Val Strefeler

Val Strefeler

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Following 45
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Social media platforms repeatedly use so-called dark patterns to nudge you toward giving away more of your data.
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A new study tested one neck gaiter and found that it didn't slow the spread of respiratory droplets. But researchers say that doesn't tell the full story.
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Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge Apple is making watchOS 7 available via public beta starting today. It’s the first time that Apple has released a public beta for its smartwatches that you can try out before the final release. It joins a couple other operating systems that Apple currently has in public preview, including iOS 14, iPadOS 14, and macOS Big Sur. We’re going to walk you through getting the new software on your Apple Watch. What to know about watchOS 7 before installing the beta Before you even start, you must install the iOS 14 public beta preview on your iPhone to get the watchOS 7 beta software, and you can follow instructions to do that here. The watchOS 7 beta requires using a phone with the latest beta software, and you’ll need to execute the steps... Continue reading…
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"I hope that a lot of the lessons that we're learning now will continue and civilisation will get smarter about digitisation because it really can add a lot of value to the human condition." The post The Big Interview: Bill McDermott, CEO, ServiceNow, on Life After SAP appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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Commentary: "I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords."
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This article was originally published by Michael Coates on Clean Fleet Report, a publication that gives its readers the information they need to move to cars and trucks with best fuel economy, including electric cars, fuel cells, plug-in hybrids, hybrids and advanced diesel and gasoline engines. Often news comes not from corporate press releases, but secondary material. Such is the case with General Motors electric vehicle product plan, which has dribbled out in individual announcements and teasers, but was finally drawn together in the company’s 2019 Sustainability Report that was released this month. The document lays out a 12-EV strategy that… This story continues at The Next Web
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Two of the best true wireless earbuds for iOS users, the AirPods Pro and Powerbeats Pro, are on sale at Amazon and Verizon from only $200.
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If you’ve been on the fence about buying any of this year’s four new iPhones, you will have a lot more time to consider after the phones get announced. There have been rumors about how Apple’s first 5G-enabled iPhones would be delayed for one reason or another but those have always been rumors. Now Apple CFO Luca Maestri himself confirmed … Continue reading
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The folks at Microsoft have pretty much exterminated the bugs they introduced in July’s patches. The Outlook-killing bug got fixed by an emergency update to Microsoft’s own servers. The Win7 .NET patch was fixed and re-released nine days after paying Win7 Extended Security customers started bellyaching.  To read this article in full, please click here
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During the company's Q2 earnings call, Google said it was "reimagining the optimal work environment," days after it told employees they could work from home for another year.  As the pandemic shows no sign of relenting, Google is faced with a new challenge: How to make the company a great place to work when it can no longer rely on its famously lavish office perks.  That will be especially challenging as Google plans to grow its headcount, particularly through new graduates who will have no sense of the old culture.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Google's second-quarter earnings on Thursday revealed a historic year-on-year revenue decline for the tech giant as the coronavirus crisis pummeled the advertising industry. But while executives were "cautiously encouraged" that the ad outlook was improving, there's another major pandemic-related challenge ahead for the search giant.  CEO Sundar Pichai told employees this week that they would be able to work from home for another year, until summer 2021. Now — as executives hinted in the Q2 earnings call — Google must sort through the reality of what extended remote work means for the company and its culture. Google's chief financial officer Ruth Porat said that Google expects a "modest decrease" in how much it spends on office and data centers through the rest of 2020, compared to the year before. "This is particularly due to our decision to slow the pace at which we acquire office buildings in the near term as we focus on reimagining the optimal work environment," she added. The "optimal work environment" for Google has historically been one of free food, live company-wide "TGIF" meetings with top executives, and more perks than you can throw a Google bike at. But with most of its workforce operating remote for up to another year, Google is faced with rethinking the way it operates and how to make an office-less Google a great place to work – especially as employees already see Google moving moving away from its culture of old. As the many perks that were touchstones of what made Google such a sought-after employer disappear, it will need to adjust its philosophies and benefits accordingly.  On the earnings call, Porat said that while Google still expected the pace of headcount growth to decelerate "somewhat" in 2020, the company will continue to hire "aggressively" in priority areas, such as Cloud. Plus, it plans to bring on a new class of younger workers, too.  "We still expect that headcount additions will be seasonally higher in Q3 as we bring on new graduates," Porat added. Bringing on a fresh spate of new employees without any sense of the old Google culture to attune themselves to presents its own bucket of challenges for Google as it tries to reimagine what a more flexible future for the company looks like. There are issues beyond the cultural aspects, too. In an interview with The Verge back in May, Pichai said that "productivity is down in certain parts" of Google during remote work. While companies such as Twitter were announcing their employees could work from home forever, Pichai seemed hesitant to suggest a fully-remote solution would work for Google. "Let's say you're designing next year's products, and you're in a brainstorming phase, and things are more unstructured," he said. "How does that collaboration actually work?" As the timeline for coming back into an office keeps moving back, Google will have to figure that out.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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What's happening in the streets isn't what you're seeing in the tweets.
