Rodney Edson

Rodney Edson

Followers 46
Following 44
US
This is the first of many battery-powered vehicles that the Detroit-based automaker will introduce in the coming years.
UK
The Google Pixel 4a seems to be a hit with cost-conscious smartphones users after preorders sell out on Amazon.
US
(Center of Diagnostics and Telemedicine) Experts from the Center for Diagnostics and Telemedicine have developed a platform for self-testing services which is based on artificial intelligence and designed for medical tasks, such as for analyzing diagnostic images. The first working prototype of the platform is hosted on the popular GitHub service, and developers from all over the world can take part in its improvement by adding verification criteria depending on the purpose of the services.
US
Samsung braved uncharted territory with the Galaxy Buds Live, at a time when everyone is following Apple's lead.
China
Xiaomi continues to expand its line of devices with new smartphones. But now the changes are really important and useful. At least, many were definitely ... The post The price of the budget Redmi 9C smartphone with NFC has appeared appeared first on Gizchina.com.
US
It looks the same, but the 27-inch all-in-one iMac changes just about everything on the inside, adding a camera with decent specs and a nanotexture screen option.
UK
While we wait for Tesla and Elon Musk to concoct a truly affordable, mass-market electric vehicle, Chinese EV maker Kandi Technologies recently unveiled the K27 and K23. Both EVs are poised to become the cheapest and most affordable electric vehicles in the US, and both are arriving this August. Early last year, Kandi got approval from the National Highway Traffic … Continue reading
UK
It's not perfect, but it's about the closest we've come so far.
US
Identity matters in open source, but not how you might think. For example, Lili Cosic works for Red Hat, and she’s also a maintainer within the Kubernetes community, responsible for kube-state-metrics. While Red Hat encourages Cosic in her Kubernetes work, they don’t control her involvement. Open source is a separate, personal thing. Or, as Cosic described it in an interview, in open source “You always wear the corporate hat, but you wear a maintainer hat and you always want to make sure you separate that.”But getting to wear that open source hat at all? That started long before when she was 13 and her mother bought her a computer, leading to development of “small things like scripts or web pages or things like that.” Her coding didn’t stop there, however, and it’s worth understanding the process by which she became a Kubernetes maintainer, and how her employment with Red Hat relates to it.To read this article in full, please click here
US
President Trump threatened Wednesday to use executive orders to "bring fairness" to the tech industry, if Congress didn't do it. The tweeted threat came as the House of Representatives prepared to host the CEOs of the biggest companies in the industry for a hearing on antitrust concerns. It was unclear what Trump meant when he said "bring fairness" to the industry. It's also unclear what exactly Trump could actually accomplish with an executive order to address "fairness" or antitrust concerns. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. As the House of Representatives prepared to host the CEOs of the biggest technology companies as part of a hearing about antitrust concerns, President Trump threatened to take matters into his own hands if Congress didn't "bring fairness" to the industry. In a tweet Wednesday afternoon, Trump criticized Congress for not taking action against the tech giants "years ago." He pledged to use executive orders to address the situation, if the body didn't act itself. "In Washington, it has been ALL TALK and NO ACTION for years, and the people of our Country are sick and tired of it!" he said in the tweet. https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1288506554585505793 It wasn't immediately clear what the president meant when he said Congress should "bring fairness" to the industry, or how exactly he could address that situation with executive orders. A White House representative did not immediately respond to an email seeking clarification about Trump's tweet. In May, Trump issued an executive order that threatened penalties against social media companies that he accused of banning or limiting speech based on their users' political views. The move came after many of those companies banned far-right users for violating their terms of service. The congressional hearing, however, is supposed to focus on issues related to competition, not about how the particular companies treat the speech of their users. While Congress could update the competition and monopoly laws — and some experts have called on it to do just that — enforcement of those laws is generally up to the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission, both of which are under the control of Trump appointees. Those agencies have drawn criticism for decades of lax enforcement of the antitrust laws and for approving mergers that have reduced competition in particular industries. Got a tip about Big Tech? Contact Troy Wolverton via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @troywolv, or send him a secure message through Signal at 415.515.5594. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop.SEE ALSO: The CEOs of Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon are about to testify before Congress in a historic antitrust hearing. Here's what's at stake for each company. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
UK
Fortnite players have been anticipating the eventual arrival of a new Point of Interest (POI) that will be called ‘Atlantis.’ As you’d expect, Atlantis will be the home of Aquaman, the superhero featured as the main theme in Chapter 2 – Season 3. Though we don’t have official details on Atlantis — the teasers in the launch trailer aside — … Continue reading
US
Figure out if Apple Arcade, Xbox Game Pass or another gaming subscription service is worth your time and money this summer.
