Ralph Vandermeer

Ralph Vandermeer

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Grab an Amazon Echo Dot for just $0.99 when you subscribe to Music Unlimited for two months.
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The live-action remake was originally scheduled for a theatrical release in March
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(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Now researchers at MIT and Caltech have shown that the weird, quantum effects of entanglement could theoretically give blackjack players even more of an edge, albeit a small one, when playing against the house.
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Microsoft is reportedly interested in purchasing TikTok from the Chinese company.
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There's more speculation that Nvidia would buy Arm, with the Financial Times reporting on Friday that the chip giant plans to offer more than $32 billion for the chip design company. Such an acquisition would definitely expand Nvidia's reach in the semiconductor market, giving it more firepower against rivals Intel and AMD, veteran industry analysts told Business Insider. But such a deal would also face intense regulatory scrutiny, they said, and could hurt Arm's relationship with existing customers. "The regulatory and the customer backlash I think will be significant," Bernstein analyst Stacy Rasgon told Business Insider. Click here for more BI Prime stories. Speculation that chip giant Nvidia could buy Arm from Softbank intensified Friday with a report that it planned to offer more than $32 billion for the chip design company. The Financial Times report was greeted with some skepticism by some veteran semiconductor industry analysts, even as they also noted how it could be a game changer for Nvidia. Buying Arm would give the chipmaker access to highly valuable intellectual property that it could use to take on new markets, including servers and supercomputers, analysts say. "If Nvidia were to buy it, they would gain significant power in the marketplace," IDC President Crawford Del Prete told Business Insider. "Nvidia gains the ability to control the source code of Arm, arguably the most popular CPU [computer processing unit] architecture on the planet in terms of volume." Arm became a tech powerhouse by introducing a power-efficient chip architecture that became widely used in the mobile market, outpacing semiconductor giant Intel. Arm-based chips have also become important in the data center market.  Arm would also give Nvidia "more control over the direct intellectual  roadmap which Nvidia often leverages," said analyst Ben Bajarin of Creative Strategies Inc. "Perhaps they could leverage it to start going after server central processing unit [chips], which is what many have speculated," he said, which would enable them to take on Intel and AMD in a critical market.  Nathan Brookwood of Insight64, a market research firm focused on the semiconductor industry, said owning Arm would enhance Nvidia's position in high-performance computing, given the gains of Arm-based processors in that market. "Tighter integration between Nvidia and Arm could lead to more powerful supercomputers," he told Business Insider, noting that this could be bad news for Intel. "If Nvidia takes share in this market, it will come at Intel's expense." An Nvidia-Arm merger would "could accelerate the growth of Arm-based PCs," he added. "This would impact both Intel and AMD." But analysts agree that such a deal would be tough to pull off for Nvidia. The marketplace power Nvidia would gain by buying Arm "would bring into question the idea of fair competition and antitrust," Del Prete said. Particularly now: Nvidia's reported interest in acquiring Arm comes amid heightened antitrust scrutiny of the tech industry, underscored by the grilling this this week of the CEOs of Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google before the House of Representatives' antitrust subcommittee. Bernstein analyst Stacy Rasgon echoed the point, telling Business Insider, "The regulatory and the customer backlash I think will be significant." Arm makes money by licensing its technology to different chipmakers, including the giants of the industry. "The value proposition of Arm is that they're independent," Rasgon said. "I can't imagine any of our customers would be happy to see any of Arm's customers purchasing it." Brookhood also raised the issue of Arm's independence, saying, "Arm is currently a 'neutral' player in the industry." "Customers of an Nvidia-owned Arm would never be sure its policies and design initiatives were not being overly influenced by what's good for Nvidia, as opposed to what's good for Arm's customers and industry partners," he told Business Insider. Del Prete speculated that Nvidia could decide to maintain Arm as "a separate entity in order to keep other suppliers engaged at least for the near term." Bajarin raised a similar point as he noted that an Nvidia-Arm merger "may be tricky given the nature that Nvidia competitors use Arm's intellectual property." "If there was a clean way to keep this separate, it could work out," he said. Got a tip about Nvidia, Arm or another tech company? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @benpimentel or send him a secure message through Signal at (510) 731-8429. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Claim your 20% discount on an annual subscription to BI Prime by clicking here. SEE ALSO: The CEO of $2.5 billion Celonis explains the hot AI startup's big expansion push during the COVID crisis, and why it's looking to fill 600 new jobs with a base pay of up to $100,000 SEE ALSO: Intel's big fumble gives way to fears that it's 'about to give up its main source of competitive advantage,' as rivals like Arm, Nvidia, and AMD only get stronger Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why electric planes haven't taken off yet
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You'll have to hurry to grab the latest $400 off Samsung Galaxy S20 deals at Best Buy - they're only available until this Sunday.
