Ramon Delo

Ramon Delo

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Following 30
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Samsung’s Galaxy Note 20 and Galaxy Note 20 Ultra are finally official, and the big question is what big price tag these big smartphones might demand. As you’d expect, US carriers have been quick to step up with some Note 20 deals, while Samsung itself has some promotions during the smartphone’s preorder period. Samsung Galaxy Note 20 trade-in deals Samsung … Continue reading
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From classic favorites to subversive hits, we've rounded up the best romantic comedies streaming on Netflix.
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Zhang said in the memo that Tiktok is currently engaged in preliminary discussions with an unnamed tech company to ensure it will still be available to US users.
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Recall rumors have swirled, but they are not true
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Amazon and WarnerMedia have struck a new temporary agreement that will allow HBO Now customers to continue streaming on Fire TV while the companies continue negotiations over HBO Max. Before we go any further, let’s break down this situation. In April, WarnerMedia launched its new crown jewel streaming service, HBO Max. The app was made available everywhere except on Amazon Fire TV and Roku. Two weeks after HBO Max launched, WarnerMedia announced it was getting rid of the HBO Go app. This is how HBO customers who purchased the network via their cable provider could stream content. At the same time, WarnerMedia announced that the HBO Now app would simply become HBO. To quickly summarize: HBO Go is disappearing, HBO Now is becoming HBO,... Continue reading…
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  HBO and WarnerMedia just launched a new streaming service — HBO Max. HBO already operates two major streaming platforms, HBO Go and HBO Now. On July 31, HBO discontinued the HBO Go app on most devices and rebranded HBO Now as just "HBO". In many cases, HBO Max is being offered as a free upgrade and replacement for those older services. So, what's the difference between the three different streaming services? A surprising amount of stuff — let's dig in! First, the bad news: "Friends" has left Netflix, and it's not coming back any time soon. Turns out there's a good reason for that — it has a new home with HBO's new streaming service alongside "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air," "Rick and Morty," and a mess of other stuff. That new service is named HBO Max, and it's intended to serve as a deluxe version of HBO's older streaming services, HBO Go and HBO Now. But what's so different about HBO Max from HBO's other streaming options? Well, it mostly comes down to content selection and device support. It's also important to note that big changes have recently been imposed upon HBO's other streaming offerings, and HBO Max is essentially being positioned as a replacement for HBO Go and HBO Now. In fact, as of July 31, the HBO Go app is no longer available on most devices, though you can still access the service via HBOGo.com. Meanwhile, HBO Now has been branded as just "HBO". In most cases, current HBO Go and HBO Now users can access HBO Max instead at no extra cost. To help further dispel some of the confusion surrounding all three services, we've broken down all of the key differences below. Updated on 7/31/2020 by Steven Cohen: We've revised this article to include details about the recent termination of the HBO Go app and the rebranding of HBO Now to HBO. What is HBO Max? HBO Max is a standalone streaming service you don't need a cable subscription to use. It costs $14.99 per month and includes all of HBO's standard offerings, plus a ton of new stuff from various WarnerMedia properties, like DC Comics, CNN, TNT, TBS, and Cartoon Network. HBO Max also produces original shows and movies, just like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime Video. The service launched with more than 1,300 movies and over 10,000 hours worth of programming. For more detailed impressions, you can read our full review of HBO Max here. In most cases, people who were previously using HBO Go or HBO Now can now access HBO Max with their existing account details for no extra cost. There are some exceptions, but for most HBO users, HBO Max is being offered as a free upgrade and replacement for those older services. You can check the HBO Max website to see if your HBO subscription is eligible for HBO Max.  What makes HBO Max different from HBO Now? Additional content. HBO Max is the same price as HBO Now, an older streaming service that features HBO original shows and the cable channel's rotating package of movies. HBO Max currently offers all of HBO Now's content plus a ton of new stuff from a variety of WarnerMedia brands — all for the same $14.99 a month price. Most HBO Now subscribers can watch HBO Max with their HBO Now account at no extra cost. In other words, HBO Max is basically an automatic upgrade to HBO Now. With that in mind, the HBO Now app has been rebranded to just "HBO".   