Peter Merchant

Peter Merchant

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The test returns results in 15 minutes. | Abbott Laboratories A COVID-19 test that takes 15 minutes and can be run without lab equipment was just granted emergency use authorization by the Food and Drug Administration. It will cost $5, and runs on a simple card that uses the same technology as a pregnancy test. The test, called BinaxNOW, is produced by the health care company Abbott. The company is also launching an app that syncs up with the tests, and gives people who test negative for the virus a “digital health pass” that they can display on their phone. CEO Robert Ford said in a statement that the combination of the test and the app offer a “comprehensive testing solution.” The company said in a press release that it plans to produce 50 million tests per month by October. “Due to its simpler... Continue reading…
The app will support food and grocery ordering, ecommerce features, financial services, and bill payments, among others.
We've scoured Amazon and found the AirPods Pro, iPad Mini, and MacBook Air on sale starting from just $234.
The first trailer has been released, and it's a doozy
What was once 256KB is now 10GB—so why does this series' return feel smaller?
South Africa has the highest emission intensity in the G20 group of industrialized and developing countries. This threatens its commitment to help slow global warming. This disproportionate contribution is driven by the country’s coal-dependent national electricity utility, Eskom. In generating power, its plants release 512 billion kg of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere annually. The country’s road transport sector also contributes to the problem: it was responsible for 13% of the total share of energy-related carbon emissions in 2018. To reach its targets, South Africa must reduce emissions by 32% in the next 10 years alone. But Eskom is also… This story continues at The Next Web
Pro Pilot Assist helps avoid fender benders if the car ahead stops too suddenly.
For those of you who are alarmed, do not fear, at least not right now.
Start your weekend off with some cool deals, including the best price ever on an Amazfit smartwatch.
In just a few hours, the mobile app and gaming market exploded into a flurry of news, removals, and two lawsuits, all revolving around a single game: Fortnite. Epic Games, who has spoken out and moved against the status quo in the game and app store markets, made a daring move to implement its own direct payment system to bypass … Continue reading
Image: Epic Games Apple has banned Fortnite from the App Store for violating store policies, and Epic is rallying players against the iPhone maker in part by telling them they could miss the game’s upcoming season if Apple doesn’t change its rules. “Because Apple has BLOCKED your ability to update, when Fortnite Chapter 2 - Season 4 releases you will NOT be able to play the new Season on iOS,” Epic said in a blog post titled “#FreeFortnite.” Fortnite Chapter 2 Season 4 is scheduled to begin on August 27th. If nothing changes between Apple and Epic by then, that means the game’s many iOS players will lose out on the chance to play Fortnite’s next major update in just a couple weeks. New seasons typically introduce a significant amount of content, such as... Continue reading…
Amazon just announced that it has partnered with K-12 schools in Utah to provide free cloud computing training using Amazon Web Services, the company's cloud business. Amazon previously collaborated with California and Virginia's community and public colleges to offer programs in cloud computing using AWS. Some experts warn that training students or job seekers in skills that corporations say they want might not guarantee a job at the company, and might result in time wasted if the skill falls out of fashion within a few years. Sign up here to receive updates on all things Innovation Inc. Jeff Bezos is ensuring that some children start getting the skills to get a job at Amazon as early as in elementary school.  Amazon just announced that it partnered with Utah's public K-12 schools to provide free cloud computing training using Amazon Web Services, the company's cloud business. The company will give educators free AWS training to help guide students, who can access the cloud computing curriculum online at their own pace, the company stated in a release. "At AWS, we strongly believe in providing individuals with the tools and resources they need to pursue in-demand cloud jobs," John Stephenson, director of AWS public policy, said in a statement. "This collaboration with Talent Ready Utah will help to build the talent pipeline for local businesses needing workers with cloud skills and industry recognized cloud certifications. The move is part of a the company's growing investment towards bringing AWS training to students. The company has previously collaborated with California and Virginia's community and public colleges to offer programs in cloud computing. In 2017, Amazon launched an AWS training program geared towards 14- to 17-year-olds.  Demand for people well-versed in cloud computing is high — and may have gotten higher due to the pandemic. Glassdoor named "cloud engineer" one of the best tech jobs in 2020 in terms of salary, job openings, and employee satisfaction. At Amazon, sales for AWS rose by 33% year over year in April from an increased need for cloud storage as more companies worked remotely this year. AWS made up two-thirds of the company's operating income between April and June, substantially more than its e-commerce empire. Plus, getting certified in courses that train job seekers using AWS software could lead to more money — one longtime IT employee told Business Insider his salary increased by 40% after completing six AWS certifications. Though some students will get trained in Amazon-specific skills that could land them a top tier tech gig, some experts warn against learning skills specifically geared toward getting a job at one company — since Amazon can't hire everyone who knows AWS.  Michael Horn, strategist at education firm Entangled Group, told Education Dive that Amazon's expansion into postsecondary credentials might incentivize students to bypass getting a two- or four-year degree altogether. "It's not hard to imagine the service becoming deeply threatening to colleges," Horn said to Education Dive's Kelly Field. Learning Amazon-specific skills won't guarantee you a job there — and research finds it could end up hurting your education Tech leaders have long said there's a skills gap between what schools teach and the training employers actually need. In April, the Trump administration spearheaded the "Find Something New" campaign that encourages unemployed Americans to learn new skills to find a new job. The program, funded entirely by 20 companies that include Apple and IBM, also encourages employers to loosen degree requirements and hire applicants with just skills-based training, Bloomberg reports.  "We believe that, with the right tools, people have the power to change their lives and the lives of their families for the better," Apple CEO Tim Cook said of the program. Cook has previously said US colleges don't adequately teach skills that business leaders need in their workforces.  But the issue with telling job seekers to train in specific skills that corporations say they need is that the company may change their in-demand skills within a few years, depending on the market, according to author and professor Ellen Ruppel Shell.  In Shell's book, "The Job: Work and Its Future in a Time of Radical Change," she studied an advanced manufacturing class geared toward retraining former automobile industry employees in their 40s. She found that while the employees left the program highly knowledgeable in the skills the company said it wanted, the jobs offered to them did not pay enough to support their families. One 2019 paper found the "skills gap" is not as large as tech leaders have claimed: economists at the American Economics Association found that Americans did have the education and job experience tech employers were looking for, but those companies hired less when the unemployment rate was high due to increased competition. And an analysis of 114,000 resumes found that US job seekers had too many unnecessary skills, rather than not enough in-demand skills.SEE ALSO: 3 million older Americans can't find high-paying jobs, and it has nothing to do with skills. Here's the one barrier they face that no one's addressing. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why YETI coolers are so expensive
Photo by JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images Capital One will pay an $80 million civil penalty for its role in a 2019 security breach that exposed the personal data of more than 100 million customers, The Wall Street Journal reported. In a scathing report on its investigation into the breach, the Office of the Comptroller of Currency, part of the US Treasury. said Capital One was aware its security practices were woefully insufficient, and that the company’s board of directors “failed to take effective actions to hold management accountable.” The breach happened in March and April of 2019, but Capital One was apparently not aware of the problem until mid-July. That’s when someone tipped the company to a public GitHub page where private Capital One data was available. That led... Continue reading…
Need proof? 'Spam Spam Spam Humbug,' a podcast dedicated to the computer role-playing games, is now in its fifth year.
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