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Halo Infinite multiplayer will be free-to-play and run at 120fps, according to reports.
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During Wednesday's antitrust hearing, tech CEOs leaned into the same pernicious argument to distract from the fact that US tech companies do bad things too.
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Bezos, Cook, Pichai, and Zuckerberg do battle, and it all goes down at 12PM ET. All that, and more tech news today.
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Mitsubishi has been on a significant decline in vehicle sales over the last several years. Many enthusiasts were done with the brand when it discontinued the Evo several years back. Now the company focuses on cheap cars and SUVs. Mitsubishi has announced that it plans a considerable new vehicle investment for North America in 2021. Its plan will see several … Continue reading
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The personal data of hundreds of thousands of Instacart users is being sold on the dark web for around $2 per person, according to a report from BuzzFeed. The publication says information including “names, the last four digits of credit card numbers, and order histories” appearing to belong to 278,531 Instacart accounts is available to buy. (Though it’s impossible to verify that this number doesn’t include duplicates or incorrect data.) BuzzFeed did confirm with two Instacart users that the order date, transaction amount, and credit card numbers included in the cache matched their recent purchases. The data also includes users’ emails addresses. It’s not clear what the source of the data is Instacart denies that there’s been a data... Continue reading…
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We examine their outlooks on social media, Section 230, and more
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The Library of Congress just released more than 11,000 images of roadside attractions and classic Americana into the public domain. Critic and photographer John Margolies took the high-resolution photos over 40 years of traveling around the country. The photos document drive-ins, car washes, diners, and other unusual structures. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The Library of Congress is doing the important work of memorializing some of the US' most oddly charming roadside attractions, from Googie-style motel signs to giant frog statues. Photographer John Margolies spent 40 years taking photos during his travels around the country, documenting classic Americana like drive-in movie theaters, car washes, novelty signs, and more. The more than 11,000 photos create a picture of small-town America which Margolies' told The Washington Post was an effort to capture quirks and oddities before every town absorbed the same franchises and chains. He also told the Post that he doesn't take a photo unless he can get it in the sun, with no people or clouds in the frame.  All 11,710 and photos are available on the Library of Congress website. Some of these attractions still exist and could be road trip inspiration for a summer drive. All of the images are now in the public domain and can be used by anyone.  Here are some of the highlights. SEE ALSO: This intense-looking humanoid robot is performing coronavirus tests in Egypt — here's how it works 1. Teapot Dome gas station in Zillah, Washington, photographed in 1987. Library of Congress 2. The whale car wash in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, photographed in 1979. Library of Congress 3. Bomber gas station in Milwaukie, Oregon, photographed in 1980. Library of Congress 4. Hat n' Boots gas station on Route 99 in Seattle, Washington, photographed in 1980. Library of Congress 5. The World's Largest Redwood Tree Service Station on Route 101 in Ukiah, California, photographed in 1991. Library of Congress 6. The Fish Inn in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, photographed in 1987. Library