Donald Trump pulled a hilarious self-own when he told a lawyer questioning him about accusations of fraud against Trump University that he couldn’t “remember” his boast that he had the “world’s greatest memory” — which was captured in a deposition video obtained by Mother Jones magazine.In the 26-minute video, recorded in December 2015 in Trump Tower, Trump answers questions regarding a class-action suit against his “university.” Trump agreed to pay $25 million shortly after he moved into the White House to settle claims against the shuttered operation. Thousands of customers who paid as much as $35,000 for Trump University seminars contended that they had been lured by false promises that they would learn Trump’s investing “secrets” from his “hand-picked” instructors.Trump’s lawyers battled to keep the deposition video secret as Trump campaigned for the presidency — though transcripts and hundreds of pages of court documents were released in 2016. During his campaign, Trump bashed the judge in the case, U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel, as biased because of his Mexican ancestry as Trump was attacking Mexican immigrants in his speeches.Mother Jones is the first to publish Trump’s videotaped deposition.In the video, Trump never admits to lying and claims nothing he has said is “false.” But he does concede statements were “innocent” exaggerations and “hyperbole.” He also claims he can’t recall several details about university operations — despite his purported world-class memory. At one point in the video (check it out above), the attorney for the plaintiffs, Jason Forge, asks Trump if he believes he has “one of the best memories in the world.”A bored, annoyed Trump replies: “That I can’t tell you.”Forge then notes that Trump had stated on NBC just weeks earlier that he had the “world’s greatest memory.”Trump responds: “As good as my memory is, I don’t remember that.”There were other similarities in the deposition to Trump’s statements during his presidency. He insisted the “university” had “a lot of very good instructors” — yet was unable to name one.He then added: “I’ve heard good things” about them.A source provided Mother Jones with the video. Its authenticity was confirmed by Art Cohen, a lead plaintiff in one of the lawsuits against Trump University and Trump.“On this video, Trump’s shifty memory and dishonest character are exposed when he is faced with questions that demand the truth,” Cohen told the magazine.Also on HuffPost
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Months after officially opening to the public, Roku has finally settled a deal that will bring NBCUniversal’s streaming service Peacock to its platform, the company has announced. The news comes only days after the negotiations entered a more heated phase, with Roku and Comcast dragging their drama into the public light alongside the threat of Roku’s platform entirely losing NBC … Continue reading
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The Dallas Stars and Tampa Bay Lightning will meet in hockey's bubble in Edmonton for a chance to raise the Stanley Cup.
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Two months after its nationwide launch in July, NBCUniversal's free service makes its way to Roku's popular streaming platform.
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Comcast and Roku have come to an agreement months after NBCUniversal’s Peacock streaming service launched. Peacock will be available to stream on Roku in the coming weeks. “We are pleased to have reached an agreement with Comcast that will bring Peacock to Roku customers and maintains access to NBCU’s TV Everywhere apps,” a Roku spokesperson said. “We look forward to offering these new options to consumers under an expanded, mutually beneficial relationship between our companies that includes adding NBC content to The Roku Channel and a meaningful partnership around advertising.” The decision comes after Comcast and Roku got into a public argument over the status of dozens of NBCUniversal apps. Comcast threatened to pull the apps as... Continue reading…
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NBC fans are in the crossfire as Peacock remains absent on Roku.
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Saturday Night Live will also kick off season 46 with five live shows in a row, a first in the show's history.
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SNL will also kick off season 46 with five live shows in a row, a first in the show's history.
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"All I know is, if you go in for anything, the majority of the time, he's going to suggest surgery," the former Irwin employee told the Intercept.
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We offer help to users looking for NBC activate process, so if you are using this amazing app and want to activate it, then all you need to do is, get in touch with our NBC activation and support facility.For that, you can call us.
"In taking a very sober view of where this president is taking this country, ... I am absolutely a 'Never Trumper'," Vindman said.
