Robert Holloway

Robert Holloway

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Following 46
UK
A new leak has surfaced that sheds some highly desired information on the anticipated 2021 Dodge Durango SRT Hellcat. An alleged dealer order document has surfaced that claims the starting price for the Durango SRT Hellcat will be $80,995. That is most certainly a lot of coin for an SUV, but the Durango SRT Hellcat is anything but a typical … Continue reading
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New research from Check Point has revealed that Google and Amazon were were the most impersonated brands in Q2.
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Soon Pokemon GO will have the glorious oddity of the Mega Pokemon. This temporary evolution mechanic appeared with Generation VI and included necessary Mega Stones and specific stones for each individual Pokemon which could go Mega. Users will likely find Pokemon like Mewtwo, Lucario, Aggron, and Ampharos able to Mega evolve once this mechanic is active in Pokemon GO. Mega … Continue reading
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Having trouble locating Rapid's Rest to gather stone in Fortnite? This guide will show everything you'll need.
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As CNBC reports, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced at a press conference this Wednesday that the United States will establish a ‘Clean Network’. ... The post US Establishes ‘Clean Network’ to Completely Block Huawei and Other Chinese Companies appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The phone giant is stepping up its efforts to work with game makers after bringing Fortnite to its devices two years ago.
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NetherRealm Studios digs deep into the lore of Mortal Kombat.
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Humans are still our biggest cybersecurity weakness. Here's how to be smarter when it comes to avoiding scams through email and on your phone.
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The viral video-sharing app TikTok is currently facing a potential ban in the US over national-security risks due to its ties to China through its parent company, ByteDance. To prevent the ban from taking place, TikTok has been weighing a number of options, including "divesting" its operations in the US. Microsoft has emerged as a potential buyer. In a statement Monday to Reuters, ByteDance said it's "evaluating the possibility of establishing TikTok's headquarters outside of the US" to demonstrate it's "global company." The Sun reported ByteDance is set to announce it intends to establish TikTok's headquarters in London. Currently, TikTok's operations in London are based in a WeWork building. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. LONDON, Aug 3 (Reuters) - TikTok's headquarters may be established outside the United States, its Chinese parent company ByteDance said on Monday following a report that the video-sharing platform may move its operations to London. "ByteDance is committed to being a global company. In light of the current situation, ByteDance has been evaluating the possibility of establishing TikTok's headquarters outside of the US, to better serve our global users," a ByteDance spokesperson said. Britain's Sun newspaper reported on Monday that ByteDance would soon announce its intention to set up shop for TikTok in the British capital, where it would join other tech majors such as Google and Facebook who have a strong presence there. TikTok's offices in London are currently based out of a WeWork building, and the app's European hub is currently located in Dublin. However, TikTok doesn't have its own headquarters separate from ByteDance, whose main offices are in China. The possibility of establishing TikTok headquarters comes as uncertainty builds around how much longer ByteDance will run the app's operations in the US. The Trump administration has been threatening to ban the app in the US since early July over its ties to China. In the wake of a threatened ban, ByteDance has been exploring "divest" its US operations. Microsoft has emerged as a potential buyer. Recently, TikTok's valuation has been estimated between $30 billion and $50 billion. The app has more than 2.3 billion downloads worldwide, and a userbase in the US as high as 80 million.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why electric planes haven't taken off yet
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(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity
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This does indeed look like a television show that exists.