Since HBO Max offers a larger streaming library than HBO (formerly HBO Now), it's clearly the better choice for subscribers. With that said, the HBO Max app is currently missing from a few notable devices, including Roku and Fire TV products. If you use one of those devices as your primary streaming player, the HBO app is currently your only option.  What is HBO Go? And what happens to subscribers now that the app has been discontinued? In the past, if you had a cable TV subscription to HBO, you could also use the HBO Go app, a freebie streaming option that came as a bonus. Plug in your cable TV login details, and you got access to a vast library of HBO content on-demand. It cost nothing extra, and worked on everything from your smartphone to your Apple TV/Roku/etc. to your computer. On July 31, the HBO Go app was removed from most connected devices. Thankfully, AT&T has brokered deals that give most HBO cable subscribers access to HBO Max instead. If you subscribe to HBO through any of the cable providers below, you can get access to HBO Max at no extra cost. Simply go to the HBO Max website and choose your provider to login. Altice One Atlantic Broadband Apple TV Channels AT&T/AT&T U-verse Cox DIRECTV Optimum RCN Spectrum Suddenlink Verizon Fios WOW! Xfinity If you happen to subscribe to HBO through a provider that isn't included, you can still access HBO Go through the HBO Go website. The addition of other WarnerMedia networks' content to HBO's existing library is an enticing proposition. Adding Adult Swim's content to HBO Max means adding "Rick & Morty." Adding CNN's content to HBO Max means adding "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown." Adding TBS' content to HBO Max means adding "Full Frontal with Samantha Bee" and "Conan."  All of which is to say that adding content from all these places adds up to a ton of really good stuff. Looney Tunes cartoons! All the "Lord of the Rings" movies! There's a surprising amount of additional content in the HBO Max package. HBO Max's lineup also features new original series, including "Love Life," a comedy show starring Anna Kendrick, and "Looney Tunes Cartoons," a new animated series featuring Bugs Bunny and company.  Beyond original HBO programs, the HBO Max catalog features a wide range of TV series, including "Friends," "Rick and Morty," "The Big Bang Theory," "Sesame Street" and "Anthony Bourdain's Parts Unknown." The full library incorporates TV offerings from DC, CNN, TNT, TBS, truTV, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Rooster Teeth, Looney Tunes, and Warner Bros. What else is coming to HBO Max? A bunch of new original content, including a show based on "Dune" and a new movie from the director of "Bird Box." Here's everything that's announced for HBO Max thus far: -"10,000 hours of premium content from HBO, Warner Bros., New Line, DC Entertainment, CNN, TNT, TBS, truTV, The CW, Turner Classic Movies, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Crunchyroll, Rooster Teeth, Looney Tunes and more. -The exclusive streaming rights at launch to all 236 episodes of 'Friends.' -The exclusive streaming rights at launch to all episodes 'The Fresh Prince of Bel Air' and 'Pretty Little Liars.' -The exclusive streaming home to a string of new Warner Bros.' produced dramas for The CW beginning with the fall 2019 season, including new DC Entertainment series 'Batwoman,' and 'Katy Keene' (spinoff of 'Riverdale'). -New exclusive movie production deals with Greg Berlanti and Reese Witherspoon ('Big Little Lies'). Berlanti will produce an initial four movies focused in the young adult space, while Witherspoon's Hello Sunshine will produce at least two films. -'Dune: The Sisterhood,' an adaptation of Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson's book based in the world created by Frank Herbert's book 'Dune,' from director Denis Villeneuve. -'Tokyo Vice,' based on Jake Adelstein's non-fiction first-hand account of the Tokyo Metropolitan Police beat, starring Ansel Elgort. -'The Flight Attendant,' a one-hour thriller series based on the novel by Chris Bohjalian. Kaley Cuoco, executive producing alongside Greg Berlanti, will star. -'Love Life,' a 10-episode half-hour romantic comedy anthology series starring Anna Kendrick, who will also executive produce alongside Paul Feig. -'Station Eleven,' a postapocalyptic limited series based on Emily St. John Mandel's international bestseller, adapted by Patrick Somerville ('The Leftovers') and directed by Hiro Murai ('Barry'). -'Made for Love,' a 10-episode, half-hour, straight-to-series adaptation based on the tragicomic novel of the same name by Alissa Nutting, also from Patrick Somerville and directed by S.J. Clarkson. -'Gremlins,' an animated series from Warner Bros. Animation and Amblin Entertainment based on the original movie. -Stephen King's 'The Outsider,' a dark mystery starring Ben Mendelsohn, produced and directed by Jason Bateman. -'Lovecraft Country,' a unique horror series based on a