nowhere near the top. But that doesn’t mean the agency, which operates New York City’s subway and bus systems as well as its commuter rail systems, isn’t irked that obscene language keeps showing up in its search results on Google. The problem was first noticed by the Queens Daily Eagle newspaper, which published its findings in an article titled “The MTA has a porn problem.” It turned out that if you searched for a Metro-North station name in Google, you’d get some, shall we say, less-than-delicate-sounding language among your results. And the description kept showing up for at least 13 stations along Metro-North’s Hudson line. This was... Continue reading…
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Chinese phone maker Cubot has finally launched their self proclaimed flagship killer a.k.a. the new Cubot X30. The smartphone does indeed pack some very interesting ... The post Cubot X30: Five AI Camera Flagship Launched at $148.99 (Limited Offer) appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Does a non-cardboard person get this excited for Cleveland’s baseball team? | Photo by Joe Sargent/MLB Photos via Getty Images As part of an attempt to make Major League Baseball games in this weird, coronavirus-shortened season seem as close to normal as possible, Fox Sports decided to create virtual fans, digital versions of cheering people who would react to the games broadcast on Fox the way real fans do. Let’s just say they didn’t quite knock it out of the park. As Nick Schwartz noted in USA Today, the virtual fans popped in and out of view during the broadcasts, appearing when cameras pointed toward the outfield, but then weren’t visible behind home plate, making for an unsettling experience. Ryan Parker of The Hollywood Reporter agreed: The virtual crowd is kinda... freaky. pic.twitter.com/eutj2r3EAe— Ryan Parker (@TheRyanParker) July 25, 2020 To be... Continue reading…
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The new smartphone glass is the first significant improvement in scratch prevention from Corning's team in seven years.
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This third-generation Ring doorbell isn't the step up from the Ring Video Doorbell 2 that we were expecting.
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Two family members of a federal judge were shot at their home in New Jersey on Sunday by an unknown assailant, officials said.NBC New York reported a gunman arrived at the home of Judge Esther Salas in North Brunswick, New Jersey, around 5 p.m. The person shot Salas’ 20-year-old son, Daniel Anderl, when he answered the door and then shot her husband multiple times before fleeing. Salas was home at the time but is not believed to have been injured. The mayor of North Brunswick, Mac Womack, told ABC News Salas’ son had died. Her husband is believed to be in critical condition. The suspect has not been apprehended, but investigators told the outlet the person may have been dressed as a FedEx driver.The intended target of the attack was not immediately clear. Salas’ husband, Mark Anderl, is a criminal defence attorney.“The FBI is investigating a shooting that occurred at the home of Judge Esther Salas in North Brunswick Township, New Jersey, earlier this evening,” the FBI told HuffPost in a statement, noting investigators were looking for one suspect. “We are working closely with our state and local partners and will provide additional updates when available.”Judge Salas and her family are in our thoughts at this time as they cope with this senseless act. https://t.co/3mOYBSd6TA— Governor Phil Murphy (@GovMurphy) July 20, 2020Salas has been a judge on the US District Court for New Jersey in Newark for nine years and is the first Hispanic woman to serve on the federal bench in the state. She was appointed by former President Barack Obama and confirmed in 2011.The judge has presided over several high-profile cases, most recently the trial of Teresa Giudice, a former star on “The Real Housewives of New Jersey.”Last week, Salas was assigned to a lawsuit filed against Deutsche Bank. A group of investors has claimed the banking giant failed to flag questionable transactions made by “high-risk” customers, including the disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein. Epstein, a convicted sex offender, died last August while awaiting trial over sex-trafficking charges.“My prayers are with Judge Salas and her family, and that those responsible for this horrendous act are swiftly apprehended and brought to justice,” New Jersey senator Bob Menendez told The Associated Press on Sunday night.The Newark office of the US Marshals Service, which is charged with the protection of federal judges but typically does not guard judges around the clock absent a specific threat, said it was investigating the shooting late Sunday.“The US Marshals Service is aware of the tragic incident involving Esther Salas, United States District Judge for the District of New Jersey, and her family and is currently investigating. The US Marshals Service is responsible for the protection of federal judicial officials and we take that responsibility very seriously.”Womack said Salas had received threats in the past.“As a judge, she had threats from time to time, but everyone is saying that recently there had not been any,” the mayor told ABC.In the 2019 fiscal year, the US Marshals Service reported 4,449 threats or inappropriate communications to those they protect, up from just 926 in 2015. The US Marshals Service said it opened 373 predicated protective investigations, the most serious kind of inquiry, in 2019.Related... Met Police Must Apologise For 'Deeply Disturbing' Arrest, Lawyer Says Man Arrested On Suspicion Of Attempted Murder After Hospital Worker Stabbed Gun-Brandishing St. Louis Couple Star In Trump Campaign Video
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Numerous owners of the Google Pixel 4 XL are reporting build issues, but there's no official response as yet.
