Monte Martin

Monte Martin

Followers 57
Following 59
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The new phone brings a slew of features for photographers and videographers like EyeAF, 4K 120fps 10-bit video and a dedicated shutter button. But it also adds impressive features for gaming like a 120Hz refresh rate screen.
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There has been a very long wait for the latest iPhone series which happens to be Apple’s first 5G smartphones. Apple recently held a press ... The post iPhone 12 series launch postponed – TSMC may adjust Apple’s A14 processor shipments appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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It's pronounced ee-kwee and it's everything other spherical cameras are not.
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Employee sued the Trump administration over worries the workforce would be affected by the ban on the app.
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(University of Tsukuba) A Professor at the University of Tsukuba provides a new theoretical mechanism that explains the ability of superconductive materials to bounce back from being exposed to a magnetic field. This work may lead to energy systems that operate without resistive losses. It is also useful for building qubits for quantum computers.
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It sucks! WIRED catches up with Lisa Hanawalt, the creator of Tuca & Bertie.
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Researchers at RMIT University have developed a new electronic artificial skin that can react to pain just like real skin. The artificial skin opens the door for improved prosthetics, smarter robotics, and non-invasive alternatives to skin grafts. Researchers say that the prototype device can electronically replicate the way human skin senses pain. It mimics the near-instant feedback response that humans … Continue reading
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Welcome to Insider Cannabis, where we're bringing you an inside look at the deals, trends, and personalities driving the multibillion-dollar cannabis boom.
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Qualcomm is expanding its 5G portfolio to its budget Snapdragon 4-series chipsets in 2021, which will bring the faster networking standard to the cheapest range of smartphones yet. Qualcomm has steadily been expanding the list of chipsets that it’s offered with 5G compatibility. In 2019, only the company’s flagship Snapdragon 8-series phones offered 5G support. (Even there, it was an optional addition only offered on a handful of phones.) This year has seen that lineup expand significantly, with the current Snapdragon 865 lineup requiring a separate 5G modem, along with cheaper options in the company’s 7-series and 6-series lineups like the Snapdragon 765 and Snapdragon 690. But adding 5G to the next wave of 4-series chipsets could be... Continue reading…
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Our brains weren't wired to deal with the "psychological pandemic" of not knowing what the future holds. Here's how to cope with living in limbo.
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The A-Level crisis this summer has left every student with a stress on their minds that could never have been anticipated at the beginning of this academic year. Most A-Level students in schools and colleges have received grades. But thousands of external candidates, which include the likes of resit students, home-schooled students or people like me who find school difficult due to health issues, are still with no grades and no hope.This year, I had been studying at home after signing up with a school to be my centre to sit my exams in the summer. Sixth form had been difficult for me due to my health issues – my polycystic ovarian syndrome and endometriosis cause so much chronic pain it hinder my mobility. I felt like studying instead an external candidate would really allow me to delve into my studies on a personal level and grow as a person with a new sense of independence.  A Hispanic girl from a working class family, I should have been excited to have obtained offers to study law and politics. But after the April announcement that exams had been cancelled across the country, my centre contacted me to let me know that they were unsure what this would mean for me as an external candidate.The government’s solution to how external candidates would receive grades was to allow centres like my school to decide if they had ‘sufficient surety’ of the predicted grades we had already obtained, and then decide whether to grade them with their other students. My registered tutors had awarded me AAA predicted grades, the same predicted grades I had in my previous sixth form. I had sufficient evidence to prove my ability, but I was still rejected by five different centres across the country, including my own and two other schools I had attended. The government advised centres to be considerate of the situations external candidates were in, but this didn’t happen.The government placed the responsibility of external candidates’ futures in the hands of every educational body but their own.Worse, information for external candidates wasn’t being released at the same rate as that of other A-Level candidates. When I contacted Ofqual about my situation, they advised me that I would need to sit my exams at another time. This left external candidates with the prospect of losing our offers, and receiving no grades on results day.Instead, we would be robbed of the experience of other A-Level candidates, celebrating grades earned on results day. After that, we would have to put ourselves through the emotional difficulty of the UCAS application process once again.To make matters worse, I was suffering with coronavirus at the time and the added stress was unbearable.The extreme pain in my lungs was so physically strenuous, the stress of having to desperately contact different institutions in hope of being saved from the consequences of receiving no grades made me feel like I was getting worse, not better.I