We finally have our first look at Mr. Bones, the battle droid-turned-potentially insane protector of the young Snap Wexley and breakout star of Chuck Wendig s Star Wars: Aftermath novel.The weird thing is he looks an awful lot like Darth Maul.If you haven t read Aftermath, Mr. Bones is a B1 battle droid heavily modded by Temmin Wexley who grows up to be Snap, one of the rebel pilots seen in The Force Awakens, played by longtime J.J. Abrams pal Greg Grunberg .Mr. Bones been described by author Chuck Wendig as kind of sweet, in a demented sort of way.When he kills people, he has a tendency to hum a lively tune.If you re about to dismiss Mr. Bones because he s a Battle Droid, well, it s a mistake several people make in Aftermath... but not for very long.
It is weird in 2016 to see a straight adaptation of a movie in comic form, months after the movie came out.Over their relationship with Lucasfilm, Marvel adapted all three original Star Wars movies throughout the run of its monthly comic, Dark Horse continued the tradition with adaptations of the prequels, and now that Marvel once again has the licence to Star Wars comics, it s suddenly less surprising to see a Force Awakens adaptation.But what sets these two series apart — aside from nearly four decades — is the completely different windows they give us into the galaxy far, far away.Characters, planets, ships, vistas — they all look just like they did on the big screen.Just as Lucas had shopped around his science-fiction action movie to various studios before settling at 20th Century Fox, the option for a Star Wars comic was floated about at several publishers — including Marvel, who initially rejected the idea as both science fiction comics and licensed comics were selling poorly.With their business in a period of worrying decline, Star Wars was seen as far too risky a venture.
It is weird in 2016 to see a straight adaptation of a movie in comic form, months after the movie came out.Over their relationship with Lucasfilm, Marvel adapted all three original Star Wars movies throughout the run of its monthly comic, Dark Horse continued the tradition with adaptations of the prequels, and now that Marvel once again has the licence to Star Wars comics, it s suddenly less surprising to see a Force Awakens adaptation.But what sets these two series apart — aside from nearly four decades — is the completely different windows they give us into the galaxy far, far away.Characters, planets, ships, vistas — they all look just like they did on the big screen.Just as Lucas had shopped around his science-fiction action movie to various studios before settling at 20th Century Fox, the option for a Star Wars comic was floated about at several publishers — including Marvel, who initially rejected the idea as both science fiction comics and licensed comics were selling poorly.With their business in a period of worrying decline, Star Wars was seen as far too risky a venture.
In the old expanded universe, the Ewoks sort of just went about their business on Endor after the second Death Star was destroyed.Disney s new canon, however, imagines something a little different—and it s ridiculous.Chuck Wendig s new novel Aftermath: Life Debt, out today, is packed with new nuggets of information about the state of the Star Wars galaxy after Return of the Jedi, many of which we broke down earlier today.At one point in Life Debt, a Rebel commando named Dade has his leg blown off in an a skirmish with Imperial ground forces.Earlier on in the novel, the little droid is described like this:It s got a clunky, squarish head, bur it rolls around slowly on a blue-and-gold ball-shaped body.
In the old expanded universe, the Ewoks sort of just went about their business on Endor after the second Death Star was destroyed.Disney s new canon, however, imagines something a little different — and it s ridiculous.Chuck Wendig s new novel Aftermath: Life Debt, out today, is packed with new nuggets of information about the state of the Star Wars galaxy after Return of the Jedi, many of which we broke down earlier today.At one point in Life Debt, a Rebel commando named Dade has his leg blown off in an a skirmish with Imperial ground forces.Earlier on in the novel, the little droid is described like this:It s got a clunky, squarish head, bur it rolls around slowly on a blue-and-gold ball-shaped body.
In the old expanded universe, the Ewoks sort of just went about their business on Endor after the second Death Star was destroyed.Disney s new canon, however, imagines something a little different — and it s ridiculous.Chuck Wendig s new novel Aftermath: Life Debt, out today, is packed with new nuggets of information about the state of the Star Wars galaxy after Return of the Jedi, many of which we broke down earlier today.At one point in Life Debt, a Rebel commando named Dade has his leg blown off in an a skirmish with Imperial ground forces.Earlier on in the novel, the little droid is described like this:It s got a clunky, squarish head, bur it rolls around slowly on a blue-and-gold ball-shaped body.
As the new Star Wars canon expands beyond the movies, Chuck Wendig s Aftermath trilogy has been the most important source of information about the era between Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens.At the Star Wars Publishing presentation at Comic-Con, Wendig hinted about what we should expect from Aftermath: Empire s End, the final book in the trilogy.Of course, Wendig joked that the Empire ends, but he also told reporters from ScreenRant that the Battle of Jakku will play an important role in the story.Jakku figures in considerably, the Empire figures in considerably, Wendig said.The end of Life Debt has some pretty galaxy-shuddering things.So Empire s End is definitely about shaking all that stuff out and getting into the consequences.