novel by Matt Ruff, written and executive produced by Misha Green, and executive produced by Jordan Peele ('Us') and J.J. Abrams ('Westworld'). -'The Nevers,' Joss Whedon's new science fiction series starring Laura Donnelly. -'The Gilded Age,' set the opulent world of 1885 New York from 'Downton Abbey's' Julian Fellowes. -'Avenue 5,' a high satire aboard a space-bound cruise ship from Armando Iannucci ('Veep') starring Hugh Laurie and Josh Gad. -'The Undoing,' a psychological thriller from David E. Kelley ('Big Little Lies'), directed by Susanne Bier ('Bird Box') starring Nicole Kidman and Hugh Grant. -'The Plot Against America,' reimagined history based on Phillip Roth's novel written and executive produced by David Simon and Ed Burns, starring Winona Ryder and John Turturro. -'Perry Mason', the classic legal drama for a new generation, executive produced by Robert Downey, Jr. and Susan Downey, with Matthew Rhys in the title role. -'I Know This Much Is True,' a complex family drama starring Mark Ruffalo playing twin brothers, one of whom has schizophrenia. Based on the best-selling novel by Wally Lamb, written and directed by Derek Cianfrance."Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
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Attack came in waves that probed for staff with access to the creds crims craved Twitter has offered further explanation of the celebrity account hijack hack that saw 130 users’ timelines polluted with a Bitcoin scam.…
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Image: Google Google One, the cloud storage service that Google launched back in 2018, will now backup your iOS or Android phone for free with your Google account. The iOS app will be able to backup your photos, videos, contacts and calendar events, consolidating what’s offered by different services like Photos and Drive into one place, Android Authority notes. Meanwhile the Android app, which could already backup a range of files from your phone, will now offer backups without a Google One membership. Along with backing up your files, Google One is also being updated to make it easier to manage which files are being stored. This storage management feature is available from either the app or the web, and will let you manage files saved from Drive,... Continue reading…
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Earlier today, Google banned 29 apps from its Play Store for allegedly spamming users and injecting malicious ads to their devices. The White Ops’ Satori ... The post Google bans 29 spamming apps from its Play Store – see full list here! appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Meteorites give us insight into the early development of the solar system. Using the SAPHiR instrument at the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), a scientific team has for the first time simulated the formation of a class of stony-iron meteorites, so-called pallasites, on a purely experimental basis.
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(Bentham Science Publishers) In this study, recombinant pPICZαC-FXIIIa was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified as well as its biological activity was determined.
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Expect the Note 20, Fold 2, Buds Live, Watch 3 and Tab S7 to be featured at Samsung's event next week.
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(Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences) If the eyes are the mirror of the soul, then thanks to the translucent corneas, we can look deep into that soul. And thanks to the work of scientists from the IPC PAS we can look into the depths of the cornea itself. And that without touching it! All thanks to the introduction of an innovative method of holographic optical tomography.
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Bad traffic rules from HQ caused intrusion detection and prevention on gateways to just stop working Ubiquiti got a lesson in never blindly trusting external input this month.…
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Unless Apple’s got a secret team designing new components and hardware from scratch, it probably won't be the first to solve these issues.
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Our robot colleague Satoshi Nakaboto writes about Bitcoin every fucking day. Welcome to another edition of Bitcoin Today, where I, Satoshi Nakaboto, tell you what’s been going on with Bitcoin in the past 24 hours. As Aristotle used to say: Live, laugh, love! Bitcoin price We closed the day, July 21 2020, at a price of $9,374. That’s a respectable 2.31 percent increase in 24 hours, or $212. It was the highest closing price in twelve days. We’re still 53 percent below Bitcoin‘s all-time high of $20,089 (December 17 2017). Bitcoin market cap Bitcoin‘s market cap ended the day at… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Bitcoin
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Dell's Cyber Savings sale ends tomorrow, so it's your last chance to score a $116 price cut on the 2019 XPS 13 laptop.
