Wayne Konwinski

Wayne Konwinski

Followers 49
Following 47
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Alibaba is building out its digital ecosystem by adding Netease, the popular music-streaming platform, to its customer loyalty program.
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Counterpoint Research recently published research data. The new coronavirus pandemic has a severe impact on economic activities and shipments of high-end models in the Indian ... The post India’s High-End Smartphone Shipments Fell Sharply In Q2 appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The road ahead for smaller enterprises is a difficult one, but embarking on digital transformations could make the journey easier.
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Because no one likes to install spoof system files Microsoft is preparing to once and for all drop support for the SHA-1 hash algorithm.…
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Between football, new gaming consoles, Indian low-end-handsets and cloud computing, life is complex for Korean giant right now Samsung Electronics has reported droopy results for its second quarter and has been beaten out by Huawei in the global handset shipments stakes for the first time.…
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Originally expected to go on sale in 2019, the new Soul EV has faced multiple delays, and now we hear it's been canceled for good.
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Many major companies remain remote as the coronavirus pandemic wears on — and plenty of those have no immediate plans to return to the office. Google just announced that it is extending its work-from-home policy by an entire year. Employees don't have to return to the company's San Francisco Bay Area campus until June 2021. Other companies like Twitter and Square have announced that employees could work remotely indefinitely. Following the coronavirus pandemic, more than half of Americans want to continue working remotely while two-thirds of companies may render their current work-from-home policies permanent. Here's a list of companies that have already announced remote work as a longterm business strategy. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. This is a developing story. Check back for updates.SEE ALSO: The coronavirus outbreak has triggered unprecedented mass layoffs and furloughs. Here are the major companies that have announced they are downsizing their workforces. Google originally said employees would return to its San Francisco Bay Area base on July 6, 2020, then pushed that date to September. Now, Google is extending its employee work-from-home policy through June 2021. Source: Business Insider, Wall Street Journal Twitter, based in San Francisco, told employees in May that they could work from home indefinitely. The company suspended business travel and in-person events for the rest of 2020. Source: Business Insider Square, which is also led by Twitter's Jack Dorsey, adopted a similar policy around the same time and will allow employees to work from home indefinitely, even after offices reopen. Source: Business Insider Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told employees in late May that many would be able to work from home indefinitely, and plans to keep staff remote through 2020. Source: New York Times Salesforce announced in May that it will give all employees an option to work from home through 2020, even as its 160 locations worldwide open on different timelines. Source: Business Insider Seattle-based Amazon will allow employees to work from home through January 8, 2021, which was recently extended from October. Source: Business Insider Microsoft, which is based in Redmond, Washington, told Business Insider in May that their employees can work from home through at least October 2020. Source: Business Insider Spotify told employees worldwide that they may continue working from home until 2021. Each office will open according to government guidelines city-by-city. Source: Variety Japanese electronic giant Hitachi also allowed employees to work from home amid the pandemic, and committed to having 70% of its employees work from home permanently. Source: CNN Coinbase, a cryptocurrency exchange company based in the Bay Area, will make working from home a permanent arrangement. CEO Brian Armstrong announced in May that the company will offer office space for those who would like it following lockdown, but most roles will remain remote. Source: Coinbase Mastercard does not plan to implement a formal return to the office anytime soon. In May, it said employees can remain remote until they are comfortable returning. Source: Reuters Zillow CEO Rich Barton announced plans to work from home through the end of 2020 in April. Source: Housing Wire Research company Nielsen plans to convert its New York City offices into meeting spaces for employees as they continue to work from home even after the pandemic passes. Source: New York Times Nationwide Insurance announced in May that it plans to downsize from 20 physical offices to just four following the pandemic. The majority of the company's employees will continue to work from home permanently. Source: Fortune