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Apple will report its fiscal third-quarter earnings on Thursday, many analysts are already fixated on the company's next major iPhone launch expected for the fall. That launch will serve as a better indicator of the company's long-term performance and value rather than recent quarterly financials given the economic impact and uncertainty caused by the coronavirus pandemic. As has been the case in recent quarters, some analysts see Apple's services business as being a potential bright spot in its third-quarter earnings. But analysts will be looking for clues about whether the company's expected 5G iPhone launch is on track for the fall.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Apple's quarterly revenue is expected to shrink by nearly $2 billion — and investors don't care.  With Apple's stock up more than 17% in the past three months, Wall Street is all too happy to ignore the recent lockdown-impaired business results and to focus instead on what's in store this Fall. The most important item on investors' minds when Apple reports its fiscal third quarter results on Thursday will be the expected launch of Apple's first iPhone to support super-fast 5G wireless technology. Whether the coronavirus delays the launch of the next iPhone, and how the pandemic might affect an anticipated iPhone sales "super cycle" are key questions. "What matters most is commentary around September," said Gene Munster, managing partner at Loup Ventures and a longtime Apple observer, calling the results of the last three months a "throwaway quarter." Investors and analysts want to get a sense of whether that the next phone is "still on track" and that Apple "is still producing products," Munster said. The results will come on the heels of a major antitrust hearing taking place on Wednesday, where CEO Tim Cook will testify alongside the CEOs of Amazon, Google, and Facebook as part of an investigation into whether large digital platforms are harming competition in the tech industry. Apple's App Store, a critical part of its services business which has helped ease concerns about sluggish iPhone sales in recent quarters, is expected to be at the heart of lawmakers' concerns.  Another 'throwaway quarter' expected for Apple Apple's revenue stalled in its fiscal second-quarter as the pandemic ravaged the economy — results that didn't come as much of a surprise considering Apple said it expected to miss its quarterly guidance because of COVID-19. Still, the company's wearables and services division continued to show strong growth, prompting Apple to surpass Wall Street's muted expectations. "This may not have been the quarter it could have been absent the pandemic, but I don't think I can recall a quarter where I've been prouder of what we do or how we do it," Apple CEO Tim Cook said during the company's earnings call in April. Since then, Apple has re-opened numerous retail stores, only to close them once again as the coronavirus rebounded in different parts of the US and in overseas markets. Analysts expect COVID-19 will continue to muddy Apple's performance. RBC Capital Markets is already dismissing the June quarter results as being "of limited importance to the longer-term thesis." Apple did not issue guidance for its fiscal third-quarter when it reported its second-quarter earnings in April, because of the uncertainty around the coronavirus. On average, Wall Street analysts expect Apple to generate $52.1 billion of revenue in the fiscal third quarter, down about 3% percent from $53.8 billion in the year-ago period. Apple is expected to report $2.04 in earnings per share in the quarter, versus $2.18 at this time last year. Services may be a 'bright spot' for Apple again  One potential bright spot for Apple in the recently-ended quarter could be its services business, which has helped offset the company's slowing iPhone sales in recent quarters.  J.P. Morgan analysts expect Apple's services business to "remain resilient but moderate," while D.A. Davidson's report, led by senior research analyst Tom Forte, suggests Apple TV Plus could give the company's services business a boost. Both D.A. Davidson and J.P. Morgan analysts also think its possible that the continuation of remote work and learning could have led to an increase in demand for Apple products. But analysts are focused on an expected 5G 'super cycle' kicking off this fall Apple's iPhone launches are always closely watched, but this year is particularly important. Even before Apple unveiled the iPhone 11 and 11 Pro, which was largely expected to be an incremental launch, analysts have looked to Apple's first 5G iPhone to drive significant upgrades.  One of the biggest questions surrounding Apple's next-generation iPhone is whether it will be delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic. Reports have offered varied perspectives on this point. Bloomberg reported in April that some models of the new iPhone could launch weeks later than expected, but would still debut in the fall window. Wedbush Securities analyst Dan Ives has written that he expects Apple's iPhone launch to take place in mid-to-late September or October.  Apple never discloses future products before it's ready to announce them. But analysts may be able to surmise whether the highly-anticipated 5G iPhone will be delayed based on whether Apple issues guidance for its upcoming fiscal fourth quarter.  "If they issue guidance that's kind of low, I think from that you can kind of triangulate that the phone might be delayed," RBC Capital Markets' Muller said to Business Insider. "If they issue guidance that is seasonally higher compared to these last couple of quarters, then you can maybe think that the phone [may] get released sooner rather than later." Analysts will also likely be looking for any commentary around Wednesday's antitrust hearings, the impacts of Apple store closures, iPhone SE adoption, Apple Watch sales trends, according to the notes from RBC Capital Markets and D.A. Davidson.  But the expected iPhone 12 launch will probably be top of mind. Apple's iPhone launch is more critical than ever as bullish analysts and investors are likely hoping that a 5G "supercycle" will ease any concerns about Apple's business stemming from the pandemic. "At the end of the day, the Apple growth story (and stock) moving higher all rests on the iPhone 12 supercycle coming down the pike," Ives wrote in a recent note, "which we believe is the most significant product cycle Cupertino has seen since iPhone 6 was released in 2014."SEE ALSO: Apple Watch Series 5 vs. Series 3: The $200 Series 3 is the best deal for iPhone owners looking for a basic smartwatch Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
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Xiaomi's pushing the limits of smartphone and wireless earbud design with this patent.