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Across the US west coast, raging wildfires have destroyed small towns and forced tens of thousands of people to evacuate their homes in California, Washington and Oregon.Oregon governor Kate Brown said on Thursday afternoon that wildfires were still burning more than 900,000 acres in the state and 80,000 people have had to evacuate their homes. California breached a grim record on Thursday when the August Complex fire in Tehama County became the state’s largest-ever recorded wildfire, burning an estimated 471,185 acres north of Sacramento.The extent of the destruction is not yet clear as firefighters continue to work on containing the blazes, but photos show entire neighbourhoods levelled and smouldering. As of Thursday night, there had been at least seven reported deaths.Here are the towns that have been destroyed by the fires this week. Berry Creek, CaliforniaAt least three people were found dead after the North Complex fire, previously known as the Bear fire, moved quickly through Berry Creek, a small town in Northern California’s Butte County. About 2,000 structures were also destroyed as the North Complex fire spread to more than 250,000 acres of the region, including in Plumas County, by Wednesday evening.Videos filmed in Butte County show charred cars and gas stations, downed power lines and smouldering forests. Local filmmaker Nancy Hamilton recorded video of fires surrounding both sides of a road in Berry Creek as cars drove by.At least 12 people have been reported missing in the areas affected by the North Complex fire, CBS San Francisco reported.“Our situation over the last 36 hours has been dangerous, it’s been deadly, it’s been extremely destructive,” Cal Fire Chief John Messina told reporters on Wednesday.On Tuesday night, fire crews had to rescue more than 100 people, fire officials told The Mercury News. About 20,000 people are under evacuation orders in Butte County.Winds and hot temperatures have exacerbated the fires. Meanwhile, the August Complex fire burning in Tehama County, west of Plumas and Butte Counties, became California’s largest-ever wildfire, sprawling over 471,000 acres, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Malden, WashingtonThe Babbs Road fire consumed at least 80% of Malden, a small town in eastern Washington state. Governor Jay Inslee told reporters at a Tuesday news conference that the fire spread to more than 330,000 acres of the region within 24 hours.“Everything around me is gone,” Larry Frick, a Malden resident, told NBC News on Wednesday. “All my neighbours, everything. There’s no standing structure.”Frick was able to save his home with hoses and a sprinkler system. He was later joined by volunteer firefighters after his deck started to burn, NBC News reported.While touring the town on Tuesday, KHQ News reporter Bradley Warren tweeted, “most everything is gone but their church is still standing.”The fire that tore through Malden, which has a population of 200, is just one of 58 fires that burned across the state, many of which were sparked on Labor Day, according to state Public Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz.Inslee noted that officials believe the fires were caused by humans.Several Towns In OregonBrown said that several towns in Oregon, including Phoenix, Talent, Detroit and Blue River, were “substantially destroyed” in wildfires across the state.“This could be the greatest loss of human life and property due to wildfire in our state’s history,” the governor told reporters on Wednesday.At least two people were found dead: a 12-year-old boy and his grandmother, near Lyons, Oregon, west of Detroit, the Salem Statesman Journal and KHQ reported.On Tuesday, the Almeda fire spread across the towns of Phoenix and Talent in southern Oregon, where an estimated 11,000 people live, according to CNN.Noelle Crombie, a reporter for The Oregonian, drove through the Barnum Road subdivision in Phoenix on Thursday and found blocks of homes that had burned to the ground with the skeletons of cars in driveways.Barnum Road subdivision, once the site of about 200 homes. Nothing is left. pic.twitter.com/Ejpyhsc75M— Noelle Crombie (@noellecrombie) September 10, 2020Talent city officials said in a news release that the fire caused “widespread property damage with loss of hundreds of structures.”Early reports on the destruction estimate 600 residences were burned in the Almeda fire, which is under criminal investigation.Police said they discovered a body near the origin of the fire, according to local station NewsWatch 12.Detroit mayor Jim Trett told Oregon Public Broadcasting that residents of the lakeside resort town were forced to evacuate their residences late on Monday night and early on Tuesday morning.This is video from the fire that ravaged Detroit, Oregon. He didn't want us to share his name, but you can hear the pain in his voice describing his family's loss. #OregonWildfirepic.twitter.com/gyfiBVNUQz— Dan Tilkin (@DanTilkinKOIN6) September 10, 2020Trett described the evacuation as “frantic” and said he and other residents haven’t been allowed to visit the town, though video filmed in the area shows homes that have completely burned.Trett told OPB that “pretty much all of our businesses,” except for one store, and “a majority of our homes” have been destroyed.The Holiday Farm fire in western Oregon burned 145,000 acres and moved toward the towns of Blue River, which faced destruction, and Vida, which remains under evacuation orders.Melanie Stanley, a Blue River resident who is known as the town’s “unofficial mayor,” told KTVZ that the town had completely burned down.“The town of Blue River is 100% gone,” Stanley told the news station. “Our area was beautiful, and it’s nothing but burnt sticks right now.” 
