William Labounty

William Labounty

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The coronavirus outbreak has hit many US businesses hard — one survey found that 75% of small businesses saw fewer sales in March.  It's especially difficult for businesses that rely on face-to-face interactions, like bars and salons, or companies that host in-person classes like yoga studios and cooking schools.  Business Insider talked to seven entrepreneurs who are trying to get some of their revenue back through virtual services on Zoom and FaceTime.  Click here for more BI Prime content. When the coronavirus outbreak forced the majority of US states into lockdown in March, it sent shockwaves through many businesses. But perhaps none were hit harder than companies that relied on face-to-face interactions to fuel their revenue — businesses like bars or salons, and companies that offer in-person classes, like yoga studios or cooking schools.  A Goldman Sachs survey from March found that 75% of small businesses were seeing fewer sales, and 51% of small business owners said their business could only continue operating for a maximum of three more months. Across the country, as many as one in five restaurants could close for good, putting millions out of work, and services like barber shops, hair salons, and other beauty services have been debilitated by the shutdown. But the crisis — and the lasting toll it's expected to have on the US economy — has forced some business owners to get creative, moving their services online in an attempt to recoup some revenue lost over the past several weeks. Trivia hosts, chefs, winemakers, yoga instructors, and others are looking to videoconferencing services like Zoom and FaceTime as a new frontier, a way to host virtual sessions and classes and connect them with customers across the country — and the world — they would never have met otherwise. One San Francisco sex toy company started hosting "build your own vibrator" parties over Zoom to engage customers with its products, Fast Company reported.  In some cases, it's only bringing in  a fraction of what they were making previously, while in other cases, entrepreneurs are raking in more money than ever before.  Business Insider spoke with entrepreneurs across the US who have transitioned to virtual services over the last few weeks. They shared how they're finding customers, whether they've seen an increase or decrease in revenue, and what the future holds after life begins returning to normal. SEE ALSO: 6 ways entrepreneurs can make the most of the coronavirus slowdown, from the owner of a hostel who hit record cancellations and has prepared for 3 months of lost business SEE ALSO: Zoom is so popular in Silicon Valley, even a Google executive's child reportedly prefers it over Google's software Stephen Walsh started a trivia business from scratch when the outbreak hit. Now, he's making more money than he ever has before. Stephen Walsh was hosting doing events on the Baltimore bar and restaurant scene when the coronavirus outbreak reached the US. His income dried up practically overnight.  He decided to turn to trivia nights, which he'd been hosting on and off for about 10 years, as a new source of income, but he never expected it to take off like it has.  For about 45 straight days, Walsh Trivia has been hosting three or more virtual trivia sessions every day, sometimes with as many as 300 participants at once. Walsh has such diehard fans in Alaska, he's added an extra session for their time zone. After one participant told their friend about the games — who happened to work for the American embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan — Walsh now has teams playing in embassies around the world. The embassy in Nepal even has two teams: Kathmandu and KathmanTwo.  Walsh uses a combination of Zoom and Google Forms to host the sessions, and he charges $3 per team "captain" and $2 for any additional player after that. The number of teams is capped at 40, and Walsh recommends no more than 10 players per team. Players pay him either by PayPal or Venmo.  Walsh said he typically hosts at least two games per night that are open to the public, and then some that are closed to specific companies or organizations, who are charged a flat rate to play. While he has social media accounts and has bought a few Facebook ads, he said the best marketing has just been word-of-mouth.  "I know that this is short-term, but it's been an incredible opportunity for me," Walsh told Business Insider. "I've never earned what I'm earning now doing any other job. In my dream world, I will not go back to doing any other job. I would love to do this because it doesn't feel like work."  Maggie Norris was initially intimidated by moving her cooking classes to Zoom, but said she thinks it'll make her business more successful long term. About 18 months ago, Maggie Norris had to shut down her Phoenix-based cooking school, Whisked Away, for four months after a flood destroyed her kitchen. Now, her cooking school has been shut down for a very different reason, but Norris said she's seeing it as an opportunity to take things online.  "My business has shifted more in the last three weeks than probably in the last five years," Norris told Business Insider. "I figured, well, you know what, if I can come back after a flood and not doing classes for four months, I can handle this."  Norris was hosting five or six cooking classes per week for hobbyist chefs, as well as local health clubs and the Desert Botanical Garden. About three weeks ago, she decided to try hosting a free class for some regulars on Zoom as she got comfortable with the process. Now, she's hosting four or five Zoom classes per week.  