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University of Texas researchers unveil protocol to shuffle large data stores into strands of genetic material
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Adam Singer, a former Google marketing manager, said that after living in the Bay Area for over a decade, he's had enough of the astronomical home prices and the city not making strides to improve living conditions. In a 2019 tweetstorm, Singer aired his hang-ups with San Francisco and announced that after a trip to Austin, he and his wife purchased land and would be moving to Texas' capital. "None of my San Francisco or Bay Area friends were surprised," Singer told Business Insider of his relocation. "They're like, 'It's totally reasonable to leave.' No one's fighting to keep me here." A recent report by the real-estate company Compass found that to afford a median-priced home in the San Francisco Bay Area, a person would need to earn more than $340,000 per year. In another vote of confidence for the area, Elon Musk announced Wednesday that Tesla's new Cybertruck factory would be coming to Austin after expressing displeasure with California's regulations. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Adam Singer is tired of San Francisco. The former Google marketing manager said that after living in the Bay Area for over a decade, he's had enough of the astronomical home prices and the city not making progress to improve living conditions. In a tweetstorm in August, Singer aired his hang-ups with San Francisco and announced that after a trip to Austin, he and his wife (and their rescue dog, Dash the Dingo) would be moving to Texas' capitol, increasingly known for its hot startup scene as much as its barbecue. Might as well just share while here & excited (got to meet so many creative, energizing people). Pulled trigger & purchased land today. Done deal. Will be in SF awhile longer while they build our house my wife is designing. Plenty of time to say goodbye. New adventures soon! — Adam Singer (@AdamSinger) August 15, 2019 "So Austin suburbs are beautiful. Houses really reasonably priced. Easy ride to the city. Great food and music scene nearby. What's the catch," Singer tweeted, adding: "For same price of your SF rental you can afford basically as much house as you want here. Crazy." Singer said he recently purchased land in Austin and would work with a local design center to construct his home. Read more: 11 facts about San Francisco's housing market that will make you glad you live somewhere else With housing prices in the San Francisco Bay Area continuing to reach record highs, many like Singer are questioning whether it's worth it to live in the region at all. In a survey of Bay Area residents in February, 44% said they were likely to leave within the next few years. They cited high housing prices as the top reason they were feeling pressure to move. Another report by the real-estate company Compass found just how costly it can be to buy a home in the San Francisco Bay Area. Including mortgage payments, taxes, and insurance, owning a median-priced home in the Bay Area costs about $8,500 per month — and in order to afford that kind of monthly expense, a person would need to earn more than $340,000 per year, the report said. The area has continued to attract top talent, and tech businesses have followed. Amazon, Facebook, and Google all have office space in the city, and on Wednesday Elon Musk announced that Tesla's new Cybertruck factory would be coming to Austin after expressing displeasure with California's regulations and high costs of doing business. Singer, a former Googler, told Business Insider in an interview this week that after two years of house-hunting across the Bay Area, he became all too frustrated seeing the type of homes he could actually afford. "I'm not paying $2 million to live in some boomer's starter home next to a strip mall," Singer said of certain houses he looked at south of San Francisco, near San Jose. In Austin, Singer said, he was able to find "gorgeous" homes for under half a million dollars. Same price SF/Austin (viewed this one but didn't buy). Sure live in the filing cabinet where you hear neighbors play who let the dogs out at 4am or have the custom built bespoke castle with same if not more professional opportunity closeby + prop values have insane room to run. pic.twitter.com/RMGI3iwXyx — Adam Singer (@AdamSinger) August 15, 2019 'A Nimby state' The former Googler put much of the blame for San Francisco's housing prices on city officials who don't want to increase the number of condos and apartments in the area. Other cities, such as Austin and Seattle, Singer said, have been able to keep housing prices from reaching untouchable rates because they've been willing to develop. "People think supply-and-demand economics don't exist as soon as you get into the Bay Area," Singer said. "It's not a thing here." Singer also pointed the finger at longtime San Francisco residents who bought their homes years before prices spiked. Those owners are cashing on the demand from renters, Singer said, and thus have little incentive to advocate for the city to increase its supply of homes. "For the people who already own here, I think they quietly don't give a f---," Singer said. "They have theirs. Whether they want to admit it or not, this is a Nimby state. What they will accomplish — they will squeeze out the middle of San Francisco." (Nimby, an acronym for "not in my backyard," is often used to describe opposition to development in a particular area.) On top of the extravagant housing costs, the Bay Area faces major problems like how to best support its homeless population and provide adequate transportation options for residents, Singer said. He also said he sees much of what initially appealed to him about San Francisco — like local cafes and restaurants — being displaced by trendy restaurants with "$500 prix