We talked to Wendig about writing the novels, integrating his original idea with the existing Star Wars universe, and the effect of The Force Awakens on it all.What was the scope of the original Aftermath pitch?Chuck Wendig: As in, how far did it go?It was a pitch for one book, but had a smaller pitch nested in it that talked about the direction of the overall trilogy.How much of this trilogy was written before The Force Awakens came out?That s how you get silly cliffhanger TV shows and fake drama.
We talked to Wendig about writing the novels, integrating his original idea with the existing Star Wars universe, and the effect of The Force Awakens on it all.What was the scope of the original Aftermath pitch?Chuck Wendig: As in, how far did it go?It was a pitch for one book, but had a smaller pitch nested in it that talked about the direction of the overall trilogy.How much of this trilogy was written before The Force Awakens came out?That s how you get silly cliffhanger TV shows and fake drama.
Last July, Twitter denizens relished a hilarious improvisational thread between fantasy authors Chuck Wendig and Sam Sykes, in which the latter was a summer camp counselor in the midst of a massacre, wondering if, you know, he might be the killer.Now, Wendig has announced on his website that the impromptu story is a feature-length slasher film: You Might Be the Killer, starring Whedonverse superstar Alyson Hannigan (Buffy, How I Met Your Mother) and Fran Kranz (Cabin in the Woods).The trailer just dropped, and it looks like it could be a hoot—like a low-budget Scream or Cabin in the Woods.Hannigan plays Chuck—sporting a mug quoting Scream quoting Psycho—who gets a panicked call from her friend Sam, covered in blood, who informs her that "everyone's dead" and there's a serial killer on the loose."Sometimes that happens," Chuck deadpans.It remains to be seen whether the inventiveness of a Twitter thread can translate to a feature film, but Sykes and Wendig produced the film, so we're hopeful the bonkers joy of the original thread should survive intact.
When authors Sam Sykes (The Mortal Tally, An Affinity for Steel) and Chuck Wendig (Star Wars: Aftermath, Blackbirds) had a detailed Twitter conversation deconstructing the horror genre last year, who could’ve guessed we’d see that conversation brought to the big screen?But that’s exactly what co-writer and director Brett Simmons did with You Might Be the Killer, a cute, clever, horror film that has plenty of merit, but doesn’t quite live up to its meta-predecessors like The Cabin in the Woods or Scream.The film begins with Sam (played by Cabin in the Woods star Fran Kranz) calling his friend Chuck (Buffy the Vampire Slayer star Alyson Hannigan) with a problem.He’s at a camp and all the counsellors are being killed.And, pretty quickly, the title comes into play.Maybe Sam isn’t the one who needs to survive...because maybe he’s really the killer.
The first feature film ever to be inspired by a Twitter thread makes its TV debut this weekend.You Might Be the Killer was one of the highlights of the recent Fantastic Film Fest in Austin, Texas, with good reason: it's good campy fun in the spirit of Scream and Cabin in the Woods.You Might Be the Killer airs this Saturday, October 6, on Syfy at 7pm ET.The Twitter thread in question dates to last July when fantasy authors Chuck Wendig (Star Wars: Aftermath) and Sam Sykes (Aeons' Gate) riffed off one another.Sykes pretended to be a summer camp counselor in the midst of a massacre, wondering if, you know, he might be the killer, while Wendig offered helpful advice ("Are you wearing a scary mask?").When the trailer dropped last month, we were instantly intrigued but wondered if the delightfully bonkers Twitter thread could ever translate into a viable feature film.
Lucasfilm revealed on Dec. 12 that Pedro Pascal (best known for playing Oberyn Martell in Game of Thrones) had been cast in the title role -- a lone Mandalorian gunfighter operating the outer reaches of the galaxy.Reports had circulated since mid-November that the Chilean-born Pascal was in negotiations for the lead role.Pascal will be joined by Giancarlo Esposito (who played Gus Fring in Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul), MMA fighter and Deadpool actress Gina Carano, Emily Swallow from Supernatural, Carl Weathers of Rocky and Predator fame, Down and Out in Beverly Hills actor Nick Nolte, Omid Abtahi from American Gods and Werner Herzog (who directed and narrated Grizzly Man).The company announced the seventh season of The Clone Wars over the summer and a Rogue One prequel series focusing on rebel spy Cassian Andor on Nov. 9.We'll give you a sense of where the show might go and suggest other viewing that'll prepare you and sate that appetite in the meantime.Over the summer, Favreau revealed that the show will be set seven years after Return of the Jedi (so six years after the Empire's final defeat at the Battle of Jakku and 23 years before The Force Awakens) and will focus on all-new characters.