US
Anyone can download and use Skype to video chat live or make a regular voice call. Best of all, it's free.
China
There was a time when Huawei’s Maimang series smartphones have almost no equals on the market. Of course, we are talking about the niche it ... The post Huawei Maimang 9 Smartphone With A 5G Support Officially Uncovered appeared first on Gizchina.com.
US
WIRED Tested. Whether you're riding a bike or schlepping around a camera, these professional backpacks do the job right.
US
Maisie Williams says playing Rahne Sinclair/Wolfsbane is a welcome change from playing Arya Stark on Game of Thrones.
UK
The newest branch of the United States military is the US Space Force. The logo and motto for the new branch of the armed services has been unveiled and can be seen below. The motto is Semper Supra, which means “Always Above.” That’s a fitting motto for a space force. The symbol for the new branch is the Delta, which … Continue reading
UK
Psyonix, makers of the insane soccer-but-with-RC-cars game, Rocket League, announced that it’s making the popular title free-to-play later this summer — five years after its launch. While the game is available across consoles and PC platforms, the announcement only mentions details about the PC version. Rocket League will continue to be available for free on Steam until the new version launches in the Epic Games Store — and it’ll support play between these platforms. So what’s changing, besides the price tag? Psyonix says it’ll “make exploring the game easier” by revamping menus, and improving major features like Tournaments and Challenges. It’s… This story continues at The Next Web
UK
Reports of sudden cardiac deaths linked to COVID-19 have been circulating since the early days of the pandemic. The reason has long been described as myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle that can result from viral infections. However, a number of autopsies performed on victims of the respiratory disease have revealed that the novel coronavirus isn’t causing the typical, … Continue reading
US
Research lab OpenAI released a "natural language generation" tool called GPT-3 that learns from a massive set of data to write impressively human-like text. GPT-3 can account for tone and context to write in conversational or formal English. Developers have been using GPT-3 to write creative fiction, design websites, and write business proposals with very little indication a robot created them. But even the most advanced AI tool raises concerns around biased language and ways the technology could be used to spread hate and misinformation. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories OpenAI, a major artificial intelligence research lab, released a new tool to select developers last week that can automatically create written passages that are nearly indistinguishable from those written by humans, and developers are already stunned by how well it can code, mimic famous authors, and write business memos.  GPT-3, as the tool is called, is the group's third iteration of a "natural language generation" model — an algorithm that can look for patterns in massive datasets of human-created text and spit out entire sentences and paragraph in a writing style that reflects those patterns (in other words, in plain-English). Language generation models and the applications they power are already used widely. For example, Google's Smart Compose uses these models to help users autocomplete sentences in Gmail and the Associated Press writes quarterly earnings stories and sports reports using them, too. But the results these tools produce are often clunky, awkward, or unnatural due to limitations with the underlying data or the language model itself. "Historically, natural language generation systems have lacked some nuance," said Carolyn Rose, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University's Language Technologies Institute. But GPT-3 seems different. Based on early reactions, GPT-3 has blown past existing models thanks to its massive dataset and its use of 175 billion parameters — rules the algorithm relies on to decide which word should come next to mimic conversational English. By comparison, the previous version, GPT-2, utilized 1.5 billion parameters, and the next most powerful model — from Microsoft — has 17 billion parameters. OpenAI published the technical specifications of GPT-3 in May, but opened it up an application programming interface to select developers last week. Developers on Twitter were amazed by the powerful capabilities of the tool and quickly started experimenting: GPT3 can code a website based on plain English descriptions, write sonnets that mimic Shakespeare's works, and explain OpenAI's research paper on this subject better than this article can (maybe). It was described as a "groundbreaking" new model that could end up making people's jobs easier (or even obsolete).  "Every bit of the hype is deserved, and it's worth wrestling with each of the big questions raised," investor Chris Sacca tweeted. German artist Mario Klingemann fed the tool examples of different authors and GPT-3 created paragraphs-long, stylistically-similar, coherent stories. Another attempt at a longer piece. An imaginary Jerome K. Jerome writes about Twitter. All I seeded was the title, the author's name and the first "It", the rest is done by #gpt3Here is the full-length version as a PDF:https://t.co/d2gpmlZ1T5 pic.twitter.com/1N0lNoC1eZ — Mario Klingemann (@quasimondo) July 18, 2020   "People are seeing this perhaps as harbinger of some huge change in natural language processing, coding, what have you," Oren Etzioni, CEO of the Allen Institute, a Seattle-based nonprofit research lab. The tool builds upon all of its predecessors, and 30 years of AI research and experimentation: "Whether it's significant or not is still an open question, but it's certainly impressive," he said.  Because it's an available as an API, it can democratize experimentation, he added. "Pople who don't have the resources — both computational and the expertise to build and train these models — could potentially use it," he said.  While GPT-3 isn't a "new frontier" in AI, it could still lead to huge improvements for automatically generated text, Rose said. For example, it could make text-to-speech tools, like voice instructions from Google or Apple Maps, "less annoying" to listen to. GPT-3 still isn't perfect, to be sure. When developer Kevin Lacker administered the Turing test — a test meant to see if the AI could trick someone into thinking it was human — he came to the conclusion that "GPT-3 is quite impressive in some areas, and still clearly subhuman in others." For example, when he asked "How do you sporgle a morgle?" GPT-3 responded, "You sporgle a morgle using a sporgle." Even Sam Altman, OpenAI's CEO, was cautious about GPT-3: The GPT-3 hype is way too much. It’s impressive (thanks for the nice compliments!) but it still has serious weaknesses and sometimes makes very silly mistakes. AI is going to change the world, but GPT-3 is just a very early glimpse. We have a lot still to figure out. — Sam Altman (@sama) July 19, 2020     GPT-3 also puts a spotlight back on existing ethical concerns surrounding AI-powered tools as well OpenAI itself. OpenAI was launched in 2015 by tech industry titans including Elon Musk, Peter Thiel, and Sam Altman, and originally preached a gospel of accountability and transparency around its work. However, Musk criticized OpenAI earlier this year, saying it should be more open about its work, and MIT Technology Review's Karen Hao reported that the company has a culture of secrecy that runs counter to its public image. It originally chose not to make the predecessor to GPT-3 — GPT-2 — available because it could be used to create realistic fake news stories, though it later reversed this decision. The Allen Institute's Etzioni did say that GPT-3's ability to mimic speech so well may make it harder to spot fake content. "The question 'Is this text or image or video or email authentic?' is going to become increasingly difficult to answer just based on the content alone," he said.  GPT-3 has also reignited concerns about the tendency of artificial intelligence to display sexist or racist biases or blind-spots. Because artificial intelligence models learn based on the data provided to them, they can end up exaggerating human biases. For example, the head of Facebook's AI program tweeted about how GPT-3 returned biased results from single-word prompts like "Jew," "women," or "Black" when trained on real tweets.  #gpt3 is surprising and creative but it’s also unsafe due to harmful biases. Prompted to write tweets from one word - Jews, black, women, holocaust - it came up with these (https://t.co/G5POcerE1h). We need more progress on #ResponsibleAI before putting NLG models in production. pic.twitter.com/FAscgUr5Hh — Jerome Pesenti (@an_open_mind) July 18, 2020   "In the end, the process that's happening is totally mechanical." Rose said. "It doesn't have values. It doesn't know what's beautiful."Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: A cleaning expert reveals her 3-step method for cleaning your entire home quickly
China
The appointment comes after Gojek's former CTO Ajey Gore stepped down last month.
UK
Nearly 220,000 merchants globally are still using Magento 1, despite the e-commerce platform reaching its end of life.
