Steven Jones

Steven Jones

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Following 54
UK
Google just wrapped up another Stadia Connect, and while the show mostly covered games that are coming to the service, Google also made some fairly big announcements. The first involves Click to Play, a feature that’s been teased since before the service even launched. In addition, Google announced that it has signed exclusive agreements with several big studios. First, though, … Continue reading
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People can have COVID-19 without knowing it -- and that's a huge threat to public health.
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PwC and tech startup Talespin have teamed up to train employees on implicit bias using virtual reality.  VR-based implicit bias training immerses its participants in scenarios where they learn to make inclusive hiring decisions and point out instances of discrimination. Studies have show VR learners required less time to learn, had a stronger emotional connection to the training content, were more focused when learning, and were more confident about their takeaways from the training.  It comes at a time of public reckoning that current corporate diversity and inclusion initiatives aren't doing enough, especially when it comes to implicit bias during the hiring process.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Virtual reality could permanently alter the way businesses approach diversity and inclusion trainings. Despite spending billions of dollars on D&I initiatives, US companies are more segregated now than they were 40 years ago, and implicit bias in hiring remains one of the biggest culprits. Implicit bias refers to the unknown assumptions people make about others based on their gender, ethnicity, age, or minority status, rather than their professional qualifications. Some companies are exploring new options for diversity trainings. PwC is one of them. The professional-services firm is working with software company Talespin to implement VR-based implicit-bias training programs —and it could be a new frontier for how companies approach diversity, equity, and inclusion training.  The Big 4 consulting and tax firm completed a pilot with Talespin last year, and it has since used virtual reality programming to train over 4,000 employees on implicit bias. How the VR training works  The training places employees in simulated office settings designed after actual PwC offices, where they speak with virtual characters through a head-mounted display. During the five-to-seven-minute training modules, they are prompted to make decisions about who to hire and promote, and must use inclusive leadership practices introduced prior to the simulation. Kyle Jackson, CEO of Talespin, told Business Insider that PwC employees using the VR tool are trained on how to recognize unconscious bias when hiring. They have to think about how even a candidate's name on a résumé can stir up implicit biases, he said.  Studies have shown, for example, that résumés with names that sound "white" get more call backs than those that don't. Employees using the VR training are asked to formulate responses if these biases are expressed in a hiring meeting by a colleague, or a senior partner. Scott Likens, emerging technology leader at PwC, told Business Insider the firm wanted to test how VR diversity and inclusion training compared to more traditional computer-based training. PwC selected a group of new managers in 12 US locations to test out the VR between February and October 2019. The results were promising. A PwC study found that VR participants required less time to learn, had a stronger emotional connection to the training content, were more focused when learning, and were more confident about their takeaways from the training. And to top it off, the VR training program was more cost-effective at scale than classroom or online learning modules. VR could present a viable training method for companies looking to update their practices. So far, traditional diversity, equity, and inclusion training programs haven't worked. US companies spend $8 billion annually on diversity and inclusion initiatives, and implicit bias seminars have become ubiquitous across the American workplace. But their efforts are still falling short.  Virtual reality has already taken off across a range of industries since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. Hospitals are using virtual reality simulations to train doctors and nurses on treatment of coronavirus patients, and computer software company MeetInVR is developing a tool for companies to host virtual reality meetings. Talespin also offers training for managers who need to have difficult conversations in the office. VR reduces the distance between the learner and the experience With VR, learners can immerse themselves in the experience at hand without feeling self-conscious about learning in a group setting. Compare this with a conventional, in-person training session: though employees might also be able to role-play in person, self-consciousness in front of colleagues may hamper an employee's ability to engage as closely with the scenario. "Our own biases creep back in and our own fears creep back in terms of our participation, because we can't actually role play," Jackson said. "A lot of people's nerves creep up and role play does not work for them. So even as much as I try to put myself in somebody's shoes, I can't."  The key lies in the immediacy of the VR experience, Likens said.  "It comes back to experience as a driver for behavior change," Likens said. "VR has a weird way of doing that. You're in the shoes of a situation which you might not ever be, or at least not frequently." VR training reduces the distance between the learner and the experience at hand, allowing participants to empathize with situations more deeply. Jeremy Bailenson, founding director of Stanford's Virtual Human Interaction Lab, worked with a group of researchers to see if people were more inclined to feel empathy after experiencing a VR simulation of homelessness. It worked: A significantly higher number of participants who had experienced the VR signed a petition supporting affordable housing for the homeless compared to those who had just read about it. A few months later, in February 2017, the Virtual Human Interaction Lab launched VR-based implicit bias training for the NFL.  PwC is not the first business to explore VR diversity initiatives — but it's doing so at a crucial time. Both the pandemic and the backlash against racial injustice have made companies more open to approaching workplace racism and discrimination with new solutions. "I think it accelerated the acceptance of the innovation," Likens said about the current moment. "We're getting executives to put on a headset, whereas a year ago they wouldn't have. But being at home, being disconnected from our teams, I think it's triggered this desire to do something big. And I think VR now is being accepted as a 'here and now' thing, not a future emerging technology." SEE ALSO: SUCCESS INSIDER: A PwC exec reveals the 3 investments business leaders should make to come out of the coronavirus crisis stronger Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How 'white savior' films like 'The Help' and 'Green Book' hurt Hollywood
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Why buy an Android tablet and monitor when you can have an Android tablet that turns into a monitor?
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You can also save big on 1TB, 2TB, and 3TB cloud backup plans.
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The musical, which debuted on Broadway in 2015, is now on Disney+. And it's ready to be reexamined in new ways by an even bigger audience.
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Visible comets like this are relatively rare, appearing about once a decade.
China
The startup, which aims to enable super fast internet connectivity, is now looking to bring its tech worldwide.
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A group claiming to be hacktivist organization Anonymous has supposedly pledged to donate $75 million in Bitcoin to startups and individuals working on anonymity propositions.The Unknown Fund will apparently be used to boost the proliferation of privacy-preserving technologies, with a specific focus on startups and individuals working on personal data protection solutions, anonymity tools, cryptocurrency, and blockchain technology.The protection of personal data, the “fund” says, is one of the main challenges facing humankind.Citing examples such as Brexit or the last US presidential elections which saw Donald Trump make it into the White House, the fund goes on to say that “the use of data has already become a powerful tool for manipulating people.”“The Unknown Fund also sees incredible opportunities to protect the rights and freedoms of people that technology such as blockchain and cryptocurrencies give us.Doubts about the fund’s legitimacy
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After a free one-month trial it costs $5 per month to subscribe, but that fee gives you and your family unrestricted access to a wonderland of great games with no in-app subscriptions or advertisements in sight.Apple Arcade works on the iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV, but also on Macs and the iPod Touch.You have to explore a map, meeting odd characters as you go, and work out how to get the things you need to progress.There are switches and things to pick up or activate, but working out how to get from point A to point B can be surprisingly tricky.You can choose to create a party and invite friends, or join up with strangers online, to compete for mini-game mastery.Billed as “Golf for people who hate golf” this clever puzzle game is enormously fun and it confounds your expectations at every turn.
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JAXA has announced that the asteroid exploring spacecraft Hayabusa2 is officially done with its mission on the asteroid Ryugu.With the sample gathering complete, the spacecraft departed the asteroid on November 13, 2019, at 10:05 am JST.The space agency says that the thruster operation of Hayabusa2 occurred normally.The spacecraft left Ryugu at a velocity of about 9.2 cm/s after firing its chemical propulsion system.The status of the spacecraft was classified as normal.JAXA says that it is planning to conduct performance tests of onboard instruments, including the electric propulsion system, which will be used for the return trip to Earth.
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Photo by Becca Farsace / The VergeTesla CEO Elon Musk said Tuesday that his company’s fourth Gigafactory will be built just outside Berlin, Germany.The announcement comes as Tesla is finishing up construction on the third Gigafactory outside Shanghai, China, and just a few days after New York State wrote down the value of the company’s second Gigafactory, a repurposed SolarCity facility in Buffalo, New York, by more than $800 million.Tesla’s first Gigafactory opened in 2016 (but is still under construction) outside Reno, Nevada.“Berlin is great,” Musk said, after receiving the Golden Steering Wheel award from German auto publication Auto Bild.Musk has spent the last few years teasing that Tesla would build a fourth Gigafactory in Europe, and Germany’s grip on the auto industry made it a likely landing spot.