Norris charges $8 per device, which she said is significantly less than she charges for in-person cooking classes, but she's able to host more people — her home kitchen can only accommodate eight people, but she's hosting about 20 people over Zoom. Norris also expects to be able to ramp up the number of classes she does per week, since virtual classes only last an hour, versus three hours for in-person classes. Norris has also started offering private classes for situations like company team-building, which she said are more expensive because participants are able to decide what they make, and the classes are more interactive.  "I was at a point in my business where classes were filling up as soon as I posted them," Norris said. "It's definitely not what it was, but actually I don't want it to be right at this moment because it's still kind of in a building process. But I'm hoping that it'll get to that point."  Ultimately, Norris said, the situation has a few perks, even though she's not making as much money as she was before the outbreak: her daughter is able to join her for all the classes, and she's able to have evenings free to spend with her family.  "I know the current situation has pushed many people out of their comfort zones, to say the least. Change is incredibly scary especially when you have a successful business that has run off of the same formula for years," Norris said. "Teaching virtual classes was never in the plan, but being pushed in that direction and taking advantage of the opportunity will make my business more successful in the long run." Sarah and Brice Garrett own a 5-year-old winery in Paso Robles, California. While their tasting room shutting down has impacted the business, they've noticed an uptick in sales. Sarah and Brice Garrett, the owners of Serrano Wine, opened their tasting room two years ago. Up until the coronavirus outbreak hit, the couple worked in the tasting room every weekend from 3 p.m. until the last people decided to leave.  "The tasting room was important in cementing our role as winemakers," Garrett told Business Insider in an email. "It has been a huge piece of building our wine club and following, as well as establishing respect and brand recognition. We are very young for winemakers (26 and 27 currently) and that led to many not taking us seriously as a brand." But the day that bars and tastings room shut down in California, the Garretts had to shift their business. They immediately started hosting wine tastings online, first over Instagram Live and then over Zoom, in order to stay connected with their customers.  But hosting an online wine tasting presents a different set of challenges than an in-person tasting — namely, ensuring everyone is drinking the same wine. To that end, the Garretts allow two weeks to purchase a four-bottle bundle of wines for $125, shipping included. The actual tasting itself, held over Zoom, is free. Once customers receive the wines, the tastings are held over two consecutive Fridays so that participants aren't forced to open four bottles of wine in one night, Garrett said. The Garretts have hosted five tastings so far, and at the most recent event, had 18 screens participating, each with anywhere from one to four people.  The outbreak has affected Serrano Wine's business on multiple fronts. Garrett said the winery hasn't finalized any grape contracts or purchased new barrels for the upcoming season because things are so uncertain. And while sales are higher than normal, the winery is paying "quite a bit more" for packaging materials as a result. Garrett noted that when it comes to the virtual wine tastings, they're making significantly more per tasting, given that customers are buying four bottles rather than five one-ounce pours.  But even when things return to normal, the Garrets don't plan to end the virtual aspect of their tasting business.  "These tastings have given us a larger audience, and there is no reason for us to stop," Garrett said. "When we are allowed to reopen we will have to devote more hours to our tasting room, but we want to make time for at least one virtual tasting experience per month."  A hair salon in Brooklyn is sending clients quarantine color kits. Nicci Jordan Hubert is the cofounder of The Bird House hair salon in Brooklyn, New York. She and her sister Brooke Jordan were forced to close their doors on March 15th and lay off all their stylists. "You still have a job when this thing is over," Hubert told her employees over the phone. "Leave all of your supplies in your drawer because the second we reopen you'll come back to us, please."  Hubert and Jordan were saving up with the goal of opening a second location, but they instead used that money to give their employees a couple more paychecks, then provide for their own families during the pandemic.   Hubert said they've lost 95% of their monthly revenue, but gift certificates and at-home color kits have kept minimal income coming in. The salon sold out of its first batch of 100 Quarantine Color Kits, which provide clients with everything they need to touch-up their roots or apply all-over color for $75 to $150. Existing clients already have their hair-color formulas on file, but new clients need to upload a well-lit photo or schedule a FaceTime consultation. "It's in imperfect science, but it is better than nothing," Hubert said.  Most services, like cutting hair and applying highlights, Hubert said just can't be done from a distance. But she said she's spending every day thinking about what her clients and stylists need.   "We believe very, very strongly that hair care is a form of wellness, she said. "So for me to have that ability to color my roots and still feel just a little bit like myself during this quarantine, I feel so grateful that I can do that. And I feel so grateful that we can provide that for our clients." A yoga studio in Washington, DC, is maximizing class sizes with livestreams. Jennie Light owns Bluebird Sky Yoga and art studio in Washington, DC. She wasn't sure how to react when the mayor and CDC were first warning of shutdowns, but she tried to stay open for as long as possible, ramping up regular cleanings and researching what other yoga studios were doing.  "One of the trickiest things is battling the moral decision of what the right answer was, what the science actually says," she told Business Insider. But when the city mandated the closure of all non-essential businesses, including gyms and fitness studios, Light had to come up with another way to keep her yogis happy. She started live streaming classes over Zoom, offering four classes per day. The next week, the studio got back to its usual daily schedule of about seven classes.  The studio also started a new calendar of workshops, like a Thai yoga massage workshop which couples and friends could do together on Zoom. Light or one of her managers handles technical support for every class to keep them interruption free and secure from cyber intruders. "That's an aspect of our business that we never had to deal with before," she said.   She has two part-time employees, who she's kept on payroll with help from a PPP loan, but her 31 instructors are independent contractors and therefore, are not covered by the government emergency funds she received.  Light said revenue has decreased by 30% from March to April. Membership hasn't dropped significantly, but the studio is losing some people who have lost their jobs or are struggling financially. On the flip-side, going virtual has opened membership to people across the US and even other countries like Canada and France. "It's made up for some of the membership loss, but not all of it," Light said. "You can have more students in a class than we could fit physically in our space." Virtual classes are flexible for parents who had difficulty juggling their schedules and finding childcare before the pandemic. That aspect has gotten Light to consider offering virtual options even after her classes return to the studio. "People could watch on their own time or they could have a kid running around the background, no big deal," she said.  The owner of an art studio and gallery is trying virtual paint and sip events to keep her community alive. Delilah Martinez started her art studio, VIP Paints, seven years ago by inviting friends and family into her apartment for paint and sip parties — which her landlord allowed her to do until she outgrew a second apartment and moved her business into a storefront. The space now doubles as Vault Gallerie to host artists in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.  After surviving years of gentrification, rising rents, and corporate competitors, Martinez said she was finally gaining traction and financial stability by the end of 2019. Then coronavirus complicated things.  First, she tried to limit classes to 20 people. Then to 10. When it got to five people in a class, she tried rescheduling, hoping to reopen come April. It's usually a busy season, with lots of bachelorette and birthday parties. "I was devastated because we had many upcoming classes and private events that were all prepaid. Refund requests were flooding in," she said.   She refunded $2,000 in the first two days of closing the studio. That amount has more than doubled since. Martinez sold stickers online, but she knew that wouldn't be enough to pay rent. So she started hosting virtual painting classes on Zoom, which cost her more money upfront to get all the supplies to ship to customers. This meant she had to increase her prices to $30 to $40 per class.  So far, she's hosted four small virtual classes, but they've made up a fraction of lost business. Martinez is mainly doing it to keep her brand and community going. "I live in a really cool community where we all support each other and we've been trying to figure out ways to all help each other," she said. To her, art is a stress reliever, especially for people who need an outlet during these difficult times. "I'm going to continue because this is what I love to do."   A founder in Atlanta is tackling postponed weddings across the country with virtual planning sessions. Sarah Chancey founded her wedding planning company, Chancey Charm, as an online service that's grown to over 35 locations across the country owned by individual planners licensed to use the brand's name.  Since the pandemic hit the US, Chancey's team has had more than 50 postponed weddings, three cancellations, and over $40,000 in deferred or lost payments. A lot of spring and summer weddings have been moved to the fall, but some couples are pushing further — even into 2021.  But the planning doesn't stop. Now, virtual planning is even more important than before as planners face what Chancey said will be the busiest fall they've ever had. "It's going to really stretch us because we already had a very full fall season," she said.  The company has always leaned on technology, especially since it targets destination weddings and planners can't always meet their clients in person. All the magic happens in its online portal, where brides can get digital design boards, which map out every detail — from the flowers and dresses, to the color palette and decor. "This design blueprint really takes all of that anxiety away for them because it's giving them a chance to see it all in person." Planners also meet one-on-one with clients on Zoom to go over their budget, timeline, and get vendor referrals. Chancey Charm has offered these services as part of its full-service planning, but since the pandemic, the company is also offering them separately for couples looking to save money and who want to plan most of it on their own, but can use some guidance along the way.
