Vivian Matthews

Vivian Matthews

Followers 67
Following 42
US
The world's first university dedicated to the field of artificial intelligence is set to open its doors to students in Abu Dhabi in January 2021.  The Mohamed bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence is part of the Emirati city state's 50-point plan to diversify its economy for the future.  Trustees includes Dr Kai-Fu Lee, previously of Google China, and Sir Michael Brady, a former director at MIT's AI Lab. We broke down the 3 books Sir Michael told us any students hoping for a spot at MBZUAI need to read.  In January, the world's first university dedicated to the study of AI will welcome its initial cohort of students in Abu Dhabi. The Mohamed bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence (MBZUAI) is part of Abu Dhabi's wider diversification drive, as it attempts to move away an from oil and gas-based economy to focus more intensely on knowledge and skills. Students at MBZUAI will take on a range of courses on the core components of AI, including "Mathematical Foundations for Artificial Intelligence", "Big Data Processing", "Human and Computer Vision", and "Natural Language and Speech Processing". All students admitted to the university will receive a full scholarship, plus benefits including a monthly allowance, health insurance, and accommodation. And the university's board of trustees includes Dr Kai-Fu Lee, former president of Google China, and Sir Michael Brady, one-time associate director of the AI Laboratory at MIT. While the school's reading list is still being finalized, we asked Sir Michael to name the most important books for incoming students to study before applying.  We broke his three top picks down below: "Elements of Causal Inference: Foundations and Learning Algorithms" by Jonas Peters, Dominik Janzing, and Bernhard Schölkopf Buy it here >>  Published in 2017, "Elements of Causal Interference" has fast risen through the ranks to become one of the definitive texts on the mathematical models used in AI. The combined might of Jonas Peters, Dominik Janzing, and Bernhard Schölkopf – the first of the University of Copenhagen and the latter two of the Max Planck Institute in Berlin, respectively – makes this an accessible and essential read. In the words of Ricardo Silver, a senior lecturer at the Alan Turing Institute in London: "This book is high quality work that breaks through, firmly establishing a connection between causal interference and general machine learning." "Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach" by Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig Buy it here >> Originally published in 1995, Russell and Norvig's "Modern Approach" is considered by many to be the definitive text on artificial intelligence, featuring on the reading lists of more than 1,000 universities around the world. Dubbed the "standard text in the field of artificial intelligence" by UC Berkley, the fourth edition of this classic textbook was only just released in April of this year.  Filled with oft-cited chapters on reasoning, perception, and communication, this latest edition focuses more heavily on machine learning, deep learning, and includes new sections on the real-world application of AI.  "Computer Vision: A Modern Approach" by David A. Forsyth and Jean Ponce Buy it here >>  Computer vision, one of the most important fields within artificial intelligence, involves teaching machines to understand, automate, and perform tasks usually only the human eye is capable of.   In their 2011 tome, Forsyth and Ponce – professors at the Universities of California and Paris Orsay, respectively – guide readers through developments in computer vision methods discovered to date. "A Modern Approach" offers both a general view of the entire computer vision industry and the necessary detail for students to be able to build on existing knowledge.       
US
At the beginning of quarantine, it was a lifeline for folks missing the thing people used to call “going out.”
US
(American Society of Agronomy) Scientists use a smartphone camera to easily measure soil density -- a key metric for analyzing our soils
US
The RAM upgrade for the entry-level 13-inch MacBook Pro now costs $200
US
This could see the possible relegation of Bixby in favor of Google Assistant.
UK
Amazon has updated its Alexa mobile app, adding enhanced personalization while reducing the presence of certain third-party features. Notably, the app’s home screen has been updated in a way that emphasizes the features that consumers most commonly use, helping them get straight to the tools they want without excessive tapping and searching. The Alexa icon has moved to the top … Continue reading
UK
It's a six-part limited series titled The Witcher: Blood Origin.
US
We compare the AirPods Pro versus the Galaxy Buds Plus' specs and features to determine the best wireless earbuds.
US
Just $10 separates two of the best premium options for cord cutters who want live TV. Here's how to choose between them.
US
AT&T had 25.5M TV users in June 2018, is down to 18.4M after latest loss.
UK
Nvidia has confirmed that it's next-gen GPU architecture will be coming to its cloud streaming service
UK
Facebook has announced that it is testing personal fundraisers on Instagram, allowing users to raise money for the causes they support. This feature joins the similar fundraising option offered on the main Facebook platform, the company points out, though it is limited to users in certain regions at this time. Users with access to the test will see the new … Continue reading
US
Disney, one of the social network's largest advertisers, put the brakes on Facebook ads for its streaming service, says The Wall Street Journal.
5
US
Review: The R-rated show starring Katherine Langford squanders its promising spin on the Lady of the Lake.
US
While digging to start constructing a high-speed rail project in the U.K., archaeologists uncovered a skeleton that may be a "murder victim" from the Iron Age.
UK
Saving the planet isn’t as simple as switching from plastic to paper.
US
Part of an ongoing White House battle against health experts.
1
US
We compare the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max to help you decide which Apple phone makes the most sense for you.
UK
