Richard Baty

Richard Baty

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Following 34
UK
IBM Security report shows breaches cost companies $188 per lost or stolen record on average in Saudi Arabia and UAE
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The story of an historic space mission told in photographs
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We pit Google's latest against Apple's budget contender.
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What if I told you all your favorite time-travel films and books were actually created by big tech in order to wrest control of the time-travel industry from the proletariat? Think about it. Back to the Future, The Terminator, The Time Machine, all of these stories share a central theme where traveling through time is a dangerous proposition that could destroy the very fabric of our reality. It’s called the butterfly effect. The big idea is that you’d step out of your time travel machine and accidentally step on a bug. Because this bug doesn’t exist… maybe a frog goes… This story continues at The Next Web
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An Indonesian fashion ecommerce startup shut down even though it was on track to profitability, and a Singapore-based fintech startup is gearing up for expansion.
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Facebook's Instagram acquisition has been the focus of an antitrust probe into the company.
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Amazon has rolled out free grocery deliveries to UK Prime members through Amazon Fresh.  Amazon Fresh is available in London and the south-east, but the service is expected to roll out nationwide by Christmas.  The service previously required a fee on top of Prime membership. Now, customers will not be charged delivery for grocery orders over £40 if they book a two-hour slot.  James Bailey, the new boss of British grocer Waitrose, told The Times that Amazon had pressed the "nuclear button" in the war for online shopping supremacy. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Amazon has announced free grocery deliveries for some Prime members in the UK through Amazon Fresh, in a move likened by the boss of grocer Waitrose to pressing the "nuclear button" in the war for online shopping supremacy. Prime members in more than 300 postcodes in and around London can now book free deliveries on orders over £40 ($51), Amazon said on Tuesday. It said it will expand Amazon Fresh to more UK cities by the end of the year. For a one-hour slot, Prime members will have to pay £3.99 ($5.18).  It also announced that customers in more than 40 UK postcodes can now get free same-day delivery for a two-hour slot, provided they book before 9.p.m.. Amazon Fresh's minimum order value has been lowered to £15 ($19) from £40 ($51).  The e-commerce giant has been selling groceries in the UK since its 2010 Grocery Store launch. It launched Amazon Fresh in 2016 in the UK, and until now, Prime members had to pay a monthly fee of either £3.99 ($5.18) for deliveries, or pay £2.99 ($3.88) per delivery, in addition to the annual £79 ($102) subscription fee for Prime. The move shows Amazon wants to grab a larger market share of UK online grocery shopping, which has boomed during the pandemic.  In reaction to the update, James Bailey, the new boss of British grocer Waitrose, told The Times that Amazon had pressed the "nuclear button." "In some ways Amazon will be very disruptive because they are ambitious in groceries and they have all sorts of technological expertise. It is more proof they are committed to this market and while this doesn't feel like a large leap forward, it is a signal of their intent." Retail sales in the UK jumped nearly 14% in June from May as the reopening of non-essential shops released pent-up demand, according to data from the Office of National Statistics.SEE ALSO: Jeff Bezos will tell Congress that Amazon's size is a good thing, and that it faces plenty of competition from rivals like Walmart: 'Just like the world needs small companies, it also needs large ones' Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
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Make your friend or family member’s birthday all the more special with the inclusion of a birthday banner in the festivities. You are sure to find one that your person of honor will be a fan of. Happy birthday banners are typically hung on a wall and go great with other decorations like streamers and […] The post The best happy birthday banners for a fun surprise party appeared first on 21Oak.
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Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images Staffers from Democrat Joe Biden’s presidential campaign must remove TikTok from personal and work phones, a campaign official told The Verge. That’s because of security concerns around the popular app. TikTok can access users’ clipboard content on iOS — potentially a problem for anyone using a password manager to log into secure accounts. Some politicians are particularly wary of TikTok because the video-sharing app is owned by Chinese internet company Bytedance. The White House is threatening a ban too The Biden campaign’s policy — first reported by Bloomberg — echoes that of other US government officials. The US departments of State and Homeland Security, the US Army, and the US Navy have already banned TikTok on government... Continue reading…
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Here's what to consider (and what to buy) before safely heading out on a multi-day cycling trip into the hinterlands.
