Stuart Smith

Stuart Smith

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Following 46
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Motorola's first flagships in years are fantastic in many ways, but the Edge and Edge Plus have high price tags and too many quirks.
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We’ve seen quite a number of retro recreations of beloved consoles from decades past but, with the exception of the rather unique Atari VCS, most of them aimed for miniature replicas of the original. There are benefits to such smaller forms, especially in saving space, but it’s not easy to recreate the same gaming experience when it comes to retro … Continue reading
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The hybrid power would likely come from Ford's electrified 10-speed automatic transmission as seen on the Explorer hybrid.
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Already a steal at $200, Motorola's latest is even steal-ier. There's also a great deal on the Moto G Power.
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These are the class-action-suit-joining 'droids lawyers are looking for. (We'll get our coats) Google "abuses Android OS to obtain a competitive advantage", according to a lawsuit filed this week alleging that the Alphabet offshoot "secretively monitored and collected users' sensitive personal data" to develop apps to compete with TikTok, Facebook, and Instagram.…
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The phones are less than a year old, but they're no longer available for purchase in the Google Store.
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In this column, “Just putting this out there…,” we write about the odd ways we engage with tech and the unpopular opinions we form about it. You can read the rest of the articles in this series here. “I’m a forward-thinking person who appreciates comfort and good products™, and I shall enjoy the fruits of this technological modernity we live in,” is what I imagine wireless charging connoisseurs think to themselves as they wake up and lift their phone off their Qi-enabled night stand, probably made by IKEA. I’m willing to concede this person does not exist in the real world, but I… This story continues at The Next Web
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(University of Technology Sydney) An efficient in situ pathway to generate andattach oxygen functional groups to graphitic electrodes for supercapacitors by inducing hydrolysis of water molecules within the gel electrolyte.
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Xiaomi currently sits as India’s largest smartphone brand and the market itself is one of the most important for the world of handsets. India is ... The post Xiaomi wants to expand Mi TV manufacture in India appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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From GPU performance profiles to anti-aliasing, this suite of features could deliver more granular gaming tweaks.
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(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) The Department of Energy has awarded $60 million to a new solar fuels initiative - called the Liquid Sunlight Alliance (LiSA) - led by Caltech in close partnership with Berkeley Lab. LiSA will build on the foundational work of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP).
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"Gone are the days of Top 40, it's now the Top 43,000," Spotify said.
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See the first trailer for Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous, an animated TV show aimed at youngsters that looks a bit like a cutscene from a '90s computer game.
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Hello, everyone! Welcome to the new edition of Insider Today. Please sign up here. QUOTE OF THE DAY "The CEOs don't want to be testifying. Even having this collective hearing creates a sense of quasi-guilt just because of who else has gotten called in like this — Big Pharma, Big Tobacco, Big Banks. That's not a crowd they want to be associated with." — Paul Gallant, a tech policy analyst, on Wednesday's Big Tech antitrust House hearing. WHAT'S HAPPENING The Big Four tech CEOs will testify Wednesday before the House antitrust subcommittee. In the most anticipated antitrust hearings in decades, Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google bosses will be interrogated about a variety of market-dominating practices.  AG Bill Barr is testifying before the House Judiciary Committee. Democrats are challenging him on his intervention in the Stone and Flynn cases, the Lafayette Square assault, and the Portland protests, among other matters. Barr is unapologetic and accused Democrats of trying to discredit him.  