felt like the government simply didn’t understand the pressure they were putting us under and, ultimately, it felt as though the government placed the responsibility of external candidates’ futures in the hands of every educational body but their own. We were failed by every layer of the system.All this meant that on results day, most external candidates were given no grades – and no way to appeal this. The government quickly decided not to charge A-Level students to appeal their grades, yet external candidates are still being expected to pay to sit our exams at another time – even though we had no other choice. And when the government made their infamous u-turn and allowed A-Level candidates to use their predicted grades instead of algorithm-awarded grades, in an attempt to regain lost university offers, external candidates were never been given this opportunity.I was left feeling discriminated against. Throughout this process the government have not treated our hard work with the same care as other students, and our registered tutors have not been given the same trust as teachers. It’s completely unjust.External candidates like me have been living in a nightmare since results day. For many of us, we have been forced to sit our exams in autumn or the new year, and reapply for university. For financial reasons, I will have to wait until next year to sit my exams because I am supporting myself financially through my studies. I am constantly nervous about how I will have to work hard enough to pay for my studies again, and the government has still not made any provision in case the same situation arises in 2021. It terrifies me that this could happen again. I have no idea what this all means for my future, and I feel like my has put my life on hold.On top of this, through no fault of our own, external candidates like me could face waiting an extra year on top of that, as university places become too competitive due to the huge amount of students likely taking gap years due to this crisis. I have no idea what this all means for my future, and I feel like my has put my life on hold.The worst part is we have a simple answer to what we need from the Government. All we want is to be allowed to use our UCAS predicted grades, so that we might have the same opportunities as other A-Level students to attend uni this year. We may be a minority of A-Level students but there are still thousands of us, each with our own dreams and hard work being forgotten.We do not want to be left behind. We do not want this government to let our futures become yet another casualty of this pandemic.Cléo-Isabela López is an external candidate A-Level student from Liverpool, studying history, geography and politics while running a small business from home.Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal I’m Hosting #BlackVoicesHPUK, A New HuffPost Series About Being Black In Britain. Here’s Why I’m An A-Level Teacher Forced To Grade My Pupils. I’m Dreading Results Day In Retail, You Get Used To Abuse. But This Pandemic Is A Whole New Level
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This Siri-powered smart speaker is back on sale for $200 at Best Buy.
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Although there are reasons for cautious optimism about the UK’s economic recovery, the emerging picture when it comes to the impact of coronavirus on employment and family incomes looks grim.The full extent of the damage to the labour market won’t be clear until later this autumn when the furlough scheme is due to end. But recent data showing dramatic falls in company payrolls, hours worked and job vacancies point to a prolonged period of higher unemployment.For millions of families across the UK, this will mean reduced incomes and an increase in hardship. It is clear that some of the worst impacts will be felt in communities that were previously experiencing deprivation. Dozens of local authorities with the highest levels of child poverty have already seen some of the biggest rises in unemployment post-coronavirus.Low-income households have experienced five years of real income stagnation.Stephen Crabb MP.The government deserves enormous credit for the huge scale of assistance that has already been provided during this pandemic and for how quickly vital parts of the safety net were put in place as the crisis unfolded.The financial support provided to families through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, Self-Employed Income Support Scheme and enhanced universal credit has been more comprehensive than that provided by any other government.But many individuals and families will require ongoing financial support to prevent them falling into financial crisis and poverty.Following the last recession, the recovery was characterised by record employment. Yet despite this, in-work poverty rose significantly. A key driver of this was weakened social security support which left families struggling to cope with the low pay and fluctuating hours that characterise the jobs that many low-income parents hold.It is important for Conservatives, who rightly hail the boost to pensioner incomes as a result of the triple lock, to recognise that the other side of that coin was a prolonged squeeze on benefits for people of working age. Low-income households have experienced five years of real income stagnation, largely due to falls in income from benefits which offset growth in employment incomes.Our efforts during this recovery should be focused squarely on supporting working age people on low incomes.As a first step, the government should make permanent the additional £20 per week for the universal credit standard allowance that it brought in to strengthen social security during the crisis. Removing it next spring, as currently planned, will amount to a painful cut in income for many people still struggling to come to terms with the loss of their jobs and who have found the transition from furlough to benefits a very hard landing indeed.In parallel, the personal allowance of so-called legacy benefits like JSA, ESA and IS should be raised to match the universal credit increase. This is particularly