Mildred Billups

Mildred Billups

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The Zen 3 CPU could spell bad news for Intel with a reported boost clock of 4.8GHz
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EKG on Samsung watches is heading to the US, but we're still not sure exactly when.
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(University of Michigan) Researchers at the University of Michigan are interested in changing the behavior of some 2 million farm youths affected by hazardous noise exposure and hearing loss in the United States.
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On paper, the car sounds like a riot, but hopefully the price tag doesn't push it out of reach for buyers.
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Get the latest on coronavirus. Sign up to the Daily Brief for news, explainers, how-tos, opinion and more.A motorist says he was “flabbergasted” to receive a £90 parking fine after taking a drive-through coronavirus test at a car park.Geoff Pugh, 52, was handed the penalty after taking his wife and two children for a throat and mouth swab at Edmonton Green Shopping Centre in Enfield, north London on July 7.He said he was at the site for a total of 23 minutes and followed all of the instructions given to him by staff.The photographer told PA Media: “At first I thought it was just a genuine fine, so I was about to pay it, but when I looked into where it happened and realised what it was, I was flabbergasted.“I think it’s completely ridiculous to charge someone for looking after the health of their family, neighbours and work colleagues.“I didn’t even leave the car the whole time I was there.”A spokesperson for the company behind the fine said it would cancel any penalty charge notices issued to visitors “incorrectly”. They said: “The car park terms and conditions and the pay-for-parking system and tariff are set by our client – we do not have any involvement in setting these rules, or indeed when they do or do not charge for parking.“We cannot confirm whether or not the car park has been repurposed by Enfield Council, just that we have been asked to suspend enforcement activity on specific days and times where they have agreed to provide space for Covid testing. However the car park is still being used for retail during this time.“July 7 was an occasion where we were only notified that the site had been used for Covid testing, more than a week later, and PCNs were already issued.“We will cancel any PCNs that have been issued to visitors incorrectly on this or any other specified date where testing is taking place.”Related... Coronavirus Second Wave Fears Unless Test And Trace Expanded London And Other Areas Could Face Travel Lockdown, No.10 Confirms New 90-Minute Coronavirus Tests To Be Rolled Out In Care Homes And Hospitals
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We spoke with Xilinx about its new real-time video server appliances and building the first 20nm space-grade FPGA.
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9to5Google reported that From Quick Settings integration to a new design on the lockscreen, Google’s upcoming Android 11 system has significantly transformed the media playback ... The post Google Confirms: Android 11 Lockscreen No Longer Displays Song Album Art appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Whether you're thinking about home intruders or just need to spy on your dog, these cameras can stream a live video feed straight to your phone.
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The short-video app is wildly popular with teens, but officials fear it could be a conduit for data to China, or for Beijing’s propaganda.
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A founder who got himself wrapped up in an ongoing legal dispute between his previous startup and his new one, and the 9 deep-tech startups that got into an accelerator program.