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The presidential election is just 56 days away, and as Donald Trump struggles to gain ground in key states, he is increasingly relying on deceptively altered media to bend reality in his favor.In the past 10 days, the president’s team has deployed misleading imagery to attack his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, at least three times. White House deputy chief of staff Dan Scavino tweeted a fake video that appeared to show Biden sleeping through a TV interview. The “Trump War Room” Twitter account shared an out-of-context clip of Biden saying, “You won’t be safe in Joe Biden’s America.” And on Facebook, Trump has run dozens of ads featuring images of Biden that were manipulated to make the former vice president appear older.And those are just the latest examples. Trump’s political apparatus has shared a deluge of misinformation with tens of millions of people through social media over the years — including a deceptively spliced video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, that appears to show her disrespecting a Tuskegee airman,a fake CNN segment about a “racist baby,” a misleadingly truncated video of Biden in which he appears to endorse Trump, an altered video of Pelosi in which she seems intoxicated, and more.This kind of visual election misinformation is not a new phenomenon — it’s been around for years, including an infamously forged photo of then-presidential candidate John Kerry, ostensibly with Jane Fonda at an anti-war rally, that made headlines in 2004. But Trump’s team has repeatedly engaged in this practice directly, elevating the tactic to an unprecedented level while defending its hoaxes as mere satire. The campaign is testing the boundaries of social media sites that let false information go viral — and they haven’t found much resistance. As Election Day looms, the stakes are critically high. Russia’s fake-news warfare demonstrated in 2016 just how vulnerable America’s democracy is to online misinformation.And this time around,experts are also fretting about what might happen if an election hoax blows up on social media on the eve of the vote, leaving no time for it to be debunked.Twitter, Instagram and Facebook (Instagram’s parent company) are scrambling under mounting public pressure to stifle the spread of political misinformation engulfing their platforms. Each site has policies in place to generally add labels to false and misleading content identifying it as such rather than simply removing it, and Trump’s campaign has eagerly exploited this leniency. Whenever its posts are labeled as manipulated media or misinformation, the campaign sees an opportunity to rally its base against tech titans’ supposed political bias.“Trump officials are obviously playing a game here,” said digital forensics expert Hany Farid, a professor in the School of Information at University of California, Berkeley. “And of course, when something gets censored, they go crazy saying ‘This is anti-conservative,’ which, by the way, is working.”Sensitive to such claims of bias, Facebook has relaxed its enforcement rules for conservative personalities and news outlets, according to leaked Facebook documents obtained by NBC News.The social media giant also refuses to fact-check political ads, which allows politicians to amplify their lies and to micro-target them to specific audiences without consequence. Last month, Trump ran an ad featuring edited and out-of-context images of Biden that appear to show him sitting alone in a basement along with the text, “Deep in the heart of Delaware, Joe Biden sits in his basement. Alone. Hiding. Diminished. Refusing to answer questions about the crazy far-left ideas he’s adopted.” In fact, Biden was sitting in a crowded room of people; the images in Trump’s ad were cropped to exclude them.To Farid, Trump’s aggressive use of deceptive online imagery is a form of “asymmetric warfare.” Biden vowed in 2019 thathe would not “fabricate, use or spread data or materials that were falsified,” or spread “doctored audios/videos or images that impersonate other candidates, including deep fake videos,” and to date, he appears to have kept that promise. His campaign has pointed to Trump’s reliance on such tactics as evidence that it “cannot and will not compete on facts.”Trump isn’t the only presidential candidate to pollute the information system with manipulated media before trying to pass it off as satire — although the scale at which he does this is unmatched. After a dismal performance in February’s Democratic debate, New York City’s billionaire former mayor, Mike Bloomberg, shared a video to social media that was deceptively spliced together to make it seem as if his opponents were left stunned and in silence after he asked them all a question. The video included chirping cricket noises, which were clearly fake, but as The Guardian’s Julia Wong pointed out, “it’s hard for the average viewer who hasn’t seen the debate to discern which parts of the video are real and which are fake, making it a potent and misleading piece of propaganda.” Still, Bloomberg’s campaign insisted the video was “tongue in cheek.”The Trump campaign often defends its use of false or deceptive media as jokes, parodies and satire: “To all the triggered journalists who can’t take a joke about their candidate, it’s not our fault Joe Biden was dumb enough to say this on camera,” @TrumpWarRoom tweeted after facing backlash in response to its latest truncated clip of Biden. (In the full video, Biden says, “Trump and Pence are running on this, and I find it fascinating: Quote, ‘You won’t be safe in Joe Biden’s America.’ And what’s their proof? The violence we’re seeing in Donald Trump’s America.”) Likewise, the video that appeared to show Biden asleep on TV was “quite obviously a parody,” Trump’s communications director, Tim Murtaugh, told The Washington Post, echoing the campaign’s defense of many of its other similarly deceptive videos. The line between political humor and misinformation is nuanced, said Farid, but a reasonable person might not recognize the campaign’s deceptive imagery as fakery“because it’s not being sold as satire.”“Visual imagery is extremely powerful media, and when it conforms to our world view, it’s even more powerful,” he said. “The campaign is trying to hide behind satire. But its line of ‘Don’t take us seriously’ is hard to take seriously.”Related... Trump Campaign Running Photo Ads Edited To Make Joe Biden Appear Older Michael Cohen Predicts Trump Plan To Save Himself If He Loses The Election Trump Slammed After Firing Off Outrageous New Insults At Kamala Harris
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"Denying Congress access to the facilities is denying the vital public oversight of our mail system," Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz told NBC News.
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The show is made and hosted by former Olympian and fitness professional turned reality television star, Robert Kiyosaki.They compete to earn a prize by winning a money prize from public voting.There are huge numbers of people from India and other parts of earth that love this show.It has been featured on several major networks such as CNN, Fox, NBC, PBS and others.It's also received several awards including the Best Reality Competition Show in the 2020 New York City Emmy Awards.The series is so popular there are many websites devoted to the show.
Four months later than originally planned, the biggest horse race of the year is running Saturday on NBC, no cable subscription required.
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"It's the worst thing you could do," Fauci said of college students returning home during campus coronavirus outbreaks.