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Every time I see robots marching around in perfect synchronization, Darth Vader’s theme from Star Wars – officially named ‘The Imperial March’ comes to my mind.And that was my instant reaction when I saw the video of MIT‘s new mini cheetah robots.Last weekend, researchers at MIT released a video of nine mini cheetah robots frolicking in the ground, performing backflips, and playing soccer.While the first scene of these robots marching across the screen in a perfect order might be scary, the rest of the video is goofy and fun.At a point, it even feels like a bunch of puppies just enjoying the fall leaves.The mini cheetah was first shown off in March.
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Incite, Inc. is here to propel you forward to the future.No, don’t think about the name too much.The new Westworld ad is a mindbender, and has ARG written all over it.Released yesterday at a WIRED panel called “The Future of Data: The Promise and Peril”, the ad features a promotion for the fictional Incite, Inc., a company that (mysteriously!)also sponsored the real-world WIRED panel.The ad itself, starring Jefferson Mays as Liam Dempsey, Sr., the co-founder of the company, talks up the vision of a futuristic, post-Silicon Valley company promising “unprecedented computing capabilities, analysing data for life’s most unsolvable problems”.
China
As you know, Xiaomi has already released its first smartwatch.The Xiaomi Watch comes with a 1.78-inch AMOLED square screen, which has a pixel density of 326PPI.There are two variants of the standard version and exclusive version.They cost 1299 yuan ($186) and 1999 yuan ($286), respectively.However, today, a Xiaomi executive issued a statement on Weibo saying that after the use of 57 hours, the Xiaomi Watch still has a power of 10%.He added that a simple calculation shows the watch can last for up to 63 hours, which is way better than the official statement.
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In other words, it's officially holiday shopping season, as you could maybe tell from our Black Friday deals posts and gift-buying guides.You might just bite the bullet and buy that special someone a new iPhone -- this week CNET made the iPhone 11 an Editors' Choice.Meanwhile, T-Mobile is dangling all sorts of incentives, like a $15 plan and free broadband for low-income families, so long as it's able to complete its merger with Sprint.We learned Ring doorbells were leaking Wi-Fi login info.And you can now buy Microsoft's HoloLens 2 augmented reality headset, if you've got $3,500 to spare.Here are some stories from the week you don't want to miss:
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The Xiaomi Mi CC9 Pro was released today with a set of 5 cameras on its backside.We’ve seen smartphones with 5x camera lenses before – a combination of front and back lenses – but never 5x on the back of a phone in an array so impressive as this.The primary lens amongst these monsters is a 108-megapixel sensor – a sensor that might well make its way to the Samsung Galaxy S11 in 2020.In addition to the five cameras about which you’ll read in the list below, the back of this phone has a pair of LED lights for flash photography.One uses a hard, bright light, the other a soft light.According to the intensive test gamut on DXOMark, the Xiaomi Mi CC9 Pro Premium Edition’s camera array is now tied for best-yet smartphone camera quality with the Huawei Mate 30 Pro.
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If you sometimes find yourself splashing the cash in Google’s Play Store, then signing up to its new rewards program is surely a no-brainer.Following an earlier launch in Japan and South Korea, Google Play Points has now arrived in the U.S., giving Android users the chance to earn rewards and discounts for their purchases in the Play Store.“It’s free to join, and you can earn Play Points to use for special items and discounts in top games like Candy Crush Saga and Pokémon Go, or for Google Play Credit to use on movies, books, games, and apps,” Google’s Winston Mok wrote in a post announcing the new program.If you’re feeling charitable and have lots of points in your account, you can even use them to support various non-profits from a rotating list, with the first ones including Doctors Without Borders USA, Save the Children, and the World Food Program USA.Play Points are earned with every purchase that you make in the Play Store, whether it’s for in-app items, movies, books, subscriptions, or anything else, and additional points can be earned by downloading free apps and games featured regularly by Google.The points system comprises four levels: Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum.