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The Middle Kingdom is thought to be a few months further down the road to economic recovery and smartmobes are discretionary purchases Sales of smartphones in China fell by 10.3 per cent year-on-year in the quarter ended 30 June, according to box-counters at analyst firm IDC.…
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Amazon‘s Jeff Bezos unloaded $3.1 billion worth of company stock earlier this week, representing a little less than 2% of his personal stake in the ecommerce giant. Bezos‘ August dumps, which were all made as part of a pre-determined trading plan lodged with the SEC, brings the total value of the billionaire chief exec’s $AMZN sales to a jaw-clenching $7.2 billion. In total, Bezos sold 1 million shares, and while the price varied, he generally got around $3,130 per share. While company execs getting rid their own stocks is common practice, Bezos now accounts for more than 98% of the stock sold by… This story continues at The Next Web
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A handful of big cities are the first markets to offer DashMart, a new type of virtual convenience store from online delivery service DoorDash. The company describes DashMart as a sort of general store for many smaller, common items from brands and restaurants that you may otherwise have to order individually elsewhere, or as part of a larger multi-store order … Continue reading
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The headless rocket known as SN5 didn't light up Monday, but Elon Musk and SpaceX will give it a go again soon.
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President Donald Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One on Friday night that he is banning the Chinese-owned social media platform TikTok from the US. "As far as TikTok is concerned we're banning them from the United States," Trump told reporters on Friday, according to a pool report from the Los Angeles Times' David Cloud. Trump asserted he had the "authority" to do so "with an executive order or that," according to Cloud's pool report. However, it's unclear whether Trump can ban the app completely. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. President Donald Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One on Friday that he is banning the Chinese-owned social media platform TikTok from the US using his "presidential authority." "As far as TikTok is concerned we're banning them from the United States," Trump told reporters on Friday, according to a pool report from the Los Angeles Times' David Cloud. Trump told reporters he planned to take action "as soon as Saturday." According to the pool report, Trump asserted he has the "authority" to ban TikTok "with an executive order or that." However, it's unclear what authority he has to ban the app completely in the US. Representatives from the White House did not respond to Business Insider's request for comment. The Trump administration has publicly been threatening to ban TikTok since early July, citing concerns about the app's ties to China and the foreign government's access to user data and content moderationthrough its parent company, ByteDance. TikTok has repeatedly insisted it would never provide any data if the Chinese government asked. Trump's quip to reporters on Friday night comes hours after reports surfaced Trump was planning to issue an executive order instructing TikTok's parent company to "divest" from the viral app's operations in the US. According to a 1988 law, Trump has the authority to block foreign business deals pertaining to US companies if he deems it a national security threat. Trump has twice previously used this authority to block deals in which tech corporations from China and Singapore were poised to take over US-based companies. Microsoft quickly emerged as a potential buyer of TikTok's US operations. The company is reportedly in "advanced talks" of the sale, which "could eliminate potential legal challenges — and public backlash — that could have occurred if the wildly popular app was forced off millions of American smartphones," The Wall Street Journal reported. It's unclear how TikTok or ByteDance would respond to either of the president's directives, but issuing an executive order would represent an escalation in the Trump administration's attacks on TikTok and other Chinese tech companies. In an earlier statement to Business Insider, a TikTok representative said that the company did not comment "on rumors or speculation" and that it was "confident in the long-term success of TikTok." "Hundreds of millions of people come to TikTok for entertainment and connection, including our community of creators and artists who are building livelihoods from the platform," TikTok said in its statement. "We're motivated by their passion and creativity, and committed to protecting their privacy and safety as we continue working to bring joy to families and meaningful careers to those who create on our platform." TikTok came to the US in 2018, and has since found an energetic and growing base of as many as 80 million users. The app, which has more than 2.3 billion downloads worldwide, was most recently valued at a whopping $30 billion to $50 billion. TikTok's China ties have attracted more attention in recent months as the president and administration officials have said they're weighing a ban on the app. Trump has said a ban would be a way to punish China over its role in the coronavirus pandemic, while Secretary of State Mike Pompeo cited national-security concerns. The resulting uncertainty in TikTok's future has reportedly led ByteDance executives and investors to explore alternatives to avoid a US ban. Earlier this month, a group of ByteDance's US investors, including Sequoia Capital and General Atlantic, were looking into buying a majority stake in TikTok, according to The Information. But The Information reported Friday that those talks had failed, because of concerns that such a takeover "wouldn't pass muster with the Trump administration."Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: The rise and fall of Donald Trump's $365 million airline
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The latest electric vehicle startup to cash in on a new wave of hype and investment in the space is Li Auto, a five-year-old Chinese company that started trading on the Nasdaq on Thursday after raising $1.1 billion in an initial public offering. It’s the second Chinese EV startup to become a publicly traded company in the United States, following Nio’s 2018 IPO and subsequent listing on the New York Stock Exchange. Another, XPeng, will reportedly be next. With Tesla recently becoming the world’s most valuable automaker, there is suddenly a renewed focus on funding EV startups. Fresh money has been rushing into the likes of Rivian, Nikola, Fisker, Karma, and even suppliers like Velodyne and Hyliion over the last few months from both the... Continue reading…
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The Stop Hate for Profit campaign is gaining steam in a way that Facebook can't exactly ignore.
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Five players and five reporters to follow for NBA news and a glimpse at quarantine life from the bubble in Orlando, Florida.
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If you are looking for a smartwatch that borrows the design of Apple Watch, the Elephone W6 could be a very interesting alternative. The latest ... The post Elephone W6 Now on Sale on the Brand’s Official Website appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Despite both living under parent company Alphabet, Verily and Google Health act largely independent of one another. But that might be about to change. Verily CEO Andrew Conrad told employees he wants to end the 'rivalry' between the two companies, hinting at more collaboration in the future. Google Health has grown to around 500 employees and could help Verily as the latter company strives to reach an IPO and break away from Alphabet entirely – something insiders say Conrad is pushing to do. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Since it was spun out of Google's highly secretive X research lab in 2015, Verily Life Sciences has operated largely independent of Google's own health efforts – but that may be about to change.  On April 27, Verily CEO Andrew Conrad sent an email to employees telling them he wanted to end the "rivalry" with Google, according to two employees who asked to remain anonymous because they were not authorized to speak to the press. "Healthcare is big and broken and neither Google nor Verily will win if we are divided," Conrad wrote in the email shared with Business Insider. "I am committed to making this work better. I don't want to go back to a world of foolish sibling rivalries." Verily, which was once the life sciences arm inside Google X, was spun out as one of Alphabet's "other bets" when Google's corporate structure was blown up in 2015. CEO Andrew Conrad said at the time he wanted "to defeat Mother Nature," and the life sciences company has since launched projects ranging from smart shoes to nanoparticles that detect cancer. Meanwhile, the Google Health team, which operates largely out of Palo Alto, California, is exploring the role of search and AI in healthcare, as well as other ideas around preventive health. Insiders say Verily and the Google Health team have occasionally worked closely together on projects, such as collaborating on a tool for diabetic eye diseases which the two launched last year. But several Verily employees also said there has long been a sense of competition with Google Health, especially in cases where the two organizations have worked on similar projects. For example, Verily has its own data infrastructure team, while Google has its "Cloud for healthcare and life sciences" solution. Sources said there have also been instances where both Google Health and Verily were both working on similar hardware projects, including a smart ring that can detect temperature. "Google Health and Verily are a lot of times doing almost the same thing," said one source familiar with the inner workings of both companies. Some projects and teams have been moved from Verily into Google Health over the years, according to several sources speaking to Business Insider. "When Google is heavily invested in some of the projects Verily is spinning up, they will sometimes absorb them back into the Google mothership," said one insider. Neither Verily or Google responded to Business Insider's request for comment on this story. Verily has