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According to the market research firm, TrendForce, the development of 5G smartphone has been quite explosive. This is possible because of the aggressive nature of ... The post Huawei to produce 74 million 5G phones this year – ranks first globally appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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I tested a $167,070 Porsche Cayenne GTS, from the latest generation of the groundbreaking SUV. The GTS trim level is intended to deliver sporty performance, sitting as it does between the base Cayenne and Cayenne Turbo. My 2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS had a twin-turbo V8 engine, making 453 horsepower. The Cayenne GTS is a very special set of wheels: expensive, but with the sort of prizefighter punch that rewards spirited driving — and the ability to haul enough luggage for a week on the road. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The Porsche Cayenne is the greatest SUV ever built by human hands on planet Earth. It shocked the motoring world with its unassailable greatness back in the early 2000s, and it's continued to dazzle over the decades. The third generation ute was a runner-up for Business Insider's 2019 Car of the Year award. After launching the base version and later the Turbo trim level and the coupé body styles, Porsche has turned its attention to the sporty Cayenne GTS, now available as an SUV and a coupé (that means the coupé version gets a fastback-style roofline). I got a crack at the car after driving quite a few Porsches in quick succession: the new 911 4S and Turbo S, as well as the Cayenne Coupé. For what it's worth, I still had memories of the Cayenne Turbo from last year. So when the 2021 GTS landed, in a dazzling "Carmine Red" paint job, I was already swimming in Stuttgart goodness and eager for more. Here's how two days with the sports car of Cayennes went:FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! My 2021 Porsche Cayenne GTS tester wore a glorious Carmine Red paint job, a $3,150 extra. The SUV started at $107,300, but a long list of options raised the sticker to $167,070. I gotta tell you, against a backdrop of Northeastern summertime greenery, that red absolutely pops. I personally prefer the silhouette of the SUV body-style over the coupé, but there's no question that the ute form is boxier. The Cayenne has never been an attractive vehicle, but it can't be mistaken for anything but a Porsche. It's all about those distinctive headlights. Bug-eyes? Well, sure, but the swept-back design somewhat mitigates that effect. These are high-tech units: LED "Matrix Design" lamps, equipped with technology that Porsche says enables the lights to adapt to oncoming traffic and bend illumination around corners. Black and red are two colors that always get along nicely, and for the Cayenne GTS, there is no exception. The front vents and grilles give the SUV an aggressive forward presentation. The grille is really a study in minimalist design — a choice that helps to conceal a sensor for the adaptive cruise control system and a front camera. The ride height has been dropped 30 millimeters lower than on the Cayenne S, according to Porsche. This enhances airflow at speed, but owners can use the air suspension to increase ride height over uneven terrain. The Porsche badge brings a modest splash of gold to the hood. Let's unlatch the hood and have a gander at the engine. The Cayenne GTS rocks a 4.0-liter, twin-turbocharged V8 engine, making 453 horsepower with 457 pound-feet of torque. The power is sent to the all-wheel-drive system through an eight-speed automatic transmission with a manual mode. The EPA hasn't yet rated the Cayenne GTS for fuel economy, but I found the punchy V8 to be moderately thirsty; in two days worth of driving, I managed to incinerate almost a half a tank of premium petrol. A steering-wheel-mounted selector enables you to switch drive modes: Comfort, Sport, Sport +, and Individual. The 22-inch "Sport Classic" wheels, in glossy black and brushed alloy tones, evoke an iconic Porsche design, familiar to fans of the cars from the 1980s. These snazzy wheels were, as you might expect, are an expensive extra: $2,770. The yellow calipers? Get ready to write a big check, as they were ... ... $9,080, with ceramic-composite, ventilated discs all the way around. The Yokohama rubber came ready to run. These tires are rated for speeds above 149 mph — a good thing, as the Cayenne GTS can max out at 160. Now for the back end. Sigh. You just can't solve the inherent design problem of adapting a bulbous Porsche rear to a vehicle genre that requires a barn door at is hindquarters. The integrated spoiler helps with performance more than with aesthetics. The hatch carries all the identifiers you need to explain why you dropped almost $170,000 on a ute. The Cayenne GTS has quad pipes, the better to tune its epic exhaust note. The compensation for an ungainly rump is a large cargo hold. With the back seats in use, there's 27 cubic feet to work with; drop the back seats and that increases to 60 