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Phishing scams in which hackers pose as trusted figures to trick people into handing over passwords are getting increasingly sophisticated. Security experts describe an arms race between services that weed out scammers and attackers developing new tricks and workarounds. Phishing is on the rise, and costing over $57 million from more than 114,000 victims in the US last year, according to a recent FBI report. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Hackers don't break in, they log in. That mantra, often repeated by security experts, represents a rule of thumb: The vast majority of breaches are the result of stolen passwords, not high-tech hacking tools. These break-ins are on the rise. Phishing scams — in which attackers pose as a trustworthy party to trick people into handing over personal details or account information — were the most common type of internet crime last year, according to a recent FBI report. People lost more than $57.8 million in 2019 as the result of phishing, according to the report, with over 114,000 victims targeted in the US. And as phishing becomes more profitable, hackers are becoming increasingly sophisticated in the methods they use to steal passwords, according to Tanmay Ganacharya, a principal director in Microsoft's Security Research team. "Most of the attackers have now moved to phishing because it's easy. If I can convince you to give me your credentials, it's done. There's nothing more that I need," Ganacharya told Business Insider. Ganacharya monitors phishing tactics in order to build machine-learning systems that root out scams for people using Microsoft services, including Windows, Outlook, and Azure, Microsoft's cloud computing service. Microsoft has led a crackdown on phishing scams that impersonate its products — it seized a group of sites in July that targeted millions of people after pursuing a civil action against the scammers and getting permission from a judge to secretly seize their domains. Ganacharya spoke to Business Insider about the trends in phishing that his team has observed. Many of the tactics aren't new, but he said attackers are constantly finding new ways to work around defenses like Microsoft's threat protection. Here's what he described.Hackers will start by targeting low-level employees, then "moving laterally" to compromise executives' accounts. Hackers will begin by sending low-level employees emails that look trustworthy, but might include links directing them to a scam website that asks them to input their username and password. Once they have access to that employee's account, they can use it to send trustworthy-seeming emails to others in the company. "You might get into a network through someone, like a sales associate. But then through that you can laterally move by sending phishing emails to, let's say, the admin of that candidate," Ganacharya said. "And then once you're able to compromise the admin, you can actually leverage that company's domain and send emails to the larger cargo." Similarly, scammers string together phishing attacks by compromising small, vulnerable businesses and leveraging their trust with larger business partners they work with. "Instead of the email coming from 'someone at gmail.com' or some random address, it actually comes from a business that they work with. In phishing it's all about gaining the trust of the email, the reader, so that they click on it. And if it is a credential thing that pops up, they just give their credentials," Ganacharya said. The old-school tactic of "typosquatting" is also seeing a resurgence among hackers, according to Ganacharya. "Typosquatting is big again," Ganacharya said. In this phishing scheme, also known as URL hijacking, attackers buy domains that are slight misspelling of popular websites, like goggle.com or yuube.com. The tactic was a mainstay of the early days of the internet, but has recently seen a resurgence.  "Spear phishers" put extensive effort into targeting a specific person, often creating multiple misleading pages to trick them. Hackers will sometimes create fake social media pages or personal blogs for the persona they're using to target someone, intentionally adding their targets' friends in an effort to seem more trustworthy. Fake credential pages are becoming more sophisticated. Hackers will regularly make fake sites that mimic the login screens of trusted services, like email accounts. Ganacharya's team has built machine-learning systems that detect subtle differences in the appearances of the sites and flag them as fraudulent, but he said hackers are constantly building workarounds. "If the attacker created a similar looking page [to a legitimate login screen], but then they were not able to match a font here and there or something is moved by one pixel, the machine learning models can pick that up," Ganacharya said. A cottage industry of phishing-as-a-service is booming as scams become increasingly profitable. Sophisticated hackers are now willing to sell their services to specific organizations, individuals, or nation-state entities who want to steal information from someone. Some phishing-as-a-service providers offer networks of bots that proliferate fake websites, while others sell phishing toolkits to clients, according to Ganacharya. "If you have the funding, you can go buy a phish kit or sign up for phishing as a service and they will build everything for you, and you just have to hope your payoff comes out higher than what you were paying the phishing-as-a-service company," Ganacharya said.