The Trump campaign has "masked" $170 million in campaign spending, alleges campaign finance watchdog. The nonpartisan Campaign Legal Center filed a complaint with the FEC that that campaign "disguised" spending by funneling it through organizations controlled by people involved in the campaign, such as Brad Parscale. The FEC has no quorum and so can't enforce campaign finance laws.  The Trump administration dispatched another 100 federal agents to Portland. They join the 114 feds already there. Nightly protests have grown since the feds stepped up their presence two weeks ago. VIEWS OF THE DAY Big Tech has no friends in Washington On Wednesday the CEOs of the four biggest tech companies — Amazon, Facebook, Google and Apple — will testify before a House subcommittee via Zoom. They will have no friends. Over the last few years both Republicans and Democrats have begun to look at Silicon Valley with a great deal of skepticism, and there are now pro-antitrust factions on both sides of the aisle. This hearing will be conducted by the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust, which is helmed by Democratic Rep. David Cicilline with GOP Rep. Doug Collins serving as Ranking Member. Both of these gentlemen have a history of supporting antitrust legislation that goes back to before the Trump administration started. Expect the politicians on this subcommittee to know their stuff in a way we have not seen in previous hearings. It's also become clear that politicians on both sides of the aisle think they can score political points with their base by beating up on these executives. On Monday, GOP Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida — who is more known for partisan stunts than any productive legislation — filed a criminal referral to the Department of Justice for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Gaetz accused Zuckerberg of lying to Congress in 2018 when Zuckerberg denied that there was any bias against conservative speech on Facebook. Facebook's own internal reports actually show a bias toward conservative content, and the top 10 most shared posts on the platform every day are consistently from conservative outlets. But it's clear Gaetz thinks his base will appreciate this spectacle. A few things to know going in: Americans are forming fewer small businesses than they ever have in decades. In this hearing Facebook is going to try to argue that we need it to counter similar platforms coming out of China. I don't expect anyone on this subcommittee to buy that argument, especially not when it comes to breaking up Instagram, Facebook, and Whatsapp. Expect Jeff Bezos to get beat up over the fact that Amazon pays so little tax. In 2019 Amazon paid about $162 million in federal tax while rival Wal-Mart paid $3 billion. Apple will likely get knocked for "rent seeking," as gatekeeper to the app market. Spotify has been arguing that Apple Music has an unfair advantage because it doesn't have to pay Apple to be in the App Store. It'll also get knocked for undercutting rivals with Apple TV+. Google will, of course, be called to answer for its dominance over search and the hellscape that is YouTube. —LL Yes, but "Big Tech" has a point: It's a global market. If we hobble US companies, we'll open the door even wider for China, et al. Many Americans are frustrated with the power and influence of tech-powered American companies like Facebook, Google, Apple, and Amazon. The answer, many people say, is to break the companies up. At the same time, many Americans worry that heavily regulated American companies are losing ground to companies based in other countries that aren't subject to the same rules. Well, we can't have it both ways. We live in a global economy, with global companies. If we want US companies to be competitive with global companies, we need to remember that US regulators don't set the rules for the whole world. — HB  More local COVID deaths mean less support for Trump President Trump was "bored" by the pandemic, until he realized it was hitting "our people." Here's why he better keep paying attention to Covid.  In a remarkable display of data wizardry, the New York Times merges disparate information about COVID and polls to show that higher local death rates are associated with a drop in support for Trump and other Republican candidates.  The drop isn't huge: A doubled death rate causes Republicans to lose one-third of a point. But it's real: That decline is not occurring in states such as Wyoming that have so far ducked Covid. The Times likens this Covid shadow to historical polls showing that combat deaths grind down politicians' popular support.  If this effect continues through Election Day, it could make a genuine difference in presidential swing states and tight Senate races, given that the virus is ravaging Arizona, Florida, Texas, and Georgia.  More than anything, this data might cause President Trump to keep paying attention to the pandemic. Even if he cares little about Americans in swing states dying, he cares a lot about Americans in swing states voting. — DP Yes, this Georgia Senate ad was anti-Semitic GOP Sen. David Perdue of Georgia has yanked down a Facebook ad he was running against Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff. The ad showed a photo of Ossoff in which his nose — and only his nose — was digitally lengthened and widened, along with a message that Democrats were trying "to buy" Georgia. The ad also included an image of Sen. Chuck Schumer, who, like Ossoff, is a Jewish Democrat.  