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Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has repeatedly said that he thinks artificial intelligence poses a threat to humanity. Of the companies working on AI technology, Musk is most concerned by the Google-owned DeepMind project, he said in a new interview with the New York Times. "The nature of the AI that they're building is one that crushes all humans at all games," he said. "It's basically the plotline in 'WarGames.'" In the 1983 film "WarGames," starring Matthew Broderick, a supercomputer trained to test wartime scenarios is accidentally triggered to start a nuclear war. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Billionaire Elon Musk has been sounding the alarm about the potentially dangerous, species-ending future of artificial intelligence for years now. In 2016,  he warned that human beings could become the equivalent of "house cats" to new AI overlords. He has since repeatedly called for regulation and caution when it comes to new AI technology. But, of all the various AI projects currently in the works, none has Musk more worried than Google's DeepMind. "Just the nature of the AI that they're building is one that crushes all humans at all games," Musk told the New York Times in a new interview. "I mean, it's basically the plotline in 'WarGames.'" In "WarGames," a teenage hacker played by Matthew Broderick connects to an AI-controlled government supercomputer trained to run war simulations. In attempting to play a game titled "Global Thermonuclear War," the AI convinces government officials that a nuclear attack from the Soviet Union was imminent.  In the end (spoiler for those who haven't seen the 37-year-old movie), the computer runs enough simulations of the potential end results of global thermonuclear war that it declares no winner to be possible, and that the only way to win is to not play. The 1983 film is a direct reflection of its time and place: fear in the US of nuclear war with the Soviet Union still looming, and fear of increasingly advanced technology. But Musk wasn't just talking about old films when he compared DeepMind to "WarGames" – he also said that AI could surpass human intelligence in the next five years, even if we don't see the impact of it immediately. "That doesn't mean that everything goes to hell in five years," he said. "It just means that things get unstable or weird." Musk was an early investor in DeepMind, which sold to Google in 2014 for over $500 million, according to reports. Rather than seeking a return on investment, Musk said in a 2017 interview, he did it to keep an eye on burgeoning AI developments. "It gave me more visibility into the rate at which things were improving, and I think they're really improving at an accelerating rate, far faster than people realize," he said in the 2017 interview. "Mostly because in everyday life you don't see robots walking around. Maybe your Roomba or something. But Roombas aren't going to take over the world." But Musk thinks artificial intelligence should have a different connotation. "I think generally people underestimate the capability of AI — they sort of think it's a smart human," Musk said in a August 2019 talk with Alibaba CEO Jack Ma at the World AI Conference in Shanghai, China. "But it's going to be much more than that. It will be much smarter than the smartest human." Is is "hubris," he said in the Times interview this week, that keeps "very smart people" from realizing the potential dangers of AI. "My assessment about why AI is overlooked by very smart people is that very smart people do not think a computer can ever be as smart as they are. And this is hubris and obviously false." Read the full New York Times interview right here.SEE ALSO: Elon Musk finally took the wraps off his new brain microchip company that plans to connect people's brains to the internet by next year Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
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It’s three domestic rivals might have teamed up to buy out the competition, but it appears US private equity firm Colony Capital sees potential in the Brazilian telecoms market.