US
Amazon Web Services sued Brian Hall, a former marketing vice president, for taking a similar job at Google Cloud. There's been no official update in the case, but a tweet from Hall — and an update to his LinkedIn profile — seems to indicate he's been cleared to work. Are you a current or former Amazon Web Services employee? Contact this reporter via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-425-344-8242) or email ([email protected]). Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Brian Hall, the former Amazon Web Services cloud marketing vice president whom the company sued for taking a similar job at Google Cloud, appears to be cleared to work. AWS sued Hall for allegedly violating a noncompete agreement, seeking to prevent him for working for a competitor for 18 months after leaving Amazon. Hall in court documents said he believed the agreement would not be enforced. While there was no update in court documents related to the case, late Thursday night, Hall tweeted, in part, "THANK YOU to all of the people who have supported me in the last few months. @charlesfitz [Charles Fitzgerald, a noncompete critic who supported Hall] I think you can retire the #freebrianhall tag now. I won't say much more..." Hall also appears to have updated his title on his LinkedIn profile from "VP in purgatory, Google Cloud" to "VP, product and industry marketing, Google Cloud." Amazon Web Services declined to comment in response to a request about whether a settlement has been reached. A representative for Hall has yet to respond to a request for comment.  Hall's case is the third high-profile lawsuit of its type filed by Amazon in recent memory, following the company's lawsuits against a sales executive who took a job at Google Cloud, and a former technology vice president who left to work at Seattle-area collaboration software company Smartsheet. The most recent lawsuit renewed controversy over noncompete agreements. Critics have charged Amazon's agreements are too broad, and applied inconsistently and even punitively. Ultimately, these critics say, the practice of suing former employees could hurt Amazon's ability to recruit the talent it needs to stay competitive. Got a tip? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message her on Twitter @ashannstew, or send her a secure message through Signal at 425-344-8242.SEE ALSO: Amazon's lawsuit against a former exec is shining a spotlight on its use of noncompete agreements — a practice that critics say is unfair and will scare away talent Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
US
One small step for cells, one giant leap for science
US
Culture secretary Oliver Dowden has informed MPs of the government’s decision to ban Huawei from the UK’s 5G networks. The Chinese vendor’s equipment must be removed from Britain’s networks by 2027 but operators are banned from purchasing Huawei’s equipment from 31st December. “This has not been an easy decision, but it is the right one... Read more » The post Huawei has been officially banned from the UK’s 5G networks appeared first on Telecoms Tech News.
China
It’s too difficult to put larger capacity battery inside a smartphone. So smartphone manufacturers have decided to go the other way. As you can see, ... The post Smartphone Battery Fast Charging Speed Doubled, Reaching 100W+ appeared first on Gizchina.com.
US
Final Fantasy VII and Trials of Mana both have problems portraying people of color.
UK
Tesla CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter earlier today to let the world know that there is not going to be a cheaper version of the Model Y. Prior to the launch of the Model Y, Tesla said that it would effectively mirror the pricing structure of its Model 3 sedan. The only difference would be a price bump of around $5,000 at each spec level. However, that’s not going to be the case as Musk says the range of a more affordable “standard range” Model Y would be “too low,” Electrek reports. [Read: Honda to buy a tiny stake… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Tesla
US
As grocery stores worldwide experienced stockpiling, long lines, and health worries amid the coronavirus pandemic, millions of people turned to shopping online. It has been a goldrush for the British company Ocado, an online-only grocery marketplace that also operates technology for supermarket giants worldwide. Ocado was the best performing stock on the FTSE 100 in the second quarter of 2020, and, in May, Ocado raised over $1 billion to grow its services. It is now betting big on its US expansion, hoping to convert Americans to grocery shopping online. Huge challenges remain, though. Many Americans are still reluctant to buy food they can't see in person, and some fear the current online pandemic-driven boom could prove a one-off. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The coronavirus pandemic has forced even those most resistant to digital change to give ground, and e-commerce is burgeoning like never before. Trapped at home, or faced with hours waiting only to find empty shelves, more people than ever are turning to online grocery shopping. "There is pretty strong evidence that that is here to stay," Luke Jensen, executive director of the Ocado Group and CEO of Ocado Solutions, told Business Insider. Ocado is a household name in British cities, but its business is largely unknown elsewhere. A British success story The company's work is twofold. There is Ocado Retail, which sells groceries and other supermarket products to consumers online. The second aspect is Ocado Solutions, which provides technology to the online operations of major global supermarkets like Kroger in the US, Sobeys in Canada, and Waitrose in the UK. The company, which was founded in 2002, does not expect to turn a profit until 2024. It has high running costs, a sky-high share price, and a price-to-earnings ratio to match.  