Perdue's campaign deleted the ad, feebly claiming that an "unintentional error" by a contractor had distorted the photo, and that Perdue had never seen it.  But this is textbook anti-Semitism, Jews trying to use their money to deceive the good people of Georgia. It's not even a dog whistle. It's a whistle. — DP Disney is strange during COVID Times The parks are largely empty, public health warnings klaxon every few minutes, the costumed characters keep their distance, you never have to wait in line, Graeme Wood writes in the Atlantic.  "The experience of Disney World under these circumstances is one of unsettling solitude….What is an amusement park in which visible smiles are forbidden, and laughter and screams of delight are muffled to the point of inaudibility?"  Working there is not so hotsy-totsy either. An anonymous Epcot employee describes their job now as an experience of cognitive dissonance — trying to maintain the trademark Disney good cheer while being deadly serious about masks and distancing. — DP  Is it just me, or does $250 billion seem cheap for some peace of mind? Republicans have released their proposal to Democrats for the next coronavirus aid bill. It includes reducing the federal boost to unemployment checks from $600 a week to $200 a week. Then in October states would start reimbursing 70% of pre-pandemic wages. Analysts at Raymond James estimate this plan will cost $100 billion. Keeping the $600 a week payments til the end of the year would cost $250 billion more.  Maybe I've become desensitized to eye-popping numbers. Maybe I just remember that the Federal Reserve spent $500 billion buying corporate bonds a few months ago and no one batted an eye, so what's $250 billion to keep people in their homes during a pandemic? After all, the sooner the government gets the pandemic under control, the sooner people can get to work. Until that happens, Republicans are trying to push people to go back to jobs that don't exist. The people who should really be pressured into going to work right now are in Washington. — LL BUSINESS & ECONOMY Ed Yardeni: Stock investors could be "delusional" if prices continue to rise faster than earnings forecasts. He also said the V-shaped recovery of May and June looks like it's stalling.  The top 5 cities for young professionals in 2020. Based on job opportunities, number of millennial residents, and access to affordable housing, Cambridge, Mass. is tops, but both DC and Arlington, Virginia make the list.  LIFE Jaw-dropping images of Simone Biles, the most dominant athlete on the planet. In a regular time, she'd be crushing it at the Tokyo Olympics this week.  There are 16 EGOT winners, and one double winner. Here they all are. THE BIG 3* Hundreds of teenagers wrecked a mini-golf facility in Memphis. The Putt-Putt Fun Center closed because of overcrowding. Furious that they didn't get refunds, the kids vandalized it.  Twitter limited Donald Trump Jr.'s account and deleted a tweet. He had shared COVID misinformation about hydroxychloroquine from controversial Houston doctor.  How to take a screenshot on Windows 10 computers. There are several different ways.  *The most popular stories on Insider today. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
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(Samara Polytech (Samara State Technical University)) A group of Samara Polytech scientists has developed a new technology of high viscosity oil recovery. It calls for the formation exposing with dual-well system and periodic heating.
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Garmin's services have been down for nearly a day.
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Vodafone today revealed the creation of Europe‘s largest telecommunications infrastructure platform, Vantage Towers, which it says is already on track to go public with an IPO in Frankfurt next year. Vantage Towers launches with over 68,000 towers across nine markets. A sizeable chunk of those come by way of a merger with Greece’s Wind Hellas and a 50% stake in UK’s leading telecoms infrastructure firm CTIL — the latter of which manages 14,300 towers. All that new infrastructure will become “part of the essential consolidated grid of at least two of the largest mobile operators in markets where Vodafone has already agreed… This story continues at The Next Web
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New research from Tessian highlights the dangers that mistakes at work can have on organizations and their employees.
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Twisted claims 200 miles of range, but beware, it's not going to be cheap.
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It comes a day before Microsoft's Xbox Series X games showcase.
