Rosalie Lee

Rosalie Lee

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You can almost do anything on smartphones these days, especially if you connect a large display and peripherals. Even more so on tablets with their large screens and keyboard accessories. That said, there are still many things you can’t do on a phone, or at least can’t do comfortably on such a small screen. One of the biggest culprits there … Continue reading
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The RTX 2070 Super is reportedly next in line for the chopping block as Nvidia prepares for Ampere's arrival
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Seven years after its first release, Pikmin 3 Deluxe is coming to Nintendo Switch later this year.
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Motorola launched one of the most affordable 5G phones you can buy in Europe. For those in the US, the company promises a sub-$500 budget 5G phone this fall.
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Windows 10 has always offered multiple methods for attempting OS recovery. But with the release of Windows 10 version 2004 on May 27, 2020, one of those recovery methods disappeared from its previous home in Settings > Update & Security > Recovery.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)
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OnePlus has just revealed its first mid-range smartphone in some years in the form of OnePlus Nord. The handset is very competitive with a Snapdragon ... The post OnePlus Nord users facing display tint at low brightness levels appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) ABSA International has awarded the contract to publish their journal, Applied Biosafety: Journal of ABSA International, to Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, effective 2021
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Many people have found themselves working remotely from home as a result of the pandemic, forcing them to adjust to a new workflow that, in many cases, involves taking over the kitchen table or bedroom closet. It is apparent that remote working, when possible, will be a long-term reality for many people, meaning it’s time to accept fate and create … Continue reading
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Donald Trump has vowed to send a “surge” of federal agents to US cities – a move he portrayed as a crackdown on violence and crime. It has proven extremely controversial among campaigners and opposition politicians.Here’s what has been going on in the US, and why the president has chosen this action now.What did Donald Trump announce? On Wednesday, the president announced he would deploy a “surge” of federal agents to Chicago and Albuquerque, New Mexico.Hundreds have already been sent to Kansas City, Missouri, as part of “Operation Legend” following the fatal shooting of a young boy there.Operation Legend is named after LeGend Taliferro, a four-year-old boy who was killed in June by a stray bullet while he slept. The FBI is still searching for suspects.Federal security forces have also been sent to Portland, Oregon, in recent weeks following two months of anti-racism protests sparked by the death of George Floyd in May. But local authorities have said the presence of federal agents on the streets of Portland has only exacerbated tensions and helped escalate civil unrest, with reports of protesters being masked and bundled into unmarked vehicles by agents.Despite this, Trump wants to expand his “Operation Legend” programme to more cities.He told reporters in the White House: “In recent weeks, there has been a radical movement to defund, dismantle, and dissolve our police departments. Extreme politicians have joined this anti-police crusade and relentlessly vilified our law enforcement heroes.”The president claimed: “To look at it from any standpoint, the effort to shut down policing in their own communities has led to a shocking explosion of shootings, killings, murders, and heinous crimes of violence. This bloodshed must end. This bloodshed will end.“Today, I’m announcing a surge of federal law enforcement into American communities plagued by violent crime.”  Trump painted Democrat-led cities as out of control, lashing out at the “radical left”, which he blamed for rising violence in some cities. Crime reports *did* go up in some cities like Chicago, New York and Philadelphia when stay-at-home orders lifted, the Associated Press reported. However, criminal justice experts have pointed to the unprecedented moment: a pandemic that has killed over 140,000 Americans, historic unemployment, a mass reckoning over race and police brutality, intense stress and even the weather.Compared with other years, crime in 2020 is down overall.On Wednesday, the American Civil Liberties Union tweeted: “We will continue to defend our constitutional rights from Trump’s lawlessness – in Portland, Chicago and wherever else necessary.” We will continue to defend our constitutional rights from Trump’s lawlessness — in Portland, Chicago, and wherever else necessary.— ACLU (@ACLU) July 22, 2020What do the leaders of Chicago and Albuquerque think about Trump’s plans? Both Trump and Attorney General William Barr insisted that the “surge” of federal agents being sent to Chicago and Albuquerque would be different to the operations in Portland. The president said: “The DHS mission in Portland is to protect federal property and our law enforcement officers. In Chicago, the mission is to protect the public from violent crime on the streets.”Meanwhile, Barr said the federal agents would serve as “street” agents and investigators who would be working to “solve murders and take down violent gangs”.