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While there are many close friendships among tech CEOs in Silicon Valley, there are plenty of feuds, too.  Some appear to be friendly rivalries — like Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff and Oracle CEO Larry Ellison — but others have become more contentious.  Tim Cook and Mark Zuckerberg, for example, have been openly feuding for years, while Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos have made digs at each other over outer space.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Silicon Valley is a breeding ground for rivalries.  In a place where world-changing ideas are born and billions of dollars are at stake, it's only natural that rivalries develop between Silicon Valley's power players, ranging from friendly sparring to pointed critiques.  While some feuds, like the one between Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff and Oracle founder Larry Ellison, appear to be born out of a close friendship and mutual respect, others — like the one between Mark Zuckerberg and Evan Spiegel — started over a spurned acquisition offer.  Here are some of the long-standing feuds, friendly or otherwise, between some of the world's most powerful execs.SEE ALSO: Billionaire tech mogul Larry Ellison has said he's 'close friends' with Elon Musk. Here are six other tech exec friendships that have thrived in the competitive world of Silicon Valley. Elon Musk and Bill Gates Elon Musk and Bill Gates don't appear to have a warm relationship, at least if their comments about each other over the last six months are any indication.  Things heated up in February when Gates said during an interview with YouTuber Marques Brownlee that while Tesla has helped drive innovation and adoption of electric vehicles, he didn't buy a Tesla when making a recent vehicle purchase — he bought a Porsche Taycan.  In response, Musk tweeted that his conversations with Gates have always been "underwhelming."  Then, in July, Gates said in an interview on CNBC's "Squawk Box" that Musk's comments about COVID-19 are "outrageous," as Musk has frequently downplayed the severity of the virus and questioned how the US has handled its coronavirus response.  "Elon's positioning is to maintain a high level of outrageous comments," Gates said. "He's not much involved in vaccines. He makes a great electric car. And his rockets work well. So he's allowed to say these things. I hope that he doesn't confuse areas he's not involved in too much." Musk took to Twitter a few days later to taunt Gates, tweeting, "Billy G is not my lover" and "The rumor that Bill Gates & I are lovers is completely untrue." Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk aren't competitors in any earthly pursuits, but they're bitter rivals when it comes to outer space.  Bezos founded his rocket company, Blue Origin, in 2000, while Musk founded SpaceX in 2002. Two years later, the pair met for dinner, and even then, things were getting testy. "I actually did my best to give good advice, which he largely ignored," Musk said after the meeting. In 2013, their rivalry heated up when SpaceX tried to get exclusive use of a NASA launch pad and Blue Origin (along with SpaceX rival United Launch Alliance) filed a formal protest with the government. Musk called it a "phony blocking tactic" and SpaceX eventually won the right to take over the pad. Months later, the two companies got into a patent battle, and soon after, Bezos and Musk took their feud public, trading barbs on Twitter. Once, when the BBC asked Musk about Bezos, he responded, "Jeff who?" For his part, Bezos has frequently criticized the idea of colonizing Mars — a main goal of SpaceX — describing the idea as "un-motivating." In May 2019, Musk jabbed at Bezos again, calling him a copycat for Amazon's plan to launch internet-beaming satellites. And last week, Musk repeated the claim, tweeting that Bezos is a copycat after Amazon acquired self-driving-taxi company Zoox for a reported $1.2 billion.  In July 2020, Musk made yet another dig at Bezos' space ambitions. In an interview with The New York Times' Maureen Dowd, took the opportunity to comment on Blue Origin, appearing to imply that Jeff Bezos is too old and Blue Origin too slow to ever make real progress.   "The rate of progress is too slow and the amount of years he has left is not enough, but I'm still glad he's doing what he's doing with Blue Origin," Musk said.  Kevin Systrom and Jack Dorsey Instagram founder Kevin Systrom and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey started out as close friends, but had a falling out around the time Instagram sold to Facebook.   According to the book "No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram" by Sarah Frier, the pair met when they were early employees at Odeo, the audio and video site created by eventual Twitter cofounders Ev Williams and Noah Glass. Dorsey expected to dislike Systrom when he joined as a summer intern in the mid-2000s, but the pair ended up bonding over photography and expensive coffee.  