fixe menus." Good weather and FOMO So why are some San Franciscans still choosing to stick around? Singer said he thinks that, besides the weather, some people, especially those in tech, stay in the Bay Area because of FOMO, or fear of missing out. The thought, he said, is that if you're not in San Francisco, you won't have the chance to work for top tech companies like Uber or Pinterest or Google. That might be true for those just starting their careers, said Singer, who now works as a digital marketing lead at the biotech company Invitae. But for someone who has worked at a company for at least a couple of years and has proved to be a "linchpin" for their team, it's unlikely that the company wouldn't let them work remotely, Singer said. "The unwritten rule at any given mega-corp is if you're a talented individual contributor they will let you work from wherever you want," Singer said. "It is not posted on their website. They will not admit that to you ever. But I've never seen that not be true at any big company." As for the reaction to his Austin relocation, Singer told us that none of his friends or family were all too shocked. "The biggest reaction is 'Why did you stay in San Francisco so long?' from all my non-San Francisco friends," Singer said. "None of my San Francisco or Bay Area friends were surprised. They're like, 'It's totally reasonable to leave.' No one's fighting to keep me here."SEE ALSO: What life is really like in the most expensive place in the US, where the typical home costs $1 million and it feels like everyone works in tech Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
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Depending on which trim you look at, the hybrid powertrain's cost fluctuates.
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Jio Platforms wraps up its fundraising run as well as other startups that recently raised in India.
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An international consortium has compiled the most comprehensive 3D map of the observable cosmos to date.
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The company believes that the attackers also may have attempted to sell some of the usernames.
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University of Washington scientists have designed a wireless camera that can fit on the back of a beetle. Researcher Vikram Iyer told Business Insider it's an important step forward for developing wireless camera technology, because although cameras on smartphones are also small, they are connected to bigger processors and batteries. Next the team is looking at attaching the cameras to moths and spiders. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Scientists at the University of Washington have successfully created a wireless camera so miniature it can be carried on a beetle's back. The scientists published their research on July 15 in Science Robotics, as first reported by Engadget. Their camera weighs just 248 milligrams and can rotate 60 degrees while streaming black-and-white video back to a smartphone from a beetle's back using Bluetooth from a distance of up to 120 meters. The team have been working on the research since fall 2018 Vikram Iyer, one of the authors on the paper, told Business Insider. So why build GoPros for beetles? "Aside from sounding like something from a sci-fi movie, this small wireless vision system is an important step to miniaturizing robots," said Iyer. While cameras in smart phones are much smaller than the ones mounted on the beetles' backs by the researchers, they are not wireless in the same sense as they're hooked up to bigger bits of hardware. "While camera chips we have in things like our phones are small, they still have pretty large batteries and processors," said Iyer. He said advances in miniaturizing wireless cameras could have huge benefits for robotics. "Vision has also become very important for all kinds of larger robotic systems, think cameras on drones and autonomous cars. When we start talking about really small robots though, about the size of a penny, wireless vision becomes pretty challenging due to power size and weight requirements. Enabling small robots to 'see' though could be useful for all sorts of tasks like exploring pipes and other confined spaces," said Iyer. Iyer theorized that cameras mounted on live insects could even have their own applicable benefits in the real world. "Since insects are much better at storing energy, they can walk around for hours unlike man made robots and opens up the potential for using them to gather data in places like smart farms," he said. The researchers chose beetles as their test subjects because they thought the bugs would have the requisite strength to carry the cameras, and because beetles are easy to handle as they don't bite or sting. Specifically the team used two species of darkling beetle, the stinkbeetle (Eleodes nigrina) and the smooth death-feigning beetle (Asbolus laevis). In future, the beetlecam could end up on various kinds of creepy-crawly, according to Iyer. "We could definitely put this on other insects as well though that can carry this weight, and are exploring the idea of putting them on moths or spiders," he said. He added that other researches have got in touch about potentially putting the cameras on birds as well, as many smaller species of bird can't carry much weight while flying.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
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We’re a few days away from finally knowing Samsung’s next big thing for 2020. In August 5, the company is set to unveil the Galaxy ... The post Samsung Galaxy Note 20 and Note 20 Ultra certified by NBTC appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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With savings up to $50 on these top-rated buds, it's the ideal time to upgrade your music listening experience.