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Seems like the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is slowly winding down in certain regions of the world, even though there are still some heavily affected. But ... The post Two non-contact IR thermometers discounted on Aliexpress appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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LG’s wallpaper-style OLEDs are among the models affected. | Photo by James Bareham / The Verge LG has launched a repair program for some of its OLED TVs sold in South Korea since 2016, Yonhap News reports. The issue is related to components in the TVs’ power boards, which LG said could cause current increase leading to potential overheating as performance degrades over time. A spokesperson for the company said that the issue only appears to be affecting TVs sold in South Korea for now, but added that LG is “investigating other markets” for potential issues. “The overheating issue occurred only in very few models out of the total that used the component, but we will provide free component swaps for all of them for customer safety,” LG said in a statement, ZDNet reports. A total of around 60,000 TVs are believed to be affected, and... Continue reading…
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Payments provider cops to 'processing issues' caused by 'equipment change' Global online payment provider Worldpay is experiencing an ongoing outage affecting businesses and organisations in the UK.…
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The government has announced it has signed new deals which will provide more than 90 million doses of Covid-19 vaccine.In a statement from Business Secretary Alok Sharma, the government said it has secured an agreement for 30 million doses of a vaccine being developed – and currently at phase two trials – by BioNTech and German firm Pfizer.Sharma said the government has also done an in-principle deal done for 60 million doses of an antibody treatment that is being developed by France’s Valneva for vulnerable patients who cannot receive vaccines.The partnerships mean England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland could have access to enough doses to vaccinate and protect priority groups such as those at increased health risk and frontline workers.Sharma said the new agreements would “ensure the UK has the best chance possible of securing a vaccine that protects those most at risk”.However Kate Bingham, chair of the UK’s Vaccine Taskforce, warned that despite progress, there are still no guarantees that a successful vaccine will be found.“We have to be very cautious because there has never been a vaccine against a coronavirus and there may never be one. What we have been tasked to do is to protect the UK population against Covid-19 through vaccination and do so as quickly as we can,” she told Sky News.“And the announcements this morning show that the UK is absolutely at the forefront of global efforts to source and develop vaccines from across the world, across as range of different technology.”The figure of 90 million is in addition to the 100 million doses of vaccine that are being developed by Oxford University in partnership with AstraZeneca, as well as another at Imperial College London which started human trials in June.Initial data from the Oxford/AstraZeneca trial – which is now in its third phase of human trials in Brazil – is due to be released on Wednesday, with high expectations over its efficacy.This comes after campaigners warned last week that AstraZeneca could price poorer countries out of a British coronavirus vaccine in the future, due to a loophole in the non-profit agreement it signed with Oxford University.Chief medical officer Chris Whitty encouraged people to take part in coronavirus vaccine trials, adding that the willingness of patients to take part has already led to improved care around the world.Whitty said: “Now that there are several promising vaccines on the horizon, we need to call again on the generosity of the public to help find out which potential vaccines are the most effective.”Health Secretary Matt Hancock said every volunteer “will be doing their bit towards finding a vaccine for Covid-19 that will have the potential to save millions of lives around the world and bring this pandemic to an end”.The human trial of the coronavirus vaccine started in May. The study was designed to assess whether healthy people can be protected from coronavirus with this new vaccine called ChAdOx1 nCoV-19. Up to 1,102 participants were recruited across multiple sites in Oxford, Southampton, London and Bristol. The criteria was that volunteers must be aged between 18 and 55, in good health and not have tested positive for Covid-19. A recent poll revealed that one third of Britons definitely will not or are unsure about whether they would take a vaccine for coronavirus.