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Details about the specifics of the hack are limited, but here’s what we have so far.
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The future of sports is unclear as the coronavirus pandemic continues to surge in parts of the US. That means viewers may be regulated to reruns for the rest of the year.  Fox Sports and Google Cloud are teaming up to try to make that content, as well as future programming, more compelling.  Using Google Cloud's machine learning capabilities, Fox Sports is hoping to better dig through its trove of media data to produce custom content.  The AI tools will also help producers and editors more quickly pinpoint and package the most engaging clips in real-time.  "We look at this as something, without a finish line. Once we're in this world, we're going to be able to continually evolve faster than in the past," said Brad Zager, head of production and operations at FOX Sports.  Sign up here to receive updates on all things Innovation Inc. The future of sports in 2020 remains unclear and there's a real possibility that many avid fans will have to settle for reruns until the coronavirus pandemic subsides further.  But even recycled content like that could soon become more compelling or tailored specifically to certain viewers. Fox Sports and Google Cloud are teaming up to use machine learning capabilities to help catalog the broadcasting giant's vast media archives. The goal is to then tap the technology to more easily scan the databases for specific footage to create programming that consumers will love. For example, the system could help Fox scour decades of old footage for the most compelling clips, pinpointing the most exciting plays in real-time There are early examples of what such a pairing can enable. IBM recently used artificial intelligence to go deep in tennis archives and remaster classic matches from the 1970s. It also used the tech to find highlights based on applause volume.   The partnership is yet another example of how legacy organizations are employing advanced technology like cloud computing and AI to make use of the data they have stored over decades of operations to gain a competitive advantage over rivals.  And it's also a recognition of the potential for providers like Google Cloud to get in at the ground-level of the transformations. An organization like Fox Sports, for example, has an immense amount of "rich media data" that, until now, has not been fully utilized, according to Anil Jain, managing director at Google Cloud.  "One of the things that is a particularly challenging area of work for them is the management of their video assets, in terms of being able to organize them, to find content that they're looking for," he told Business Insider. "It's tedious, it's laborious. It's a largely manual process."  The partnership aims to make that process smarter and more efficient.  A marathon, not a sprint Adopting a cloud provider is often one of the first step organizations have to take before seeking to apply AI in their operations. The transition is largely necessary because it centralizes all the data in one location — which is critical for powering the algorithms — and allows for better information management.  Discussions between Fox Sports and Google Cloud began nearly two years ago. Initially, the aim is to use machine learning to analyze the vast troves of data to help improve search capabilities, as well as quickly compile new content using existing footage.  Using AI, for example, the company could begin to create more personalized content for users based on preference because producers could quickly scan for specific plays or matches. It can also accelerate the pace with which Fox Sports can put together highlight reels to drive further consumer engagement because the algorithms can suggest pertinent clips much quicker than a human could scan the recordings.   But executives say the transformation will enable Fox Sports to better capitalize on emerging tech to ultimately improve the bottom-line.  "You have to kind of pick a path for the future. But the one thing we wanted to make sure of was that we didn't race to a world that we didn't do all of our research on," said Brad Zager, head of production and operations at Fox Sports. "We look at this as something, without a finish line. Once we're in this world, we're going to be able to continually evolve faster than in the past."  Viewers, however, will have to wait to see the full impact of the partnership. Jain estimates that much of the background work will not become public until the middle of 2021. "If you can enable a media organization to actually utilize all that data effectively, they can do a much better job of serving their customers and driving the business," said Jain.  A nascent cloud industry  Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian took over the helm of the organization in early 2019. Since then, according to Jain, the company has been focused on verticals that are "in the midst of significant industry disruption and transition."  