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Greyp has announced a line of high-tech electric mountain bikes with price tags up to $16,999.  The company is spun out of EV maker Rimac, which is known for building some of the fastest cars on the planet.  Greyp's G6 e-bikes come with integrated action cameras, a handlebar-mounted computer, internet connectivity, and a heart-rate monitor, among other tech-filled features.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Established car manufacturers like BMW, Audi, and Ford have been making their way into the micromobility game with electric bikes and scooters. Now, boutique carmakers are joining the party as well.  Greyp — pronounced "grape" — is a new e-bike company spun out of Rimac Automobili, a Croatian carmaker that builds limited-run, high-performance electric sports cars. Rimac says its latest creation, the C Two, boasts more than 1,900 horsepower, a top speed of 258 mph, and a 0-to-60-mph time of 1.85 seconds. Thus, it's not surprising that when Rimac decided to build e-bikes, it went a bit over the top. Greyp's line of G6 mountain bikes, which the company recently said would be available for the US market, are packed with tech — including GPS, internet connectivity, a heart-rate monitor, dual action cameras, and other gadgets.  Take a closer look at Greyp's G6 series below. Greyp — a sister company of electric-supercar builder Rimac — recently released a lineup of tech-packed electric mountain bikes for the US market. The G6 series of bikes is the brainchild of Mate Rimac — whom Greyp calls "Croatia's Elon Musk" — and was developed with help from the EV maker's auto team. The result, Greyp says, "is a full-carbon trail bike with a high-tech heart and an e-supercar soul." The bikes come with pedal-assist capabilities, meaning the electric motor kicks in when the rider is pedaling. That's a typical feature for e-mountain bikes. Depending on the model chosen, the G6 comes with either a 250-watt or a 460-watt motor. The bikes' 36-volt, 700Wh batteries provide up to 60 miles of pedal assist under normal conditions, Greyp says. The battery, prominently displayed below the rear shock, is removable. The mountain bikes are full suspension, meaning they have shock absorbers in both front and rear. All that is great, but fairly common in the electric-mountain-bike landscape. Where the Greyp G6 really stands out is in its tech. Greyp's bikes come with built-in 4G connectivity through T-Mobile. That means owners can remotely lock and track their bike. The G6 also comes with an integrated display, which lets cyclists log rides, check their battery, and map routes. Thanks to their internet connectivity, the bikes can get over-the-air software updates. Plus, the G6 has wide-angle, high-definition cameras mounted in front of the handlebars ... ... and behind the seat. The cameras record entire rides, just in case owners forget to hit the button before doing a cool trick. During rides, the bike constantly measures data points including power output, cadence, speed, G-forces, barometric pressure, and heart rate. Greyp says the intention is to help riders train, compete, and to "start experiencing bike riding in a whole new way." Using an included wrist strap, the bike can adjust the amount of pedal assistance depending on a rider's heart rate. One of Greyp's electric mountain bikes won't run you in the seven figures like a Rimac supercar, but the e-bikes don't exactly come cheap either. The base model retails for $7,999, which isn't unheard of in the e-mountain-bike world. The top-of-the-line blacked-out G6.X Limited, with upgraded components and the more powerful motor, costs $16,999. There are brand-new cars you can get for less. According to its website, Greyp has electric touring and city bikes in the works.
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Microsoft’s Windows 10X operating system, originally planned for dual-screen devices, might not appear until 2021. The software giant revealed earlier this year that Windows 10X is being reworked for single-screen devices, rather than hardware like the Surface Neo. These changes mean Microsoft won’t be releasing Windows 10X like it had planned to do so later this year. ZDNet reports that single-screen devices running Windows 10X, designed for education and business use, are expected to arrive in spring 2021. A year later, Microsoft is rumored to be launching dual-screen hardware running Windows 10X. If accurate, this is a significant delay to Microsoft’s original launch plans. Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge ... Continue reading…
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One of the key differences between Microsoft and Sony’s strategies for next-gen consoles is that Microsoft isn’t releasing exclusives for its Xbox Series X console ... The post Xbox boss confirms: First-party games won’t be exclusive to Xbox Series X appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The small SUV reportedly already has a 0% APR offer, but don't expect a lengthy loan timeframe.