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Netflix provided a list of its 10 most popular original movies of all time to Bloomberg on Wednesday. The list includes "Extraction," "Bird Box," and "The Irishman." Netflix counts a view if an account watches at least two minutes of a movie or TV series. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Netflix has revealed its most popular original movies ever. The list, provided to Bloomberg on Wednesday, includes the action movie "Extraction" starring Chris Hemsworth, the thriller "Bird Box" starring Sandra Bullock, and Martin Scorsese's Oscar contender "The Irishman." Netflix has lifted the curtain on viewership numbers in recent years on some of its biggest hits, but never indicates whether an original movie has performed poorly. It also introduced daily top 10 lists of its most popular movies and TV shows earlier this year. This is the first time the streaming giant has offered its own list of its most popular movies of all time, though. Netflix counts a view if an account watches at least two minutes of a movie or TV series, which is how it calculated this list and its daily lists. The list of biggest movies ever is based on viewership within the first four weeks. After "Extraction" debuted in April, Netflix said it was pacing to be its biggest movie premiere of all time. It looks like it lived up to expectations, as it topped the list. Netflix's latest original movie, "The Old Guard," is another hit and has topped the daily lists since it debuted on Friday. Below are the 10 most popular Netflix original movies ever:SEE ALSO: Netflix's 'Old Guard' writer explains the challenges of turning his comic into a movie and his 'in case of sequel, break glass' ending 10. "The Perfect Date" (2019) — 48 million viewers in first four weeks Description: "To earn money for college, a high schooler launches an app offering his services as a fake date. But when real feelings emerge, things get complicated." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 65% What critics said: "'The Perfect Date' feels engineered by Netflix algorithms." — Los Angeles Times 9. "The Platform" (2020) —56 million Description: "In a prison where inmates on high floors eat better than those below, who get the scant scraps, one man tries to effect change so everyone gets enough." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 83% What critics said: "If you can stomach it, 'The Platform' is a funny and fierce farce with its eyes on race, class and the ways people can rise up for the betterment of all by working together." — Detroit News 8. "The Wrong Missy" (2020) — 59 million Description: "Tim thinks he's invited the woman of his dreams on a work retreat to Hawaii, realizing too late he mistakenly texted someone from a nightmare blind date." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 36% What critics said: "One can't shake the impression that Spade has been handed his unwanted leftovers." — AV Club 7. "Triple Frontier" (2019) — 63 million Description: "Loyalties are tested when five former special forces operatives reunite to steal a drug lord's fortune, unleashing a chain of unintended consequences." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 71% What critics said: "There's a meta-narrative in there somewhere, condemning films like Triple Frontier for exploiting the violence of war for superficial ends, but Chandor doesn't delve into self-analysis long enough to make a point about it." — The Wrap 6. "The Irishman" (2019) — 64 million Description: "Hit man Frank Sheeran looks back at the secrets he kept as a loyal member of the Bufalino crime family in this acclaimed film from Martin Scorsese." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 96% What critics said: "It's the ultimate fusing of Scorsese's two sides ... And even though it takes a while to get there, the movie is a masterpiece, one made by a man counting down his own years as if they were rosary beads." — Boston Globe  5. "Murder Mystery" (2019) — 73 million Description: "On a long-awaited trip to Europe, a New York City cop and his hairdresser wife scramble to solve a baffling murder aboard a billionaire's yacht." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 44% What critics said: "It would be uncomfortably cynical to assume that Sandler thinks these novocaine-like comedies are what common people want to watch, but the guy doesn't leave us much choice." — Indiewire 4. "6 Underground" (2019) — 83 million Description: "After faking his death, a tech billionaire recruits a team of international operatives for a bold and bloody mission to take down a brutal dictator." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 36% What critics said: "This is a terrible action movie that utilizes Michael Bay's worst instincts and none of his best." — Newsday 3. "Spenser Confidential" (2020) — 85 million Description: "Spenser, an ex-cop and ex-con, teams up with aspiring fighter Hawk to uncover a sinister conspiracy tied to the deaths of two Boston police officers." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 37% What critics said: "It's an action-comedy-mystery-thriller that manages to spectacularly fail at all the above, an algorithmic abomination that's as coldly constructed as it is clumsily made." — Guardian 2. "Bird Box" (2018) — 89 million Description: "Five years after an ominous unseen presence drives most of society to suicide, a survivor and her two children make a desperate bid to reach safety." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 63% What critics said: "Unfortunately, Bird Box puts these performers through familiar paces, in roles of such tight typecasting that they seem like recurring characters in an extended TV series." — New Yorker 1. "Extraction" (2020) — 99 million Description: "A hardened mercenary's mission becomes a soul-searching race to survive when he's sent into Bangladesh to rescue a drug lord's kidnapped son." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 68% What critics said: "No judgments here if you just want to hang back and let nonstop gore, gunfire, explosions and a gung-ho Chris Hemsworth numb you into submission." — Rolling Stone
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(University of Cambridge) Research England has awarded two grants, totalling £1.5 million, to support two programmes working to dramatically increase the economic value and social impacts derived from university research, both internationally and in the UK. The funds will be administered by the University of Cambridge.