Systrom and Dorsey stayed in touch even after Systrom got a full-time job at Google. Systrom was an early proponent of Twitter (then known as Twttr) and when he started working on Burbn, the precursor to Instagram, he reached out to Dorsey for guidance. Dorsey ended up becoming an early investor, putting in $25,000. When Burbn pivoted to Instagram, Dorsey became one of the app's biggest fans, cross-posting his Instagrams to Twitter and helping the app go viral soon after it launched. Dorsey eventually attempted to buy Instagram, but Systrom declined, saying he wanted to make Instagram too expensive to be acquired, according to Frier.  The Dorsey-Systrom relationship appeared to have soured in 2012, when Dorsey found out that Instagram had signed a deal to be acquired by Facebook, Twitter's biggest rival. According to Frier, Dorsey was hurt that Systrom hadn't called him first to discuss the deal, or to negotiate one with Twitter instead. Dorsey hasn't posted to his Instagram account since April 9, 2012, when he snapped a photo of an unusually empty San Francisco city bus — according to Frier, it was taken the morning he found out Instagram had sold. While Systrom had been quiet on Twitter for the last few years, he's recently begun using the platform again, and the pair even recently had a pleasant tweet exchange. Marc Benioff and Larry Ellison Oracle founder Larry Ellison and Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff met when Benioff began working at Oracle when he was 23. He was a star early on, earning a "rookie of the year" award that same year and becoming Oracle's youngest VP by age 26. He spent 13 years at Oracle, during which he became a trusted lieutenant to Ellison.  Benioff began working on Salesforce with Ellison's blessing, and Ellison became an investor, putting in $2 million early on.  But since then, the duo has publicly feuded on multiple occasions. In 2000, Oracle launched software that directly competed with Salesforce. Benioff asked Ellison to resign from Salesforce's board, and Ellison refused (he eventually left the board, but Benioff let him keep his stock and options). Over the years, Benioff and Ellison have sparred off and on: Ellison once mocked Salesforce, calling it an "itty bitty application" that's dependent on Oracle, while Benioff has called Oracle a "false cloud." And in 2011, Ellison ordered that Benioff be removed from the speaker lineup of Oracle's OpenWorld conference, which Benioff said was because Oracle was afraid he'd give a better speech.  But throughout it all, Benioff has described Ellison as his mentor. "There is no one I've learned more from than Larry Ellison," Benioff said in 2013. Tim Cook and Mark Zuckerberg There is no love lost between Apple CEO Tim Cook and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. The two moguls have traded insults over the years, beginning as early as 2014, when Cook said in an interview that "when an online service is free, you're not the customer. You're the product." Shortly after, Zuckerberg appeared noticeably tense in an interview with Time when the subject of Cook's comments came up, saying, "'What, you think because you're paying Apple that you're somehow in alignment with them? If you were in alignment with them, then they'd make their products a lot cheaper!'" But the tension between Cook and Zuckerberg came to a head in the aftermath of Facebook's Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which private Facebook user data was stolen from 50 million users. In 2018, Recode's Kara Swisher asked Cook what he would do if he was in Zuckerberg's shoes, to which he responded: "What would I do? I wouldn't be in this situation." Zuckerberg was reportedly so incensed by Cook's comments that he asked executives to switch to Android phones. In a company blog post in 2018, Facebook confirmed the feud between the two execs: "Tim Cook has consistently criticized our business model and Mark has been equally clear he disagrees." Steve Jobs and Bill Gates In the early days of Apple and Microsoft, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates got along — Microsoft made software for the Apple II computer, and Gates was a frequent guest in Cupertino, where Apple is headquartered.  But the tides started to turn in the early '80s, when Jobs flew up to Microsoft's headquarters in Washington to try to convince Gates to make software for the Macintosh computer. Gates later described it as "a weird seduction visit" and said he felt like Jobs was saying "I don't need you, but I might let you be involved." Still, they remained relatively friendly until 1985, when Microsoft launched the first version of Windows and Jobs accused him of ripping off the Macintosh.  "They just ripped us off completely, because Gates has no shame," Jobs later told his biographer, Walter Isaacson, to which Gates replied: "If he believes that, he really has entered into one of his own reality distortion fields." The duo traded barbs for years, with Jobs calling Gates boring and Gates calling Jobs "weirdly flawed as a human being." Tensions remained high even after Microsoft invested in Apple to keep it afloat, with both Gates and Jobs insulting each other and their companies' products time and time again.  