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If the 1950s American South wasn't scary enough, the series adds a horde of monsters
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Affirm said on Wednesday it will power Shopify's buy now, pay later product, Shop Pay Installments, set to launch later this year. The partnership dramatically expands Affirm's reach to US consumers looking for an alternative to credit cards. Shopify has been on a product-launching spree, with a focus on ways to boost sales for its merchants. Offering a buy now, pay later option like Affirm can help retailers convert browsers to buyers online. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Shopify has been on a product-launching spree recently, moving beyond its e-commerce enabling software and eyeing more consumer-facing products.  In early May, it released a consumer-shopping app. Later that month it announced plans to roll out a new buy now, pay later feature for its merchants called Shop Pay Installments, set to go live later this year. On Wednesday, Affirm said that it will be Shopify's exclusive partner powering the buy now, pay later offering. "We're super excited to be part of Shopify's growth," Max Levchin, founder and CEO of Affirm, told Business Insider. Read more: POWER PLAYERS: Meet the 12 key execs driving Shopify, the breakout e-commerce star that's inking partnerships with Walmart and Facebook and seen its stock price triple since March Shopify powers over one million merchants, more than half of which are based in the US. That opens up a huge market of retailers, and in turn, shoppers, that Affirm will now have access to. "Tens of millions of US consumers are going to be exposed to Affirm, which is a huge leap for us in terms of just being visible," Levchin said. Currently, Affirm is available at check out for more than 6,000 merchants. Prior to the announcement, Affirm was available to Shopify merchants through its app store. But retailers needed to integrate Affirm's tech, which, at times, was more complicated.  By powering Shop Pay Installments, the integration on the merchant side will be more seamless, Levchin said. "You just flip the switch and off you go," Levchin said. "It eliminates all forms of complexity and makes it a choice for the merchant that's super easy." Affirm's brand will still be featured on Shop Pay Installments Often, fintechs will sell their tech to other companies, letting them rebrand it themselves. Startup Bread, for example, does this with its buy now, pay later tech, selling it directly to retailers. But with this partnership, Affirm's brand will still be featured on the Shop Pay Installments product. In fact, keeping Affirm's name was a sticking point for Levchin. "We get full credit and visibility. We actually insist. Part of the adherence of our mission is that people need to know who their heroes are," he said. "We are bringing transparent and honest financial products, and people need to know that it's us who are doing it." As they grow in stature, buy now, pay laters are increasingly considering their brand awareness. For example, Klarna recently announced a loyalty program for customers. Valued at $2.9 billion, Affirm has raised $800 million to-date from investors including Andreessen Horowitz, Lightspeed Venture Partners, and Spark Capital. See more: From Affirm to Klarna, buy now pay later startups are booming. But experts warn juggling explosive growth with responsible lending is a tricky balance. Levchin, who was a cofounder of PayPal, has been vocal about Affirm's 'mission of honest finance,' offering consumers a more transparent alternative to credit cards. As part of that, Affirm has never charged late fees. "We think it is incredibly important that we be transparent with our merchants and buyers," Kaz Nejatian, vice president and general manager of financial solutions at Shopify, told Business Insider in emailed comments. "Like Affirm, we believe that products that hide behind late fees and hidden fees are bad for everyone," he added. And Levchin says Affirm's commitment to working with its users