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SpaceX has launched hundreds of its internet-beaming Starlink satellites into orbit since 2019. On Tuesday, a college student tweeted the first official SpaceX photos of satellite dishes, or user terminals, that will connect subscribers to the web. Company founder Elon Musk has described the terminals as "UFOs on a stick" and confirmed their authenticity as SpaceX works to start a private beta test of the internet service this summer. A review of Starlink.com's public source code by Business Insider revealed numerous potential details about the upcoming beta program. Beta users may have to pay only $1 for a Starlink user terminal and internet service, but may need to install the devices themselves — and can't talk publicly about their participation in the test program. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Hidden in the code of a SpaceX website are the first official pictures of satellite dishes that will connect future subscribers to Starlink — a fleet of low-flying, internet-beaming satellites. What's more, a review of the site's code by Business Insider turned up numerous credible details about how an upcoming beta test of Starlink might work. SpaceX founder Elon Musk has previously described the satellite dishes, or user terminals, as looking like a "UFO on a stick." Though the company has yet to formally share images of the terminals, fans have hunted down Starlink test sites listed in US regulatory documents and taken pictures of prototype antennas.  In this case, Vivien Hantusch, a student at the Peter Behrens School of Arts (who often interacts with Musk on Twitter), found links to official pictures in the public source code of Starlink's website. "UFO on a stick aka Starlink user terminal looks beautiful," Hantusch tweeted on Tuesday evening, sharing two crops of the images. Her posts led Business Insider to carry out a wider review of the site code, which contained what appear to be in-depth details of the Starlink beta program. Musk replied to the tweet with details he's shared before about the terminals.  "Starlink terminal has motors to self-orient for optimal view angle. No expert installer required. Just plug in & give it a clear view of the sky," Musk said. "Can be in garden, on roof, table, pretty much anywhere, so long as it has a wide view of the sky." SpaceX is gearing up to launch a private beta for Starlink this summer and a more public user test program later this year. To that end, the company sent emails overnight on Monday to Starlink beta applicants requesting addresses for where they'd like service. A review by Business Insider of Starlink.com's public source code suggests that SpaceX is very close to finishing a website for beta testers. SpaceX did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Being a Starlink beta tester may cost $1 a month During our code review, Business Insider discovered a JavaScript file that appears to power a future page for beta invitees. The code gives a picture of how the page would probably work, but could change before launch. The file includes a link to another apparent user terminal image, above. It also has programming for would-be users to enter a non-transferable participation code and create an account. More importantly, there are roughly 2,000 words in the file that appear to lay out a privacy policy, terms of service, and the fee to participate in "Starlink Beta" — $1 a month. (Though the file later specifies a $3 initial charge, followed by $2 per month charge thereafter.) The Starlink website file says: "These charges are not a fee for the Starlink hardware or services, but are being requested exclusively to allow for the testing of our ordering and billing systems as part of this beta program."  "SpaceX is temporarily loaning you the hardware and providing the internet services free of charge. The $1 will be charged 30 days after your hardware is shipped." Also in the file is text explaining the rationale for the test program: "Starlink Beta is an opportunity to be an early user of the SpaceX's satellite internet system. The purpose of Starlink Beta is to gather feedback that will help us make decisions on how best to implement the system for Starlink's official launch. "By design, the beta experience will be imperfect. Our goal is to incorporate feedback from a variety of users to ensure we build the best satellite broadband internet system possible." Following that is an FAQ that expands on how the beta program might actually work. An answer to a "who can participate" question says "Starlink Beta will begin in the Northern United States and lower Canada, with those living in rural and/or remote communities in the Washington state area." Being in those locations won't ensure participation, though, as