The new foldable Moto Razr might indeed be coming to India, as hinted earlier by the teasers on social media and now, a registration link on Motorola’s website.The original Moto Razr was one of the most iconic flip phones of all time.To honor that caliber, Motorola brought back its namesake but as a fancy foldable this time.With a tall, inward-folding screen, the new Razr continues to be a flip phone, but with a futuristic twist.The phone was unveiled yesterday at an event in Los Angeles and will be available in the States early next year.Around the same time as the announcement, Motorola’s Indian social media handles posted teasers of the Razr, hinting at its possible arrival to India in near future.
US
At the recent Telecoms.com LIVE event we spoke to CityFibre CEO Greg Mesch to get his perspective on the current state of UK telecoms infrastructure and what could be done to improve it.
China
Earlier this year, 5G was officially launched in China.However, it was only on November 1st that the three major Chinese carriers announce their standard 5G packages.Nevertheless, a couple of 5G smartphones were already in the Chinese market.IDC now has its first tracking report for 5G smartphones in China.As of September this year, the total shipment of 5G mobile phones is about 485,000.The IDC report shows that Vivo ranks first with a 54.3% market share.
US
Now, new models of the physics behind the improbable feat may just help doctors crack kidney stones to pieces.When supersonic jets were first being developed for commercial use in the 1960s, researchers discovered a curious phenomenon that sometimes occurs on test flights through rainforests.Even though raindrops weigh almost nothing, they are capable of creating ring-shaped cracks in the jets' substantial windshields.Although scientists initially had difficulty explaining this curiosity, Professors Frank Philip Bowden and John Field of the University of Cambridge eventually recognized surface waves as the culprits.Certain details of the phenomenon, however, have remained poorly understood due to a lack of mathematics to describe it and experimental setups to validate proposed models.In a new paper published Nov. 1 in Physical Review Research, Pei Zhong, professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke University, and his former graduate student Ying Zhang, now an acoustical engineer for Bose, have closed that gap in scientific knowledge.
UK
Slack markets itself as a tool to increase productivity and portrays other forms of communication, particularly email, as outmoded.Even employees who sit feet away from one another in open areas eventually prefer slacking each other rather than communicating verbally.It seems somehow easier, after all, and maybe less disruptive.The truth, though, is that Slack has become as much a tool for corporate surveillance as email had been in the decades that preceded Slack’s 2013 launch.And workers have good reason to avoid discussing anything on the platform they wouldn’t say aloud in an elevator standing next to their boss.In an article for the Wall Street Journal this summer, reporter Sarah Krouse wrote about the numerous new ways employers are mining internal data to keep tabs on their workers, including text messages and recorded calls on company phones, and yes, even Slack messages.
US
After a nearly six-month-long journey through beta testing, Microsoft is finally getting ready to launch its new Chromium-based Edge browser.Announced today, November 4, during the first day of the Microsoft Ignite conference, the browser will be set to launch on January 15 on Windows 7, 8, and 10, and MacOS.Although this launch is still quite a while away, Microsoft is making a release candidate of the new browser (which is based on Google’s open-source Chromium-engine) available for download.Unlike the current beta builds and insider channels, this release candidate version of the browser is close to what can be expected come January 15.It is also much more stable and bug-free but with the same new abilities that have been tested over the past few months.Some of those new abilities include a “Collections” feature that helps users quickly gather a list of webpages in one central hub from right inside the browser.
US
He wanted to show off a strange trick he'd discovered.Sugawara pointed a high-powered laser at the microphone of his iPad—all inside of a black metal box, to avoid burning or blinding anyone—and had Fu put on a pair of earbuds to listen to the sound the iPad's mic picked up.As Sugawara varied the laser's intensity over time in the shape of a sine wave, fluctuating at about 1,000 times a second, Fu picked up a distinct high-pitched tone.The iPad's microphone had inexplicably converted the laser's light into an electrical signal, just as it would with sound.Six months later Sugawara—visiting from the Tokyo-based University of Electro-Communications—along with Fu and a group of University of Michigan researchers have honed that curious photoacoustic quirk into something far more disturbing.They can now use lasers to silently "speak" to any computer that receives voice commands—including smartphones, Amazon Echo speakers, Google Homes, and Facebook's Portal video chat devices.
Sweden
The Swedish game developer Stunlock Studios has, since 2010, has built up its business in sweden, with up to 40 employees.It's a fighting game with a fantasy theme where two teams battle against each other in a best-of-five-round unanimous decision in a gladiatorlik of the arena.In its latest annual report, wrote in Stunlock Studios, they were in desperate need of external funding in 2019.Prior to that, the company had not been able to grow organically without venture capital.They are investing $ 4 million, equivalent to 39 million euros, against a 31 per cent stake in Stunlock Studios.in the Di, the Digital has been applied for Stunlock Studios, which is, by the chief financial officer of Philip Wannerskog welcome to the company does not wish to comment on, Tencents investment.
US
The GamesBeat Decides podcast can finally talk about Death Stranding, and that’s exactly what happens on this week’s episode.Gameranx producer Tom Johnson and Sidequesting editor and podcaster Erron Kelly join GamesBeat PC gaming editor Jeff Grubb for that discussion.The crew also touches on some Destiny 2, The Outer Worlds, and Lonely Mountain Downhill.The news this week is all about BlizzCon and Blizzard’s announcements.EA is back on Steam.Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, meanwhile, misrepresents a real-world war crime, which is fun.
More

Top