“This is different than the operations and tactical teams we use to defend against riots and mob violence,” Barr said.“We will continue to confront mob violence. But the operations we are discussing today are very different – they are classic crime fighting.”However, it’s fair to say that the leaders of Chicago and Albuquerque didn’t seem entirely convinced by this reassurance. Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot and New Mexico governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, both Democrats, said they would only welcome help from federal agents if they actually assisted law enforcement with community policing and public safety.Both threatened legal action if federal agents were used to crack down on protests, as they have been in Portland.  “If the Trump administration wishes to antagonise New Mexicans and Americans with authoritarian, unnecessary and unaccountable military-style ‘crackdowns,’ they have no business whatsoever in New Mexico,” Lujan Grisham said in a statement. What has been happening in Portland? Since the death of George Floyd in May, Portland has seen almost two months of anti-racism protests. In July, Trump sent federal law enforcement officers to the city, vowing to “quell” unrest. In the US, HuffPost journalists have reported how federal agents terrorised peaceful protesters, bundling them into unmarked vehicles without probable cause and pulling masks over their faces. The actions have alarmed members of Congress, with House majority whip James Clyburn calling it “the activity of a police state”.Meanwhile, representative Joaquin Castro tweeted: “This is what dictators do.” On Sunday night, dozens of women – some of whom were reported to be pregnant – formed a human shield against the federal agents outside the city’s courthouse, calling themselves a “wall of moms”. Federal agents were filmed using batons and tear gas to try and disperse the women. Why is Donald Trump doing this now? Wondering whether it’s a coincidence that Donald Trump – whose approval rating has plummeted over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic – has launched a new law and order programme just a few months before he runs for re-election as president? According to the Associated Press, the decision to dispatch federal agents to American cities comes at a “hyper-politicised” moment when the Trump is grasping for a new re-election campaign after the Covid-19 pandemic upended the economy.Trump has already claimed that violence on the streets will worsen if Democratic candidate Joe Biden is elected as president in November. But Leon Panetta, a former defence secretary and CIA director, told The Guardian: “One of the last holdouts for tyrants is to try to have the military be able to protect them, and that fear that he may try to do that raises a lot of concerns about just how far will he go to try to ‘take over’ a lot of these cities and states in terms of their ability to conduct law enforcement on their own.”Related... Biden Claims Trump Is The First Racist President Donald Trump Cries 'Fake News' In Coronavirus Tweet Full Of... Fake News
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The first major announcement since the merger with Sprint was completed sees TMUS go after the big two on unlimited price plans.
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SpaceX is developing a fully reusable rocket system called Starship-Super Heavy in Boca Chica, Texas. Before the vehicle can fly to orbit, though, the aerospace company first has to show the system's core design works. To that end, founder Elon Musk tweeted on Tuesday that SpaceX's latest Starship prototype, called SN5, could "fly later this week." Documents released by the Federal Aviation Administration in 2019 following a query by Business Insider suggest the prototype could soar nearly 500 feet (150 meters) in the air. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Anyone who said grain silos can't fly may be in for a surprise later this week. SpaceX, the aerospace company founded by Elon Musk, is working feverishly to develop a potentially revolutionary rocket system called Starship in Boca Chica, a remote region in southeastern Texas that sits on the Gulf of Mexico. If Starship and its Super Heavy rocket booster end up being fully reusable, Musk has said, the system may reduce the cost of launching anything to space by about 1,000-fold. But first, SpaceX has to see if its core designs for Starship works. To that end, the company is moving briskly to build, test, and launch prototypes. And according to Musk, the first such full-scale example may fly from a beachside launch site in a matter of days. "Will attempt to fly later this week," Musk tweeted in response to a question about the status of a Starship prototype called SN5 (short for "serial number 5").  