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A leaked document from the agency warned that a "lack of time to research" could mean "serious errors discovered in the data may not be fixed."
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Netflix has long been one of the kings of streaming, but these days, it’s facing some stiff competition from old foes and newcomers alike. With Hulu, Amazon, Disney, NBC, and more all vying for a slice of the streaming pie, Netflix certainly has a fight on its hands. Perhaps that’s why it’s now letting people stream some of its original … Continue reading
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Time to walk through the door. On the other side of the door? Lots of crying.
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While the video's narrators talk about "rioting" and "crime" in the US, a 2019 video that shows a firey Barcelona demonstration appears on the screen.
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Twitter has been taking increasing action against accounts that violate its policies on coordinated inauthentic behavior ahead of the 2020 election.
It'll star SNL's Kate McKinnon as tiger-loving Baskin.
President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign said the Republican National Convention would be a “very optimistic and upbeat” event, but its first night was anything but.Nearly every speaker who took the stage at an empty auditorium near the White House on Monday predicted fire and brimstone if Democrat Joe Biden becomes president next year, echoing Trump’s tirade earlier in the day after he was formally renominated as the Republican Party’s standard-bearer in Charlotte, North Carolina.Conservative activist Charlie Kirk opened the GOP convention with a dark warning about a “vengeful mob that wishes to destroy our way of life,” touting Trump as “the bodyguard of Western civilization.”Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) continued the apocalyptic theme, saying there would be “no refuge for freedom should we fail” to reelect Trump in November.School choice advocate Rebecca Friedrichs took aim at unions, which she accused of “subverting our Republic” by undermining “educational excellence, morality, law and order.”“In Joe Biden’s America, we’d be lucky if we could see any doctor,” Natalie Harp, a cancer survivor and member of the president’s campaign advisory board, added in her speech Monday night.Andrew Pollack, who lost his daughter in the February 2018 high school shooting in Parkland, Florida, said he believed “the safety of your kids depends on whether” Trump is reelected. The white St. Louis couple who pointed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters outside their home said that Democrats “want to abolish the suburbs altogether. ... These are the policies that are coming to a neighborhood near you,” in one of the evening’s not-so-subtle dog whistles.In perhaps the most bizarre moment of the night, former Fox News host Kimberly Guilfoyle delivered an angry speech, shouting at what seemed to be the top of her voice into an empty room about Democrats trying to “destroy” the country. A few speakers hit optimistic notes, however. Keynote speaker Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) and former United Nations ambassador Nikki Haley both spoke of their inspiring and unlikely stories and painted a picture of a bright future for the U.S. under Republican policies.Here are four other takeaways from the convention’s first night:Republicans Paint A Rosy Picture Of Trump’s Coronavirus ResponseThe GOP convention aired videos that heaped praise on Trump’s leadership and handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, saying the president’s “historic” actions “saved lives” despite the U.S. leading the world with more than 5.7 million confirmed cases and over 177,000 deaths ― which went unmentioned on Monday.But the videos, which essentially resembled campaign ads, omitted Trump’s repeated dismissals of the severity of the virus, how he said it would disappear, his praise of China’s handling of the disease, his push for states to reopen prematurely, his conjecture that injecting disinfectants could be a cure and his inaction as severe testing shortfalls persisted months into the crisis.A Subtle Effort To Make Trump More Palatable To Voters Public polls show Trump is currently badly lagging behind Biden with suburban voters ― especially women. That’s why some speeches at the GOP convention on Monday night sought to sand down some of the president’s roughest edges by presenting him in a more positive context. “President Trump sometimes raises his voice ― and a ruckus. He knows that’s what it takes to raise an army of patriots who love America and will protect her,” Gaetz said at one point.Retired NFL star Hershel Walker similarly defended Trump, whom he counted as a friend for 37 years.“He leaves nothing on the field. Some people don’t like his style, the way he knocks down obstacles that get in the way of his goals,” Walker said. “People on opposing teams didn’t like it when I ran right over them either. But that’s how you get the job done.”Walker also said he felt offended by people calling Trump a racist. “He works night and day” to improve the lives of African Americans,” Walker said.Trump Gets Involved ― And Uses The White House As A Prop The Republican National Convention aired two videos of Trump interacting with two separate groups ― essential workers and freed U.S. hostages. The short vignettes were filmed at the White House and, while technically the Hatch Act does not apply to the president, the move does raise ethical questions about the role of taxpayer-funded property being used as a campaign prop.In one of the videos, Trump was met with six Americans who were freed from captivity during his administration, including Andrew Brunson, a pastor who was arrested in Turkey. “I have to say that, to me, President Erdogan was very good,” Trump told Brunson, who was held in captivity by the government of Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Policy Takes A Backseat To Culture WarsVery few speakers discussed actual policies on the first night of the convention. In fact, the party didn’t write a platform at all this year, preferring instead to endorse Trump’s second-term agenda, as soon as he figures it out.The event was instead aimed at riling up conservatives with red meat ahead of the November election with speeches from activists and lesser-known voices in the party. As NBC’s Alex Seitz-Wald noted on Twitter, the traditional GOP establishment confab resembled the Conservative Political Action Conference, an annual gathering of conservative activists and far-right segments of the party.The RNC is CPAC now— Alex Seitz-Wald (@aseitzwald) August 25, 2020Related... Downing Street Shoots Down Donald Trump's Hopes Of Fast-Tracking Coronavirus Vaccine US Talk Show Host John Oliver Shows How Trump Built The Perfect ‘F**king Monument’ To Himself