important for those with disabilities, and their carers, who make up most of the people remaining on these benefits. It’s just not right that some of the most vulnerable people have not seen equivalent protection.The government should also look at targeted extensions to the furlough scheme beyond October. A definitive end point was seen as vital for getting the country back to work. But there are still many firms in different sectors that simply cannot operate in the current scenario. Related... Sunak Risks 'Historic Mistake' In Unwinding Furlough Scheme, Labour Warns Some of these sectors are of enormous strategic importance to the UK. With aerospace, for example, there is a real danger that the unwinding of furlough will lead to the loss of thousands more high value jobs and a permanent dissipation of skills and expertise. Germany, which knows all about retaining domestic industrial strength, has just decided to continue its furlough scheme for another 12 months.The costs of all this are very substantial and there are many who would rather invest instead in re-training and new apprenticeships. But it’s not either/or. A stronger safety net to protect families makes a successful recovery more likely, not less.The Rt Hon. Stephen Crabb is MP for Preseli Pembrokeshire and a former Work and Pensions Secretary.
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Fast food consumption by kids in the US is rising — but it is affected heavily by age and ethnicity, a report from the CDC has revealed.
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According to the Securities Times, Huawei Investment Holdings Co., Ltd. recently released its first half-year financial report in the inter-bank market. In the first half ... The post Huawei earned $35 million everyday throughout the first half of the year appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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He is the popular e-sports organization's first-ever chess player
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Microsoft's 'open source wonk' Sarah Novotny wants to see easier ways for people to get involved Interview  Linux kernel development – which is driven by plain-text email discussion – needs better or alternative collaborative tooling "to bring in new contributors and maintain and sustain Linux in the future," says Sarah Novotny, Microsoft's representative on the Linux Foundation board.…
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This list is based strictly on each car's top speed, so make sure to get behind the wheel and test them out.
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Coronavirus has changed everything. Make sense of it all with the Waugh Zone, our evening politics briefing. Sign up now.Tory MPs are in open revolt after the government’s latest U-turn on coronavirus policy, with ministers being urged to “get a grip” of what has become an “absolute sh*t show”.It comes after ministers led by education secretary Gavin Williamson changed guidance to make secondary pupils and staff wear face masks in schools in locked down areas of England.Conservative MP Huw Merriman broke ranks to brand the situation an “absolute disgrace”, while vice chair of the 1922 committee of backbenchers, Charles Walker, said the government was “making stuff up on the hoof”.One Tory MP told HuffPost UK many people in the party were “pissed off” about “another shit show” following a string of U-turns during the pandemic.And another called for Williamson to be sacked: “Who thinks he should stay? I’ve never met them.” Charles Walker, vice chairman of the 1922 committee of backbench Conservative MPs, has told @TimesRadio "the government just cannot make this stuff up now on the hoof" after their change in policy on face [email protected] | @StigAbellpic.twitter.com/xZF8rxTerR— Times Radio (@timesradio) August 26, 2020The MPs voiced concerns that the government was sending the wrong message as children prepare to go back to school from next week.One said: “I understand the decision but I think we have to start making people think more realistically about the risks and accept that you are going to have to live with this thing and for kids in particular, for young people, it’s not that much of a risk.”They added: “There is a lack of confidence in the overall strategy within government and as a result we are making weird decisions.”Merriman said he wanted to see the “firm smack of government”.He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “We need to send a message out that schools are a safe setting.“We know that the risks are so low, you’re sadly more likely to see your child lose their life through getting to school than actually the Covid pandemic.“I just absolutely fundamentally feel that young people just need to be able to get on with their education free of any encumbrance.“Anything that sends a message out that it’s not safe in the corridor means that it can’t be safe in the classroom and we’re on a slippery slope.”He added: “I feel it’s an absolute disgrace and I really feel the government needs to get a grip and just be certain, get on with it and inspire confidence rather than just completely changing its mind.”Walker meanwhile told Times Radio he was “disappointed”.“What we are in now are the biggest of policy issues, restricting people’s liberties and freedoms with very little science attached to it. [...] Let’s debate these issues on the floor of the House of Commons.“We cannot continue to have government by edict. This has been going on for six months.”Walker added: “The government just cannot make this stuff up now on the hoof [...] – saying one thing on Monday, changing its mind on Tuesday, something different presented on Wednesday. It’s just not acceptable.”Related... 10 U-Turns Boris Johnson's Government Has Been Forced To Make During The Pandemic We Won’t Shut Down Schools, Vows Williamson After 10 Government U-Turns Another U-Turn As Boris Johnson Changes Mask Policy For English Secondary School Students
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Xiaomi is joining Huawei and Samsung by offering tighter PC/smartphone integration.