SpaceX is also considering how many participants are in a given area. Importantly, would-be beta testers will also need a clear view of the northern sky: "Why do I need a clear view of the northern sky to be a beta tester? The Starlink system is currently made up of nearly 600 satellites orbiting the Earth that can provide internet service in a very specific range — between 44 and 52 degrees north latitude. "Your Starlink dish requires a clear view of the Northern sky in order to communicate with the Starlink satellites. Without the clear view, the Starlink dish cannot make a good connection and your service will be extremely poor." But even with ideal service, participants shouldn't expect a seamless web connection, the file states, since SpaceX's work to improve the satellite network may cause intermittent disruptions. "When connected, your service quality will be high, but your connection will not be consistent," the file says. "This means it may support streaming video with some buffering, but likely is not suitable for gaming or work purposes." Users who complete the sign-up process will be permitted to order a "Starlink Kit" and, once they do, will be greeted with an order confirmation page, according to the code. "Your Starlink Kit will arrive via FedEx pre-assembled with a Starlink dish, router, power supply and mount depending on your dwelling type," the file says. Near the end of the FAQ is more detail about SpaceX's technical argument for creating Starlink internet service: "How does Starlink internet work? Starlink will deliver high-speed broadband internet across the globe with a large, low-Earth constellation of relatively small but advanced satellites. Satellite internet works by sending information through the vacuum of space, where it travels nearly 50% faster than in fiber-optic cable. "Most satellite internet services today come from single geostationary satellites that orbit the planet at about 35,000km, covering a fixed region of the Earth. Starlink, on the other hand, is a constellation of multiple satellites that orbit the planet much lower at about 550km, and cover the entire globe. "Because the satellites are in a low orbit, the round-trip data time between the user and the satellite — also known as latency — is much lower than with satellites in geostationary orbit. This enables Starlink to deliver services like online gaming that are usually not possible on other satellite broadband systems." Finally, text in the file says, beta testers who want to cancel can do so "at any time." But the first rule of the Starlink Beta is you do not talk about Starlink Beta However, the terms and conditions laid out in the text make clear the program isn't one you can tell anyone about, since every tester will be required to sign a non-disclosure agreement. "You are being provided early access to the Starlink Services. The Starlink Services and details like internet speeds, uptime, coverage, and other performance specifications are confidential and proprietary to SpaceX," the file says. "You may NOT discuss your participation in the Beta Program online or with those outside of your household, unless they are SpaceX employees." The file goes on to add: "You must not share anything on social media about the Starlink Services or the Beta Program. This applies not only to public forums, but also to private accounts and restricted groups. "Do not provide access or information about Starlink Services to the media or allow third-parties to take pictures of any part of the Starlink Kit." Over the course of 8 weeks, the file says, testers may be expected to "dedicate an average of 30 minutes to 1 hour per day testing the Starlink Services and providing feedback on a periodic basis," including surveys, emails, and calls with SpaceX employees. Further, SpaceX also seems to want testers to install their own kits. This may be to test the ease of mounting an advanced satellite dish to a roof or wall, but perhaps also to protect trade secrets from curious local handymen (who might post photos or descriptions of the tech). "You are responsible for installing the Starlink Kit. Do not allow third-parties, or those not associated with SpaceX, to access or install the Starlink Kit unless you obtain approval form [sic] SpaceX," the file's text says. Doing anything illegal with a Starlink web connection won't be tolerated, according to SpaceX's file, and those users who don't return the equipment within 30 days of SpaceX's request will apparently be charged an "equipment fee." Though that fee is unspecified, it could be significant: The phased-array antenna inside each user terminal may cost more than $1,000 to make, according to some industry analysts. Jake Swearingen and Samir Yahyazade contributed to this story. Have a story or inside information to share about the spaceflight industry? Send Dave Mosher an email at [email protected] or a Twitter direct message at @davemosher. More secure communication options are listed here.SEE ALSO: Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos have profound visions for humanity's future in space. Here's how the billionaires' goals compare. DON'T MISS: A fast-growing startup led by former SpaceX and Blue Origin employees just scored 2 huge wins in its quest to launch 3D-printed rockets Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why NASA waited nearly a decade to send astronauts into space from the US