Former EastEnder Alex Ferns has become the latest former soap star to impress fans with his US success, after his role in the new Batman film was teased in a new trailer. The actor is set to play Gotham Police Commissioner Pete Savage in the caped crusader’s upcoming big-screen outing – but he’s far from the first small screen star to go from soapland to Hollywood.Over the years, the likes of EastEnders, Hollyoaks and Coronation Street have developed a proven track record when it comes to helping launch international careers. And it’s not just British soaps either, as Neighbours and Home & Away have seen more than a few of their young stars jet off to LA and impress movie business bigwigs.Here’s just 17 former soap stars who made a name for themselves Stateside... Ben HardyIn one pretty impressive career move, former EastEnders star Ben (aka Peter Beale) swapped Walford for Wolverine by nabbing a role in X-Men: Apocalypse, playing Angel. He also won acclaim when he was cast as Roger Taylor in the hit Freddie Mercury biopic Bohemian Rhapsody, and has appeared in other films including Only The Brave and 6 Underground.Nathalie EmmanuelNathalie went from playing Hollyoaks’ Sasha Valentine to starring in one of the world’s biggest shows when she was cast as Missandei in Game Of Thrones in 2013 – a role she played until the series’ conclusion in 2019. She currently voices Deet in Netflix’s The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance, while her film credits include her role as Ramsey in Fast And Furious 7, 8 and the upcoming 9th instalment, as well as the Maze Runner film series.Roxanne McKeeRoxanne spent three years in Hollyoaks as Louise Summers, before taking a number of small parts in the UK and eventually relocating.In the US, she reached a new fanbase when she played Doreah in Game Of Thrones from 2011 to 2012, before going on to appear in US TV series Dominion, as well as starring in films including Vendetta and The Legend of Hercules.Sam StrikeEastEnders’ original Johnny Carter actor Sam followed Ben Hardy’s lead out of from Albert Square, and nabbed himself a part in the Texas Chainsaw Massacre prequel Leatherface. He has also appeared on US TV series Mindhunter, Nightflyers and FBI: Most Wanted.Ricky WhittleRicky set off for LA not long after leaving his role as Calvin Valentine in Hollyoaks in 2011.After nabbing a number of small roles, he finally got his big US break in 2014, when he began playing Lincoln in the CW Network drama The 100. Since then, Ricky has appeared in the US adaptation of BBC drama Mistresses, as well as taking the lead role of Shadow Moon in American Gods. In 2018, he also appeared in Netflix film Nappily Ever After.Rachel Shenton and Chris OvertonRachel – who played Mitzeee Minniver on Hollyoaks – won an Oscar in 2018 for her short film The Silent Child, which told the story of a four-year-old deaf girl, learning to communicate. She wrote, produced and starred in the film, while her real-life boyfriend Chris – who previously appeared as a cagefighter on Hollyoaks – directed it.Claire CooperClaire waved goodbye to Hollyoaks’ Jacqui McQueen in 2013, going on to star in the NBC drama A.D. The Bible Continues. She has since appeared in TV series Strike Back, Knightfall and 12 Monkeys, as well as In The Club back here in the UK.Michelle RyanBack in 2007, Michelle became one of EastEnders’ first big international successes when the former Zoe Slater star was cast in a US TV remake of The Bionic Woman.Anna FrielWhile you’re more likely to recognise Anna from movies, ITV’s Marcella, or perhaps the West End stage, she actually started out in Brookside back in 1993.She headed out to the US in the late 90s, and appeared in a plethora of films and TV shows, but her breakthrough role came in 2007 when she was cast in the lead role of comedy drama Pushing Daises. The show earned her a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress. Some of Anna’s film credits include Limitless, The Look of Love and I.T, while her role in British crime noir Marcella also won her an International Emmy Award in 2017.Chris HemsworthLong before Chris was making film fans swoon as Hollywood superhero Thor, he was tearing up the waves of Summer Bay as Home & Away’s Kim Hyde. As well as his Marvel Cinematic Universe role, Chris’ film credits include Snow White and the Huntsman, Ghostbusters and Men in Black: International.Liam HemsworthChris’ little brother Liam had guest roles in Aussie’s two biggest soaps Neighbours and Home And Away before finding a new level of fame in The Hunger Games film series alongside Jennifer Lawrence in 2012. His other film credits include Independence Day: Resurgence, The Expendables 2 and Netflix’s Isn’t It Romantic?Rob KazinskyRob’s bad boy character Sean Slater caused plenty of trouble in Walford prior to his exit in 2009, and he went on to stir things up as a vampire in US fantasy horror series True Blood in 2013. Since then, Rob’s appeared in films including Pacific Rim, Hot Pursuit and Captain Marvel and starred in Fox series Second Chance.Zaraah AbrahamsZaraah left her role as Coronation Street’s Joanne Jackson back in 2007, and in 2015 she starred in the US medical drama The Knick, where she played Opal Edwards in the second series.Samara WeavingAfter waving goodbye to Summer Bay in 2013 when she left her role as Home & Away’s Indi Walker, Samara packed off to the US where she was cast in Ash vs Evil Dead in 2015.In 2017, she appeared in Oscar-winning film Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, and is set to appear in Bill & Ted Face the Music in 2020. Her other US TV credits include SMILF, Picnic at Hanging Rock and Netflix mini-series Hollywood. Barry SloaneBarry, who played Hollyoaks serial killer Niall Rafferty until 2008, and went on to have a regular role in hit US drama Revenge from 2012 to 2014.He’s also appeared in The Whispers, Longmire, Saints & Strangers, Six, L.A.’s Finest and Bluff City Law.Margot RobbieMargot is arguably soapland’s biggest Hollywood export, having gone from Neighbours school girl Donna Friedman to Leonardo DiCaprio’s on-screen wife Naomi Lapaglia in The Wolf Of Wall Street. Since her international breakthrough role, Margot has starred in films including Focus, The Big Short, The Legend of Tarzan, Suicide Squad, Goodbye Christopher Robin, Mary Queen of Scots and Once Upon A Time... In Hollywood. Margot was also nominated for Oscars for her roles in I, Tonya and Bomshell.READ MORE: Did You Spot Trevor From EastEnders In The New Batman Trailer? OK, We Need To Talk About Colin Farrell's Unbelievable Transformation In The Batman Trailer The Batman Director Reveals Feature Of Robert Pattinson's Suit We Could Have Done Without Knowing