of Congress 7. Harold's Auto Center in Spring Hill, Florida, photographed in 1979. Library of Congress 8. The Donut Hole in La Puente, California, photographed in 1991. Library of Congress 9. Hoot Owl Cafe in Los Angeles, photographed in 1977. Library of Congress 10. Christie's Restaurant sign cowboy shrimp in Houston, Texas, photographed in 1983. Library of Congress 11. The Re Ball Cafe in Albuquerque, New Mexico, photographed in 1979. Library of Congress 12. The Modern Diner in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, photographed in 1978. Library of Congress 13. Miss Bellows Falls Diner in Bellows Falls, Vermont, photographed in 1978. Library of Congress 14. Dog Bark Park in Cottonwood, Idaho, photographed in 2004. Library of Congress 15. Motel 36 box car room units in Somerville, Texas, photographed in 1982. Library of Congress. 16. Hurricane Camille Gift Shop in Gulfport, Mississippi, photographed in 1979. Library of Congress 17. The Caboose and Loose Caboose Gift Shop in Whitefish, Montana, photographed in 1987. Library of Congress 18. Dinosaur World's Tyrannosaurus Rex in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, photographed in 1994. Library of Congress. 19. American Legion Post in Paso Robles, California, photographed in 1977. Library of Congress 20. Tascosa Drive-In Theater in Amarillo, Texas, photographed in 1977. Library of Congress 21. The Grotto of the Redemption arch in West Bend, Iowa, photographed in 1988. Library of Congress 22. Mr. Peanut sign in Swansea, Massachusetts, photographed in 1984. Library of Congress 23. The world's largest pecan at James Pecan Shop in Brunswick, Missouri, photographed in 1988. Library of Congress 24. Giant artichoke in Castroville, California, photographed in 1991. Library of Congress 25. The Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame in Hayward, Wisconsin, photographed in 1988. Library of Congress
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Frank Miller and Tom Wheeler on bringing a fresh angle to a well-trod mythology.
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Attempt to squash WhatsApp dispute with Israeli spyware company foiled by US court.
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On this Digital Trends Live, we discuss the top tech stories, including a widespread Twitter hackand more.
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Photo illustration byJakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images You may be switching jobs, or maybe you’ve decided to stop using a specific email account, or maybe you just want a copy of all your email just in case. Whatever your reasons, it’s not a bad idea to back up and export your Gmail and other Google accounts using Google’s Takeout feature. In fact, you can set your accounts to back up regularly, which is a good practice in general. One note: if you’re backing up a company account, you may find that your company has disabled Takeout. There are third-party apps that say they can back up your Gmail, but you should check your company’s policies before you try them out. How to back up your Gmail: Go to myaccount.google.com Under Privacy & personalization, click on “Manage your data &... Continue reading…
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On July 14, a new Mars-bound spacecraft will launch from Japan. While several Mars missions are planned to launch over the next month, what makes this different is who’s launching it: the United Arab Emirates. Though new to space exploration, the UAE has set high goals for the probe, named Hope. The mission aims to further study the climate of Mars, but Omran Sharaf, mission lead, also says, “It’s a means for a bigger goal: to expedite the development in our educational sector, academic sector.” With space exploration usually pursued by actors like the United States, Russia, China, the European… This story continues at The Next Web
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You can reserve a new Bronco online right now for only $100.