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Deep upset at what is perceived as broken commitments Google's creation of an Open Usage Commons organisation to manage trademarks including those of Kubernetes service mesh Istio has drawn harsh criticism from other tech giants unhappy with the new approach.…
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Lucid Motors CEO Peter Rawlinson worked for Tesla CEO Elon Musk from 2009 to 2012. Rawlinson said the biggest lesson he learned from Musk is the importance of relentless optimism. "Sometimes you have to put all your chips in," Rawlinson said. Are you a current or former Lucid employee? Do you have an opinion about what it's like to work there? Contact this reporter at [email protected], on Signal at 646-768-4712, or via his encrypted email address [email protected] Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Peter Rawlinson worked for Tesla CEO Elon Musk from 2009-2012 as he led the development of the electric-car maker's groundbreaking Model S sedan. Now the chief executive of the electric-vehicle startup Lucid Motors, Rawlinson learned from Musk the importance of relentless optimism. "I really believe that success can beget success," Rawlinson said in an interview with Business Insider. "It can be a self-fulfilling prophecy if you're really committed and you're all in, and everyone at Lucid knows I am. And that's the leadership I hope I provide." If you focus too much on what might go wrong, it can decrease your odds of achieving your goals, he added. "Sometimes you have to put all your chips in," he said. Musk, Rawlinson said, demonstrated his commitment to success "on an hour-by-hour basis." Rawlinson has taken that attitude to Lucid, which he joined in 2013 (he became the company's CEO in 2019). His confidence in the company and its debut vehicle, the Air luxury sedan, is driven by Lucid's in-house engineering and design efforts. According to the company, the Air will be able to drive over 400 miles between charges and accelerate from 0-60 mph in under 2.5 seconds. Those specs would make the Air competitive with the Model S, which, depending on the trim, has a maximum range of 402 miles and a 2.3-second 0-60 mph time. "We're creating a car which is going to be the best car in the world," Rawlinson said. "People are going to want it." Lucid will unveil the production version of the Air in September before beginning production next year. The vehicle's price will start "well north" of $100,000, Rawlinson said. Are you a current or former Lucid employee? Do you have an opinion about what it's like to work there? Contact this reporter at [email protected], on Signal at 646-768-4712, or via his encrypted email address [email protected] Read more: Electric pickups are on the way, promising everything from bulletproofing to drinking fountains. Here are some of the wildest features to expect from Tesla, Rivian, and others. Tesla is transforming how cars are sold. But 27 insiders say the company's methods mean slashed pay and living in constant fear of getting laid off. Elon Musk predicts Tesla will complete the 'basic functionality' needed for fully autonomous driving this year — 4 years after the company started selling 'full self driving' software Hydrogen vs. electric: Nikola's CEO reveals why businesses should buy the Nikola Two hydrogen-fueled truck instead of the battery-powered Tesla Semi SEE ALSO: A Ford Focus driver wound up with a nearly $1,000 ticket after being clocked at 437 mph by a faulty speed camera Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Tax Day is now July 15 — this is what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
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(University of Technology Sydney) A study investigating sustainable-origin sorbent materials to clean up oil spill disasters has made a surprising discovery. Dog fur is particularly good at cleaning up crude oil from different types of land surfaces and, together with human hair recycled from salons, can be used as an effective and sustainable way to mop dangerous environmental contaminants.
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