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“Security should be embedded within the existing code build process through direct plug-ins and integration into the tools that developers are using every day for their pipelines”Agile software development has been with us for nearly two decades since the original Manifesto was published.However, there are still problems that exist around the processes and politics of software, writes Marco Rottigni, Chief Technical Security Officer EMEA, Qualys.DevOps can help here, with teams collaborating on how to get software out faster and more efficiently.Yet for IT security teams, the rise of DevOps has led to problems with managing software security and risk too.Software Security: Building Better Processes Across Teams
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With Apple’s new AirPods Pro on the market, it’s time to see if they can be easily repaired by end-users.In fact, iFixit gave the AirPods a dismal repairability score of 0/10, indicating that they were in no way repairable by the DIYers of the world.Surely the new AirPods Pro would be at least a little more DIY-friendly, right?Unfortunately not, it seems, as iFixit’s teardown of the freshly-released wireless earbuds leaves little hope for anything outside of simply buying a new set when something goes awry.With AirPods Pro priced at a not-insignificant $250, that’s a tough pill to swallow.Like the original AirPods, getting into the AirPods Pro in the first place proves to be a challenge.
Sweden
Studenter med en prenumeration på Apple Music kommer få Apple TV Plus på köpet.Det meddelade Hailee Steinfeld – stjärnan i Apple-serien Dickinson – på Instagram, rapporterar Imore.En studentprenumeration på Apple Music kostar 49 kronor i månaden, mot 99 kronor för en standardprenumeration och 149 kronor för familjekonto.Apple TV Plus kostar 59 kronor i månaden trots att priset i USA är samma för båda tjänsterna, på grund av den svaga svenska kronan.Apple bekräftade sedermera paketerbjudandet, skriver The Verge.Vi vet emellertid inte om det kan röra sig om ett tidsbegränsat erbjudande eller om andra Apple Music-prenumeranter också kommer ingå.
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För att autonoma fordon enklare ska känna igen cyklar i trafiken har två studenter utvecklat ett kontrollsystem som ska ge mer realistiska säkerhetstest.Autonoma fordons säkerhetssystem testas hela tiden för att bli bättre på att känna igen saker som dyker upp framför fordonet.Tom Andersson och Niklas Persson från akademin Innovation, Design och Teknik på Mälardalens högskola (MDH), uppmärksammade att säkerhetssystemen har extra svårt att identifiera cyklister i trafiken.De valde därför att under utbildningen utveckla en förarlös cykel så att autonoma fordon ska få en mer realistisk testmiljö.I dag när autonom teknik testas ställs cyklar på en släde och dras fram genom säkerhetstestet.Genom ett forskningsprojekt tillsammans med bland andra Chalmers, Volvo Cars och Asta Zero har Tom och Niklas utvecklat en självbalanserande cykel, som enligt dem skulle kunna vara en utvecklingsmöjlighet för framtida tester.
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Instagram announced on Sunday that it’s banning drawings, memes, video, and comics that portray self-harm and suicide, as well as “other imagery that may not show self-harm or suicide, but does include associated materials or methods.” This adds to its preexisting policy of prohibiting content which promotes or encourages self-harm and suicide.Advocates have implored the platform to take stronger measures, especially after the well-publicised death of 14-year-old Molly Russell.In January of this year, her father publicly spoke about finding images of depression, self-harm, and suicide on her social media feeds.Still, she’d displayed “no obvious signs” of preexisting mental health issues.Moved by Russell’s story, health secretary Matt Hancock addressed a letter to Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Google, Snapchat, Pinterest, and Apple urging them to remove graphic and triggering content.“It is appalling how easy it still is to access this content online and I am in no doubt about the harm this material can cause, especially for young people,” he wrote.