SN5 is the latest of several Starship prototypes that SpaceX has built in Texas. The previous versions have either crumpled during tests or, as was the case on May 29, catastrophically exploded. Each failure has taught SpaceX valuable lessons to inform design and material changes. The steel vehicles don't have wing-like canards or nosecones attached in case something goes wrong in their earliest phases of testing, so they look more like flying fuel tanks or grain silos than rocket ships. from Rocket GIFs via Gfycat   However, as last year's test launch of an early Starship prototype called Starhopper showed, the flights of such crude experimental vehicles (shown above) can easily impress: On August 27, Starhopper soared about 492 feet (150 meters) into the air, translated across a launch site, and landed on a nearby concrete pad. The full-scale SN5 prototype may similarly soar nearly 500 feet (150 meters) in the air before attempting to land, according to regulatory documents released by the Federal Aviation Administration in September 2019, following an inquiry by Business Insider. SpaceX on May 28 earned an FAA launch license to fly prototypes on a "suborbital trajectory," meaning the experimental spaceships could reach dozens of miles above Earth before returning and landing. The company won't attempt such flights right off the bat, though. On Thursday, SpaceX asked the FCC for permission to use communicate with prototypes flying as high as 12.4 miles (20 kilometers) within the next seven months. Nevertheless, SpaceX is pursuing a launch license for full-scale, orbital-class Starship-Super Heavy vehicles, part of which includes a new environmental review of its Boca Chica site. Musk hopes Starship will launch a cargo mission to Mars in 2022, send a private crew around the moon in 2023, return NASA astronauts to the lunar surface in 2024, and even begin sending people to Mars the same year.SEE ALSO: SpaceX must pass a new environmental review before it can launch Starship-Super Heavy rockets from Texas, and it might add years to Elon Musk's Mars timeline DON'T MISS: Rocket Lab's founder and CEO Peter Beck opens up about the company's recent launch failure — and its spacecraft to reach the moon, Venus, or even Mars Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why NASA waited nearly a decade to send astronauts into space from the US
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Minutes and hours? That's old thinking. Artist Scott Thrift wants you to see the bigger picture.
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Domestic companies to be mashed together in the service of digital transformation, 5G and cloud Fujitsu will relaunch several of its domestic business services units under a new company called Fujitsu Japan.…
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You deserve privacy. Here's how to check your phone, laptop, and online accounts to make sure no one's looking over your shoulder.
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Get the latest on coronavirus. Sign up to the Daily Brief for news, explainers, how-tos, opinion and more.Global cases of Covid-19 rocketed on Saturday with a record increase of more than 260,000, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has confirmed. The news came as the worldwide death toll exceeded 600,000, with a number of countries struggling to contain the rapid spread of the virus. While the US leads global infections, South Africa now ranks as the fifth worst-hit country in the pandemic with 350,879 cases – roughly half of all those confirmed on the African continent.Its growing difficulties are a sign of trouble to come for nations with even fewer healthcare resources.India on Sunday reported a 24-hour record surge of 38,902 new cases, taking the country’s total to 1,077,618.Elsewhere in Asia, China confirmed 13 new cases in the northwestern city of Urumqi.The outbreak is the latest to pop up since China largely contained the domestic spread of the virus in March.At least 30 people have been infected and authorities are conducting universal testing in communities where cases were discovered, later to be expanded to other parts of the city and major businesses.South Korean authorities are also struggling to suppress an uptick in local infections, with 34 additional cases, 21 of them domestic and 13 from overseas, raising the country’s total to 13,745 with 295 deaths.Both countries are mandating testing and enforcing two-week quarantines on all overseas arrivals.After a one-day respite, Covid-19 cases in the Australian state of Victoria rose again, prompting a move to make masks mandatory in metropolitan Melbourne and the nearby shire of Mitchell.Health officials on Sunday recorded 363 new cases in the past 24 hours.Two men and a woman in their nineties died, taking the national death toll from Covid-19 to 122.South Africa now trails the US, Brazil and India – all far more populous countries – in the number of infections, surpassing Peru, after health authorities announced 13,285 new cases.South Africa’s new coronavirus epicentre, Gauteng province, hosts the cities of Johannesburg and Pretoria and one quarter of the country’s population of 57 million, with many poor people living in crowded conditions in the middle of a frosty southern hemisphere winter.