Chuck Wendig is a name you’ll recognise if you’re a fan of Star Wars novels (or follow the ins and outs of Star Wars comics).But he also does plenty of work beyond the galaxy far, far, away – including his epic new sci-fi thriller, Wanderers, which is coming to shelves this week.She appears to be sleepwalking.The terrifying secret will either tear the nation apart – or bring the survivors together to remake a shattered world.Mystery Shrouds Murder-Suicide of Cedar Fort Man and FamilyA young black woman, skin lighter than his own, stood there.
My colleague Chaim Gartenberg recently reviewed married woman Gailey’s debut novel Magic for Liars, prompting Pine Tree State to bump it more up my to-read list.Marko Kloos is best better-known for his study fiction series Frontlines, however, it looks he’s taking a brief break.Following an enormous celestial body war in a very distant scheme, a veteran of the facet that lost the war works to come back to terms with what comes next.Earlier this year, Kloos told The Verge that the story emerged as he developed his scheme, mistreatment his data of Germany’s history throughout the Twentieth Century.Now, years when the film came out, del Toro is collaborating with ancient history books and authors Cornelia Funke to write down a penning of the film, alongside some extras.once the book was proclaimed earlier this year, IndieWire noted that it’s a transformation of the picture, and can embrace some design and short stories that repose on the planet.
My colleague Chaim Gartenberg recently reviewed married woman Gailey’s debut novel Magic for Liars, prompting Pine Tree State to bump it more up my to-read list.Marko Kloos is best better-known for his study fiction series Frontlines, however, it looks he’s taking a brief break.Following an enormous celestial body war in a very distant scheme, a veteran of the facet that lost the war works to come back to terms with what comes next.Earlier this year, Kloos told The Verge that the story emerged as he developed his scheme, mistreatment his data of Germany’s history throughout the Twentieth Century.Now, years when the film came out, del Toro is collaborating with ancient history books and authors Cornelia Funke to write down a penning of the film, alongside some extras.once the book was proclaimed earlier this year, IndieWire noted that it’s a transformation of the picture, and can embrace some design and short stories that repose on the planet.
Disney today launched its Disney+ streaming service, its answer to the other TV content platforms out there, after teasing the service for over a year, and promising to open the company’s bountiful vault to users.Now Disney+ is in the wild, and users can sign up for a free trial, purchase subscriptions, and start watching the hundreds of movies and shows available there.Unfortunately, the launch is already in trouble.According to DownDetector, the problems range from the streams not working to login issues.Needless to say, potential users aren’t happy, and they’re expressing their discontent quite loudly.*downloads on Samsung Smart TV*
My colleague Chaim Gartenberg recently reviewed married woman Gailey’s debut novel Magic for Liars, prompting Pine Tree State to bump it more up my to-read list.Marko Kloos is best better-known for his study fiction series Frontlines, however, it looks he’s taking a brief break.Following an enormous celestial body war in a very distant scheme, a veteran of the facet that lost the war works to come back to terms with what comes next.Earlier this year, Kloos told The Verge that the story emerged as he developed his scheme, mistreatment his data of Germany’s history throughout the Twentieth Century.Now, years when the film came out, del Toro is collaborating with ancient history books and authors Cornelia Funke to write down a penning of the film, alongside some extras.once the book was proclaimed earlier this year, IndieWire noted that it’s a transformation of the picture, and can embrace some design and short stories that repose on the planet.
My colleague Chaim Gartenberg recently reviewed married woman Gailey’s debut novel Magic for Liars, prompting Pine Tree State to bump it more up my to-read list.Marko Kloos is best better-known for his study fiction series Frontlines, however, it looks he’s taking a brief break.Following an enormous celestial body war in a very distant scheme, a veteran of the facet that lost the war works to come back to terms with what comes next.Earlier this year, Kloos told The Verge that the story emerged as he developed his scheme, mistreatment his data of Germany’s history throughout the Twentieth Century.Now, years when the film came out, del Toro is collaborating with ancient history books and authors Cornelia Funke to write down a penning of the film, alongside some extras.once the book was proclaimed earlier this year, IndieWire noted that it’s a transformation of the picture, and can embrace some design and short stories that repose on the planet.
My colleague Chaim Gartenberg recently reviewed married woman Gailey’s debut novel Magic for Liars, prompting Pine Tree State to bump it more up my to-read list.Marko Kloos is best better-known for his study fiction series Frontlines, however, it looks he’s taking a brief break.Following an enormous celestial body war in a very distant scheme, a veteran of the facet that lost the war works to come back to terms with what comes next.Earlier this year, Kloos told The Verge that the story emerged as he developed his scheme, mistreatment his data of Germany’s history throughout the Twentieth Century.Now, years when the film came out, del Toro is collaborating with ancient history books and authors Cornelia Funke to write down a penning of the film, alongside some extras.once the book was proclaimed earlier this year, IndieWire noted that it’s a transformation of the picture, and can embrace some design and short stories that repose on the planet.
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