around 850 full-time employees, according to internal data viewed by Business Insider. Google Health, which is currently led by David Feinberg, had about 500 employees as of February this year, according to CNBC. As Business Insider recently reported, Verily made an aggressive pivot to COVID-19 programs when the pandemic began – an initiative known internally as 'Code Red.' During the onset of that initiative around 1,000 employees from around Alphabet were temporarily brought into Verily to help out. Sources say it is common for employees within the Alphabet organization to move from one company to another temporarily, in what is referred to internally as a "bungee." But as 'Code Red' winds down, Verily and Google Health could find themselves working together more closely than they have before.  Tapping more of Google Health's resources could also help Verily, which has already procured outside investment, to eventually break away from Alphabet as a fully independent company. In 2017, Verily announced it had raised $800 million from Singapore's state investment firm Temasek. Then in 2019, in a round led by Silver Lake, the life sciences division raised an additional $1 billion in external investment. Two employees told Business Insider that they had been explicitly told last year Verily was looking to go public in 2020, which would be a first for an Alphabet "bet" company. However, they added, the pandemic will likely postpone those ambitions.SEE ALSO: POWER PLAYERS: 23 top executives and product leaders inside Google who are shaping the future of the company Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Leslie Odom, Jr.'s $500,000 gamble that led to a starring role in 'Hamilton'
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Two brothers have been jailed for trafficking a 20-year-old woman and forcing her into sex work in London.Ilcic Dumitru, 19, of Plumstead High Street, was sent to prison on Friday for more than 15 years for facilitating the trafficking of the victim, conspiracy to hold a person in servitude and being involved in the supply of cocaine, a Class A drug. His older brother Ioan Dumitru, 24, of Balgowan Street, was imprisoned for 16 years for conspiracy to arrange or facilitate the trafficking into the UK a person for sexual exploitation and conspiracy to hold a person in servitude.The victim, from Romania, was told that she would be working in a factory on her arrival in the UK.A ticket was bought for her, and she arrived in early April 2019, with the brothers then taking her to a house in Plumstead where two other Romanian women were already living. Her travel documents were then taken. On her first night in the UK the brothers told her to dress in “sexy clothes” and drove her to north London, where she was told she would be working on the streets.Despite telling the brothers she had never done sex work before she was forced to find customers, with Ioan threatening to “break her head” if she failed to make money for them. Soon after her arrival she became pregnant when a client’s condom split, but she was forced to continue working under a threat of violence from the two brothers – sleeping with up to 15 men a day and making up to £1,000 a day, which was taken straight from her. She was regularly beaten by Ilcic and Ioan, and was banned from leaving the house alone. Approximately seven months into her pregnancy she was forced into an attempted abortion. It was around the same time that a client asked her if she was in touch with her family in Romania, and she told him about some of the abuse she had suffered. A week later the unknown man came to see her again and gave her a small mobile phone which she hid.Two Romanian officers, who are seconded to the UK to help with international affairs with Romania, were instrumental in helping detectives, working with a team of officers to arrest the brothers. The pair were convicted in December 2019 after pleading guilty to the charges against them.Detective Inspector Grant Anderson, from the Met Police’s Modern Slavery and Child Sexual Exploitation (MSCE) unit, said: “This was an awful crime which subjected a vulnerable young woman to a hideous way of life. We know she will never forget her time in captivity but I can report she gave birth to a healthy baby boy.“I hope she now has some closure after knowing these men will be behind bars for a long time.“We are committed to bringing these offenders to justice and will continue to work with local and oversea partners to do this.”Related... Wiley Dropped By Management And Temporarily Banned From Twitter Over Anti-Semitic Tweets A-Level Sociology Textbook Says Working Class Black Students 'Lack Reasoning Skills' How Trump Is Using A Violent Crackdown To Paint Himself As A Strongman
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Plus: An interview from the archives, the most-read story in WIRED history, and bottled-up screams.
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We've rounded up the best back to school apple sales which include deals on MacBooks, iPad, AirPods, the Apple Watch, and more.
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Lucifer, The Legend of Korra, Jurassic Park and more!
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Keep your texts interesting with new animals, food, smiley faces and people.