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Facebook‘s AI boffins have developed a new system that creates original dance routines for any music that you feed it. The system doesn’t merely imitate the Moonwalk, the Renegade, or whatever other moves the kidz are busting on TikTok these days. Instead, it creates entirely new routines that are “synchronized and surprising” — “the two main criteria of a creative dance,” according to Facebook. The company claims the system can vanquish the choreographer’s equivalent of writer’s block. Frustrated dancers need only play it a song, and the system will analyze the tune and spit back some original synchronized moves. [Read: 4… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Facebook
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There are plenty of excellent iPhone SE deals available right now for both upgraders and those looking for an unlocked phone.
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A database containing scraped data from 235m social media profiles was left exposed online without a password.
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Combined with earlier leaks, the Moto E7 Plus could be a sleeper hit for the brand.
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Companies are increasingly trying to learn what consumers are saying about their brands online.  But traditional customer feedback methods — like surveys or focus groups — aren't able to capture that data.  Birdie is trying to solve that problem. It uses artificial intelligence to analyze data gathered from sources like online reviews or Reddit forums to produce actionable insights for clients.  The Palo Alto-based startup just closed a $1.6 million seed round, led by Brazilian venture firm ASTELLA.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A decade ago, companies may have turned to surveys or focus groups when they wanted to learn customer feedback. But those methods now ignore an increasingly critical aspect of how consumer's shop: online reviews. Birdie is trying to fill that gap. The company gathers online data like customer reviews and uses artificial intelligence to analyze it and produce actionable insights for clients. Founded by a group of Brazilian entrepreneurs, the technology is already in use by brands like Samsung and Procter & Gamble. On Tuesday, the Palo Alto-based startup announced a $1.6 million seed round led by Brazilian venture firm ASTELLA.  With the latest funding infusion, Birdie plans to expand its presence in the US and grow the customer base. "This is the largest market when it comes to market research: 44% of the spend on market research is in the US," co-founder and Chief Marketing Officer Pat Osorio told Business Insider. The team began fundraising in late 2019, but were left scrambling once the coronavirus outbreak began and many venture capital firms froze new investments. Ultimately, however, Birdie was able to raise well-over its $1 million goal. And now demand is growing as the coronavirus pandemic continues to lead to a shift in consumer behavior.  "Brands want to understand what's going to be this 'new normal,'" said cofounder and CEO Alex Hadade. "Brands are lost. Even before they were lost because they lost control of the message because consumers have the power nowadays. Now, they really need help." The company begins with publicly-available third-party data, including online review and threads in forums like Reddit, and combines it with internal data sources — like market share information. Birdie then automatically structures the data and analyzes it using the firm's proprietary AI technology, ultimately giving clients insight into consumer behavior.   Birdie's system, for example, helped Samsung discover an untapped market. On online forums, pet owners were touting the firm's washers and dryers because they were very effective in removing cat and dog fur. Samsung was then able to use that information to redirect its marketing efforts to try to grow its customer base within that audience.  In a similar example, Birdie found that Samsung was marketing one of its televisions as having top sound quality. Customers, however, were saying the opposite: The sound quality was poor, but the image quality was great. "Because of that, they started changing how they were explaining the product, how they were positioning the product," Osorio told Business Insider. Take a look below at the pitch deck that helped Birdie close its seed round.
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The chair comes with a nice surprise for prospective Razr buyers.