Still, they clearly respected and admired each other, despite their animosity. When Jobs died in 2011, Gates said: "I respect Steve, we got to work together. We spurred each other on, even as competitors. None of [what he said] bothers me at all." Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Zuckerberg have never seemed particularly chummy, but the rivalry between the two execs seems to have grown worse in the last few years.  Facebook has come under fire during the last several months over its decision not to fact-check political ads. In response, Dorsey announced last October that Twitter was suspending political advertising altogether, saying "political message reach should be earned, not bought." Dorsey also said at an event that month that Zuckerberg's argument that Facebook is an advocate for free speech "a major gap and flaw in the substance he was getting across," and that "there's some amount of revisionist history in all his storytelling." For his part, Zuckerberg hasn't been shy about criticizing Twitter, saying in an all hands that "Twitter can't do as good of a job as we can," according to leaked audio obtained by The Verge. In December, Dorsey unfollowed Zuckerberg on Twitter.  Larry Ellison and Bill Gates Gates and Ellison may have patched things up these days, but back in the late '90s and early 2000s, they were enemies.  While it seems like there's no real bad blood currently between the two, there definitely appears to have been a touchy relationship between the them throughout the '90s, mostly defined by Ellison trying to outdo Gates.  "He's utterly obsessed with trying to beat Bill Gates," former Microsoft CTO Nathan Myhrvold once told Vanity Fair. "I mean, the guy's got six billion bucks. You'd think he wouldn't be so dramatically obsessed that one guy in the Northwest is more successful. [With Larry] it's just a mania." Their animosity partly stemmed from Ellison's close friendship with Steve Jobs, a frequent opponent of Gates. But things took a more serious turn in 2000 when Microsoft was being investigated by the federal government over antitrust violations. At the time, several groups were openly supportive of Microsoft, and Ellison suspected they were being funded by Microsoft itself. He hired private investigators to in an attempt to out Microsoft and help out the feds.  Eventually, Microsoft lost the suit, and Gates stepped down as Microsoft CEO.  Evan Spiegel and Mark Zuckerberg Snap CEO Evan Spiegel and Mark Zuckerberg seemed to get off on the wrong foot right from the start, beginning with what may have been a Spiegel brush-off in 2012.  Snap had reportedly turned down an acquisition offer from Facebook on three separate occasions.  Spiegel and Zuckerberg haven't been friendly since. Facebook has mimicked many of Snapchat's features over the years — both on its own app and its subsidiary, Instagram — and the CEOs have made jabs at each other in public. In 2018, after Facebook cloned yet another Snapchat feature, Stories, Spiegel said: "We would really appreciate it if they copied our data protection practices also," a dig at Facebook's various privacy scandals. Steve Jobs and Michael Dell In 1997, Dell founder and CEO Michael Dell was asked for his opinion on Apple, which, at the time, was in dire straits. He responded that he'd "shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders." That comment irritated Steve Jobs, who told his team in response: "The world doesn't need another Dell or HP. It doesn't need another manufacturer of plain, beige, boring PCs. If that's all we're going to do, then we should really pack up now." At an Apple keynote shortly after, Jobs said Dell's comments were "rude" and told him that Apple was coming for him.  Dell later softened his comments, saying that he was trying to make clear that he wasn't for hire.  But Dell rankled Jobs enough that, in January 2006, Jobs sent around this memo to the entire company: "Team, it turned out that Michael Dell wasn't perfect at predicting the future. Based on today's stock market close, Apple is worth more than Dell. Stocks go up and down, and things may be different tomorrow, but I thought it was worth a moment of reflection today." Mark Zuckerberg and Kevin Systrom Mark Zuckerberg and Instagram founder Kevin Systrom used to get along well — so well that Zuckerberg bought Instagram for $1 billion in 2012. But in the intervening years, the relationship between the two executives seemingly fell apart. When asked why he left, Systrom said, "no one ever leaves a job because everything's awesome." According to an April 2019 piece from Wired's Nick Thompson and Fred Vogelstein, Systrom and cofounder Mike Krieger left because of increasing tensions with Zuckerberg. Zuckerberg reportedly became increasingly controlling, banning Systrom from doing magazine profiles without approval, taking away Facebook tools that helped Instagram grow, testing location-tracking while Systrom was out on paternity leave, and adding a new button to Instagram that Systrom detested. 