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The darker exterior elements are a $1,295 upgrade.
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Looking for the best PlayStation Vr games right now? Here's our pick of the most essential PSVR titles.
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Apple has increased privacy features with the iOS 14 update, but will they change the way you interact with your phone?
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Snap’s Spectacles 3 have finally gone on sale, but if you were hoping for wearable genius from the $380 camera sunglasses you’ll probably be disappointed.Announced back in August, the third-generation of Snapchat’s eyewear now pack two cameras rather than just one, so that wearers can generate augmented reality content.The original Snap Spectacles promised immediacy in your Snapchat content.Resembling the sort of sunglasses you might get free in a trade show swag-bag, their $130 price tag combined with a clever pop-up sales campaign left them the must-have wearable, albeit only briefly.Spectacles 2 followed, with the promise of better image quality, water resistance for the frames, and more onboard storage.That gets you a more striking design, certainly more memorable even if it’s not necessarily to your taste, along with better-quality construction.
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Is it the web page that’s slow or is it your network connection?Google announced today a plan to identify and label websites that typically load slowly by way of clear badging.The company says it may later choose to identify sites that are likely to be slow based on the user’s device and current network conditions, as well.Google hasn’t yet determined how exactly the slow websites will be labeled, but says it may experiment with different options to see which makes the most sense.For example, a slow-loading website may show a “Loading…” page that includes a warning, like a caution icon and text that reads “usually loads slow.” Meanwhile, a fast website may display a green progress indicator bar at the top of the page instead of a blue one.And for links, Chrome may use the context menu to help users know if the site will be slow so you can decide whether or not you want to click.
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Last week, our investigation into some odd transactions at Honestbee under former CEO Joel Sng finally dropped.Such articles validate Tech in Asia’s decision to go the paywall route.To give you a sense of what it took to get this out, we had to conduct numerous conversations with sources, parse through pages of documents, do meticulous fact-checking, and vet the story with a lawyer.Having subscribers gives us the resources to pursue in-depth reporting.But it’s not all about economics.Ex-employees have told me how their lives have been negatively affected by their stints at Honestbee, and how our coverage serves as a form of catharsis for them.
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There are plenty of avenues to get TVs these days, whether you’re pacing the stacks of shelves in a local retailer or absent-mindedly clicking whatever Black Friday TV deal comes up on your Google newsfeed.The past couple of decades has seen traditional supermarkets vastly expand the kind of products they offer, moving from groceries to clothing ranges, kitchenware, 4K Blu-rays and video games, and even electronic devices such as brand new televisions.You won’t get every new TV in your local supermarket, though, as its only specific types of TV brands that tend to offer their wares in that environment.These TV brands include the likes of Polaroid, Onn, RCA, Spectre, JVC, Logik, or Blaupunkt.Supermarket TVs need to appeal to the income bracket of people shopping in that particular outlet – and while you could drop a four-figure sum with your credit card in your local Walmart / Tesco, the most effective targeting strategy for TV manufacturers is to make the TV sale as frictionless as possible with the other purchases you’re making in the store.Televisions you can pick up or fit in your shopping trolley are the easiest to stock in supermarkets, and easiest to fit into your car or method of transport (though a bicycle basket may be pushing it a bit).
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Google it seems, has lost interest in VR tech and now wants it to independently develop on its own.No compatible source was found for this media.Google had started exhibiting its virtual reality (VR) a couple of years ago when it introduced the recently discontinued Daydream VR headset.While the Daydream VR headset was a high-end one, its Cardboard headset is a much affordable version.Cardboard is basically a DIY-kit for creating a VR headset that was available for cheap or even free.It comprised of low-cost lenses and folded cardboard.
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