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An algorithm used to determine school-leaving grades in England has downgraded 39% of the results predicted by teachers — with disadvantaged students suffering the biggest drop. Exam regulator Ofqual adopted the system when exams across the country were cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Instead, teachers were instructed to submit their predicted grades for each student. The algorithm then moderated their assessments by comparing them to their school‘s historic performance and each pupil’s past results. In total, the algorithm downgraded about 280,000 A-level results, with poorer students more likely to receive lower grades. Ofqual’s figures revealed pupils at fee-paying schools received double the improvement in… This story continues at The Next Web
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Photo by Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images The US Department of Justice says it has dismantled three online fundraising campaigns involving terrorist organizations, including Al Qaeda, ISIS, and the al-Qassam Brigades (Hamas’ military wing). In doing so, the DOJ seized millions of dollars in cryptocurrency that was meant to fund the groups. It’s “the government’s largest-ever seizure of cryptocurrency in the terrorism context,” per the department. US officials have also seized over 300 cryptocurrency accounts, four websites, and four Facebook pages that were related to the campaigns. The Verge has reached out to Facebook for comment. “Terrorist networks have adapted to technology, conducting complex financial transactions in the digital world, including through... Continue reading…
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Photo illustration by William Joel / The Verge ‘Cash, cash, cash, cash, cash.’ Continue reading…
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I tested a $47,500 MINI John Cooper Works GP, the fastest street-legal MINI in history, and a car intended to be used for track attacks more so than everyday life. The 2021 MINI JCW GP is a two-seater with a punchy, 301-horsepower, turbocharged four-cylinder than matched up with various go-fast goodies, from an eight-speed automatic to special brakes and a race-ready suspension. The MINI JCW GP has no business on civilian roads, but it is actually sort of versatile, given its considerable cargo space.  If you aspire to the race track, the JCW MINI GP is a relative bargain for this much machine. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. MINI has a long and illustrious competitive history, dating all the way back to the original marque's heyday in the 1960s. The famous "Italian Job" getaway is nothing compared to what MINIs have done in actual racing. And since the revival of the brand under BMW ownership, the "John Cooper Works" moniker — taken from old-school race tuner John Cooper, who gave his name to the first MINI Cooper in 1961 — has signaled that a MINI could be taken to the track. And trusted to do its job as a legitimate high-performance machine. One of my personal favorite cars of all time is the MINI JCW, which I tested years ago and am still scared of. Last year, MINI brought out the JCW GP, the most intense and fastest vehicle it's ever produced. The car was meant to hit the street — er, the race track — mid-way through 2020, but the coronavirus pandemic appears to have slowed things down. In the US, you're still limited to pre-ordering a GP, for $1,000. Only 3,000 will be made, and the car is already advertising its bona fides. It lapped Germany's legendary Nürburgring in under eight minutes, according to the MINI. That's up there with some older Porsche 911s and Ferraris. MINI loaned me a 2021 JCW GP — base price of $44,900, but $45,750 as-tested — in an awesome "Racing Grey Metallic" paint job. My challenge was to figure out if I could fake a race track somewhere in the New Jersey suburbs. I failed, but I had a good time.  Here's how it went:FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! I was rather lucky to get a crack at the MINI JCW GP hardtop, 2021 edition. This MINI is limited to 3,000 units and is currently still at the taking-reservations level. If you want one, you'll have to put down $1,000. Yes, the styling is nuts, but the familiar MINI cues are ever-present, starting with the classic MINI headlights. They're surrounded by model-specific black rings. The intricate dual-wing dominates the JCW GP's silhouette, overhanging the hatch. Yes, it looks bonkers. But it also provides useful downforce at speed. The "reversed wing profile ... generates maximum downforce with the lowest possible aerodynamic drag," MINI said when the JCW GP was announced prior to last year's LA auto show. Aerodynamics abound on this MINI. The front end also incorporates downforce-inducing elements. The dual exhaust pipes signal that this MINI means business. Four-piston aluminum brake calipers clamp down on ventilated front rotors. The rear brakes don't get the same treatment, but my tester did have lightweight, 18-inch JCW