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Seventy-five percent of enterprises surveyed reported that they would need three or more additional security analysts to address all alerts the same day that they came in. The post Security Operation Centres: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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(Terry Collins Assoc) French President Macron and leaders of partner nations declare the beginning of a new energy era with the official start of the assembly of the world's largest fusion device.The ITER machine in Southern France will replicate the Sun's fusion power, offering clean, reliable energy without CO2 emissions with no physical possibility of a run-away meltdown.When finished, ITER is expected to demonstrate that fusion power can be generated sustainably on a commercial scale.
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It appears that these benchmarks are not the developer kit at all, but just another iPad Pro.
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Digital Trends found more than two dozen accounts touting conspiracies, with hundreds of thousands of views.
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Pledge required that health data will not be used to improve search engine.
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The Apple co-founder said videos are using his likeness to promote the schemes
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What can we expect from Xbox on its new Series X console?
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Waymo and Chrysler have been working together since 2016 to create autonomous vehicles. One of the vehicles resulting from that partnership is the L4-ready Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivan. Waymo has announced that it and Chrysler are strengthening their partnership in several essential ways. FCA has selected Waymo as its exclusive, strategic technology partner for L4 fully self-driving technology for its … Continue reading
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Samsung is finally bringing the Galaxy M31s to India on July 30th. The company has already confirmed that the device will have a 64MP sensor ... The post Galaxy M31s with 6,000mAh battery to launch on July 30 appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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After Twitter suffered a massive hack Wednesday that took over dozens of high-profile verified accounts and ground the site to a halt, the hunt began to identify culprits. Many assumed the scale of the hack meant it was carried out by sophisticated actors like a nation-state — but new findings from researcher Brian Krebs and cybersecurity firm Unit 211B suggest that the heist may have been led by a relatively unsophisticated group of young hackers. The researchers identified one account that, in the days leading up to the heist, demonstrated on Twitter and in hacker forums that it could carry out the type of attack that played out on Wednesday. The account belongs to a 21-year-old from Liverpool, U.K., named Joseph James Connor. It's not clear whether Connor acted alone or with others to carry out the hack Wednesday — and cybersecurity experts told Business Insider that hackers likely have more plans in store. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. New evidence surfaced by cybersecurity researchers suggests that the massive hack that compromised dozens of verified Twitter accounts Wednesday was not carried out by a sophisticated nation-state actor, as some had thought, but rather by a ragtag group of young hackers. The heist apparently began when the cryptocurrency exchange Binance tweeted that users who sent bitcoin to a specific address would receive even more bitcoin in return. Within minutes, similar messages were sent from the accounts of Bill Gates, Tesla CEO Elon Musk, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, President Barack Obama, and Kim Kardashian West urging people to send bitcoin to the link in exchange for more bitcoin. The fraudulent tweets continued to appear for more than an hour with Twitter apparently helpless to stop them. In many cases, the tweets were quickly deleted, only for similar tweets to be sent out minutes later. Twitter ultimately blocked all verified accounts from sending tweets for roughly 30 minutes as it attempted to take control of the situation. Before order was restored, more than 13 bitcoin — or roughly $117,000 — appeared to be transferred to the bitcoin wallet linked in the malicious tweets. Twitter said in a statement late Wednesday night that it had evidence to suggest the hackers targeted Twitter employees using social engineering in order to "access internal systems and tools."  "We know they used this access to take control of many highly-visible (including verified) accounts and Tweet on their behalf. We're looking into what other malicious activity they may have conducted or information they may have accessed and will share more here as we have it," Twitter said in the statement. It's the widest-reaching hack in Twitter's history — but cybersecurity experts began to point out indicators that the attack wasn't carried out by a well-financed hacking operation or a sophisticated nation-state actor. For one, its scope was apparently unambitious — attackers could have leveraged access to the massive accounts to disrupt the stock market, sway an election, or even attempt to start a war. And the amount of money pilfered through the bitcoin scam is relatively small given the level of access. Some experts saw the noisy hack as a sign that a more nefarious attack may have taken place simultaneously. Now, new evidence surfaced by researcher Brian Krebs and cybersecurity firm Unit 211B shows users bragging in hacker forums and on Twitter that they could compromise any Twitter account in the days leading up to the hack. One person in the account hijacking forum OGusers said in a post days before the Wednesday hack that they could compromise any Twitter account, offering to sell access to accounts for prices ranging from $250 to $3,000, according to Krebs' findings. Before that, at least two Twitter accounts — @shinji and @b — posted screenshots of Twitter's internal tools. Motherboard reported Wednesday that the internal tools can be used to change the email address associated with an account and take over the account without notifying the account's original owner. Citing a source who works in security at a US-based mobile carrier, Krebs traced the @shinji and @b Twitter handles to a notorious hacker who goes by PlugWalkJoe. PlugWalkJoe is known for SIM swapping attacks, or heists in which hackers bribe or trick mobile carrier employees to give them control of a different person's cell phone number in order to compromise their other accounts. PlugWalkJoe is also affiliated with ChucklingSquad, a group of SIM swappers thought to be behind the 2019 hack of Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey. According to Krebs' security sources, PlugWalkJoe is a 21-year-old from Liverpool, UK, named Joseph James Connor, who is currently living in Spain. The source told Krebs that an undercover female investigator recently convinced Connor — operating under his PlugWalkJoe handle — to agree to a video call, which showed a pool in the background that Connor has also posted to his Instagram. It's not clear whether Connor acted alone or with others to carry out the hack Wednesday, nor is it clear whether the attack has run its course. Details of the hack suggest that attackers could have viewed the direct messages of every compromised account, which could theoretically be used for lucrative blackmail schemes. Twitter now faces demands from state and federal lawmakers to more thoroughly explain how the accounts were compromised and why it took so long to regain control. Both the FBI and New York State regulators opened investigations into the hack Thursday, and the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence said it would request information from Twitter. And cybersecurity experts told Business Insider that the attack likely isn't over. "In security, you're paid to be paranoid," Kevin O'Brien, the CEO of the cloud email security company GreatHorn, told Business Insider Thursday. "And the paranoia says there was something else happening at the same time, or these accounts were being accessed in ways that are far more damaging." Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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This story was delivered to Insider Intelligence Connectivity & Tech Briefing subscribers earlier this morning. Insider Intelligence publishes hundreds of insights, charts, and forecasts on the Connectivity & Tech industry with the Connectivity & Tech Briefing. You can learn more about subscribing here. Zoom formed a new business unit this week named Zoom for Home, which will supply remote workers with purpose-built video conferencing hardware. As part of the announcement, Zoom unveiled its first piece of hardware, an "all-in-one personal collaboration device" dubbed the DTEN ME. For $600, video conferencing connoisseurs can buy the 27-inch touchscreen tablet, which boasts three built-in cameras and eight microphones. The device offers a number of features geared specifically toward remote workers, including interactive whiteboarding, co-annotation, and one-touch meetings. It can also function as an external monitor.  Zoom's push into hardware is intended to boost customer loyalty amid the shift to long-term remote work. Enterprise subscribers who buy video conferencing hardware purpose-built for Zoom's services will have a harder time switching providers down the line, as they're further enmeshed in the Zoom ecosystem. Zoom for Home also signals a tacit acknowledgement that, for many, remote work is here to stay — Zoom announced last week that it will start selling enterprise-grade communications hardware through a hardware-as-a-service model, but the market for those products is limited while most offices remain closed due to the ongoing pandemic. Because spending on video conferencing services is up now, when remote work is at an all-time high, Zoom stands a better chance at deepening loyalty with a product designed for remote workers rather than office spaces. And looking forward, more than half of US executives (55%) expect that most of their employees (60–100%) will work remotely at least one day per week after the pandemic subsides, according to the PwC Remote Work Survey from June 2020.  