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Instantly save $100 when you buy an iPhone 11, 11 Pro, or 11 Pro Max from Best Buy and activate with Verizon.
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Say there's no Plan B for any September disruption.
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The biggest complaint I get from boards is "how do I know what expenditure will reduce the risk?" The post Former GCHQ Director Robert Hannigan: Regulators Will Need to Do More on IIoT Security appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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We compare the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max to help you decide which Apple phone makes the most sense for you.
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The current Switch is hard to find and the sequel isn't expected anytime soon, but we already have a good idea of what new features a next-gen Nintendo system needs.
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A closer look at the advice on which the UK based its decision to ban Huawei from its 5G networks reveals a mixture of rigour and improvisation.
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John Bosco, CIO of Northwell Health, told BI why Microsoft's cloud business is becoming a new favorite in healthcare. Mainly, it's because the tech giant has other services that are compatible with its cloud offering, like disaster recovery, login management for internal networks, and a host of functions that can read healthcare data. Other CIOs shared some of Bosco's sentiments in a survey conducted by JPMorgan Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Sign up here to receive updates on all things Innovation Inc. Microsoft seems to be gaining a bigger foothold in healthcare. In the past month, it announced deals or extensions with Allscripts to house its electronic health record, Johns Hopkins to make medicine more personalized, and Walgreens to bolster its digital health offerings, just to name a few. Plus, in a recent survey of 130 chief information officers by JPMorgan, just over half said Microsoft's cloud unit, called Azure, would be the most critical for their tech needs going forward. Others favored cloud offerings from Google or Amazon. The CIOs were from a range of industries, not just healthcare. Read more: 130 CIOs surveyed by JPMorgan say that nearly half of their cloud dollars are going to Microsoft, and they expect usage of AWS to drop slightly within the next 3 years. John Bosco is CIO of Northwell Health, which has 23 hospitals and more than 700 outpatient facilities, making it New York's biggest hospital system. We talked to Bosco about how the health system uses cloud technology — and why Microsoft is gaining ground. Northwell's primary cloud vendor is Microsoft, but it keeps electronic health records stored in its own physical data centers, Bosco said. Northwell also uses "a little bit" of Google Cloud, and starting in January, Oracle for its human resources and payroll system, he said. Northwell uses Azure to help monitor data from its hospitals, and also to power some of Northwell's workplace apps and systems. In the interview, Bosco shared three reasons why Microsoft's Azure is becoming a favorite in healthcare, based on his experience using it. The reasons all have to do with the fact that many of Microsoft's other services are compatible with its basic cloud infrastructure, he told Business Insider.  First, Azure does a better job of communicating with the other systems in hospitals using application programming interfaces, or APIs. Lots of pieces of software rely on APIs to exchange healthcare data. For example, they can allow researchers to combine data from different hospitals in a provider's overall network to study it. While Amazon and Google's have similar capabilities, they're less robust, Bosco said. "If I need certain API services so that I can have systems in their cloud talking to systems down here, they can provide those kinds of software services," he told BI.  The second reason is Azure's disaster recovery services, he said. If there's a blackout, storm, or other event, Microsoft can save healthcare data when the power goes out and help hospitals get their doctors back online quickly.  That's helpful for Northwell's contingency plans for power outages brought on by winter storms, as one example. Read more: How tech titans like Amazon, Google, and Microsoft are taking on the the $3.6 trillion healthcare industry. Third, Microsoft's directory services can let employees log in to many different systems, he said. At Northwell, an employee might sign onto the network in the morning, and then use the payroll system. At each step, she's asked to give her login credentials, which Microsoft verifies. That's all run via the cloud, so Northwell doesn't need to program the same information into its data centers, Bosco said.  In JPMorgan's survey, the CIOs, who're collectively responsible for $88 billion in annual IT spending, cited similar reasons for favoring Microsoft, as Business Insider's Rosalie Chan reported in June. They like that many of its products, like Microsoft Office 365 and Windows, can bundle together. Some also said they were already using Microsoft for other reasons, so expanding to Azure is a natural fit. The company owns the most popular workplace applications, after all, and people tend to trust Microsoft more than similarly sized tech companies, per reporting by Business Insider and CB Insights. To be sure, Amazon's is the biggest cloud provider on the market, boasting healthcare work with Cerner, Bristol Myers Squibb, and the Cleveland Clinic. Google's cloud tools are advanced, though the company is particularly focused on machine learning programs and companies that advance scientific research.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: The rise and fall of Donald Trump's $365 million airline
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Lots of phones now have 5G but so far the iPhone doesn't, so will the iPhone 12 change that?