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The pandemic is generally considered a boon to the cloud market as the shift to remote work has driven huge surges in demand for cloud services. Top cloud providers like Amazon, Microsoft, and Google have benefited. But some of their top partners, whose businesses rely on selling Amazon and Microsoft software and services, told Business Insider they've faced challenges, including customers canceling sales and putting projects on hold, as well as worries about whether they'd be able to cover rent or make payroll. Three top cloud partners who spoke with Business Insider said they've since seen uptick in some parts of their businesses because of the pandemic. But industry data and information from experts suggest that's not the case for all of the companies in the cloud providers' respective armies of resellers, systems integrators, and consultants. The major cloud companies rely on these smaller partners to resell their products, especially into specialty markets like retail or healthcare — meaning any turbulence here will likely float up to Amazon, Microsoft, Google Cloud, and their peer companies in the enterprise IT space. Are you an Amazon Web Services or Microsoft employee or partner? Contact this reporter via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-425-344-8242) or email ([email protected]). Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A small Arizona-based project- and portfolio-management consultancy called Sensei Project Solutions is a repeated finalist for a Microsoft Partner of the Year award — a title Microsoft says will give companies that sell its software and services a "competitive advantage." But that title didn't seem to mean as much in March, when the coronavirus outbreak began to create a global public-health and economic crisis. Sensei's customers "went dark," Elizabeth Gujral, the company's business-operations manager, said. "We had key points of contacts' emails suddenly bouncing back as people started to get laid off and furloughed, and migration to Microsoft was no longer a priority," Gujral told Business Insider. "A lot of contacts went dark on us, or said 'come back to us in Q4 or Q1 next year.'" The company worried it might lose a big client and not be able to cover rent or payroll, she said. Ultimately, Sensei's management decided to take out a loan through the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), a federal program designed to help small businesses continue operating and paying employees through the pandemic. While the company didn't disclose the size of the loan, federal data showed it was between $150,000 and $350,000. The company froze hiring, but Gujral said the loan helped the company avoid layoffs. Sensei's story, and those of the two other top cloud partners we spoke with, shows that while Microsoft, Amazon, Google, and other major enterprise IT organizations have survived and even thrived in the pandemic, their partners — the smaller third-party consulting firms, resellers, and systems integrators on whom they rely for a healthy chunk of their business — are far more sensitive to the twists and turns of the economy. Indeed, a recent survey of members of CompTIA, an industry trade group, with about 230 respondents showed customers were increasingly canceling or postponing spending and asking to reconsider commitments. And while the Big Tech companies may have deeper pockets than these smaller partners, that turbulence could cause waves that affect those cloud providers too. Microsoft, for example, said last year 95% of the company's commercial revenue came through its partners. Amazon, Microsoft, and Google did not respond to requests for comment on this story. Uncertainty in the pandemic  The Boston-area consulting firm Privo IT, which has about 60 employees, primarily works with Amazon Web Services, but cofounder Doug Heestand told a similar story. He said there was a "tremendous amount of uncertainty" for the company, and some of its customers were "severely impacted" and put many projects on hold. And we heard the same from the Florida-based Pragmatic Works, a finalist for a 2020 Microsoft Partner of the Year award. "We were kind of a little panicked," CEO Brian Knight told Business Insider of the early days of the pandemic. "We were having customers delay or cancel projects. Everything was flashing yellow." Knight estimated customers canceled or delayed more than $1 million worth of Pragmatic projects early on in the pandemic, mostly from retail customers who had furloughed employees. Both Pragmatic Works and Privo took PPP loans of their own — Privo took $350,000 to $1 million, while Pragmatic took $1 million to $2 million. Ultimately, however, things settled down for all three companies. The shift to remote work led to increased demand for cloud services, which in turn brought customers back. Privo and Pragmatic have returned the PPP money, according to their respective leaders. These stories illustrate how the fortunes of IT partners are deeply tied to those of the industries that they serve. Partners are vital to the technology industry but take some unique risks In the same way that auto manufacturers like Ford and Toyota largely rely on independently owned auto dealerships and mechanics to sell their cars and provide frontline service, the major cloud providers and enterprise tech companies rely on their partners to do much of the nitty gritty of selling and supporting their products. Sensei, for example, specializes in helping customers move to Microsoft products like Dynamics 365, Project, and the Power BI analytics service, while Pragmatic focuses more specifically on data analytics.  These partners often have expertise in serving a handful of very specific industry sectors: Some specialize in helping customize Office 365 and related apps for use by schools or healthcare systems, while there's a thriving partnership scene in and around Washington, DC, serving the public sector. But that strategy of specialization carries its own risks. Smaller IT partners in particular are more heavily reliant on small and medium-size business (SMB) customers, CompTIA spokesperson Steven Ostrowski said, and are likely to have suffered the most during the pandemic. CompTIA found 58% of respondents in a member poll said customers were canceling or postponing spending, compared with 43% in March. Meanwhile, 46% of respondents in June said customers are requesting to restructure commitments like contracts or payment terms, compared to 26 percent in March.  "SMBs in many markets have felt the brunt of the pandemic's economic impact," Ostrowski said. "Even the loss of a few customers is going to have a significant more damaging impact on an SMB tech firm than a larger competitor, who likely has a more diverse customer bases and a larger menu of product and service offerings." Not all partners face the same challenges Tim Herbert, executive vice president for research and market intelligence at CompTIA, said some Amazon, Microsoft, and Google partners are likely doing well, especially if they provide technologies for which the shift toward remote work has created increased demand such as cybersecurity and data analytics. But not all partners face the same challenges, Herbert said, and how they fare during the pandemic depends on factors such as partners' customer base, their business line, and firm size. As Ostrowski said, the partners who serve small business customers have likely been hit hardest. Joe Panettieri, a cloud partner ecosystem expert and cofounder of partner-focused trade blog Channele2e, says that while some partners are doing just fine, it's going to shake out those who were on uneven footing:  "The pandemic has simply accelerated what has already happened in the market," Joe Panettieri, an expert on the cloud partner ecosystem, said.  Panettieri estimates that the top 25 percent of partners in the cloud market have likely maintained or accelerated business amid the pandemic. Meanwhile, about half of partners are still in the "yellow zone," and the bottom 25 percent — those Microsoft and Amazon partners who were struggling pre-pandemic — are still in "worry mode." "That 25 percent is hurting right now," he said. More than 30 top cloud partners are listed as recipients of PPP loans, giving a window into the uncertainty It's tough to quantify how many Amazon, Microsoft, and Google partners have faced hardships during the pandemic, or to what degree their businesses have (or haven't) stabilized. But a look at federal data on the recipients of PPP loans, designed to help small businesses keep operating through the pandemic, gives some insight. After comparing the data with Microsoft and Google 2019 partners of the year winners and finalists (Microsoft released a list of its 2020 partners of the year on Monday), and AWS "premier tier" consulting partners, Business Insider found more than 30 of those top partners listed among loan recipients.  It's not a perfect measure of which companies faced challenges. First, the program itself is controversial, as unclear rules allowed large and well-funded companies to receive the loans. And, while some of the partners on the list confirmed to Business Insider that they received loans, the database has been found to contain errors, making it impossible to verify that all of the names on the list actually participated in the program. Furthermore, taking out a PPP loan isn't necessarily an indication of business health. As Panettieri put it, "I think a lot of partners out there thought, 'Free money. Why not grab it for a worst-case scenario?" he said.  The largest loan amount among partners in Business Insider's analysis was listed for SADA Systems, a Google Cloud 2019 partner of the year, which in February committed to reselling $500 million in Google Cloud services over the next three years. SADA is listed as a recipient of a loan between $2 million to $5 million to retain 218 jobs, but the company declined to comment on or confirm those figures. At stake for tech giants is the ability to renew contracts with tens of thousands of customers, and ultimately, revenue The success or failure of these IT partners has a direct line back to the performance of tech giants like Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. Take Microsoft's Office 365 suite of business applications, Panettieri said for example. It would be very difficult for Microsoft to deal directly with the tens of thousands of businesses who use the software directly, so it relies on partners to renew customer contracts and drive the recurring revenue that's helped make the company's cloud business so successful, he said. This means that for better or worse, their fates are linked. "If those partners go away," Panettieri said, "Microsoft's cloud will be okay, but it just won't see that incredible strength." Got a tip? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message her on Twitter @ashannstew, or send her a secure message through Signal at 425-344-8242.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How waste is dealt with on the world's largest cruise ship
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The rules are due to human rights abuses, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says.
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Will have to find a new way to weed out the people they don't like.
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The firm is concerned about "significant" wait times for some of its customers
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There’s a budding interest in marijuana in Asia as legislations ease one by one. But why is the cannabis tech ecosystem yet to benefit?
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Let’s say you want to start a powerbank rental business in Southeast Asia. Will it work? We did a deep dive to find out if it’s viable in the region.
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Post-pandemic, many companies plan to allow employees to work from home and a main office. But trying to do both ensures neither experience is good.
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The WHO has not released a new guidance on how to stay safe—or changed its stance.
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Smartphones mean we usually can’t go an hour, let alone a day, without receiving or responding to texts, notifications and DMs.Verizon-owned carrier Visible has taken these rituals and other familiar aspects of smartphones and turned them into a playful installation called Phonetopia.The pop-up consists of interactive—and, of course, Instagrammable—vignettes inspired by the basics of mobile devices.The experience is free (with RSVP through Eventbrite) and open now through Nov. 24 in Visible’s home base of Denver, Colo.Phonetopia is Visible’s latest effort to engage with existing customers and make a memorable first impression on potential new members of the digital-only no-contract service, which launched in early 2018, according to CMO Minjae Ormes.“For Phonetopia, we asked ourselves: What happens if we show up in people’s lives in a surprising and unexpected way?
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