The 2020 Republican National Convention will kick off Monday, August 24
President Donald Trump accused the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in a wildly paranoid tweet of a “deep state” conspiracy against him over COVID-19 vaccine testing.Trump tweeted that the FDA was specifically out to hurt him — “obviously,” he tweeted — by delaying progress on a COVID-19 vaccine and treatment until after the presidential election.Critics, meanwhile, accused Trump of preparing to push an unproven vaccine to win his reelection despite the health risk to Americans.Trump appeared to accuse the FDA in his tweet of interfering with drug company recruitment of subjects for testing vaccines and therapeutic medicines in the fight against the disease caused by the coronavirus.Research labs are responsible for finding volunteer test subjects and conducting testing but must follow health guidelines enforced by the FDA to protect people’s lives. FDA staff people meet with researchers and inspect clinical trial study sites to “protect the rights of patients and verify the quality and integrity of the data,” according to an FDA statement.The deep state, or whoever, over at the FDA is making it very difficult for drug companies to get people in order to test the vaccines and therapeutics. Obviously, they are hoping to delay the answer until after November 3rd. Must focus on speed, and saving lives! @SteveFDA— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 22, 2020Trump tagged FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn in his tweet. Hahn, whom Trump named to his post last December, vowed last month in an NBC interview that the FDA “will not cut corners” to rush a risky vaccine. “We’re going to call the balls and strikes on this,” he said.Hahn repeated that vow to doctors in a video briefing to the American Medical Association earlier this month, adding: “All of our decisions will continue to be based on good science and the same careful deliberative processes we have always used when reviewing medical products.” Peter Marks, head of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, said earlier this month in a call with officials and pharmaceutical representatives that he would resign if the Trump administration approves a vaccine before it’s proven to be safe and effective, Reuters reported.“You have to decide where your red line is, and that’s my red line,” he told Reuters. “I would feel obligated [to quit] because in doing so, I would indicate to the American public that there’s something wrong.” Marks said he has not yet been under any political pressure to speed approval of an unproven vaccine.The FDA has not yet commented on Trump’s Saturday tweet attack.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Saturday called Trump’s wild “deep state” accusation “very scary” and a “very dangerous” statement. “Even for him it went beyond the pale in terms of how he would jeopardize the health and well-being of the American people,” she said at a Washington news briefing.“The FDA has a responsibility to approve drugs, judging on their safety and their efficacy — not by a declaration from the White House about speed and politicizing the FDA,” Pelosi told reporters.Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, also slammed Trump’s accusation as dangerous. “The American public needs to have absolutely no doubt FDA is basing its decisions on science — not the president’s conspiracy theories,” she said in a statement to HuffPost.Trump previously said that a COVID-19 vaccine could be ready by election day, contradicting reputable health experts.Two U.S. companies are already in phase three clinical trials for vaccines, the final stage of testing, but final results will take months. One of the companies, Moderna, must first finish enrolling participants — possibly by the end of September, CNN reported. Volunteers are then given their first shots. They must wait 28 days before receiving a second round of shots, then wait two weeks longer to determine if the vaccine is effective. Related... Donald Trump Praised By Controversial Polish MEP After Bizarre 'We Want God' Tweet Also on HuffPost
US tech giant Oracle is reportedly preparing a bid for the US operations of massively popular social media app TikTok. President Trump, expressing support for Oracle's bid, called it a "great company." Larry Ellison, the Oracle cofounder, is one of the richest people in the world and has previously hosted a fundraiser for Trump at his Coachella Valley home (he told Forbes he didn't attend). Representatives for Oracle declined to comment for this story. The Trump campaign did not immediately respond to request for comment.  Take a look inside their relationship.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Oracle is reportedly eyeing a bid to take over popular social media app TikTok — with President Trump's support. On August 14, President Trump released an executive order directing ByteDance, TikTok's parent company, to sell all of its US operations in the next 90 days and distance itself from any data collected through the popular app, citing a potential threat "to impair the national security of the United States." Prior to that, he signed a different executive order on August 6 that would prevent China-based companies, like TikTok, from doing business in the US. Trump began discussing similar actions regarding TikTok in late July, when he told reporters onboard Air Force One: "As far as TikTok is concerned, we're banning them from the United States."  