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VW:s storsäljare får tre mildhybrid-versioner – samt två laddhybrider.Nya Golf har dessutom fler assistanssystem än någonsin, som bland annat använder svärmintelligens.Nu släpper VW sin åttonde version av Golf, som lanseras i Sverige under det första kvartalet nästa år.Och även om förändringarna utvändigt är försiktiga så har en hel del ny teknik hittat in under skalet.Från att ha erbjudit en hybriddrivlina får Golfen nu hela fem.Tre av dem är mildhybrider (eTSI), där motorerna backas upp av små batterier med 48-voltsteknik.
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Need help figuring out what movie to see this weekend?Join Erin Keeney and Riley Winn for our Reel News segment, as they dive into the biggest movies opening this weekend, and tell you if anything will be worth your money at the box office.This week we take a look at The Kill Team, Terminator: Dark Fate, and Motherless Brooklyn.Based on a true story, The Kill Team centers on a small U.S. infantry team in Afghanistan who executed a number of Afghan civilians and then attempted to cover their tracks.Director Dan Krauss, who also directed an award-winning documentary about the subject in 2013, calls this film “timely,” and “unrelentingly authentic.” Winn notes that he thinks The Kill Team will “give us a different look into the military.I’m the daughter of a war veteran, and I’m going to be seeing this one for sure.” If you’re going to see one movie this weekend, Riley says, see The Kill Team.
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Every weekday, WIRED publishes a new cartoon about the worlds of science and technology.Check back here for more laughs throughout the rest of the week.And if that's still not enough, you can find all of WIRED's cartoons in one place, right here.Plus, sign up for the Daily newsletter and never miss the best of WIRED. Prepare for the deepfake era of video; plus, check out the latest news on AI Want the best tools to get healthy?
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The call-for-papers closes soon – and we'd love to hear from youEvent The call for papers for our Continuous Lifecycle London 2020 conference closes this Friday – and we’re waiting to hear how you’ve transformed your organisation’s software development and deployment pipeline.We’d love to hear your proposals for practical sessions that address real-world problems our attendees face, and the ways in which DevOps, continuous delivery, containers, cloud native, and associated tools, can help solve them.Whether you’ve applied cutting-edge code, technologies, and methodologies to build an entirely new development pipeline, or applied some innovative thinking and a dash of microservices to keep an ageing monolith alive, we’re interested in your stories.We’d also particularly like to hear about deep dives into key concepts and systems, or detailed explanations of how you’re tackled a problem in your own organisation.It doesn’t matter if you achieved your original goal or not, as long as you learned something on the way, and the audience learns something from your experience.
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Facebook wants you to head to its site and apps for news coverage as well as memes that your friends and family are sharing: the social media giant has apparently struck a deal with news providers that will let it display headlines in a dedicated news tab.That's as per a report from the Wall Street Journal, which says licensing fees and other details have been worked out with the WSJ, the New York Post, the Washington Post, BuzzFeed News and Business Insider.Part of the negotiations involved working out how paywalls would be handled, the WSJ says – news providers aren't going to want to give away all their stories for free.According to inside sources, not all of the 200 or so news outlets will be paid, but for the biggest ones, the licensing fees could run into the millions of dollars per year.Have they got news for youBoth human editors and algorithms are going to be used to pick the best stories of the day, the WSJ reports, and there won't be any advertising in this new news tab.
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Cities of London and Westminster MP hits out at “fractious and febrile” political atmosphere and the government’s approach to leaving the EU.HuffPost is part of Verizon Media.Verizon Media and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.Verizon Media will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.Select 'OK' to continue and allow Verizon Media and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.
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"South Park" mocked NBA star LeBron James during Wednesday's new episode, "Let Them Eat Goo," for James' recent controversial comments regarding Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey.Morey tweeted, and then deleted, in support of the Hong Kong protests earlier this month.During the episode, Cartman repeated James' comments about Morey, saying, "Yes, we do have freedom of speech, but at times there are ramifications for the negative that can happen when you are not thinking about others and only thinking about yourself!""Yes, we do have freedom of speech, but at times there are ramifications for the negative that can happen when you are not thinking about others and only thinking about yourself!"China controversies have been a recurring topic during this season of "South Park," and the show was even banned by the Chinese internet recently after the show mocked the country's censorship.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
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