that are unable to pay has been key to its success during recent months. "That's the brand Affirm stands for. We will work with you and treat you like a grown up," Levchin said. "Part of that requires the end customer knowing that they're dealing with Affirm, so we really have never white labeled." Offering buy now, pay later can help merchants boost sales Shopify's consumer-focused products — like its Shop app — are all about driving more business to the network of merchants running on its platform. And Shop Pay Installments is no exception. Offering a buy now, pay later product at checkout can help retailers increase sales and convert online browsers to buyers. Affirm, which already partners with brands like Casper and Peloton, says that it can increase average order values by 85% and up repeat purchase rates by 20%, as of May this year. Read more: Buy now, pay later startups are 'having a moment' — here's why retailers like Walmart and Target are betting on installment payments to keep consumers spending "We're looking forward to partnering with Affirm to power Shop Pay Installments in the U.S. for eligible merchants, helping them give their customers better shopping experiences while boosting their overall sales," Nejatian said. Affirm, in addition to other buy now, pay later players like Afterpay and Klarna, continue to see a growing number of consumers sign on for their products, often marketed as a more flexible alternative to credit cards. "Today's consumers want more flexibility when they're shopping and making purchasing decisions," Nejatian added. "By giving our merchants the ability to offer more payment choice and flexibility, we're helping them meet their customers' wants and needs." Read more Buy now, pay later startups are surging. But Affirm CEO Max Levchin says the industry will see a shakeout as the pandemic hits borrowers. $85 billion e-commerce giant Shopify is trying to make banks irrelevant for small businesses. Its chief product officer lays out why. Buy now, pay later startup Affirm just launched a high-yield account with an eye-popping rate. Its CEO explains why the startup wants to cater to both saving and splurging.SEE ALSO: POWER PLAYERS: Meet the 12 key execs driving Shopify, the breakout e-commerce star that's inking partnerships with Walmart and Facebook and seen its stock price triple since March SEE ALSO: Buy now, pay later startups are 'having a moment' — here's why retailers like Walmart and Target are betting on installment payments to keep consumers spending SEE ALSO: Shopify's general manager reveals its last-minute sprint to include a tool for a new app to help small merchants take on Amazon and Walmart during COVID-19 Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Leslie Odom, Jr.'s $500,000 gamble that led to a starring role in 'Hamilton'
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Using Twitter in Japan just got a lot more complicated. The country’s Supreme Court has ruled that users who retweet copyright-infringing images can have their details passed onto rightsholders — whether they knew the pic was in violation or not. In a decision handed down yesterday, the court ordered Twitter to turn over the email addresses of three users who allegedly retweeted a copyright-infringing image on the platform, TorrentFreak reports. The ruling dates back to a case from 2014, when a photographer spotted one of his photos had been scraped from his website and posted to Twitter without his consent.… This story continues at The Next Web
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The risk of nasty side effects in the Moderna and Oxford trials should be made clear now, before it ends up as fodder for the skeptics.
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China aims to be the third country to land on the red planet, but its space agency has been tight-lipped over the new mission.
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Officials in the three countries believe a state-linked group is trying to steal intellectual property and information about potential vaccine candidates.