In short, it's now acting like less an online retailer and more like a tech giant. Its share price hit a record £22.36 ($28) on June 1, and the company has turned out to be the best performing stock on the FTSE 100 in the second quarter of 2020, boasting a 66% rise. Ocado first set out as an online grocer, boxing and delivering orders for Waitrose, the UK's deluxe supermarket. But it has now established itself as the guardian of online grocery delivery in its own right. It now has operations in the US, Canada, Britain, Sweden, France, and Japan. The pandemic has wreaked havoc on many industries, and businesses around the world are struggling to stay afloat. National economies are sliding into recession, as global unemployment rates are inching upward. But Ocado, and the grocery sector at large, have found themselves booming in light of astronomical demand.  The future of food is online The pandemic has left companies around the world reassessing how the habits of their customers will change. Nowhere has this been more apparent than in grocery shopping. "When you see people try grocery online for the first time, there's a high proportion of people who stick with it and make it part of their repertoire," Jensen said. There are many signs that online grocery shopping is growing. Online grocery sales in the US boomed to $7 billion in May 2020, up from $5.3 billion in April, according to a Brick Meets Click/Mercatus Grocery Shopping survey. For reference, this number was $1.2 billion in August 2019. A 2018 Nielsen study also predicted that 70% of US consumers would be grocery shopping online by 2024. Before the pandemic, online grocery shopping made up only 4% of the US market, but that is set to change. "The US has seen an enormous boom," Jensen told Business Insider. "We expect a lot of that to stick." Back in the UK — where, pre-pandemic, 7% of grocery shopping was online — Ocado said in May that "a simply staggering amount of traffic" meant they had to turn away new customers.  "They could be doing even better than they are because they deliberately limited their growth," Matt Botham, a strategic insight director at the Kantar data consultancy, told Business Insider. The elevated demand for online grocery shopping won't last forever. Shops will reopen, and constraints on freedom of movement will end. But what is expected to remain — and what Ocado is betting its bottom dollar on — is the knowledge that online grocery shopping is possible, and may even be preferable. 'The share price is what it is, but we're not going to ... go all Elon Musk' "Ocado has been absolutely smashing it during lockdown," Fawad Razaqzada, a financial market analyst, told Business Insider.  Daniel Coatsworth, the editor of the Shares financial-news magazine, also told Business Insider: "Any grocery company with either an inferior service, or without one at all, will be seriously looking at how they can up their game. And that's where Ocado's strengths lie." "It's easy to see why Ocado has done so well on the stock market this year." But as a result of Ocado's extraordinary rise, some wonder whether the company is overvalued. Ocado's price-to-earnings ratio — how many years of annual earnings it would take to make up its valuation — is way higher than its competitors, a common trait of tech stocks.  "The share price is what it is, but we're not going to worry about it and go all Elon Musk," Jensen said, referring to the view taken by the Tesla CEO that investors are overvaluing his company.  "We're delighted the world is seeing that opportunity, and we're embracing it vigorously and going after it. On June 11, Ocado announced it was raising £1 billion ($1.24 billion) from investors to expand its services. "The opportunity for Ocado is massive in what we do," Jensen said. "There will then will be opportunities beyond what we do." Grocer or tech firm? Ocado's cash cow is not its grocery business, but in its technology. The company owns hundreds of patents for the machinery and software that power its warehouses, from product-picking robots to item scanners that members of staff can wear on their heads. This software, and future products, can be leased to supermarkets across the world. That's where Ocado's value lies. "Investors bidding up Ocado's shares are effectively saying that its services as a provider of solutions to automate online grocery orders will be in greater demand," Coatsworth said. "There is merit in the market valuing it as a technology stock rather than as simply a grocer or delivery business." The future of online grocery shopping "At the heart of it all," Ocado says on its website, "lies our technological know-how and unparalleled IP." This stands for intellectual property — one of the most lucrative assets a tech company can own. Ocado has registered at least 350 patent applications in Europe alone, according to IP law firm Reddie and Grosse. Half concern "storing articles, individually or in orderly arrangement, in warehouses," the firm said. Dozens entail "systems and methods ... relating to logistics." Coming to America Nowhere has online grocery shopping boom been more apparent than in the US. Americans weren't big on online grocery shopping before the pandemic, with it making up just 4% of the total market. Kroger, the largest US grocer, appears keen to get a head start. It struck an exclusive partnership with Ocado 2018, and the companies already have plans to develop 20 distribution centers across the country. They have broken ground on three so far, with the locations of six more confirmed.  