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The world used to get by on just a smattering of databases. You know, trusty relational workhorses like Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, Ingres, and IBM DB2. Soon enough, however, open source crashed the party with MySQL and PostgreSQL. A bit later, NoSQL databases hit the market, with the likes of MongoDB, Redis, and Apache Cassandra growing in popularity. In terms of numbers, by January 2013 DB-Engines, which ranks database popularity, listed 109 databases. Today? DB-Engines catalogs 356 databases, more than triple the number just seven years ago.To read this article in full, please click here
Sweden
Deras flygande motorcykel ska prestera 241 km/h – men enligt Jetpack Aviation är den teoretiska toppfarten över 640 km/h.Grundaren David Mayman har visat att Jetpack Aviation besitter den tekniska kompetensen för att få upp fantasifordon i luften.Företagets namn kommer från deras första produkt – men med en toppfart på 193 km/h har JB-10 mer gemensamt med Iron Man än med Nasas gamla jetpack.Flygtiden för JB-10 ligger på åtta minuter, och för att åka framåt eller stanna lutar man sig helt enkelt framåt eller bakåt.Från marken kan det hela se komplicerat ut, men en rad sensorer kontrollerar de små jetmotorerna åt bäraren.2016 började Mayman sälja sitt jetpack till utvalda, kvalificerade kunder.
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People dramatically proclaim all the time that they don’t think they could survive without their smartphones, but a new series from the forthcoming streaming service Quibi from Jeffrey Katzenberg and Meg Whitman approaches smartphone survival in a much more literal way.The scripted series, which will premiere on Quibi at launch in April 2020, stars Tye Sheridan from “Ready Player One,” and counts Steven Soderbergh as an executive producer.The series, called “Wireless,” was created by Jack Seidman and Zach Wechter, who are the creators of the short film “Pocket,” which is shot entirely as though it was taking place on a person’s phone, almost like a screencast of that device.“Wireless” will feature similar cinematography, which is a good fit for Quibi’s short-form, made for a mobile approach to original streaming content.Wechter and Seidman have a head-start in this regard, in fact, as their film collective Pickpocket is specifically aimed at making this kind of feature.“Wireless” will tell the story of Sheridan’s lead character, who is described as “a self-obsessed college student whose only hope for survival is the tool he has spent his whole life learning to use: his smartphone.” Said character will apparently be trapped inside of his freshly crashed car during the action, and using the smartphone (which is low on battery) to try to survive his predicament.
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If you're looking to craft a custom animation, you can make a GIF in Photoshop with the following steps.But have you ever felt limited by the selection available?Or perhaps you want to elevate the content you post on social media with sleek, artistic-looking animations.While GIF-making may look like a difficult feat, if you follow these steps in Adobe Photoshop CC 2020, you'll be well on your way to cranking out custom GIFs in minutes.Check out the products mentioned in this article:Adobe Photoshop (From $129.99 at Best Buy)
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As of today, Podcasts on Pandora are now available for all users on the Pandora website and on its desktop app for Mac and Windows.The company first launched podcasts on its app last year, leveraging its Podcast Genome Project, an offshoot of Pandora’s Music Genome Project, which can personalize podcast recommendations down to an individual episode level.Pandora is banking on this hyper-personalization, and says its system uses more than 1,500 attributes — from the show’s MPAA ratings to a user’s listening history — to drill down on shows it thinks you’d like to listen to, along with specific episodes.This is mostly done with the Podcast Genome Project’s algorithms, but there’s still a human curation component involved to help guide recommendations.Since launching podcasts in 2018, Pandora says its podcast offerings have grown from around 100,000 episodes to over 600,000 episodes, spread across a variety of genres like comedy, music, news, and more.Backing this effort, the platform also introduced its self-service Pandora for Podcasters online hub earlier this year, providing a centralized place for podcast creators to submit their shows for inclusion in Pandora’s catalog.
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