The entertainment sector is one of those. And now, with the coronavirus pandemic upending many industries — including sports and entertainment — the pivot to the cloud is accelerating.   "The cloud enablement of certain aspects of media is really nascent right now. We're still very much in the early days," said Jain. Due to the pandemic, "all of those things that we have been focused on suddenly are front-and-center and the priority focus of media organizations."  Other enterprise firms like IBM are also trying to gain market share in the sports industry specifically. The company is training AI models to be able to provide sports commentary and automatically compile highlight reels, among other applications.  Jain envisions a similar future, though he cautions that it will never be a completely autonomous process because humans remain critical to the creative process.  "If you can recognize different types of plays that are going on in a particular game, you can actually provide that information proactively to the humans who are actually doing the creative work of editing and producing the stories that are being told," he said.  But to improve the ability of the machines to work alongside humans, it first must understand the data. That's why for efforts like the one Google Cloud is undertaking with Fox Sports, much of the early work is training algorithms on a firm's own stored information.  "The notion here is training these models to pick up things like a player's jerseys, specific actions on the fields of play, celebrations, audience reactions," Jain said. "You want to be able to have in your tray, if you will, all of the relevant types of clips or content that you can actually repurpose and utilize to put together something." SEE ALSO: We got an exclusive inside look at Fidelity's innovation lab where the $8 trillion investment giant is prototyping VR systems for meeting financial advisors and explaining quantum computing Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What it's like inside North Korea's controversial restaurant chain
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Here's how Ford's new SUV stacks up against the original Bronco.
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(Global Aerospace Corporation) Global Aerospace Corporation announced today that it has patented (US 10,683,071) a passive system to decompress the air within a crew compartment of a disabled submarine (DISSUB) thousands of feet below the surface of the ocean. The patent, published June 16, 2020, addresses possible DISSUB scenarios.
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Every week, Parrot Analytics provides Business Insider with a list of the nine most in-demand original TV shows on streaming services in the US. Netflix's "Dark" surged up this week's list.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Audiences are catching on to how good Netflix's sci-fi series "Dark" is in its final season, as the series surged up the demand carts this week.  Every week, Parrot Analytics provides Business Insider with a list of the nine most in-demand TV shows on streaming services in the US. The data is based on "demand expressions," Parrot Analytics' globally standardized TV-demand measurement unit. Audience demand reflects the desire, engagement, and viewership weighted by importance. The list is ranked by how much more in demand the top series are than the average TV show in the US. More than a year after season three debuted last July, Netflix's "Stranger Things" is the top series in the US and has rarely given up that title in that time period. Below are this week's nine most popular original shows on Netflix and other streaming services:9. "Narcos: Mexico" (Netflix) Times more in demand than average show: 30.6 Description: "Witness the birth of the Mexican drug war in the 1980s as a gritty new ‚Narcos' saga chronicles the true story of the Guadalajara cartel's ascent." Rotten Tomatoes critic score (Season 2): 87% What critics said: "As ever, it's exquisitely written, cast and shot, making great use of Mexico's stunning landscapes, opulent haciendas and colourful '80s fashions. The series does a fine job too of keeping the viewer straight about a big cast of characters." — Sydney Morning Herald (Season 2) Season 2 premiered February 13 on Netflix. See more insights for "Narcos Mexico". 8. "The Witcher" (Netflix) Times more in demand than average show: 33.6 Description: "Geralt of Rivia, a mutated monster-hunter for hire, journeys toward his destiny in a turbulent world where people often prove more wicked than beasts." Rotten Tomatoes critic score (Season 1): 67% What critics said: "For all its massive scale, The Witcher is a surprisingly small story centered around three appealing main characters." — Collider (Season 1) Season 1 premiered on Netflix on December 20. See more insights for "The Witcher." 