Microsoft was the first major US tech firm to confirm, in an early August blog post, that it was considering acquiring TikTok's American assets. CNBC reported that it could go for as high as $30 billion.  Earlier this week, the New York Times, Axios, Guardian, and others reported that Oracle is preparing a rival bid for TikTok's US operations.  On August 19, President Trump said that Oracle is a "great company" and, regarding a TikTok takeover, said it "would be certainly somebody that could handle it."   Ellison stepped down as Oracle CEO in 2014 but continues to enjoy his position as one of the richest people in the world. Ellison, ranked ninth in the list of richest people in the US and twelfth in the world, has a net worth of $64.6 billion. The number grew by just a hair short of $6 billion in the last year. His Bloomberg Billionaires profile credits him as being "self-made." In 1977, Ellison and two colleagues at an electronic company cofounded the programming firm that evolved into Oracle Corp. Ellison stepped down as CEO in 2014 but remained at the company as executive chairman of the board and chief technology officer.  He bought the Hawaiian Island of Lanai for $300 million in 2012, which Forbes later called "his petri dish of experimentation on health, wellness, and sustainability." During the coronavirus pandemic and shutdown, Ellison said he would pay his workers full wages and benefits through at least May 1. He currently lives in Rancho Mirage in California's Coachella Valley.  In a Forbes profile from April 2020, Ellison said he supports Trump and wants him to do well. "We only have one president at a time. I don't think he's the devil — I support him and want him to do well," Ellison told Forbes writer Angela Au-Yeng. He added that he would support anyone who's currently in the Oval Office. Ellison also told the magazine that he had never donated to the Trump campaign. The Desert Sun reported that Ellison didn't donate in 2016 or 2020, citing federal campaign reports.    Ellison held a fundraiser for Trump at his Rancho Mirage home in February, with the contributions going to a fundraising committee created in collaboration between his campaign and the state and national chapters of the Republican Party. The Desert Sun's Sam Metz reported that Ellison's Rancho Mirage property hosted supporters of the president's reelection bid on a golf outing.  A $100,000 donation guaranteed golf with the president and a photo to commemorate the occasion. With $250,000, supporters got everything in the previous bracket as well as a round-table conversation.  As for whether he was present during the fundraiser, Ellison told Forbes, "Be absolutely precise. I said President Trump could use the property. I was not here."  Barack Obama visited the same golf course in 2015. Theodore Schleifer wrote for Recode that Ellison was previously known to be close to Bill Clinton and attended fundraisers for his reelection in the '90s.    Though Ellison has maintained that he wasn't physically present at the fundraiser, his hosting didn't sit well with some of his employees. After news broke that Ellison was hosting the fundraiser, a Change.org petition started circulating online, asking senior Oracle leadership to condemn Ellison's actions. The petition gathered close to 10,000 signatures. The day after the fundraiser, about 300 Oracle employees staged a walkout called "No Ethics / No Work." Nico Grant reported for Bloomberg that employees stopped working at noon local time, wherever they were located, and devoted the rest of the day to volunteer work.      Per Forbes, Ellison and Trump had a phone call in the initial days of the coronavirus pandemic in the US. It is unclear who called whom. The New York Times reported in April that Ellison was the first person Trump heard from about hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine as possible treatments for the novel coronavirus. The president has repeatedly touted the two anti-malaria drugs, even saying that he's taken one of them himself, despite scientists and doctors warning against it. In June, the Food and Drug Administration revoked approval for emergency use of the two drugs, citing their lack of effectiveness and warning they could have potentially "serious side effects." Dr. Carlos Del Rio, an infectious disease physician at Emory University School of Medicine at Emory University, told NBC News in July that "it does not work for treatment or for prevention. I have no idea why there is still talk about it, but it's wrong."     Ellison brought together engineers at his own company and federal agencies to create a far-reaching coronavirus database. Per his April Forbes profile, Ellison brought together Oracle engineers and officials from federal agencies including the FDA and the National Institutes of Health to build a database of COVID-19 cases in the US where doctors could log treatments used and their effectiveness.  The Washington Post reported that, among other drugs, hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine were being tested through this system. Trump put Ellison on the tech cohort of his Great American Economic Revival Industry Groups. In April, Ellison joined industry bigwigs such as Mark Zuckerberg, Tim Cook, and Satya Nadella on a tech committee to advise President Trump on how to safely reopen the economy.   In February, the Trump administration argued before the Supreme Court that Microsoft's decade-long legal case against Oracle be dismissed. This recommendation came on the same day as Trump's fundraiser at Ellison's Coachella Valley home. The lawsuit has been in the court system for a decade and began when Oracle sued Microsoft for use of copyrighted programming in Android devices. The Trump administration asked the Supreme Court to disregard Microsoft's appeal. Bloomberg reported that this would potentially allow Oracle to collect $8 billion in royalties. Ellison isn't the only top Oracle employee to show President Trump support. In 2016, co-CEO Safra Catz joined the transition team. While maintaining her position at the tech company, Safra Catz joined the president-elect's transition team in December 2016. An executive who had been at Oracle on and off for longer than two decades resigned soon after in response. 