Zoom needs to boost customer loyalty to stave off Microsoft and Google, but expanding into hardware will only do so much to help. Zoom took an early lead in the pandemic-driven video conferencing boom, but Microsoft and Google have since encroached on its dominance in the market, matching Zoom feature-for-feature. Making matters worse for Zoom, Microsoft and Google together account for virtually the entire enterprise office suite market, which gives them a significant advantage over Zoom since they can prominently feature video conference integrations within their enterprise ecosystems. Zoom's expansion into hardware can help it stave off this threat, but it certainly won't be a game-changer: Global spending on IT devices is projected to decrease nearly 16% this year, according to Gartner. A $600 video conferencing device likely won't be an easy sell for cash-strapped companies, especially one that simply enhances, rather than transforms, the remote work experience. Want to read more stories like this one? Here's how you can gain access: Join other Insider Intelligence clients who receive this Briefing, along with other Connectivity & Tech forecasts, briefings, charts, and research reports to their inboxes each day. >> Become a Client Explore related topics more in depth. >> Browse Our Coverage Are you a current Insider Intelligence client? Log in here.Join the conversation about this story »
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Save yourself some dressing room distress and start here.
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Sony has confirmed that an A7S II is finally imminent, but what can we expect from the video-focused full-frame camera?
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Sean Lomax likes to tell people he came out of the womb whistling.Winner of numerous international championships, Lomax has mastered his craft in ways we mere mortals can’t.Unlike those who can barely hold a tune while whistling, Lomax hits every note precisely, even going so far as to practice with a frequency tuner to ensure accurate pitch.His range spans three octaves.(“On a good day, maybe four,” he says.)He can break notes fast enough to whistle acrobatic songs like Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Flight of the Bumblebee.” He whistles while inhaling and exhaling to extend notes to impressive lengths.
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Recently we heard from some of those expert types that the UK really needs a big factory to keep up with demand for electric car batteries - because right now we're not doing so well.As it turns out Tesla-superowner Elon Musk had considered building a battery gigafactory here, but Brexit meant he chose Germany instead.Back in late 2016 Elon Musk said Brexit wasn't really an issue when it came to expanding into the UK and Europe.He even had plans to build a Tesla R centre in the UK at one point, but a lot can change in three years.Speaking to Auto Express, he said that Brexit did play a role in Tesla choosing Germany as the location of its gigafactory.“Brexit [uncertainty] made it too risky to put a Gigafactory in the UK.”
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" Jonas Arnberg, president and ceo at HUI Research, to the News agency Bloomberg.”the Discounters are growing just as rapidly, such as e-commerce.for example, here in Stockholm, sweden, is the renovation of and opened the store next to the NK of each other's opposing forces.There is certainly a need for low cost,” he said.as He points out, we see a strong growth for this segment, while in other countries, and suggest that one explanation for this is that this is something that the trade in mastering the fine.There are always going to be cheaper to set up a pallet in the shop, and let the customer do the work than to have e-trade, where one has to deliver the goods,” he said.
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The world is switching to 5G.And it will touch all aspects of our lives.This simply means that not only the top manufacturers but also the small companies will design their own products supporting the new network.As smartphones are the most frequently used devices nowadays, it’s logical to see the first 5G terminals to belong to this category.Of course, we know there more than a dozen 5G-enabled smartphones.Today, we learned about another company that is going to release its own 5G handset.
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