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Robert Jones, CEO of the Public Religion Research Institute, comes from a line of white American Christians that stretches back before the Revolutionary War. His ancestors weren’t large plantation owners or Confederate generals, or ― as far as he knows ― active members of the Ku Klux Klan. For much of his life, Jones believed the “unremarkable” nature of his family’s background meant that white supremacy wasn’t a part of their history.But he’s recently started to tell a different kind of story ― one that acknowledges that white privilege shaped his family’s sojourn on American soil.His ancestors were wealthy enough to own slaves, Jones said. The family settled in Georgia on land the government seized from indigenous Creek and Cherokee people. They became Southern Baptists, part of a denomination founded in 1845 on the belief that it was perfectly moral for Christians to be slave owners.Decades later, after Jones’s great-grandfather was killed in a clay mining accident, co-workers allegedly killed an innocent Black worker in retaliation. Jones still remembers how satisfied his great-uncle appeared while retelling that story, as if this arbitrary and unjustified act of racial violence helped balance the scales after a white man’s death.It wouldn’t be hard for many white Christians to find examples of white supremacy’s claims on their own family’s trees, Jones said. But white Christians’ image of themselves and their religion has been warped by what Jones calls “white-supremacy-induced amnesia.”Jones wrestles with that amnesia in his new book, “White Too Long: The Legacy of White Supremacy in American Christianity.” He argues that white Christians ― from evangelicals in the South to mainline Protestants in the Midwest to Catholics in the Northeast ― weren’t just complacent onlookers while political leaders debated what to do about slavery, segregation and discrimination. White supremacist theology played a key role in shaping the American church from the very beginning, influencing not just the way denominations formed but also white Christians’ theology about salvation itself.HuffPost spoke with Jones about his book earlier in July. Just as his own family history would be incomplete without acknowledging the influences of white supremacy, Jones said it’s impossible to talk about American Christianity without recognising that racism helped shape the church.How did your own eyes open to the ways that white Christianity and white supremacy are entangled? I grew up in Jackson, Mississippi. I was deeply immersed in white Southern Baptist evangelical culture. I was that kid who was always at church, four to five times a week. I have a degree from a Southern Baptist college, and I have a Master of Divinity degree from a Southern Baptist seminary. But it wasn’t until I was in grad school in my 30s that I really began to examine the history of my denomination’s direct ties to slavery.Along with that, in my day job as CEO of PRRI, we’re repeatedly confronted with public opinion data that suggests white Christians really have a blind spot in seeing racial injustice and particularly structural racism. So it was a combination of really reckoning with my own family’s history, together with seeing patterns in the data that just made it so clear that this is not a story of some distant past, but this is very much still in the DNA of white Christianity today. So what is the story that white Christians tell themselves about the church’s relationship to white supremacy? They tell themselves that their version of Christianity is God’s means of bringing salvation to the lost world. That they are the embodiment of everything that is good about America, that they are pillars of the community. But that story doesn’t stand up to very much scrutiny.Along with the good that white Christian churches have done — building hospitals, orphanages and other civic institutions — they have also pronounced the blessings of God on slavery. They were the main legitimisers of a massive resistance to civil rights and have very consistently been on the wrong side of those issues. You can certainly point to the abolitionist movement and say, yes, that has Christian roots. But the bigger picture is that there were many, many more white Christians resisting desegregation than were on the abolitionists’ side of things.The legacy of this ― the proof in the pudding ― is what public opinion looks like today. White Christians ― evangelicals, mainline Protestants and Catholics ― are 30% more likely than religiously unaffiliated whites to say the Confederate flag is more a symbol of Southern pride than a symbol of racism. If you ask whether the killings of Black men by police are isolated incidents or part of a pattern, white Christians are twice as likely as religiously unaffiliated whites to say these are isolated instances. They have a very difficult time connecting the dots and seeing the structural justice issues at stake. You spend some time in the book explaining that white mainline Protestants and white Catholics were also complicit in white supremacy. Why did you feel that it was important to point that out? It’s important not to dismiss this as a question of Southern culture. In the book, I developed a racism index, a broad index of 50 different racial attitude questions. I put those into a statistical model that controlled for things like Southern regionalism, Republican identity, education level, all kinds