  Compared to services like Hulu + Live TV and AT&T TV Now, Sling is one of the most affordable cord-cutting platforms that still offers a healthy selection of live channels like ESPN, CNN, Bravo, and Discovery. Sling offers two branches of its streaming service — Orange and Blue — each for $30 a month. Bundle both packages and you'll get a bit of a discount at $45 a month. That's one of the two packages for half price. Read more: A full breakdown of what channels you get with every Sling TV package, plus all the add-ons Cord cutting — or ditching cable — is all about freeing yourself from the confines of contracts, ditching bulky hardware, and, most importantly, saving money. But many of the live TV streaming services out there are creeping up in price, ever closer to the threshold that might cause you to reconsider cancelling that cable subscription after all. But Sling remains one of the options on the market that is truly much cheaper than a cable subscription. Though you may make some sacrifices in the user-interface department — it's a bit clunky and not as intuitive as some of the more expensive services — the streaming quality is top-notch, making its cost-effectiveness a no-brainer if Sling carries the channels you watch. Updated 8/20/2020 by Kevin Webb: Updated language for accuracy and timeliness. Added new link for additional information in the article's summary. How much does Sling cost? Sling offers two different channel bundles, Orange and Blue, and each one costs the same at $30 a month. While the services are largely the same, there are a few channel differences between the two packages. Sling Orange gives you access to ESPN and Disney. While Sling Blue doesn't include those, it makes up for it by adding on Bravo, Discovery, FX, AMC and, in select areas only, NBC. For a full list of channels on Orange and Blue, click here. Sling Orange only lets you stream on one device at a time, while Blue lets you watch on three devices simultaneously. If your little one absolutely can't miss "DuckTales" on Disney and you can't live without "The Real Housewives" on Bravo, you can bundle the two packages into Orange + Blue and get a small multi-service discount. Instead of paying $30 times two, the bundle package is $45 a month. As a special introductory offer, new Sling subscribers will get their first month of Orange or Blue for just $20 or the Orange + Blue bundle for $35. At that price, it's a great opportunity to see if the service is right for you without sinking a ton of cash into trying it out. Additionally, Sling offers a ton of different ad-on options if you want to beef up your channel selection. For $5 to $10 a month each, you can add mini-bundles like Sports Extra, Kids Extra, Comedy Extra, News Extra, Lifestyle Extra, Heartland Extra, or Hollywood Extra. Each offers a handful of channels in the genre you select. Sling comes with ten hours of DVR storage included, but you can upgrade to 50 hours for an additional $5 a month. If you want to package all the extras together, Sling offers its Total TV Deal, which is all seven add-ons plus cloud DVR storage for an additional $20 a month with Orange or Blue, or an extra $25 a month with the Orange + Blue bundle. Sling is also not slacking on their premium channel add-ons either. They offer a Showtime package for an additional $10 a month, a Starz package for $9 a month, and EPIX for $5 a month.  If you have a smart TV, it's likely the Sling app is already installed, and you can start streaming right away once you sign up. If not, Sling's got some device offers to get you streaming quickly and affordably. If you subscribe and pre-pay for two months of Sling, they'll throw in a free Amazon Fire TV Stick 4K or AirTV Mini. Click here for full details on current device bundles from Sling.  All in all, Sling might not have the beautiful interface that Hulu + Live TV sports has, or the channel selection that Youtube TV boasts, but for the money, Sling is the best low-cost service out there. The streaming quality is comparable to cable, and if Sling carries the channels you watch most often, the price can't be beat.  SEE ALSO: Every service Hulu offers begins with a free trial — here's what you need to know to get started Join the conversation about this story »
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