wheels all the way around ... ... Plus a quartet of Hankook high-performance tires. The powerplant for the JCW GP is a very special thing! It's a unique GP motor: a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that cranks out 301 horsepower with 331 pound-feet of torque. Controversially, unlike the MINI JCW, the GP lacks a manual transmission — because MINI doesn't have a manual that can handle the engine's power output. Thus, you get an eight-speed automatic coupled to a limited-slip differential. Fuel economy, for a car with this much pep, is sort of stunning: 24 mpg city/30 highway/26 combined. A chili-red bar spans the rear cargo area, which is quite commodious at 33 cubic feet. Let's take a look at this hot hatch's interior. Be forewarned: It's cozy. The GP is a two-seater, with just about anything that could add weight — such as rear seats — removed. A small GP logo adorns each seat, right where a racing harness could be fitted. The interior was rendered in "Carbon Black Dinamica" and leather. The multifunction steering wheel inspires confidence when you grab it. The small, all-digital cluster is a study in displaying only what you need to drive fast. Each of the 3,000 MINI JCW GPs produced will be numbered. My tester was number 250. I adore MINIs for spirited driving, and the focused nature of the cabin really gets you in a track-day frame of mind. When the new MINI arrived back in 2000 — yes, two decades ago — a large speedometer occupied the center stack, an homage to designer Alec Issigonis' original from the 1960s. The space now awkwardly hosts BMW's rectangular, 8.8-inch infotainment screen. I'd rather have the speedo, but the system is effective: it handles Bluetooth pairing, USB device integration, GPS navigation, and audio perfectly well. The system is controlled using this buttons-and-knob interface between the seats. Otherwise, the climate controls are straightforward, and the switchgear is carried over from several previous generations of MINIs. The start/stop engine switch, in bright red, is one my favorites in the entire auto industry. So what's the verdict? I've often thought that if I wanted to obtain a perfect weekend track car, the JCW MINI would be just what the doctor ordered. Yes, it's moderately terrifying. But it would be perfect for setting some zippy personal lap times. The JCW MINI GP is all of that and more, more, more. Beyond more rear wing — the JCW MINI doesn't have one — the GP's engine makes 75 more horsepower, bringing the total oomph above 300 horsepower and combining with a speed-optimized chassis to offer an enviable power-to-weight ratio. I'm inclined to poke fun at that big ole rear wing, which challenges the best that some 1980s Porsche 911s had to offer, not to mention a few Subaru WRX STi's and of course the Honda Civic Type R. But the wing is, well, sort of necessary to keep this fling-able two-door stuck to the asphalt. Interestingly, for a machine that can blast to 60 mph in about five seconds, the GP feels composed and stable. It doesn't feel like the quickest street-legal car MINI has ever produced.   Still, the word "hardcore" suggested itself to me behind the wheel of the GP. MINI really thought it through. "Model-specific modifications include a reinforced crankshaft with enlarged main bearing diameter, specific pistons, bushless connecting rods, and a new torsional vibration damper with optimized cooling," the brand said when the GP was revealed last year. Added to that is a new turbocharging technology, plus a new air-intake arrangement, all intended to jack up the ponies. It translates into an exhaust note that's downright gnarly. There wasn't much I could do on civilian-grade roads to test out the GP's mighty, race-ready suspension, but you can certainly feel the firmness in everyday motoring. It's sort of unpleasant at times, but given how this car looks from the outside, you expect it. Let's just speculate on how the GP would handle a track. The straightaways would be a thrill, as all 301 horsepower gets laid down, the drivetrain counteracts any torque steer, the aero maintains drag-race stability, and the transmission zings through its gears. The front brakes are divine, so a slam-down to take on a corner would be followed by either brisk automatic or quick auto-manual downshift, then an effort of getting back on the throttle, pronto, to re-establish grip up front and power out. The steering is assured, so the entire maneuver could be executed with an attitude of supreme self-confidence. I had to make do with some windy country roads, a feeble test for a maniac ride like the GP. But I at least caught a glimpse of what this car could do in its natural environment. That isn't the everyday highways and byways of normal life. But if you reckon you could at some point buy a racing helmet and start thinking about your own hot laps, there are worse ways to spend $47,500. In fact, the MINI JCW GP gives you so much legit performance in one high-strung package you might be foolish to look elsewhere.  
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