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Paris-based video game company Ubisoft announced Saturday that several high-level company officers are leaving amid allegations of abuse and harassment. The departures of chief creative officer Serge Hascoët, global head of HR Cécile Cornet, and Yannis Mallat, managing director of Ubisoft’s Canadian studios, “come following the initiation of a rigorous review that the company initiated in response to recent allegations and accusations of misconduct and inappropriate behavior,” Ubisoft said in a statement. Earlier this week, Ubisoft confirmed the departure of its vice president, Maxime Béland, following assault allegations, making a total of four prominent executives departing. Under Mallat, Ubisoft’s Toronto studio produced several of... Continue reading…
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Mayfield managing director Navin Chaddha told Business Insider that the months of sheltering in place in California's Bay Area have been some of the most productive of his professional career. He credits the change to ditching his lengthy morning commute and time spent shuttling between Mayfield's office and various meetings in San Francisco. He said he has started taking socially distant hikes and walks with founders and firm partners in Silicon Valley's South Bay as a safe way to build and maintain relationships. The extra time has helped Chaddha focus on "out of the box" goals, and he said he has done more writing and webinar broadcasts in the last few months than any other time in his career. Click here for more BI Prime stories. The commute in and around California's Bay Area is particularly nightmarish. The handful of highways are gridlocked with Teslas and corporate shuttles beginning around 6 a.m. and, with the exception of a short reprieve around noon, stay that way until long after the sun goes down.  But when the counties that make up the Bay Area issued shelter-in-place orders in early March, the highways became eerily quiet. Commuters were staying home and clocking in from the home office, and the massive corporate campuses in Silicon Valley became ghost towns. And the longer workplaces remain closed in favor of remote options, the harder it will be for the masses to resign themselves to hours-long daily commutes. That's what Mayfield managing director Navin Chaddha thinks, at least. As a prominent venture capitalist living in Silicon Valley, Chaddha has the ability to manage his own schedule and access to reliable transportation even while working remotely. But after months of working from home, without a daily commute or time spent traveling between meetings, he realized that there were more productive ways to spend his time. "I'm feeling more productive and I'm able to think more out of the box," Chaddha told Business Insider. "There's no more driving to the office or to board meetings, and suddenly you get back half your day that you can use to read and think." Study after study has shown the negative effects of long commutes on workers' mental and physical health, but now many professionals with shorter drives are starting to see how much even a short commute could drain them. For Chaddha, that time is now spent with his family, with whom he is sheltering, and in front of the grill. It's the balance he needs to avoid Zoom fatigue, a relatively new phenomenon used to describe the mental effects of back-to-back video conference meetings. "Business-building is a marathon, not a sprint," Chaddha said. The marathon has continued, Chaddha explained, even as other firms scaled back funding activity in hopes they could wait out any underlying uncertainty. Since his firm's physical office closed on March 6, Mayfield raised its latest fund, saw multiple exits from portfolio companies, and continued to source new deals from a large network of investors and entrepreneurs. He has started writing more often, he said, and has been channeling some of his creative energy into webinar broadcasts for Silicon Valley insiders. He told Business Insider that he has likely done more writing and broadcasting than any other time in his career over the last several months. "What I'm getting that I wasn't getting before was the time to think and read," Chaddha said. "The driving and interruptions in a physical setting that happen, you get back four or five hours a day, and the efficiency goes up." Chaddha has had to get creative to keep the firm running smoothly, at times hosting socially distant executive meetings in large outdoor spaces with limited internet access or taking founders on hikes around the nearby parks in the South Bay Area, like the West Valley College campus or the Los Gatos Trail, when he feels the conversation topics are especially sensitive. "You can do a lot of the stuff you would do, I would say it's almost better than face-to-face because everyone is relaxed," Chaddha said. "You can learn so much more about a person when you are walking or hiking in an hour than in three hours over dinner."SEE ALSO: Startups need to beware of these 'toxic' deal terms when negotiating with VCs for fundraising Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
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Deep learning continues to be one of the hottest fields in computing, and while Google’s TensorFlow remains the most popular framework in absolute numbers, Facebook’s PyTorch has quickly earned a reputation for being easier to grasp and use.PyTorch has taken the world of deep learning research by storm, outstripping TensorFlow as the implementation framework of choice in submitted papers for AI conferences in the past two years. With recent improvements for producing optimized models and deploying them to production, PyTorch is definitely a framework ready for use in industry as well as R&D labs.To read this article in full, please click here
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This was notable for one major reason: the keyboard.Apple has backtracked on its controversial butterfly design and has gone back to the old design: the scissor switch.For those who haven’t been following the saga closely, some context.Since the end of 2015, Apple has been using a butterfly design on its laptop keyboards.You can find more in-depth info about that here, but, basically, it has to do with the mechanism of the keys.You can think of this like a big ‘X.’ The issue with this mechanism is the keys have to travel a (comparatively) long distance when you type.