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Microsoft this week held layoffs, in what a spokesperson characterized as a small number of job cuts across multiple business units. The cuts come in at less than 1,000 jobs, according to a person familiar with the situation.  Microsoft had about 156,000 employees as of the end of March, meaning that the cuts affected less than 0.64% of its global workforce. Earlier this week, Microsoft is said to have cut several roles at MSN.com, its online news portal, as it shifted to an AI-powered algorithmic feed. Some jobs were also cut in the Microsoft Azure cloud division, one source later told Business Insider. Are you a current or former Microsoft employee? Contact this reporter via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-425-344-8242) or email ([email protected]). Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Microsoft cut a small number of jobs relative to the size of its workforce this week as it transitions to a new fiscal year, the company confirmed. Microsoft has not issued a public statement on the layoffs, but a spokesperson said the cuts came across various teams and locations, without giving specifics. It's common, the spokesperson said, for Microsoft to re-evaluate its business as it enters a new fiscal year on July 1st.  The most recent cuts affected less than 1,000 jobs, a person familiar with the situation said. The company had 156,439 employees as of March 31, including 92,335 in the US and 55,513 in the Seattle area, where it's headquartered. That means that the cuts affected approximately 0.64% or less of its total workforce. Earlier this week, Microsoft is said to have laid off several workers at its MSN.com news portal as it shifts to an AI-powered algorithmic feed. Some jobs were also cut in the Microsoft Azure cloud division, one source later told Business Insider. Microsoft declined to comment on any cuts in the Azure division. Microsoft typically makes changes around this time. Perhaps the most significant of these changes came in the July of 2017 when the company reorganized its entire sales organization to focus on cloud computing, and laid off thousands of employees. This year, just prior to the end of Microsoft's fiscal year on June 30, Microsoft announced plans to close all of its physical retail locations and shut down its video game streaming service Mixer. In Mixer's case, Microsoft last month told Business Insider the company is "committed to redeploying people and technology across our team wherever possible." In announcing the store closures, Microsoft said in a press release: "the retail team members will serve consumers, small-business, education, and enterprise customers, while building a pipeline of talent with transferable skills."  Microsoft earlier this year also confirmed it froze hiring for some roles, except for in unspecific "strategic areas." The current status of the hiring freeze is unclear. "We continue to seek industry-leading talent in a range of disciplines as we continue to invest in certain strategic areas," a Microsoft spokesperson told Business Insider in April. "However, in light of the uncertainties presented by COVID-19, we are temporarily pausing recruitment for other roles." Got a tip? Contact Ashley Stewart via email at [email protected], message her on Twitter @ashannstew, or send her a secure message through Signal at 425-344-8242.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
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It's worth the extra $10 for this ebook reader to escape Amazon's stranglehold on our lives.
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All eyes may be on Ford’s new Bronco right now, but Jeep is aiming to remind us that the Wrangler is far from finished with its latest teaser. In the process, it’s serving up a reminder that though Ford has given Bronco enthusiasts most of what they were hoping from the venerable nameplate’s reboot, there’s one conspicuous thing missing. That’s … Continue reading
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Versatile Video Coding (VVC) could revolutionise the video streaming and telecoms industry by massively reducing the file size of encoded video.
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One of the biggest challenges of outdoor apparel is finding ways to effectively wick moisture away from the body, while also maintaining a high degree of wind and water resistance.But a European company called Kjus has introduced a new ski jacket that takes an innovative and technical approach to this problem by using a process called “electro-osmosis.”At first glance, the Kjus “Hydro_Bot” jacket, as the company styles it, looks a lot like many other ski jackets on the market.It features a helmet-compatible hood, strategically placed zippered pockets, and an athletic cut designed to keep skiers and snowboarders comfortable while on the slopes.However, inside that jacket is a new kind of membrane that promises to be a real game-changer when it comes to keeping the wearer warm and dry, both while being active and when standing still.What makes that membrane unique as compared to Gore-Tex or The North Face’s Futurelight fabrics is that it is surrounded by a layer of conductive material that allows it to become porous when a small electrical charge is passed through it.
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For a couple of years, LCD large display panels dominate the market probably because its cheaper and easy to handle.However, all that seems to be changing now.With the consistent need for innovation, the cost of AMOLED panels is no longer a concern and this is proving harmful for LCD display panels.Recent reports claim that between 2020 to 2024, global large-size LCD panel shipments will decline at a negative compound annual growth rate of 0.8%.This decline is a result of the preponderance of monitors, tablets, notebooks and 9-inch and above displays.In addition, the sale of small and medium-sized LCD panel shipments will reach 1.8 billion in 2024.