of things that could be driving these attitudes that have nothing to do with Christian identity. Even when I controlled for all of those things, white Christian identity in itself is directly connected to racist attitudes. Some of this data gets dismissed by white Christians who say those numbers are muddied because they include people who just claim to be Christian but never darken the door of a church. But the data refutes that quite soundly. In fact, among white Christians overall, there’s a positive relationship between their religious identity and holding more racist views. Perhaps most disturbing is that among white evangelicals, the relationship between holding racist views and white Christian identity is actually stronger among more frequent church attenders. That ought to be a cause for a deep soul-searching among white Christians overall and among white evangelicals in particular. How do you think racism helped shape white American Christians’ theology about salvation?I think it’s helpful to go back and imagine what early church history in the U.S. looked like in the colonies. There was this sense that white people were God’s chosen instruments to civilise the U.S. and the world. It would not be unusual for white slave owners to bring enslaved people to church with them on Sunday morning. Whites would sit in the front and enslaved people would sit in the back. That context certainly shapes the way Christian theology and practices form. You’re not going to preach a lot of liberation, freedom and equality from the pulpit. You’re going to preach more about obedience to the master and fulfilling your roles, those kinds of things. I think that fundamentally distorted American white Christianity from the beginning.One of the ways this happened is that salvation became this very hyper-individualised concept. So it becomes about a person’s individual relationship to God through Jesus, and it’s very much about personal morality and piety. It was this very privatised and cordoned off way of thinking about spirituality and Christianity. This developed by necessity and by design, as a way of thinking about salvation that would be consistent with a world that was already committed to the idea of white supremacy.I’d like to get your thoughts on how white supremacy influenced how white Christians think about the purpose of government. In my ownreporting, I’ve seen white evangelical Christians express the idea that, when it comes to issues such as immigration and policing, it’s the government’s God-given duty to keep the country safe, while it’s individual Christians’ duty to be charitable and care for the poor. Do you think this way of thinking has racist roots? I do think whenever white Christians declare or draw lines between what is biblical and what is political, I would look for white supremacy to be at work. This kind of boundary drawing is a way of delegitimising certain kinds of claims and privileging other kinds of claims. One of the most prominent recent examples is from the 1960s, when the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and other African American ministers were using churches as places for civil rights organising.Jerry Falwell Sr. came out and said that this was not a legitimate thing for a pastor to be doing, that pastors should only be preaching the gospel from the pulpit, that these kinds of organising things are political and shouldn’t be the concern of the church. Not too many years later, Falwell suddenly changed his mind. The one thing that really made him change his tune on this was that Bob Jones University, an evangelical university, was threatened with losing its federal funding because it didn’t allow interracial relationships. Evangelicals at the time were making very explicit claims defending the separation of races, and all of a sudden, that was a biblical issue.What is biblical, what is political, often tends to be driven by self-interest. In the case of white Christian churches, I think it’s always appropriate to ask, “What kind of interest is that? Is it an interest that is privileging the position of white Americans over Americans of colour?” And if it is, then it’s a straightforwardly white supremacist interest that’s being reflected in those distinctions.There still seems to be a lot of scepticism and resistance in white Christian spaces to words such as “social justice,” “white privilege” and “systemic racism.” At the same time, over the past few weeks, I’ve seen evangelicalnews sites emphasising reconciliation, forgiveness, people coming together.  Where do you think that comes from? The easiest thing for white Christians to reach for is reconciliation. While I think that’s a laudable goal, if it’s reached for too quickly, I think it’s actually disingenuous. Too often, the formula for white Christians is white apology or lament plus Black forgiveness equals reconciliation. What’s missing in that equation is any conversation about justice and repair. If you’re a white Christian,  heading straight for reconciliation is the quickest way to protect the status quo without doing the hard work and without really dealing with the past.It’s surprising to me in some ways because if there’s anything I heard and that white Christian churches emphasise is this idea of repentance. But repentance, in the biblical sense of the word, is never just about apology. It’s about making things right. I think the real test of authenticity for white Christians who want to lament this past