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Supermarket says it's innocent and we don't need more than that, ICO told judgesThe UK's Information Commissioner urged the Court of Appeal to side with Morrisons in the supermarket’s battle to avoid liability for the theft and leaking of nearly 100,000 employees’ payroll details – despite her not having read the employees’ legal arguments.A letter (PDF) sent to the Court of Appeal in May 2018 on behalf of the watchdog's leader, Elizabeth Denham, urged senior judges to side with Morrisons and rule the supermarket wasn’t responsible for the criminal actions of disgruntled auditor Andrew Skelton.Crucially, the letter – written by an Information Commissioner’s Office solicitor on Denham’s behalf – admitted the ICO had only seen one side of the detailed legal arguments, months before the case was heard by judges.Those same judges later ruled against Morrisons, effectively dismissing the Information Commissioner's letter.Skelton, an auditor for the supermarket chain, had authorised access to its entire payroll while KPMG was auditing the company accounts.
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Last week, IDC released the Q3 global mobile phone report and now the firm has posted a new report solely targeted at the Indian mobile phone market.According to the report, smartphone companies shipped a record 46.6 million units in the country with 26.5% quarter-over-quarter(QoQ) and 9.3% year-over-year(YoY) growth.Xiaomi still leads the market, whereas Realme showed the highest growth.As per Upasana Joshi of IDC India, the online channel witnessed a record-high market share of 45.4% with YoY growth of 28.3% thanks to attractive cashback and buyback offers as well as No Cost EMIs and other financing options.On the other hand, offline channel viewed 2.6% YoY decline even though the offline players tried to counter online players with their offers.The feature phone market which accounted for 43.3% of total mobile phone shipments observed 17.5% YoY decline.
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Remember that wild month where we all thought Spider-Man might not be in the MCU and everyone promptly got a bit wound up about it?Well, even if that ended up not being the case, it turns out no one might have kicked off more than Ben Mendelsohn.Mendelsohn is, of course, part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe himself now, having appeared as Talos the Skrull alongside both Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel and Tom Holland’s Spider-Man (technically for the latter, given that he’s disguised as Samuel L. Jackson for most of it) in Captain Marvel and Spider-Man: Far From Home.But, speaking to Metro recently, the actor enunciated in a spectacularly sweary fashion that he would happily trash not just his own role but basically a good chunk of the Marvel roster before contemplating the reality where Marvel Studios really did lose out on future appearances from the web-slinger.“I think what happens in these things is, most of the time, cooler heads prevail,” Mendelsohn told Metro, before promptly doing the exact opposite himself.“Sometimes we end up in a situation which feels like it’s going to be the lead up to World War I.”
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Rolls-Royce Black Badge Cullinan proves there's always room for moreUber stock sinks and drivers protest as lockup period endsC8 Corvette production delayed, UAW strike blamedVolvo turns to blockchain to check EV batteries are responsibly sourcedGood news, Acura RDX owners: You get Android Auto now
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(I expect many of you have yet to try this browser out, so here’s the link to the preview of the browser.)So while both vendors started very differently, they are increasingly looking more and more alike.[ Become a Microsoft Office 365 administrator in record time with this quick start course from PluralSight. ]Admit it: The browser wars were stupidIf you were around in the 1990s, you lived through the so-called browser wars, where Microsoft and Netscape decided to fight to the death, and Microsoft won a Pyrrhic victory, taking over the segment for a time.A Pyrrhic victory is one where the cost of winning is as great or greater than the cost of losing, and while Netscape failed as a company, Microsoft was nearly broken up due to their anti-competitive behavior.
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RISC-V-based design for Root of Trust blueprints announcedOpenTitan – an open-source blueprint for a Root of Trust (RoT) system-on-chip based on RISC-V and managed by a team in Cambridge, UK – was teased by Google along with several partners today.Hardware RoT is a means of verifying the firmware and system software in a computing device has not been tampered with, enabling features such as secure boot.The goal of OpenTitan is to provide an open-source design for RoT silicon so that it is (as far as possible) open for inspection.The OpenTitan SoC will use the RISC-V open-source CPU instruction set architecture, and will be managed by lowRISC, a nonprofit in Cambridge, which has "an open-source hardware roadmap in collaboration with Google and other industry partners," we're told.The OpenTitan SoC will include the the lowRISC Ibex microprocessor design, cryptographic coprocessors, a hardware random number generator, volatile and non-volatile storage, IO peripherals, and additional defensive mechanisms.
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