“The simple fact is that many South Africans are sitting ducks because they cannot comply with World Health Organisation protocols on improved hygiene and social distancing,” the foundation of former South African archbishop and Nobel Peace Prize winner Desmond Tutu and his wife Leah warned in a statement.Meanwhile, global Covid-19 deaths have hit 601,549, according to Johns Hopkins University data.The United States tops the list with 140,119 deaths, followed by 78,772 in Brazil, 45,358 in the United Kingdom and 38,888 in Mexico, where a surge in cases has frustrated plans to reopen the economy.The number of confirmed infections worldwide has passed 14.2m, out of which 3.7m are in the United States.There are over two million in Brazil and more than one million in India.Experts believe the true numbers around the world are likely to be much higher because of testing shortages and data collection issues in some nations.Infections are soaring in US states such as Florida, Texas, Arizona, fuelled by the haphazard lifting of lockdowns and the resistance of some Americans to wearing masks.Teams of military medics have been deployed in Texas and California to help hospitals deal with a deluge of patients who are flooding emergency rooms in parts of the US.Some patients are being moved into hallways to make room for the most seriously ill and nurses are working extra shifts to keep up with the surge.Patients struggling to breathe are being placed on ventilators in emergency wards since intensive care units are full, officials say.Patients are waiting “hours and hours” to get admitted, said Dr Alison Haddock of the Baylor College of Medicine in the state of Texas, which reported a new daily record for virus deaths on Friday and more than 10,000 confirmed cases for the fourth consecutive day.More than 80 infants have tested positive for the virus in the state.“I’ve never seen anything like this Covid surge,” said Dr Haddock, who has worked in emergency rooms since 2007.“We’re doing our best, but we’re not an ICU.”Despite the loosening of lockdown in many countries, some authorities are now moving to adjust restrictions in order to ensure continued social distancing. Police in Barcelona are limiting access to some of the city’s beaches because sunbathers are ignoring regulations amid a resurgence of coronavirus, while authorities in Amsterdam are urging people not to visit the city’s famous red light district and have closed off some of the historic district’s narrow streets because they are too busy.Local governments in India continued to reimpose focused lockdowns in several parts of the country following a surge in cases.And in Iran, the president made the startling announcement that as many as 25m Iranians could have been infected, the state-run IRNA news agency reported.Hassan Rouhani cited a new Health Ministry study that has not yet been made public. Iran has the Middle East’s worst outbreak with more than 270,000 confirmed cases.In Bangladesh, confirmed cases surpassed 200,000 but experts say the number is much higher as the country lacks adequate labs for testing.Most people in rural areas have stopped wearing masks and are thronging shopping centres ahead of the Islamic festival Eid al-Adha this month.Related... More Than 140 Released Prisoners Housed In Hotels During Lockdown No Cash, No Wi-Fi, No Help: One Mum's Story Reveals Sheer Inequality Of Home-Schooling 9 Charts That Show Just How Bad The Coronavirus Situation Is In The US
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The C-Mask from Donut Robotics can translate and transcribe speech and connect to bluetooth. When the coronavirus hit, the company pivoted from its primary robot design to developing masks. They are set to ship in September, and cost about $40. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The coronavirus made masks a must-have item for leaving home, and Japanese company Donut Robotics gave them an upgrade. The robotics company pivoted from designs for airport travelers to integrating those same functions into face masks. Experts have cautioned people to wear masks, whether they have COVID-19 symptoms or not, and say that masks significantly reduce an infected person's ability to spread the virus. A downside, though, is that they make communication more difficult. A mouth covering naturally muffles speech, and they also make lip-reading and following expressions difficult or impossible. With both transcription and translation capabilities, the C-Mask could be a solution to that problem, especially if masks are going to be part of everyday life for the foreseeable future.  Here's how Donut Robotics made them work.Donut Robotics had a contract with Haneda Airport in Tokyo to sell robot translators and guides, like this robot, called Cinnamon. Source: Reuters When COVID-19 hit, the team quickly worked to use its technology in a relevant way. "We worked hard for years to develop a robot and we have used that technology to create a product that responds to how the coronavirus has reshaped society," CEO Taisuke Ono told Reuters. The mask connects to a smartphone app over Bluetooth, where it can then transcribe speech, be used for calls, or translate Japanese into eight different languages. The name comes from the Five Cs on Donut Robotics' website:  1.Clear voice 2. Connect with smartphone 3. Cool design 4. Clean material 5. Combat coronavirus. It took Donut Robotics' designers only about a month to adapt the technology from the translator robot into the mask. The C-Mask is worn over a typical face mask, which holds up the smart mask with its straps. The first 5,000 C-Masks will ship in Japan in September. The company also has plans to sell in Europe, the US, and China, and has received international attention since it was featured by Reuters. Ono also said that he hopes to make money from subscriptions to the translation app.