cubic feet. Porsche interiors aren't overtly luxurious, nor are they supposed to be. But the Cayenne GTS's has something else going for it: sporty touches. The GTS invites you in. Carmine red topstitching on the black leather seats matches the exterior, as does the GTS call-out. (The seats are comfy for cruising, yet also sufficiently bolstered for spirited driving.) The feature is echoed on the rear seats. Interior highlights are subdued in their elegance. The grab handle is rendered in Alcantara. Note that there's one each, for the driver and passenger. A large moonroof fills the cabin with light. The joystick shifter is par for the course in the luxury segment. I don't much care for these things, but I'm used to them by now. Rear seat passengers can manage their own climate. In fact, my Porsche Cayenne GTS tester was fully outfitted for rear-seat entertainment, an offbeat option for what's supposed to be a high-performance trim. The system runs on an Android interface and provides assorted entertainment choices, none of which I was able to sample in the brief time I had with the vehicle. Rear legroom is ... decent. I was able to stretch out, but I'm also not very tall. A less vertically-challenged adult might feel cramped. The steering wheel has a fantastic feel, wrapped in suede and with all critical functions close at hand. The sport-chronograph lives in the center of the dash — and carries the red from the exterior over into the instrumentation. See what I mean? The tachometer is of course front and center. The Cayenne GTS's redline is at 6,800 rpm. To the right is a screen that can display different types of information, including g-forces. Porsche's infotainment system is quite good, although it isn't the best. It's outdone by Audi (which is Porsche's corporate VW Group stablemate). GM's Cadillac is also better on the infotainment front. But the system checks all the right boxes, from Bluetooth pairing to USB device connectivity to GPS navigation. There's also wireless charging. A Burmester 3D audio system added $7,000 to the final tally. Worth it? Oh yes. This is one of the top systems on the market. So what's the verdict? I am an unapologetic Cayenne-o-phile. So the GTS — with its sportier vibe compared with the less-powerful Coupé I drove earlier this year, and the Cayenne Turbo from last year, which had a stonking 541-horsepower interpretation of the V8 — is right up my alley. Essentially, what we have with the GTS is the Cayenne that critics feared the SUV wouldn't be: a very fast (0-60 in about 4.5 seconds) four-door Porsche with a big ol' cargo hold. It corners like it's on rails (rear-axle steering lends an assist) and it can drop the hammer in a straight line. On certain American highways, favored by freight carriers, you can pass semis all day long and feel the bottomless oomph that the GTS's magnificent engine produces, never laggy, always ready to punch like a prizefighter. Obviously, if you like to drive, get this Cayenne. My tester was notably expensive, but it was optioned into next week. The base price, at just north of $100,000, gives quite similar dynamics, with less punishment directed at the bank account. Then again, even at almost $170,000, this is lotsa-lotsa-lotsa machine for the money. A Lamborghini Urus has a 641-horsepower V8 under the hood and came in at $250,000 when I tested it last year — but it honestly wasn't as much fun to pilot as the GTS. These days, the high-performance SUV space is full of choices. Back when the Cayenne first arrived, it wasn't. The joke then was, "Great, just what I was asking for — a slow Porsche!" But the Cayenne was, indisputably, no joke. And the new GTS proves that, as with the new generation of the 911, Porsche's engineers can somehow continue to make not just good, better — but great, greater.  Decades ago, Porsche essentially made one great car, the 911. But nowadays, the lineup includes multiple sports cars, plus the Panamera sedans (and wagons), as well as the all-electric Taycan and the venerable Cayenne and its smaller sibling, the Macan. Having now driven several examples of the new-generation Cayenne, I can safely say that the GTS in particular proves that Porsche can do it all. Tom Cruise was right. There is no substitute.
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The 12-issue limited series will be out in October.
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(King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST)) Collisions of tiny air bubbles with water surfaces can reveal fundamental characteristics of foamy mixtures.
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This tutorial will show you how to make a game in Python using the popular Pygame.
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Details start to emerge on real-world impact of Prez-signed secret memo The CIA is running a secret cyberwar including Russian-style hack-and-leak operations with little or no oversight, US officials have warned.…
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The popular music streaming service is launching in 13 new Eastern European markets.