is whether they’re willing to walk through the valley of repair and justice in order to get to that destination of reconciliation or whether they want to skip that part of the journey.How do you think white Christian churches have responded to George Floyd’s death and the Black Lives Matter protests? Do you think the message is sticking, or are you seeing more evidence of what you call in the book the “white Christian shuffle”?I called it the white Christian shuffle because there does tend to be this one step forward, two steps back movement. Particularly at moments like this one, where there’s a high social expectation that something will be said, something will be done, the question is whether it’s something authentic or something to just check the box and move on.In my home state of Mississippi, the legislature finally voted to remove the Confederate battle flag from the state flag. Before that happened, the Mississippi Baptist Convention had a press conference and actually called on the legislature to do that. Now that’s a pretty big deal. But in my view, we can’t pretend we’ll get on the right side of the battles around symbols without dealing with the way white Christians built white supremacy into their theology and for so many years used Christian theology as a way to legitimize the worldview that put those monuments up in the first place. What do you think it would it look like if white Christians began reckoning with that theology?Part of what I hope the book will do is help white Christians tell a truer story about themselves. If it’s an older church, the questions are pretty obvious: “Where were we on the issue of civil rights? Where were we on the integration of our own congregation? Where are we now on the issue of mass incarceration?” Even for newer congregations that are predominantly white, it’s worth interrogating things as simple as, “Are we in an all-white suburb, and if so, why? Has there been a conversation about police killings of African Americans or about Black Lives Matter that isn’t just about the dangers of rioting but actually about the pain that African Americans are feeling at this moment?”The second step after that reflection is to ask, “How can we be in community with African Americans and other people of colour in our communities? How can we be allies on issues of racial justice?” Those conversations themselves will begin to challenge some of the ways in which white Christian theology has blinded white Christians to these issues.A defensive reaction is a real temptation for white Christians at the moment. One of the biggest moves white Christians could make is to try to find some deep sense of humility and to listen and resist the urge to rebut and defend and to try to take in the witness that our African American brothers and sisters are trying to bring to white Christians. This interview was condensed and edited for clarity.  
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Go forth and test code that may never become a product if you dare VMware has announced that its flagship vSphere virtualisation suite now offers a continuous beta.…
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Teenagers and an abandoned Starfleet ship? What could go wrong?
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Microsoft and Bungie are partnering to bring Destiny 2 to Xbox Game Pass. The original Halo developer will launch Destiny 2 at no additional cost to Xbox Game Pass subscribers in September, and it will include access to previous expansions and the upcoming Destiny 2: Beyond Light DLC. The standard editions of Destiny 2 DLCs will all be available, with Destiny 2’s season pass sold separately. Bungie recently delayed its Beyond Light expansion to November 10th, after it was originally scheduled to launch on September 22nd. Bungie cited difficulties of development during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Beyond Light will include a new element called stasis for Destiny 2 players. Stasis is based on manipulating time, and the major expansion... Continue reading…
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Illustration by Alex Castro Twitter believes the perpetrators of last week’s unprecedented attack on the company accessed the direct message (DM) inbox of an elected official in the Netherlands, the company said Wednesday evening. The revelation comes as part of the company’s ongoing investigation into last Thursday’s attack that allowed attackers to hijack the accounts of some of the service’s most high-profile users, including politicians Barack Obama and Joe Biden, to tweet a bitcoin scam. Although Twitter didn’t name the Dutch official, local media reported last week that far-right, anti-Islam politician Geert Wilders, had his account hacked, retweeting a number of conspiracy theories and replacing Wilders’ profile photo with a caricature of a Black man and... Continue reading…
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At this point, we’ve heard a lot of rumors about 2020’s iPhones, along with a few about 2021’s batch. Today, however, we’re looking even further into the future with an analyst prediction about 2022’s iPhones. More specifically, a noted Apple analyst is making some big predictions about the rear-facing cameras on the back of 2022’s devices. As reported by MacRumors, … Continue reading
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There's no time like a high-profile Twitter hack to make sure you're doing this right.