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Today LG released their LG TONE Free FN6 earbuds for sale in the United States. These earbuds were first announced back at the tail end of June, 2020, but a release date and/or price weren’t revealed for the United States. Now the earbuds are ready to roll here in the USA in two distinct colors – Matte Black and Gloss … Continue reading
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Image: Kobo Kobo is introducing a new entry-level e-reader to its lineup, the $99.99 Nia, which slots in beneath the $119.99 Clara HD model (which is sticking around). While both models have a 6-inch display, the Nia’s $20 savings come with slightly worse specs in a few areas compared to its slightly pricier sibling. Specifically, the Nia has a slightly lower-resolution display (212 ppi, versus 300 ppi on the Clara HD), a standard backlight (versus the Clara HD’s color temperature-changing options), and weighs 8 grams (about a quarter of an ounce) heavier. The Clara HD also has a painted finish, while the Nia does not. Image: Kobo But the comparison to Kobo’s own products is less important than how the Nia matches up against... Continue reading…
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All 3,500 reservation slots for the most-expensive version of the new SUV have already been claimed.
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This tiny backlit square handheld was my first Game Boy ever, and no one forgets their first love.
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Yevgeniy Nikulin faces up to 10 years in a US cooler The Russian hacker accused of raiding LinkedIn, Dropbox and Formspring, and obtaining data on 213 million user accounts, has been found guilty.…
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Players worry how remote play will affect a game centered on social encounters.
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Coronavirus has changed everything. Make sense of it all with the Waugh Zone, our evening politics briefing. Sign up now. Boris Johnson urged Brits to holiday in the UK this summer as he revealed he would enjoy a “staycation” rather than go abroad amid the coronavirus pandemic. Speaking on Monday, the prime minister said people should remember the UK has “fantastic” and “peerless, wonderful, superlative places” to visit. He did not reveal where in the UK he would go but added it was a “great year” for a staycation. Johnson’s appeal for people to holiday at home comes as the Covid-19 lockdown is eased, amid widespread concern that the UK hospitality has been hit hard by the pandemic. However, the appeal follows criticism of Johnson’s own father Stanley, who was accused of breaking lockdown by visiting his villa in Greece.Stanley Johnson told people he was making the property, in Pelion overlooking the Aegean sea, Covid-secure. “I think this is a great, great year for people to have a staycation. This country is uniquely blessed with fantastic places to holiday, whether coastal or otherwise,” the prime minister told reporters during a visit to the London Ambulance Service.“And I am certainly going to be doing that, but I won’t necessarily tell you where at this stage.“Obviously if people feel the need for a foreign holiday then that’s completely a matter for them – I totally understand it. But there are fantastic, fantastic places – peerless, wonderful, superlative places – in the UK to go on holiday and that’s certainly what I will be doing.”Pubs, restaurants and holiday parks have been allowed to reopen after Johnson relaxed the two-metre social distancing rule to “one-metre plus”, meaning a mitigation such as a face covering must be in place. From July 10 people who live in England will be able to travel to some countries without having to quarantine for 14 days when they return home.The government’s “travel corridor” list of destinations with “a reduced risk” of coronavirus includes popular short-haul destinations including Spain, France, Italy, Turkey, Greece and Cyprus, as well as long-haul locations including Australia, Barbados, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand and Vietnam.Related... Zoos, Safari Parks And Outdoor Cinemas In England To Reopen On June 15 Boris Johnson Warns Public 'Enjoy Summer Safely' As Pubs Set To Reopen in England Revealed: The Full List Of Countries Exempt From England’s Coronavirus Quarantine
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(National University of Singapore) Two multidisciplinary research teams from the National University of Singapore have developed three nasopharyngeal swabs designs to help address the global shortage.
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Close that newsfeed for a while. These Android and iPhone videogames are a great distraction.