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Aircam is a new startup that allows anyone to get instant access to pictures taken by professional photographers at weddings, parties and other events.The company was founded by brothers Evan and Ryan Rifkin, who previously co-founded Burstly, the company behind mobile app-testing service TestFlight (which was acquired by Apple).“The process of finding a great photographer still sucks and the tools photographers use to share photos are antiquated for an industry worth over $10 billion,” said Upfront Ventures Managing Partner Mark Suster in a statement.“Aircam provides real-time, location-aware and enhanced photos that today’s consumers expect with booking simplicity that will change the current playing field.”The Rifkin brothers are pitching Aircam as “a real-time photo-sharing platform for professional and consumer photos.” To try out the technology, I visited the Aircam website and hit a button to see nearby photos.Then, as the Rifkins took photos with a DSLR camera, those photos appeared on the site nearly instantaneously.
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South Western Railway staff are about to strike for so long that it may be quicker to build a standalone rail line to run alongside the existing tracks and use that instead of trying to negotiate a solution, as workers are about to embark on a planned 27 days of action through December and January.SWR is striking with the support of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union, which is backing staff calls for bosses to reiterate their support for workers fulfilling the role of guard on the trains.That's it, it's entirely about staff not wanting a "Driver Controlled Operation" system introduced that may see guards one day replaced by robots, smart barriers, or a series of interns doing it for free and as much as they can eat from the buffet trolley instead.Workers allied with the union have been told to take the week off starting from December 2, and not to show up for 11 solid days between December 13 and 24, then again from December 27 until January 1.Basically train travel through December is entirely bollocksed if you're planning to go home to see your parents for Christmas, and they live in Bournemouth, Exeter, Southampton and all the other south-west-ish cities served by the franchise where mums and dads usually live.
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After toying with the idea of a smartwatch in the past, OnePlus could finally be making one.A tweet from TechPP writer Tech Auntyji seems to indicate that OnePlus has something brewing, with a reference to a fitness-related wearable.While the brand isn't mentioned outright, it's 'Never Settle' slogan was directly referenced, leaving little doubt as to which tech company was being hinted at.For all of you who have a fitness band right now, darlings, or are planning to acquire one shortly, I have two words: never settle.— Tech Auntyji (@techauntyji) November 2, 2019PhoneArena goes one step further, citing a leak the suggests the wearable - whether it's a fitness band or the smartwatch that was previously in development - will be launching alongside next year's OnePlus 8 in, which is expected to make its debut in May at the earliest.
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Keeping a brisk pace in its eternal quest to be as headache-inducing as possible, Facebook announced on Monday that it has rebranded as FACEBOOK.Facebook is now FACEBOOK, written in all caps in what looks quite like a slightly friendlier version of the vaguely authoritarian Futura typeface to capture some of that “Zuckerberg stamping on a human face, forever” energy.While the spelling hasn’t changed, we’d like to imagine that the proper pronunciation of the rebranded entity involves terrified screaming.According to the company’s blog post, written by chief marketing officer Antonio Lucio, the decision was made “to be clearer about the products that come from Facebook.” In practice, that means adding additional front-facing Facebook branding to products produced by subsidiary companies like Instagram, WhatsApp, and Oculus at a time when the company is staring down a steadily growing number of antitrust and anticompetition inquiries.Facebook has also announced efforts to further integrate WhatsApp, Instagram, and Facebook Messenger into one unified technical backend, triggering additional antitrust concerns (such as whether it is trying to score an end-run around regulators by making the company too difficult to break up).“This brand change is a way to better communicate our ownership structure to the people and businesses who use our services to connect, share, build community and grow their audiences,” Lucio wrote.
Sweden
the Investigation is linked to the acquisition of the social mediaappen Musically two years ago, and the details of Tiktok for them to censor content in order to appeal to the government in Beijing.the Tiktok in the united states quickly emerged as a favorite among the young americans.the App, which offers you the opportunity to share a short self-made videos, has 26.5 million monthly active users in the united states, of which 60 per cent are between the ages of 16 and 24 years of age.also, There is the question of how and where the Tiktok will store its data.the Company has previously said it is in the united states.for more information, see the tide has turned, after the Tiktoks success, to copy the west to China.
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