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As we wrote recently, Samsung most likely will not show the successor to the Galaxy Fold at its major presentation, scheduled for August 5th. However, ... The post The standard version of the Galaxy Tab S7 won’t get an in-display fingerprint scanner appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Ubisoft promised guerrilla warfare, an island nation similar to Cuba, and more
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Google has announced another change to its Calendar app, enabling users to add more details to their event listings. This change follows the improvements to Google Calendar’s event creation option first introduced last year, which involved new scheduling features, additional fields in the pop-up creation box such as ‘Description’ and ‘Location,’ and more. Google announced its latest Calendar update today, … Continue reading
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The Samsung Galaxy Fold and Huawei Mate X are two examples of what future smartphones could look like, with tablet-sized screens hidden beneath a fold.But what if the future doesn’t mean making even bigger screens, but instead shrinking down the size of our existing displays?But Motorola didn’t just adopt the clamshell fold to appease rosy-eyed retro-enthusiasts — turns out it’s the most favored design for a fair amount of consumers.Motorola tested over 20 prototypes with different designs, and it was the clamshell that won out for providing the perfect mix of portability and the large screen we’ve all come to love.The new Motorola Razr is made from a stainless steel body and 3D Gorilla Glass, and those premium materials add to the device’s heft.Unfortunately, there’s no IP-rated water-resistance except for the usual Motorola splash-proofing.
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A camera has captured the incredible moment when a meteor lit up the sky over the iconic Gateway Arch in St. Louis.Footage of the meteor was recorded by an EarthCam camera facing the Gateway Arch from across the Mississippi River.FOX 2 News St. Louis reports that a number of viewers called the station around 8:50 p.m. local time Monday after hearing a loud boom and observing a bright flash of blue light in the western St. Louis metro area.WATCH STUNNING METEOR LIGHT UP THE NIGHT SKY IN AUSTRALIAThe meteor is likely from the annual Taurid meteor shower, according to FOX 2’s Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmermann.The American Meteor Society said that it received 175 reports of a fireball across a number of midwestern states on Monday, including Missouri and Illinois.
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The latest numbers from telecoms group Vodafone are a mixed bag, with India casting a shadow over some solid performances elsewhere.In the UK Vodafone said it had its best ever quarter for new customers, with nearly double the number of mobile contract customers joining in Q3 2019 than in the year-ago quarter.On top of that the prepaid business grew for the first time in a decade and Vodafone managed to steal Virgin’s MVNO business from BT, so not a bad quarter at all for Vodafone UK.As you can see from the table below Europe is pretty stable and Vodafone has upgraded its EBITDA guidance by around a billion euros, thanks mainly to the completion of its Liberty Global acquisition.“I am pleased by the speed at which we are executing on the strategic priorities that we announced this time last year,” said Nick Read, Vodafone Group Chief Executive.“The consistency of our commercial performance has improved in both regions, and we have made a fast start on integrating the acquired Liberty Global businesses, where we see significant long-term opportunity.
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A species of mouse-deer undocumented for almost 30 years has been rediscovered in the lowland forests of Vietnam.The silver-backed chevrotain, about the size of a small cat, had never been photographed in the wild and is only known to science thanks to five specimens, four of which were described in 1910.The fifth specimen, a pelt from a hunter-killed chevrotain, was described in 1990.The species appeared to be extinct, felled by deforestation and intensive hunting over the last century.On Monday in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, scientists announced the discovery of a population of silver-backed chevrotain, detailing an expedition to Vietnam's Greater Annamite region.An intense period of study and field work resulted in the first detection of the species in nearly three decades.
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Like Patrol let subscribers follow what other Instagram users were liking and commenting on, after Instagram removed the following tab in October.CNET reported in late October that Instagram had sent a cease and desist letter to Like Patrol, alleging it was scraping Instagram user data without consent.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Founder Sergio Luis Quintero told CNET in an email that the app was like Instagram's "Following Tab, on steroids."Life Patrol even claimed to have an algorithm that determined whether those users were attractive or not.On the app's public website, it downplays the potential for the app to be used to stalk Instagram users, saying "Check out current liked posts.
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Remember when Channel 4 announced they had the rights to Rick & Morty season 4, and that we'd have to wait until next year to get a legitimate way to watch the series in the UK?Well thanks to people complaining, Channel 4 has decided to push it up a bit, and it's only 9 days away.Now the series will arrive on E4, instead of Channel 4, with 20th November being the day the first episode will premiere.It's not as good as the week wait we had with Netflix and season 3, but it's still a heck of a lot better than waiting until January.an Katz, Director of Programmes at Channel 4 said:“When we announced we would be airing Rick and Morty Series 4 on free to air TV in January we thought fans would be delighted.