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Wormable bug patch landing The post “Wormable” CVSS 10 Windows Server Vulnerability Patch Lands appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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Hello everyone! Welcome to this weekly roundup of Business Insider stories from executive editor Matt Turner. Please subscribe to Business Insider here to get this newsletter in your inbox every Sunday. Hello! One-click checkout startup Fast raised $20 million from investors including Index Ventures and fintech Stripe in May. On Tuesday Fast's cofounder and CEO Domm Holland, and Jan Hammer, general partner at Index Ventures, will chat with Shannen Balogh about how to build a pitch deck, and what it takes to win over investors. Sign up for the digital event here: SIGN UP NOW: On Tuesday we're talking to Fast CEO Domm Holland about how he crafted the perfect pitch to raise $20 million from top investors Separately: You can now get the top healthcare stories delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here.  Starting this week, you can get the top stories in advertising and media delivered daily to your inbox. Sign up here.  Read on for more on Jeffrey Epstein's little black book, Gen Z day traders, an energy CEO who may face charges for pulling a gun, and the top stories you might have missed. Jeffrey Epstein's little black book There are more than 1,500 people listed in Jeffrey Epstein's infamous little black book, Angela Wang reported this week. Now you can search them all. From her story: Among them are royalty and nobility, celebrities and academics, art collectors and hedge funders, politicians and heads of state: a motley compendium of global high society. Business Insider has transcribed and tabulated the black book in its entirety, making the entries in the late sex offender's notorious Rolodex fully searchable for the first time. You can search Business Insider's database right here: There are 1,510 people in Jeffrey Epstein's little black book. Now you can search them all for the first time. Angela also compiled a dataset of every known flight made by Jeffrey Epstein's private jets. Per her story, the sex offender owned a Gulfstream IV, a Gulfstream GV-SP, and a Boeing 727 nicknamed the "Lolita Express."  We compiled every known flight made by Jeffrey Epstein's fleet of private planes. Search them all for the first time. Gen Z day traders Joe Mecane, the head of execution services at Citadel Securities, said this week that retail investors have accounted for as much as 25% of the stock market's activity in recent months, Ben Winck reported. Robinhood added more than 3 million new accounts in the first quarter alone, meanwhile, and as Ben reported, posts on investing forums have topped Reddit's "popular" page. From Ben's story: As the stock market attempted to claw back from multiyear lows spurred by the coronavirus outbreak, retail investors flooded the market with speculative bets and improbable picks. They bought struggling airline and cruise stocks in droves. They rushed into shares of tiny biotechs offering faint hopes of a COVID-19 vaccine. They even piled into shares of Hertz, a bankrupt company whose stock is viewed as worthless in the long run. He talked to two Gen Z day traders to find out what makes them tick. You can read his story here: Wall Street is being shaken to its core by a legion of Gen Z day traders. From a casual hobbyist to a 20-year-old running a 14,000-person platform, meet the new generation of retail investors. Elsewhere in investing news: The most accurate tech analyst on Wall Street says these 6 stocks have potential for huge gains as they transform the sector Bank of America identifies 3 indicators that could make or break the stock market this summer – and warns they're all deteriorating fast UBS has compiled an investing playbook for all the possible election outcomes. Here are the 6 trades it recommends to profit from a Trump triumph — and 10 for a Biden blue wave. Energy CEO may face charges From Dakin Campbell:  A senior executive at a Colorado company backed by Apollo Global Management may face charges over pulling a gun on a Mexican American couple that took a wrong turn onto his property.  Paul Favret, the CEO of Resource Energy, may be charged with two counts of menacing and two counts of false imprisonment, according to an arrest warrant issued for Favret that was seen by Business Insider.  "After being made aware of this last week, Resource Energy Partners placed Mr. Favret on administrative leave and retained outside counsel to conduct a thorough review of the incident," a company spokesman said. You can read the story in full here: The CEO of an Apollo-backed energy company may face charges for pulling a gun on a Mexican American couple that took a wrong turn near his Colorado home Below are headlines on some of the stories you might have missed from the past week. — Matt Billions of dollars are gushing through Election 2020. Here are 9 things you need to know, including who's winning in the Trump vs Biden main event. 'Hamilton' creator Lin-Manuel Miranda's best advice for juggling projects, meeting deadlines, and never throwing away your shot A growing group of lenders are looking to unload hundreds of millions of dollars of souring hotel loans. Teams hired to sell the portfolios say it's just the beginning of a surge in activity. These 11 people should grow from rich to richer if Palantir has a successful IPO Inside the legal industry's reaction as it deals with the messy optics of white-shoe law firms taking PPP money WeWork faces 3 new discrimination and harassment lawsuits, including a complaint that says a manager brought knives and a crossbow to work 16 top tech leaders who came to the US from around the world explain their forceful opposition to Trump's freeze on immigrant work visas: 'It's only going to make America less competitive' I tried the McKinsey problem-solving game every candidate has to beat to land a 6-figure job at the firm. Here's what you need to know to prepare for the test and impress recruiters. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
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A massive, intense heat wave is settling over the continental US. The ravages of the Covid pandemic are going to make it all the more deadly.
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A man's medication for alcohol dependence caused him to have a strange reaction to hand sanitizer, according to a new report of the case.
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Pinterest is saving and kids are misbehaving, but first, a cartoon about a robot's biggest challenge.Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less.Want to receive this two-minute roundup as an email every weekday?How wily teens outwit bathroom vape detectorsSchools around the country are starting to use vape detectors to catch kids using ecigarettes—but like many things built to try to contain kids, they aren't working.From exhaling the smoke into their backpack or sleeves, to simply running out of the bathroom before administrators can catch them mid-puff, kids are making the thousands of dollars schools spend on these things seem like a bit of a waste.