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In March, Google announced it would move its summer internship online in response to the pandemic. It's since confirmed it's doing the same for its fall program. That's meant a lot of logistical headaches for the company. Kyle Ewing, Google's head of talent, told Business Insider how Google adapted to the new virtual format. From algorithm-based coffee chats to open-source programs, here are some of the ways Google has tried to adapt its internship for 2020. Its fall internship will still go ahead remotely, but with a reduction in numbers. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. In March, when Google responded to the pandemic by moving its workforce remote, it wasn't just employees who had concerns. Thousands of students from around the world had landed spots on Google's coveted summer internship program, and were planning to descend on its Mountain View headquarters – and other offices – in a matter of weeks. There was suddenly a big question mark over whether Google's intern program, which had been running since 1999, would go ahead at all. But in late March, Business Insider first reported that Google's summer internship, which runs from May until August, was moving to an entirely online format. Then it had to figure out how it would actually work. "Even though hindsight is 20-20, it was definitely the right call," said Kyle Ewing, Google's head of talent, who oversees Google's intern onboarding each year.  These problems went beyond logistical headaches like shipping thousands of laptops across the world or ensuring mentors were matched with interns on the same time zone. It also meant ensuring everyone got the same exposure to company culture, access to other employees, and the chance to put their stamp on Google products. "Historically one of the more valuable aspects of being an intern is physically being located next to your mentor and your host and your colleagues," said Ewing. "We knew immediately it would be quite difficult, and we couldn't replicate that." Replacing the "micro moments" So Google tried to adapt. For example, it built a new platform for connecting interns with hosts for "coffee chats" so they could connect with Google employees. "We used this algorithm that would help match interns with Googlers they would have otherwise not have interacted with throughout the summer," said Ewing. The program factors in "anything from your professional interests, your technical interests, or your hiking interest interests" to match interns to likeminded Googlers, said Ewing. "You do miss the benefit of standing in the lunch line and talking with someone. You miss those micro moments." It also made its mentor program – where interns are paired with Googlers who aren't their hosts or managers to gain insight into the company – mandatory. "It was historically more of an opt-in type program, which not everyone took advantage of, and this year everyone is matched with a mentor," said Ewing. And in another first for Google, it shifted many of its technical internship roles to open-source projects. Several interns who spoke to Business Insider said they had been moved into these open-source programs, which meant Google didn't have to cancel those programs entirely – and reduced some of the associated risks of granting thousands of people access to the company's corporate programs. "It was a really important part of the dialogue when pivoting to virtual that students will continue to work on the real things that have real impact, and that can help us assess if they're someone who's interested in being at Google," said Ewing. And, naturally, interns still got the signature Google hat. Just this time, it came in the mail. 'We decided we would run a smaller fall internship' But the process hasn't been entirely smooth. Some interns who had been accepted on Google's UX programs told Business Insider their offers were rescinded after the pandemic hit. And in April, international interns who would have been traveling to Mountain View were told that their compensation was being cut by as much as 50% to bring it in line with their local currencies. Ewing wouldn't say how many interns Google has brought aboard this summer, but said it was in the "thousands" with interns from across 43 countries. Last year, the company said it received more than 125,000 applications for the summer program. She also confirmed that, although Google has moved its fall internship online too, it has reduced the number of interns.  "We decided we would run a smaller fall internship" said Ewing, who added there would "probably a couple of hundred" fewer interns than usual. "It will be a little smaller because we're just being a bit more cautious," she said. Are you a Google insider with insight to share? You can contact this reporter securely using encrypted messaging app Signal (+1 628-228-1836) or encrypted email ([email protected]).SEE ALSO: Meet the 15 Google execs who report to CEO Sundar Pichai and are leading the internet company's most critical businesses Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why electric planes haven't taken off yet
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On Monday, Twitter announced that it would be developing a deepfake policy and asked users to help make its final decision on the new rule.Late last month, the Twitter Safety team announced it’d be seeking feedback on what a deepfake and synthetic media policy would look like on the platform.In a blog post on Monday referencing that announcement, Twitter vice president of trust and safety Del Harvey wrote that if manipulated media was flagged on the platform, Twitter could end up placing a notice next to it alerting users that it’s been distorted, warning them that it’s false before they share it, or adding context in the form of a link or news article breaking down why others believe that it’s untrue.Twitter could also remove the content, Harvey wrote.At the end of the blog, Twitter directs users to take a survey to help weigh the platform’s options.It asks multiple-choice questions prompting them to help decide whether manipulated video should simply be removed or flagged.
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And what is Mastodon anyway?First launched in 2016, Mastodon is a relatively new social network created by 26-year-old German coder Eugen Rochko.It is a microblogging service that offers many of the same features as Twitter.While it is growing in popularity, that number is still well below Twitter’s current daily user number of 126 million.On the surface, Mastodon looks and acts much like Twitter.Just like Twitter, you can like and repost messages from other users.
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Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.This week we did something just a little bit new.Kate was in studio at TechCrunch’s SF HQ.We’ve done similar setups before, but never with video all around.So, welcome to a slightly new chapter in Equity’s production history (all praise to Chris for making it work, video will be out today on TechCrunch’s YouTube page).Our guest this week was the excellent Sarah Smith from Bain Capital Ventures.
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