Smart warehouses are underway in Monroe, Ohio, where Kroger is a mainstay, and Groveland, Florida, where rivals — Publix and Target — rule the roost. "We see plenty of evidence that what we will be able to develop with Kroger will be able to push on quite an open door in terms of consumer demand," Jensen told Business Insider. No mean feat But getting Americans to shop for groceries online isn't as simple as it sounds. There has been a traditional reluctance to purchase fresh food online because people want to see what they are going to put in their mouths before they buy it. At an Amazon Fresh distribution warehouse in Washington state, a third of bananas were thrown out because each banana had to be perfect to the naked eye, an MIT study found in 2015. A 2014 Instacart training video seen by Quartz told its fruit pickers to "make sure there are no bruises, no cuts, no mold, it's not too soft, not too hard, just perfectly ripe." And as consulting firm Oliver Wyman wrote in 2019: "Customers resist the idea of having someone else pick fresh food for their family." The boom in online shopping during the pandemic could be a flash in the pan, rather than an inflection point for the industry.  Another orthodoxy about online grocery shopping is that the US is just too big to cover with online delivery. Ocado is less concerned about the challenge, however. Jensen concedes that the US is huge, but said "if you look at the distribution of the population in the US, you have about 75% of the population who live in urban or related-to-urban markets." "In that respect the US is not terribly dissimilar from any other geography around the world." Worldwide, Ocado has partnered with Kroger in the US, Sobeys in Canada, Aeon in Japan, Waitrose and Marks & Spencer in the UK, Groupe Casino in France, and ICA in Sweden. In Japan, online grocery sales doubled during its coronavirus lockdown, which is remarkable for a country that obsesses over fresh produce and food presentation. As Ocado proclaimed in its 2019 report: "We can change the way the world shops." Leading the field at the right time Coatsworth, the editor of Shares magazine, said: "What the market hasn't priced in is the likelihood of increased competition. If the opportunity is so clear for everyone to see, there will inevitably be other players entering the scene." Several competitors already exist, especially in the US. The main ones are Amazon Fresh and Instacart. Fresh Direct and Shipt, which is owned by Target, are also in the game. Amazon has tried to get online vegetable and fruit delivery to stick for some years, but with little to no success. When asked about the company, Jensen said it has been fascinating to watch. "What's interesting with Amazon is they've been in grocery for over 10 years now and they've made multiple attempts at particularly getting into the fresh grocery market, and today their market share remains very, very small," he said. "I think what that indicates is not that Amazon is not good at doing stuff, it indicates just how difficult and different grocery is." 'We don't do vanity tech projects' The Ocado vans that ferry food from warehouses to homes still bear the slogan "the online supermarket," but the company is essentially a tech company. (It successfully applied to be un-designated as a grocer by the UK's Competition and Markets Authority in 2019.) Nowhere has Ocado's performance as been more apparent than at its warehouses. Inside these warehouses, known as Customer Fulfilment Centres, cuboid "Bots" whizz back, forth, and side to side on grids known as "The Hive," depositing supermarket produce from orders. A 50-item order can be sorted by a bot, which travels through The Hive at a speed of eight meters per second, and is complete in a matter of minutes. Ocado is also transitioning from a reliance on human produce-pickers to robots.  "As we continue, we will see a greater proportion of the range picked robotically," said Jensen. He envisions "a tipping point where you get a payback with the cost of a robotic picking station versus the cost of a year of labor." "We don't do vanity tech projects," Jensen said. "We do projects because they work and they pay back." Here's what an Ocado warehouse in Andover, England, looked like in 2018: Ocado has also invested in vertical farming, billed as a more sustainable and profitable way of growing vegetables indoors.  He sees Ocado's warehouses ultimately being built alongside vertical farm facilities, which would dramatically lower costs and speed up deliveries of fruit and vegetables. Botham, of Kantar, told Business Insider that the days of Ocado being a retailer are long gone. "They see themselves as a solutions business," he said. "That's where they think their money is." Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Inside London during COVID-19 lockdown
More

Top