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This is not a straightforward virus narrative along the lines of 28 Days Later.Van Goethem’s original proposal centered on documenting Brussels’ evolution over the years—its modernization, its rise on the International scene, its sociopolitcal changes throughout the great wars—and he had done a lot of research.Working with the Royal Belgian Film Archive Cinematek, Van Goethem perused no fewer than 1,268 films to assess various archival content spanning avantgarde experiments, journalistic productions, educational films, propaganda, prior documentaries, and more.The archive felt like a gatekeeper—they decide whose memory we’re talking about, they choose the selection of items you can find in the catalog,” he told Ars this fall.I wanted to deal with those kind of issues.”Throughout Night Has Come, Van Goethem’s ideas become clearer and clearer but never overt.
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Strong ecosystems have great reservoirs of talent congregated close together, a culture built around helping one another on ambitious projects, and sufficient risk capital to ensure that interesting projects have the resources to get underway.And if Charles Marohn’s Strong Towns: A Bottom-Up Revolution to Rebuild American Prosperity is any indication, a whole heck of a swath of America has little hope of ever tapping into the modern knowledge economy or creating the kind of sustainable growth that builds “Strong Towns.”Across the country, Marohn sees evidence of what he dubs a “Municipal Ponzi scheme.” Cities — armed with economic development dollars and consultants galore — focus their energies and budgets on new housing subdivisions as well as far-flung, auto-dependent office parks and strip malls, all the while ignoring the long-term debt, maintenance costs, and municipal burdens they are transferring to future generations of residents.He provides a multitude of examples, but few are as striking as that of Lafayette, Louisiana:As one example, the city of Lafayette, Louisiana, had 5 feet of pipe per person in 1949.And if national trends hold locally in Lafayette, which they almost certainly do, household savings decreased while personal debt skyrocketed.
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“The Michael Kors Lexington 2 is a stylish smartwatch let down by Wear OS.”It may have a shiny, stylish exterior, and an impressive-sounding name, but underneath the Michael Kors Access Lexington 2 is just another Wear OS smartwatch.Googles smartwatch platform has had issues from its inception five years ago, and little has been done to elevate the experience.The Fossil Group, which has multiple lines of Wear OS smartwatches (including licensed devices from brands like Michael Kors, Kate Spade, and Diesel) does well to make fine-looking watches, but can’t do much about their lackluster smarts.It’s perfectly legible indoors, but the brightness is limited so you’ll need to shield the screen to see it in direct sunlight.Wear OS just isn’t very good
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AMD has revealed its newest 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadripper processors, adding a release date to the chips the company says are its most potent desktop silicon for creators and enthusiasts.Running the gamut from 24- through to 32-cores, the new 7nm CPUs were revealed alongside the Ryzen 9 3950X, a 16-core flagship AM4 chip targeting more demanding mainstream users.AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3960X and AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970XThere are two new 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadripper processors, the 3960X and the 3970X.Both use AMD’s Zen 2 core architecture and have a TDP of 280 watts.They also support up to 88 PCIe 4.0 lanes – 72 of which are usable when the CPU is paired with an AMD TRX40.
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It’s time to start thinking about what you’re going to do with your pets, who’s going to water your plants, and whether you should just cancel all your video streaming accounts and exist on an entertainment diet of nothing but free trials.Unfortunately once you’ve used up all your free trials to Netflix and Hulu, it gets a little harder to find the programming you’re used to.Yes, that’s the wrestling one with The Rock and The Undertaker.When I came across this one and saw it cost $9.99 a month my jaw dropped.Who on Earth is going to pay the same subscription fee to watch wrestling reruns as they would for everything on Netflix?Even if you didn’t watch wrestling, everyone remembers the Macho Man Randy Savage yelling “Snap into a Slim Jim!”
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