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But in recent years, fuelled by the fervour of enhancement-obsessed online communities and an economic arrangement that incentivises a perma-primed brain, a whole new class of nootropics has come to wider attention: some of these nootropics, like the class of drugs known as racetams, can be bought in many gas stations.The question hanging over all of these drugs – prescribed and over-the-counter – is: do they actually work?Forget the fake “nootropic stacks,” the phenylpiracetams, and other pretenders which carry labels with words like “nootropic,” “cognitive enhancement,” “smart drug,” and so on.There is little or no good evidence that any of those products work.When I say that smart drugs work, I’m talking about the real deal: modafinil, methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, and (somewhat less common) pseudoephedrine, as well as (rather annoyingly) paracetamol, codeine, and a range of other medications we typically think of as treatments for diseases and disorders.When the ability to do those things is viewed as a marker of smartness – or when using that ability leads to the acquisition of things or qualities that are viewed as markers of smartness – then we call those medications “smart drugs.”
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Sword and Shield aren't the first Pokemon games developed specifically for the Switch.They follow Pokemon Let's Go: Pikachu and Let's Go: Eevee, reimagined versions of 1998's well-regarded Pokemon Yellow.I can't believe I'm saying this, but in Gen 8 the grass-type Pokemon actually looks the coolest.There are some run-of-the-mill types, like Wooloo, that you don't need to fuss over.Following a feature introduced in Pokemon Sun and Moon, the Gelar region will have it's own variations of generations-old Pokemon.This Pokemon switches between two forms that are apparently related to how hungry it is: "full belly mode" is its happy one, but it also has a "hangry"mode.
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The impeachment hearings against US President Donald Trump start today in Washington, D.C. at 10 am local time, which is 3pm for us.Thanks to the wonders of the internet, we can watch it all unfold on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and more, with our links below.The central question at today’s hearings is whether President Trump tried to get the President of Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky, to open an investigation into Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden.But the U.S. State Department intervened, releasing the aid just days before Zelensky was scheduled to announce the sham investigation on CNN.Today’s witnesses in front of the House Intelligence Committee will be Ambassador William B. Taylor Jr., the top American diplomat in Ukraine, and George Kent, the deputy assistant secretary at the State Department for European and Eurasian affairs.And Kent testified privately that Trump, “wanted nothing less than President Zelensky to go to the microphone and say, ‘investigation,’ ‘Biden’ and ‘Clinton.’”
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Meanwhile Facebook appears to have shot itself in the footUp is down and down is up when it comes to one of the most important, and now controversial, US legal protections for internet companies.Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act gives internet platforms blanket legal protections concerning the content posted by others on, or through, their services.Until recently it was a holy cow: untouchable and frequently praised as the reason that companies like Google and Facebook were able to exist in the first place.But as those internet giants have grown increasingly disliked - in no small part thanks to them imagining themselves to be immune to normal legal pressures - so lawmakers have grown tired of the catchall get-out-of-jail card.“You can’t just say anything at all and not acknowledge it when you know something is fundamentally not true.”
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TLDR: The Blurams Dome Pro packs the AI and advanced features of a much more expensive home security camera, but it’s only $49.99.Top flight home security systems usually come with top flight prices in the hundreds, sometimes thousands of dollars.So when you see a home security camera priced under $50, it’s easy to assume it’s probably a stripped down model with only a few of the advanced features available today.However, the Blurams Dome Pro is a rare exception to that rule.In fact, you usually can’t find it under $50, but with this limited time offer, TNW Deals is knocking $10 off the regular price, bringing your cost down to only $49.99.This indoor cam, which can be set on a tabletop or wall-mounted, connects to WiFi via its app and is ready for use in minutes.
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The cofounder of WhatsApp and the Signal Foundation thinks the use of encrypted communications tools will only increase in the future.“There’s a global education that’s happening,” says Brian Acton, who left WhatsApp in 2018 and now chairs the non-profit foundation, which promotes open-source, end-to-end encryption in messaging.“Back in the ‘90s, we all got the same hoax emails, and we all learned to ignore them.Today, privacy is becoming a much more mainstream discussion.People are asking questions about privacy, and they want security and privacy built into the terms of service.”Acton spoke onstage with WIRED writer Steven Levy on Friday at the WIRED25 conference in San Francisco.
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