7. "Harley Quinn" (DC Universe) Times more in demand than average show: 35.0 Description: "Harley Quinn has taken down the Joker and Gotham City is finally hers for the taking…whatever's left of it that is. Gotham has become a desolate wasteland, left in ruins, following the huge earthquake caused by the collapse of Joker's tower. Harley's celebration in this newly created chaos is cut short when Penguin, Bane, Mr. Freeze, The Riddler, and Two-Face join forces to restore order in the criminal underworld. Calling themselves the Injustice League, this group now stands in the way of Harley and her crew from taking sole control of Gotham as the top villains of the city." Rotten Tomatoes critic score (Season 2): 100% What critics said: "One of the best TV takes on comic books you can catch right now." — The Verge (season 2) Season 2 premiered April 3 on DC Universe. See more insights for "Harley Quinn." 6. "Titans" (DC Universe) Times more in demand than average show: 39.9 Description: "'Titans' follows young heroes from across the DC Universe as they come of age and find belonging in a gritty take on the classic Teen Titans franchise. Dick Grayson and Rachel Roth, a special young girl possessed by a strange darkness, get embroiled in a conspiracy that could bring Hell on Earth. Joining them along the way are the hot-headed Starfire and lovable Beast Boy. Together they become a surrogate family and team of heroes." Rotten Tomatoes critic score (Season 2): 81% What critics said: "Titans is not going to blow anyone away but it will still appeal to established fans and has some nice moments for fans of DC Comics history." — JoBlo (Season 2) Season 2 premiered on DC Universe on September 6. See more insights for "Titans." 5. "Doom Patrol" (DC Universe/HBO Max) Times more in demand than the average show: 40.2 Description: "Doom Patrol is a team of traumatized and downtrodden superheroes, each of whom has suffered a horrible accident that gave them superhuman abilities but also left them scarred and disfigured. The members of the team have found their purpose through The Chief and have come together to investigate some of the world's weirdest phenomena. After The Chief mysteriously disappears, though, the reluctant heroes find themselves called to action by Cyborg, who comes to them with a mission that they cannot refuse. Doom Patrol, part support group, part superhero team, is a band of super-powered freaks fighting for a world that wants nothing to do with them." Rotten Tomatoes critic score (season 2): 96% What critics said: "The cast inhabits their roles with a kind of familiarity that comes with having spent so much time realizing them, and the end result is more than a handful of scenes that make you genuinely feel for the team members and all they've gone through." — io9 (season 2) Season 2 premiered on DC Universe and HBO Max on June 25. See more insights for "Doom Patrol." 4. "Star Wars: The Clone Wars" (Disney Plus) Times more in demand than average show: 41.8 Description: "From Dave Filoni, director and executive producer of 'The Mandalorian,' the new 'Clone Wars' episodes will continue the storylines introduced in the original series, exploring the events leading up to 'Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith.'" Rotten Tomatoes critic score (Season 7): 100% What critics said: "While I'm not particularly sold on the Bad Batch being 'truly' bad, or even all that complicated, they do provide an off-kilter dynamic that may lead to some interesting developments down the line." — AV Club (season 7) Season 7 premiered on February 21 on Disney Plus. See more insights for "Star Wars: The Clone Wars." 3. "The Mandalorian" (Disney Plus) Times more in demand than average show: 46.6 Description: "After the fall of the Empire, a lone gunfighter makes his way through the lawless galaxy." Rotten Tomatoes critic score (Season 1): 93% What critics said: "The Mandalorian is a classic Western series with modern production values, set in the galaxy far, far away. Every episode is a Star Wars movie in half an hour, and a delight. And Baby Yoda is really, really cute." — Starburst (Season 1) Season 1 premiered on Disney Plus on November 12. See more insights for "The Mandalorian." 2. "Dark" (Netflix) Times more in demand than average show: 50.5 Description: "A missing child sets four families on a frantic hunt for answers as they unearth a mind-bending mystery that spans three generations." Rotten Tomatoes critic score (Season 3): 94% What critics said: "One of the most mind-melting shows on television, and possibly the most unique Netflix original, Dark finishes its run with peak writing, shocking conclusions, and a bittersweet sense of finality." — RogerEbert.com  (Season 3) Season 3 premiered on Netflix on June 27. See more insights for "Dark." 1. "Stranger Things" (Netflix) Times more in demand than average show: 69.7 Description: "When a young boy vanishes, a small town uncovers a mystery involving secret experiments." Rotten Tomatoes critic score (Season 3): 89% What critics said: "The third season is sweet and sad, it's funny and thrilling, and the last 14 minutes of Episode 5 is 'Halloween'-esque straight-up horror." — News and Observer (Season 3) Season 3 premiered July 4, 2019 on Netflix. See more insights for "Stranger Things."
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